How do holograms work on stage

The Voice Season 21 kicked off its finale in the most amazing way as Coldplay took to the stage to perform on My Universe along with BTS holograms. While the K-pop group wasn't able to perform on stage in person, the group's members, RM, Jungkook, Jimin, Jin, Suga, J-Hope and V joined Chris Martin via hologram as they performed to their hit collab.

After BTS and Coldplay's energetic number set the mood for the evening, the evening further advanced to some more star-studded performances which also included Jennifer Lopez, who took to the stage to deliver a soulful live performance on her song On My Way, which features in her upcoming film Marry Me.

Further on, Ed Sheeran who had appeared on the reality show a few weeks back as the mega mentor also took to the stage at the finale and delivered a rocking performance to his new song Shivers.

The Voice coach, John Legend himself also performed at the much-awaited finale of the singing-reality show and was joined by Carrie Underwood. The duo performed to their CMT Award-winning duet, Hallelujah.

Check out The Voice finale videos HERE

The 21st season of The Voice was also in major spotlight thanks to its coach Ariana Grande who debuted this season. Earlier, in an interview with Entertainment Tonight, the singer spoke about the finale and despite not having any contestants from her team to compete, she said, "I wouldn't change anything about it. I know I'm out of the running in a big way, but I had the most beautiful time, and I feel like I got to do some really special work with these artists."

How do holograms work on stage

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How do holograms work on stage

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How do holograms work on stage

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How do holograms work on stage

Jem and the Holograms. From left to right: Aja, Jem, Kimber and Shana.

Alias

Origin

Genres

Labels

Associated acts

Members

Manager

Jem and The Holograms, or simply The Holograms, is an American rock band formed in Los Angeles, California. Their executive producer is Jerrica Benton, co-owner of Starlight Music, a record company to which the band is signed under on behalf of Sh-K-Boom Records, and their road manager is Rio Pacheco. Jerrica does not only take care of the band’s business affairs, though, and she’s in fact their main vocalist, who performs under the secret identity of Jem.

The band’s four founders are siblings Jerrica and Kimber Benton, and foster sisters Aja Leith and Shana Elmsford. The fifth member is Raya (Carmen Alonso), who joined later in the band’s career.

Contents

Background [ ]

The band derives its name from the main concept of the show, which are the holographic images projected from Synergy, a supercomputer built by Jerrica’s father, via her earrings. These earrings have remote micro-projectors in them, allowing Jerrica to assume the persona of her alter ego, Jem. She can also project images around her, which she uses in many cases as a distraction if her cover is about to be blown or to protect herself and her friends from danger.

The band has made much progress throughout the series, starting with their formation in the first episode, and would often reach the top of the charts. All of the band members are close friends, with Kimber Benton being Jem’s sister, although the band has been separated a few times. Examples include: The Day the Music Died and The Bands Break Up.

Band members [ ]

  • Jem: Main vocalist
  • Aja Leith: Lead guitar, backup vocals
  • Shana Elmsford: Bass guitar, backup vocals (former drummer)
  • Kimber Benton: Keyboards, backup vocals, lyrics
  • Raya Alonso: Drummer

Music style [ ]

Unlike the style of The Misfits or The Stingers, who mainly focus on topics such as self-indulgence and greediness, Jem and The Holograms’ style deals with themes such as love, tolerance, understanding and redemption.

Despite being rock and ballads the main focus of their songs, they are known to frequently venture into a wide variety of other music styles as a result of their exciting adventures. These range from classic styles such as from rock and roll or jazz, to the more modern hard rock, pop rock, and new wave.

How do holograms work on stageMaclean's 3 days ago Linda Besner

When Tupac Shakur joined Dr. Dre on stage at the Coachella festival in 2012, crowds were awestruck—not only by the quality of the music, but because Shakur had been dead for 15 years.

Shakur’s presence onstage was a convincing holographic illusion. The basis for the ghostly Shakur, as well as ABBA’s upcoming tour in 2022, which will feature younger-looking holograms of the bandmates, is a popular Victorian mirror trick. But now, thanks to researchers at the University of Glasgow, these illusions can be real enough to touch.

The team has invented a method for using jets of air to simulate tactile experience. They’re calling the technology “aerohaptics” (“haptic” refers to the sense of touch). A motion sensor tracks the movement of the user’s hand as they interact with a holographic object, and directs a nozzle to release puffs of air on the user’s fingers and palm. So far, the Glasgow team has used aerohaptics to simulate the experience of “bouncing” a virtual basketball: push hard on the rounded surface of the ghostly ball, and it strikes your hand forcefully on the return; a gentle pressure results in a softer sensation when the ball bounces back.

Ravinder Dahiya, an electronics and nanoengineering Ph.D. who leads the team, emphasizes the collaboration between our five senses—even drinking a beer is a tactile as well as a gustatory experience. “If a beer doesn’t feel cold, you don’t really get the taste—that’s how the mind is trained,” Dahiya explains. Besides applications in video games and other forms of entertainment, aerohaptic technology could help colleagues shake hands at virtual meetings, or allow medical students to dissect virtual instead of real mice.

This article appears in print in the January 2022 issue of Maclean’s magazine with the headline, “Aerohaptics.” Subscribe to the monthly print magazine here.

How do holograms work on stageColdplay — Photo: Trae Patton/NBC

“The Voice”‘s season 21 finale is set to feature some star-studded performances!

The star-studded live finale kicked off on Tuesday with a special performance from Coldplay and BTS! While the K-pop group wasn’t able to take the stage in person, its members — RM, Jungkook, Jimin, Jin, Suga, J-Hope and V — joined Chris Martin and his bandmates via hologram as they performed their soaring collab.

Next up, Walker Hayes made his “Voice” debut with a performance of his smash hit country crossover, “Fancy Like,” and Matthew McConaughey and Nick Kroll were on hand to introduce their “Sing 2” co-stars Keke Palmer and Tori Kelly performing a duet of “Christmas (Baby Please Come Home),” alongside “The Voice”‘s Top 13 artists!

Then, season 21 Mega Mentor Ed Sheeran returned to “The Voice” with a performance of his new single, “Shivers!” However, an unfortunate technical malfunction left Ed’s mic muted for the first part of his performance, but, ever the consummate professional, he ad-libbed until things were back on track.

Still ahead during the star-studded finale, following his semifinals performance of his new holiday hit, “You Deserve It All,” John will take the stage with Carrie Underwood to perform their CMT-winning duet, “Hallelujah,” off of her Christmas album, My Gift (Special Edition). And a familiar “voice” will return as former coach Alicia Keys debuts a special performance of her new song, “Old Memories,” from her new album, KEYS (Original and Unlocked), a double album due out Dec. 10.

Ahead of the big finale, the coaches opened up to ET about Ariana Grande‘s first season on “The Voice”. John praised her as a “conscientious and loving” coach, who offered her team members “specific and excellent advice.”

And while Ari was a bit down on herself for not having any competitors in the season 21 finale, Kelly Clarkson assured her that many coaches have been in the same position in Voice seasons past, while also praising her for putting an immediate emphasis on vocal health with her team. “I was like, how have we never talked about this! It’s so important.” Kelly remarked.

For her part, Ariana said she felt “so blessed” to have coached her first season of “The Voice” — even if it didn’t end in a victory.

“I wouldn’t change anything about it. I know I’m out of the running in a big way, but I had the most beautiful time, and I feel like I got to do some really special work with these artists,” she shared. “And I will continue to know and work with them, and I care deeply about them.”

“I made incredible friendships, and learned so much from [my fellow coaches],” Ari added. “I’m so blessed to have been a part of it, and it was a very cherished experience to me.”

See more from this season of “The Voice” in the video below.

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Semplice is for those with certain taste & ambition. We count design studios , UX designers , illustrators , photographers , 3D artists and many more to our family.

We build creative tools so you can do your best creative work. We aim to help you create something different, something that makes you proud. Because isn’t that why we’re all in this?

By using Semplice, you’re supporting an independent company .

Semplice 5 is the most advanced online portfolio system based on WordPress.

The world’s leading designers use and love Semplice. Our ♔ showcase is the pride of our team and community.

We could have you scroll endlessly through our features or point you to what other people say about Semplice . But using it yourself is more convincing.

Semplice is for those with certain taste & ambition. We count design studios , UX designers , illustrators , photographers , 3D artists and many more to our family.

We build creative tools so you can do your best creative work. We aim to help you create something different, something that makes you proud. Because isn’t that why we’re all in this?

By using Semplice, you’re supporting an independent company .

Semplice 5 is the most advanced online portfolio system based on WordPress.

The world’s leading designers use and love Semplice. Our ♔ showcase is the pride of our team and community.

We could have you scroll endlessly through our features or point you to what other people say about Semplice . But using it yourself is more convincing.

Semplice is for those with certain taste & ambition. We count design studios , UX designers , illustrators , photographers , 3D artists and many more to our family.

We build creative tools so you can do your best creative work. We aim to help you create something different, something that makes you proud. Because isn’t that why we’re all in this?

By using Semplice, you’re supporting an independent company .

Semplice 5 is the most advanced online portfolio system based on WordPress.

The world’s leading designers use and love Semplice. Our ♔ showcase is the pride of our team and community.

We could have you scroll endlessly through our features or point you to what other people say about Semplice . But using it yourself is more convincing.

Semplice is for those with certain taste & ambition. We count design studios , UX designers , illustrators , photographers , 3D artists and many more to our family.

We build creative tools so you can do your best creative work. We aim to help you create something different, something that makes you proud. Because isn’t that why we’re all in this?

By using Semplice, you’re supporting an independent company .

A new hologram persuasively suggests the singer is here and in top form. Is America ready for concert resurrection?

The caramel hair was as perfect as remembered. The rhythmic moves were as graceful as they are in our mind’s eye. And when those signature melismas of “I Will Always Love You” began, it was impossible not to be transported to the spot again — that spot, the plane of transcendent Zen only a handful of singers have ever taken us.

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Whitney Houston was back.

It’s just that she was a hologram.

The Grammy-winning legend died more than nine years ago. But beginning this week in Las Vegas, Houston took the stage with a complement of breathing performers, shimmying and shimmering — and of course singing some of the most famous pop songs of all time in “An Evening With Whitney,” a live concert with a Houston hologram.

This is what Pat Houston, her sister-in-law and manager, wants; this is what a company known as BASE Hologram, run by the former Clear Channel executive Brian Becker, wants. Soon enough, we will find out if this is what America wants — whether we crave Houston in colorful regalia on a buzzing stage, delighting audiences as she did so often when she was alive, ascending us to new heights of afterlife performance, or, maybe, just plummeting us straight into the uncanny valley.

The show in many ways shatters the norms of techno-illusion. A two-minute deep fake is one thing. The dead dancing for us is another.

“I don’t see it as resurrecting the dead but as celebrating a life,” said Becker last week, pushing back, a little. “We want to build a great live show around her.”

The “live show” is made up of a four-piece band and four dancers. “Her” is a computer-generated face of the singer in her prime that has been digitally grafted to an actress body-double, choreographed and shot months ago and now projected onto a scrim. Nothing on performance night can go wrong.

Barring a power outage, at least.

What has been carved out with “Whitney” is more than a show: It’s a glimpse of a future, one in which departed performers live on, not just in shaky YouTube footage but in full-splendored presence. In a sense, the Houston hologram represents nothing less than technology’s ability to transcend time and sideline mortality, if only for 80 minutes while bopping along to “I Wanna Dance With Somebody” on the Vegas Strip.

Fatima Robinson, the prolific director and choreographer, is behind the show, but it is Houston’s specter that floats over it. The singer, with sales of more than 200 million records, works her way through all the hits people bought those records for, “How Will I Know” and “The Greatest Love of All,” “I Wanna Dance With Somebody” and “I Will Always Love You,” from the stage of the 550-seat Harrah’s Showroom.

Several performances were held in the United Kingdom in early 2020, before lockdowns did to the star what death could not. The pause gave BASE and the team time to regroup, and now they are back with an open-ended, $80-a-pop run in Sin City.

If all goes well, a tour will follow in 2023, delivering hologram Whitney across the country. Yet Vegas is its most natural venue, an ethereal city playing host to a singer who is not actually there. (The Washington Post has viewed footage of multiple performances.)

Keith Harris, the Grammy-winning producer who is the show’s musical director, says the aim is the flow of a live show, though lifting the vocals from concert footage and lining them up with a hologram’s mouth movements wasn’t easy. Then again, if any of the vocals did wind up looking lip-synced, he points out, “what are they going to say, she’s not really singing?”

From the shuffling opening notes of “Higher Love” to the final sultry bars of “I’m Every Woman,” the show is a full-on Houston performance. Hologram implies a column of dust-filled light, but that would be an undersell. The singer walks around the stage, she salutes the band and crowd, she slinks and dances, all in a dynamic, human-seeming performance. She speaks, a little: “I’d like to do some songs for you tonight. Is that okay?” Oh, and there are wardrobe changes.

If one wants to drop down into a deep well of pop-philosophy, it is worth visiting the YouTube clip of an England show, where a commenting chorus calls it “creepy” and “demonic” and respondents offer defenses like “How is this demonic? It’s just a projection, they didn’t conjure up her spirit or anything.”

How do holograms work on stage

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Ikin is developing an accessory that attaches to smartphones to enable holographic images. — Ikin/TNS

Remember R2D2 beaming a hologram of Princess Leia pleading for help from Obi-Wan-Kenobi in the first Star Wars movie back in 1977?

Now a San Diego company aims to bring similar holograms to real life on desktop and handheld devices.

Ikin, founded four years ago by Taylor Scott Griffith and Joe Ward, is working on volumetric hardware, “neural adaptive” artificial intelligence algorithms and other software to deliver holograms on small devices – including an accessory that attaches to smartphones.

Ikin’s products aren’t ready for prime time yet. They remain in the beta testing or special order phase. When they do launch commercially, they’ll face stiff competition from more established technologies, such as augmented reality smart glasses and virtual reality headsets.

“When I look at holographics, I don’t know that there is a huge market today or in the next couple of years,” said Eric Abbruzzese, research director at ABI Research, which tracks the industry. “But I am excited to see the miniaturisation of the technology. I think we’re seeing the first of that with an Ikin.”

If Ikin succeeds in delivering easy-to-use holograms without headgear, it could find audiences across a wide range of industries. They include video conferencing – with life-like Zoom calls and more engaging online education – e-commerce, healthcare, real estate, architecture, remote field repair and gaming.

Griffith, Ikin’s chief technology officer, contends that holograms deliver a more intense emotional experience. He saw that first-hand while working on holographic shows in Las Vegas, which he declined to name. But holograms are used in some stage productions to bring back deceased performers such as Tupac Shakur, Whitney Houston and Michael Jackson.

“You would have people weeping, especially when it came to the holographic resurrections,” he said. “It is really an incredibly powerful thing.

“I was working to create this optics system,” he continued. “It is easy to create large-scale systems but incredibly difficult to create a functional small-scale system when it comes to holograms. I finally stumbled upon a solution.”

The young company’s technology has popped onto the radar of a US military contractor, which included it as part of a 5G logistics demonstration at a military warehouse in Georgia.

It’s also being explored by an undisclosed cosmetics firm, which is looking to use it for remote product testing.

Ikin has two main projects under development. The Arc is a 32in desktop display that projects holograms in ambient light and is directed at businesses. At the company’s San Diego headquarters, Arc produced a hologram of an eyeball, which spun so it could be examined from various angles.

“It’s really cool to be able scan a turbine engine and see it in a hologram for cracks and defects over time,” said Ward, Ikin’s chief executive. “The goal is to continue to explore business-to-business opportunities while at the same time producing a consumer product.”

Ikin’s second project is an accessory display that attaches to smartphones to enable holographic images on handsets.

Estimated to cost under US$500 (RM2,113), the RYZ display is expected to launch sometime next year. It includes a software kit that can be uploaded into the Unity 3D development platform.

Unity is a popular game engine used by software developers across desktop, mobile, console and virtual reality platforms.

The RYZ kit allows developers to repurpose existing content and apps to enable holograms, as well as create new holographic content. “Literally right now all the applications that exist on a phone are ready to be translated into a holographic environment,” said Griffith.

The roughly 20-employee company has raised about US$15mil (RM63.40mil) in seed money since it was founded. It is now seeking to raise an additional US$20.9mil (RM88.34mil), according to filings with the US Securities and Exchange Commission.

Abbruzzese, the ABI Research analyst, said Ikin’s challenge will be getting content creators on board and making its technology easy to use. It is still “early days”, he said.

“I hesitate to make the comparison to 3D TVs, but I think it is apt,” said Abbruzzese. “Even if the content is there, the interest might not be. There have been attempts at glasses-free 3D – holographics being sort of the next step for 3D – and it never really caught on.” – The San Diego Union-Tribune/Tribune News Service

Headset-free volumetric digital imagery could have applications in retail, education, real estate, videoconferencing and health care.

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Remember R2-D2 beaming a hologram of Princess Leia pleading for help from Obi-Wan Kenobi in the first “Star Wars” movie back in 1977?

Now a local company aims to bring similar holograms to real life on desktop and handheld devices.

Ikin, founded four years ago by Taylor Scott Griffith and Joe Ward and headquartered in an office next to the Hyatt Regency La Jolla at Aventine hotel, is working on volumetric hardware, “neural adaptive” artificial intelligence algorithms and other software to deliver holograms on small devices — including an accessory that attaches to smartphones.

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Ikin’s products aren’t ready for prime time yet. They remain in the beta testing or special-order phase. When they do launch commercially, they’ll face stiff competition from more established technologies, such as augmented reality smart glasses and virtual reality headsets.

“When I look at holographics, I don’t know that there is a huge market today or in the next couple of years,” said Eric Abbruzzese, research director at ABI Research, which tracks the industry. “But I am excited to see the miniaturization of the technology. I think we’re seeing the first of that with an Ikin.”

If Ikin succeeds in delivering easy-to-use holograms without headgear, it could find audiences across a wide range of industries, including videoconferencing — with lifelike Zoom calls and more engaging online education — e-commerce, health care, real estate, architecture, remote field repair and gaming.

Griffith, Ikin’s chief technology officer, contends that holograms deliver a more intense emotional experience. He said he saw that firsthand while working on holographic shows in Las Vegas. Holograms of deceased performers such as Tupac Shakur, Whitney Houston and Michael Jackson are used in some stage productions.

“You would have people weeping, especially when it came to the holographic resurrections,” Griffith said. “It is really an incredibly powerful thing.

“I was working to create this optics system,” he continued. “It is easy to create large-scale systems but incredibly difficult to create a functional small-scale system when it comes to holograms. I finally stumbled upon a solution.”

The young company’s technology has popped onto the radar of a U.S. military contractor, which included it as part of a 5G logistics demonstration at a military warehouse in Georgia.

It’s also being explored by an undisclosed cosmetics firm that is looking to use it for remote product testing.

Ikin has two main projects under development.

ARC is a 32-inch desktop display that projects holograms in ambient light and is directed at businesses. At the company’s headquarters, ARC produced a hologram of an eyeball that spun so it could be examined from various angles.

“It’s really cool to be able scan a turbine engine and see it in a hologram for cracks and defects over time,” said Ward, Ikin’s chief executive. “The goal is to continue to explore business-to-business opportunities while at the same time producing a consumer product.”

Ikin’s other project is an accessory display that attaches to smartphones to enable holographic images on handsets.

Estimated to cost less than $500, the RYZ display is expected to launch sometime next year. It includes a software kit that can be uploaded into the Unity 3D development platform.

Unity is a popular game engine used by software developers across desktop, mobile, console and virtual reality platforms.

The RYZ kit allows developers to repurpose existing content and apps to enable holograms, as well as create new holographic content. “Literally right now all the applications that exist on a phone are ready to be translated into a holographic environment,” Griffith said.

Ikin, which has about 20 employees, has raised roughly $15 million in seed money since it was founded. It is now seeking to raise an additional $20.9 million, according to filings with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

Abbruzzese said Ikin’s challenge will be getting content creators on board and making its technology easy to use. It is still “early days,” he said.

“I hesitate to make the comparison to 3D TVs, but I think it is apt,” Abbruzzese said. “Even if the content is there, the interest might not be. There have been attempts at glasses-free 3D — holographics being sort of the next step for 3D — and it never really caught on.”

— La Jolla Light staff contributed to this report.

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Mike Freeman covers technology for The San Diego Union-Tribune, where his coverage includes Qualcomm, San Diego’s largest publicly traded company. Mike started at the Union-Tribune in 1999, covering the golf and action sports industries. Over the years, Mike has reported on commercial real estate, the housing bubble, banking and defense contractors. He also covered the Pinnfund Ponzi scheme and several real estate scams. He is one of the few journalists in the country who researches and writes a special section on executive compensation. Before joining the Union-Tribune, Mike was business editor of a daily newspaper in Bend, Ore. He graduated from Linfield College in McMinnville, Ore. with a bachelor’s degree in communications.

Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid and Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed oversee unveiling of the note which was redesigned to celebrate the UAE’s 50th National Day

A new Dh50 banknote has been issued by the UAE Central Bank to celebrate the country’s 50th National Day.

Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid, Vice President and Ruler of Dubai, and Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed, Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi and Deputy Supreme Commander of the Armed Forces, attended the unveiling of the third issue of the note on Tuesday.

The banknote has a picture of the Founding Father, Sheikh Zayed, and the other founding Rulers, according to state news agency Wam. It also features a number of national and historical monuments.

The redesign is in honour of Sheikh Zayed, the founding Rulers and their dedication to uniting the country.

From left, Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid, Sheikh Mohamed bin Zayed and Sheikh Hamad bin Mohammed Al Sharqi. Mohamed Al Hammadi / Ministry of Presidential Affairs

“We see, in this issuance, the new phase that the UAE will enter and a renewed pledge to continue its growth path,” said Sheikh Mansour bin Zayed, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Presidential Affairs, and chairman of the board of directors of the UAE Central Bank, according to the Wam report.

“The occasion also allowed us to express our appreciation and gratitude to our founding fathers by issuing a new [Dh50] banknote to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the establishment of the UAE.”

The front of the new note has a portrait of the late Sheikh Zayed on the right and the commemorative picture of the founding Rulers after signing the Union document.

It also has a picture of Wahat Al Karama – the memorial to the heroes of the Emirates – on the left side.

The reverse has a picture of Sheikh Zayed signing the Union agreement, as well as a picture of Etihad Museum, which is where the Union was established and the UAE flag raised for the first time.

The banknote is made of polymer, which allows for enhanced security features such as a see-through window and holograms.

Polymer banknotes are more durable and sustainable than traditional banknotes, which are made of cotton paper. They can also be recycled.

The design has different shades of violet and fluorescent blue colours at the note’s centre, along with drawings and inscriptions.

In this issue, the Central Bank took into consideration all banknote users by adding symbols in Braille to help blind and visually-impaired people identify the note.

The new note will be available at Central Bank branches and ATMs soon. The current Dh50 note will continue to be in circulation and accepted as currency.

Sheikh Hamad bin Mohammed Al Sharqi, Ruler of Fujairah; Sheikh Saud bin Rashid Al Mualla, Ruler of Umm Al Quwain; Sheikh Saud bin Saqr Al Qasimi, Ruler of Ras Al Khaimah; Sheikh Sultan bin Mohammed Al Qasimi, Crown Prince and Deputy Ruler of Sharjah and Sheikh Ammar bin Humaid Al Nuaimi, Crown Prince of Ajman, also attended the unveiling ceremony.

A man scans a QR code at the entrance of Queen Victoria Market in Melbourne in August. The state government has launched an update to the Service Victoria QR code check-in app, which allows users to share their Covid vaccination certificate. Photograph: Diego Fedele/AAP

A man scans a QR code at the entrance of Queen Victoria Market in Melbourne in August. The state government has launched an update to the Service Victoria QR code check-in app, which allows users to share their Covid vaccination certificate. Photograph: Diego Fedele/AAP

Last modified on Wed 13 Oct 2021 02.48 BST

Developers say it takes just minutes to fake vaccination status through the Service Victoria app, as the state trials the new system ahead of lifting lockdown later this month.

When the state reaches its 70% double-dose vaccination target, fully vaccinated people will be able to enjoy new freedoms such as going to the pub or cinema, getting a haircut and attending weddings or funerals.

On Monday, the Victorian government launched an update to the Service Victoria QR code check-in app, which allows users to share their Covid-19 vaccination certificate via the Medicare Express app or MyGov account with the app.

Once enabled, a person’s vaccination status appears when they check in to a venue, along with an animated hologram of the Victorian government logo.

The animations are one of the security measures the Victorian government has used to stop people presenting fake versions to access venues that do not allow unvaccinated people.

However, software developer Jim Mussared was one of several developers who were also able to fake the vaccination status in the Service Victoria app in less than 10 minutes.

Mussared said the process was “really simple”. Others had also managed to build their own version of the app from the ground up, complete with recreating the hologram animations upon check-in.

Mussared said it showed the need for verification using digital signatures.

“The key point is that apps cannot be trusted. Triangles, animated effects, etc, can always be faked or forged, often very quickly,” he said. “Much more so than the physical equivalent.”

He said the failure was the result of the federal government not using an international standard format with a digital signature in all forms of the vaccine certificate.

A spokesperson for the Victorian Department of Premier and Cabinet said the state was trialling proof of vaccination through the Service Victoria app in regional Victoria and would not take lightly any attempts to forge vaccination status.

“Fraud is a criminal offence, one that both state and federal governments take very seriously.”

New South Wales exited lockdown on Monday, but the state has yet to launch its updated Service NSW app that includes vaccination status, with trials in regional areas only beginning this week.

This is the VaxPass.

1. It’s in testing phase now.

2. In the next few days we will undertake closed pilots in some regional areas.

3. At this stage we are still on track for statewide roll-out on 18 October… pic.twitter.com/WUNwKLHvFa

— Victor Dominello MP (@VictorDominello) October 8, 2021

Service NSW will allow businesses to verify a customer’s vaccination status through the “check a licence or credential” function on the Service NSW app which will allow them to scan a QR code on a customer’s digital certificate to ensure it is valid.

Ultimately, however, using the Service NSW app to verify vaccination status is optional, and people can otherwise choose to present their Medicare Express app, the certificate through their wallet app on their phone, or a paper certificate from the Australian Immunisation Register.