How to ace an interview 17 things that hiring managers look for

How to ace an interview 17 things that hiring managers look for

How to ace an interview 17 things that hiring managers look for

Hiring managers look at five key areas that set candidates apart in a job interview.

With new unemployment claims still high according to data released by the Department of Labor, it is undeniably a tough job market. But there are still professional opportunities out there. For example, information technology is one area that is seeing strong demand. And as companies rush to adapt to a tight IT job market, they’re doing everything possible to attract top talent. But what really makes the difference between many equally competent candidates? Here are the top five things hiring managers look for in a job interview that will set you apart from the competition.

Passion

While skills and experience are essential, hiring managers also look for passion. Some would even say that passion is the most important credential when looking for a job. For one thing, skills can be taught. Passion can’t. Bring your whole self to the job interview. Make it clear how excited and enthusiastic you are about the opportunity. You never want hiring managers to doubt your genuine interest in the role. Passion can also be translated into an eagerness to advance. “We have found that employees with career drive and an eager attitude to take on new projects often succeed in their roles and help improve processes of their department,” says Sacha Ferrandi, Founder and Director of HR of Source Capital Funding, Inc.

Fit

To create and maintain a strong corporate culture, hiring managers want to ensure that new hires will fit into that culture. Organizations committed to hiring based on fit tend to define the company’s cultural values and use them to inform the interview process. Ideally, hiring managers use an objective assessment to identify people likely to be a good fit. Hiring for fit is especially important in smaller organizations. For example, at software company Officevibe, they have their core values printed out on cards. Then one of their interview questions consists of asking the candidate to order the cards in terms of what they think is the most critical value and then explain their answer. Ultimately, it’s not about how similar you are to the interviewer. It’s about having a unique perspective that enhances the team in the long run.

Preparation

Hiring managers look for candidates who have taken the time to do their homework. In fact, 88% of hiring managers say that an informed candidate is the top quality they want when interviewing, according to a survey from Glassdoor. Lori Goler, Facebook’s vice president of people, suggests that potential interviewees learn about Facebook’s company culture and do their research before the job interview. That means taking the time to thoroughly read up on the business for up-to-date insight into its priorities. Show that you understand what the company stands for. Look for connections you have with current employees so you can talk to people on the inside. Remember that every conversation you have is essentially an interview. Then find out who you will be interviewing with and investigate their background. Prepare questions that are specific to each interviewer. And if you can find a personal connection, even better.

Resourcefulness

The world of work is fast-paced, especially during these hectic times. With more employees than ever working remotely with little to no supervision, resourcefulness is an important quality. You need to be able to figure things out on your own. In many cases, there aren’t set procedures or processes in place. That means it’s up to you, the employee, to take the initiative. If you don’t know the answer, figure out how to get it. Or if you have a problem, know how to solve it.

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How to ace an interview 17 things that hiring managers look for

Interviews for management roles are challenging not only for job candidates but also for the decision makers of the hiring company. Human resources managers and executives from the departments involved in the recruitment process need to carefully select the right candidate to be sure he or she will generate a high return on the investment that the company is about to make.

To make that final decision, the company schedules in-person interviews with the top candidates — perhaps the most important step of the whole recruiting process, as it puts candidates in the room with their future boss, the hiring manager. While hiring managers are not psychologists or behavioral experts and may not have training in interview skills, they do know better than anyone else in the organization what the key challenges of the open position are. They know the team, the market, and have a clear idea of what a good candidate should be like to ace the interview and get the job.

Gaurav Rekhi, the head of product management at eBay, identifies the right candidates for his team and as a hiring manager he hones in on specific personality traits during an interview as indicators of leadership and high performance: “I look for individuals who are problem solvers,” people who “can take on different roles,” who are full of “passion” and who exude “confidence.” In short, he looks for candidates who can “influence others.”

One secret to acing an interview is providing examples and ideas or proposals of how to approach specific problems, such as a strategic plan, Rekhi says.

What hiring managers are looking for is a proof, a demonstration that the candidate not only has the right background and experience to succeed in the job but that he or she can connect past experience to future performance.

So candidates would be wise to research the company’s industry, competition, potential partners and market trends, showcase their problem solving skills — and most have a plan. Finalists for a management role are in some cases expected to provide a short description of what their strategic plan would be to overcome current business challenges.

Joanna Weidenmiller, the CEO of human-resources technology firm 1-Page that gamifies the hiring process (and my employer), works closely with HR departments and hiring managers at large companies to identify challenges that candidates need to solve before landing a final interview with the hiring managers. “The right way to approach company’s challenge and ace those interviews is to really understand the job responsibilities and requirements, do the homework and present a strategic plan on how to solve it,” she says. “Ultimately, hiring managers are looking for candidates who are prepared to answer how [their] experience will work in the position and at the company, not only how it worked in the past.”

Candidates should be ready to provide answers on how they will overcome specific market threats, trends they have identified that company should follow, how they are going to make or save money for the company and provide strategic direction — something that managers won’t find in the resume.

Sydney Fleming, in charge of hiring for TrustPilot, a review-driven community that connects online consumers with companies, has similar advice. She looks for skilled candidates who can show
proactive approach and interview preparation that goes beyond reporting the results of a Google search. What Fleming really values during an interview is hearing from “a candidate with a deep understanding of my business and of the market in which the company operates,” someone who “could potentially educate me on my own company”.

There is no silver bullet that will work with every hiring manager or organization, but these steps should help. It’s all about demonstrating that proof of an expected investment for the company because nobody wants the disaster effects of a bad hire: a loss in productivity, plus the waste of time and money involved in hiring that employee and the associated training costs. Descriptive data (resumes) won’t land managers a job. Instead candidates should present predictive data instead, like a strategic plan and a demonstration of problem solving skills.

How to ace an interview 17 things that hiring managers look for

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Even if you’re extremely competent in your field, you still must wow the manager who’s doing the hiring in order to land the job. The interview is where you demonstrate your interest in the company, and then present the attributes that would best fit the workplace. If you do these things, you’re more likely to ace the interview.

Read the job description several times to get a clear picture of the skills you’ll need to perform the job. Review your resume to see what the hiring manager may look at when trying to match your skills to their job description. There’s nothing you can do about the resume after you’ve sent it out — but it’s a good practice to have fresh in your mind what the hiring manager may look for and ask about.

Print out a copy of the job description and place checkmarks next to the skills you think you possess. Then, make notes in the margin about specific jobs you’ve had that helped you hone those skills. Employers want to hire candidates whose skills best match the job, so this exercise can help you identify the skills you possess that they want. Likewise, you may discover that you don’t have a number of skills that the employer is looking for. In that case, spend some time thinking about how you may gain those skills, and how you’ll answer should the employer ask about those gaps. In some cases, showing that you have the desire to learn new skills will encourage the hiring manager to give you a chance.

Research the company to find out about its history, progress and the direction the company is headed. Look at the company website’s “About” and “History” pages. If the company has biographies of individuals, read the bio for the hiring manager so that you know what she looks like and what interests she may have. Also perform an online search to read what other newspapers, magazines and blogs are saying about the company. Also look at the company’s Facebook and Twitter feeds to see what’s happening on a day-to-day basis. This research will help you determine the tone of the company and allow you to present yourself in a way that will match it.

Perform a self-assessment using online tools. Personality and skill tests can help you identify your strong and weak points, so you’ll be able to tackle any questions about your work style, strengths and weaknesses with more confidence.

Write down a list of possible interview questions, based on what you know about the company and the job description. If you have a friend in the same industry — or a friend whose job includes hiring employees — have them help you come up with possible questions. Then, have your friend take you through a practice interview.

Dress appropriately for the job when you go to the interview. If you’re not sure, err on the more formal side. Ensure that your clothing is clean, ironed and free of stains. The last thing you want is to be dinged during your interview for things that are entirely within your control.

Arrive at the interview a few minutes early, well-rested and having eaten a decent meal. You want all burners firing when you get to the interview so that you can present your best side and answer the questions — which you’ve rehearsed — with ease.

Look for common ground. You’ve done plenty of research to get to know the company — and in the best-case scenario, you’ve looked at the biography for the hiring manager. If that biography mentioned her hobbies or background, look for ways to show mutual interest or involvement. If you’ve both played tennis since high school, find a way to mention it. This can be a way to make your interview stand out from the many others the company is likely doing.

Listen to the things the hiring manager tells you during the interview. You may hear or see things you didn’t learn during your research that can help you. Likewise, the hiring manager may be trying to see if you’re paying attention and may ask you something based on the information she’s given. Answer questions clearly and succinctly, and don’t forget to smile and maintain eye contact.

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Going through the job interview process can, admittedly, be painful. Even when you have thousands of incredible jobs from top-ranking businesses at your fingertips with our search engine and expert advice, there are still things about the process that can just get your adrenaline revving. Luckily for you, we have been around the block a few times — both as interviewees and interviewers — and we have a bevy of great tips to better handle any given interview situation.

Today, we bring you one of the most important counter-question you could ever ask a hiring manager, supervisor, or upper-level executive when vying for that job change or promotion and the important reasons to keep it in your back pocket for that next big opening.

What does success look like in this position, and what measurable would you be expecting?

It demonstrates your desire to meet the business’ needs

Whether you’re interviewing for a new position within the company, filling a previous slot, or otherwise helping them pivot their brand and its goals, there is a certain level of comfort in knowing that a job applicant is aware of their responsibilities very quickly. Even more so when they’re looking to meet or exceed expectations even before they walk in for their first day of training.

This particular question indicates that you recognize success is assessed by measurables, not just a charming personality at an interview and a pristine pedigree. By asking someone this question, you are acknowledging that there are things about this particular job you may not know – even if you’ve been on this career path for years elsewhere – and that you have an open mind to other forms of operation and growth. To feel better prepared for the interview, make sure you’ve got a few of these key skills up your sleeve.

It indicates specificity and attention to detail

You’re getting into the nitty-gritty with this question. Whether you choose to ask it with the first round interview, or while you’re discussing 401k packages and information in your third round informational, this question packs multiple punches. Two questions in one, besides “What does success look like in this position?” and “What measurable would you be expecting?” you’re also asking questions like:

  • What measurables are valuable to the company?
  • How do you mark growth in an employee in this position?
  • How do you, personally, determine success?
  • How does the company determine success?
  • What expectations does the company have that I might be able to exceed quickly?
  • What is my direct impact on the growth of the company?

It familiarizes the interviewee with the interviewer

As with all follow-up questions in interviews, this is your opportunity to get some face time with a member of the team you might be on or someone representing a company you really admire. Be sure to embrace each question you might have as an opportunity to not only learn about the rhythms of the office space and the way your team works together but also about this person as a colleague. If nothing else, it might give you a fun anecdote to mention in your thank you note. (Here are some remote interview-specific tips.)

It helps you determine the company’s level of empathy

The way the interviewer approaches the answer to this question could help indicate how much wiggle room they allow for mistakes during onboarding, what their expectations look like in the long run, and how strict their measurables are. Many hiring managers have had to go into greater detail in their responses to these questions as of late because of the COVID-19 pandemic and how deliverables are transferred, etc. Their response could spur on additional, more deep-dive questions that will help you determine if the company or your superiors have a sense of empathy and if they can provide the right work environment for you.

It applies to most industries and career paths

As specific as the question is to each unique position, it actually casts a wide net for industries and jobs it could be referring to. Even if you had no previous knowledge of the position, company, or top-level executive who is taking your call before the interview – which should never, ever be the case – this question will perk their ears up and ensure them that you are invested in not only your success but the success of the company as a whole.

Try this question on for size during your next interview with one of our highest paying companies.

Related Stories:

Going through the job interview process can, admittedly, be painful. Even when you have thousands of incredible jobs from top-ranking businesses at your fingertips with our search engine and expert advice, there are still things about the process that can just get your adrenaline revving. Luckily for you, we have been around the block a few times — both as interviewees and interviewers — and we have a bevy of great tips to better handle any given interview situation.

Today, we bring you one of the most important counter-question you could ever ask a hiring manager, supervisor, or upper-level executive when vying for that job change or promotion and the important reasons to keep it in your back pocket for that next big opening.

What does success look like in this position, and what measurable would you be expecting?

It demonstrates your desire to meet the business’ needs

Whether you’re interviewing for a new position within the company, filling a previous slot, or otherwise helping them pivot their brand and its goals, there is a certain level of comfort in knowing that a job applicant is aware of their responsibilities very quickly. Even more so when they’re looking to meet or exceed expectations even before they walk in for their first day of training.

This particular question indicates that you recognize success is assessed by measurables, not just a charming personality at an interview and a pristine pedigree. By asking someone this question, you are acknowledging that there are things about this particular job you may not know – even if you’ve been on this career path for years elsewhere – and that you have an open mind to other forms of operation and growth. To feel better prepared for the interview, make sure you’ve got a few of these key skills up your sleeve.

It indicates specificity and attention to detail

You’re getting into the nitty-gritty with this question. Whether you choose to ask it with the first round interview, or while you’re discussing 401k packages and information in your third round informational, this question packs multiple punches. Two questions in one, besides “What does success look like in this position?” and “What measurable would you be expecting?” you’re also asking questions like:

  • What measurables are valuable to the company?
  • How do you mark growth in an employee in this position?
  • How do you, personally, determine success?
  • How does the company determine success?
  • What expectations does the company have that I might be able to exceed quickly?
  • What is my direct impact on the growth of the company?

It familiarizes the interviewee with the interviewer

As with all follow-up questions in interviews, this is your opportunity to get some face time with a member of the team you might be on or someone representing a company you really admire. Be sure to embrace each question you might have as an opportunity to not only learn about the rhythms of the office space and the way your team works together but also about this person as a colleague. If nothing else, it might give you a fun anecdote to mention in your thank you note. (Here are some remote interview-specific tips.)

It helps you determine the company’s level of empathy

The way the interviewer approaches the answer to this question could help indicate how much wiggle room they allow for mistakes during onboarding, what their expectations look like in the long run, and how strict their measurables are. Many hiring managers have had to go into greater detail in their responses to these questions as of late because of the COVID-19 pandemic and how deliverables are transferred, etc. Their response could spur on additional, more deep-dive questions that will help you determine if the company or your superiors have a sense of empathy and if they can provide the right work environment for you.

It applies to most industries and career paths

As specific as the question is to each unique position, it actually casts a wide net for industries and jobs it could be referring to. Even if you had no previous knowledge of the position, company, or top-level executive who is taking your call before the interview – which should never, ever be the case – this question will perk their ears up and ensure them that you are invested in not only your success but the success of the company as a whole.

Try this question on for size during your next interview with one of our highest paying companies.

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Before you face the hiring manager, you’ll probably spend some time on the phone with the company’s HR department. Here’s what it takes to win them over.

If your resume passes muster for a job to which you’ve applied, a phone screen will probably be your next stop. Human-resources and hiring managers just don’t have time to grant every promising resume a face-to-face interview. Instead, top performers in a phone interview with HR will advance to in-person interviews with a hiring manager.

In my many years as a recruiting manager, human-resources business partner and director of human resources for Fortune 100 companies, I’ve conducted my fair share of phone interviews and screens with candidates. I know what HR representatives are looking for and what it takes for a candidate to win them over. With these experiences in mind, the following recipe can help take qualified candidates from the phone to an in-person interview:

1. Save your applications

  1. Must be able to create advanced Excel spreadsheets
  2. Must be able to analyze data
  3. Must be able to create macros in Microsoft Office documents

When you pick up the phone and an HR representative asks to speak to you for five minutes, you don’t want to be scrambling for a description of the job or trying to remember which ones you’ve applied to.

Keep a copy of all the jobs that you have applied to in a separate folder in your e-mail In box. When the recruiter calls, be sure to get her name, company and the job she is referencing. You can cross-check this with the job description that you have in your “Job Posting” or “Applied for Jobs” folder in your In box. If you have applied for more than one job with a company you want to ask what job they are referencing so you can be prepared for the phone interview.

Having the job description in front of you during the phone interview is critical. Typically, job descriptions are written with the primary job responsibilities listed in descending order of importance. For instance, a simple job description may read like this:

The most important part of this job will be a candidate’s ability to create advanced Excel spreadsheets, followed by data analysis, then macro creation.

Having the description handy will let you speak to each of those requirements in order of importance, even if the recruiter doesn’t bring it up. If you absolutely can’t find the original job description, ask the recruiter to send you a copy before your phone interview. It’s best to ask rather than try to wing it and not get that in-person interview.

2. S.T.A.R.s

  1. Situation: Analyze the activity you faced, in this case determining why sales have steadily decreased by 5 percent from the previous fiscal year.
  2. Task: Describe the tasks available to respond to the situation. In this case, identify why sales were decreasing and provide a solution.
  3. Action: Describe the steps you took to resolve the issue.
  4. Result: What was the result of your action? What did you take away from the resolution? What if anything would you have done differently?

Create an S.T.A.R. document. This is an acronym for Situation, Task, Action, Results, and it is the key to answering behavioral interview questions, like these STAR interview questions.

The HR representative will probably ask one of these common phone interview questions about how you handled specific types of situations in previous jobs. After all, it’s a common HR tool to test your professional experience and gauge your aptitude.

The hiring manager may ask the “what is your greatest weakness” question, which you can ace using one of these 3 weaknesses job interview examples.

The HR representative is looking for you to respond to each in a clear and succinct manner. Here is an example of a behaviorally based question:

Tell me about a time when you most effectively used financial or quantitative data to identify and solve a critical problem.

You want to answer the question in way that demonstrates your ability to handle the situation and I recommend you break it down into Situation, Task, Action and Result.

Create at least two S.T.A.R. documents for each position on your resume. Then attempt to map each STAR to job responsibilities listed in the job description. You will thank me later when your answers come out polished and prepared as you clearly communicate your challenges, successes and results. Without it, you’re bound to stall and appear as if you can’t substantiate what is written in your resume.

3. Print it out

  • Resume
  • Bio
  • Cover letter
  • S.T.A.R. document

Keep the following documents printed out and with you at all times:

This way you aren’t constantly looking for these documents. You never know when that interviewer might call, and you want to be prepared. You should also review these documents every day so that you are keenly familiar with each. I’ve known executive candidates who were forced to admit they forget some of the content written in their own resumes or bios.

Use this sample of a phone interview thank you email to seal the deal after you nail the conversation.

You’re most likely very familiar with the traditional job interview where you meet with a recruiter or hiring manager face-to-face in their office. Nowadays, companies are implementing video interviews into their hiring process to better and quickly connect with candidates. The one-way interview, in particular, is used by many Spark Hire customers for the early stage of their interview process.

Below are answers to questions that you may have about your one-way interview so you can fully prepare and ace it:

Will there be someone else on the other end?

A one-way video interview is sometimes referred to as an “asynchronous interview” because only you, the job seeker, are present and doing all the talking. The interview questions will be presented to you in either text or video form. Once you have recorded and submitted your responses, the recruiter or hiring manager will review your interview on their own time.

When is my one-way interview due? How long do I have to complete it?

The due date for your one-way interview is set by the recruiter or hiring manager who invited you. The amount of time that you have to complete the one-way depends on the date and the time they have chosen for the interview to be completed by. You can find this information on the landing page for your one-way interview.

Where should I do my interview?

Ideally, you should record your one-way interview in a quiet area with no other people around. A recruiter or hiring manager will not appreciate being distracted by people coming in and out of the room you recorded in. The company wants to know more about you, therefore, you need to be the sole focus of the video interview. It’s also important to make sure that the space you are recording in looks clean and professional.

What if I don’t have a webcam? Can I use my phone?

If you don’t have access to a computer and webcam, you can conveniently complete your one-way interview by using your mobile device. Just simply download the Spark Hire mobile app and you’re ready to go! The mobile app supports iOS or Android devices. You can also check out your local library for a computer to use for free to complete your interview.

How many questions are there? Do I see the questions ahead of time? How much time do I have to answer?

The number of questions for a one-way interview is decided by the recruiter or hiring manager. Once you start the interview, you will be told the number of questions you will need to answer. The most questions you will be asked is ten. The questions will be presented to you one at a time so you will have an opportunity to think about your response before recording.

The length of time to answer a question varies from interview to interview. You can have as much as three minutes to respond or as little as thirty seconds — the amount of time is decided by the recruiter or hiring manager. Don’t worry too much about whether you’ll be able to say all you need to in the time given or if you will have enough to say at all. Focus on answering the question as best you can.

How many times can I re-record?

Depending on how the company sets up your interview, you will have anywhere from 1 to unlimited attempts at answering a question. The number of takes will be indicated before you answer a question. However, don’t get caught up trying to perfectly record your responses. You’re going to do great!

Congratulations on getting a McDonalds Interview.

The McDonalds Interview Process consists of open interviews (walk-in), one-on-one, group interviews, and second interviews.

We all know interviews are stressful and competition is intense.

However, with a small amount of preparation, you can ace the McDonalds Job Interview.

Here you will find how to successfully answer McDonalds Job Interview Questions.

McDonald’s Interview Questions

1. What can you tell us about McDonald’s?

  • McDonald’s is the largest quick-service restaurant chain in the world.
  • As of 2020 there nearly 40,000 McDonald’s restaurants.
  • McDonald’s sells hamburgers, cheeseburgers, chicken, French Fries, breakfast items, soft drinks, shakes, and desserts.
  • McDonald’s offers a wide variety of healthy food options such as salads, yogurts, apple and orange juice, snack wraps, and fresh fruit.
  • Approximately 70 percent of McDonald’s’ U.S. sales now come from drive-thru windows.

2. Why do you want to work at McDonald’s?

Possible Answers are:

  • Since McDonald’s is a huge corporation, state you see lots of opportunities to learn and grow. Mention you read on the McDonald’s website more than 50% of McDonald’s franchise owners started off behind the counter and so did 75% of restaurant managers.
  • If going to school state, it is a great way to pay for school.
  • State you enjoy working with people and hope to work in a challenging fast-paced environment like McDonald’s.
  • Say you feel McDonald’s offers exceptional value for its customers and because of this you would be proud to represent them.

3. Why should I hire you?

  • State you are a quick learner and will not have any issue learning the product line at McDonald’s or how to use the point of sale system.
  • Mention you pay great attention to detail and will always make sure the orders are accurate and your station is clean and tidy.
  • Finally, say you are great with people and will always make sure customers feel welcome by greeting them with a smile.

4. What hours can you work?

  • It is in your best interest to be as flexible as possible with your hours so try and say yes. Note many of their restaurants are now open 24 hours a day.

5. Are you good at math?

  • Say Yes. Remember this is simple addition and subtracting (making change).

6. Are you looking for full time or part-time work?

  • I don’t think there is a wrong answer to this question. McDonald’s is always looking for part-time and part-time employees.

7. Where do you see yourself in five years?

This question is designed to see if you have career goals but also to see if you are a good fit for the industry.

  • If you are going to college tell them what you plan on doing and relate how working at McDonald’s can help you with your career goals. For example, if you are studying commerce, state you think working at a Fortune 500 company can teach you a lot about business.
  • Perhaps you want to learn about the restaurant industry if so tell them you would like to get into restaurant management.

You’re most likely very familiar with the traditional job interview where you meet with a recruiter or hiring manager face-to-face in their office. Nowadays, companies are implementing video interviews into their hiring process to better and quickly connect with candidates. The one-way interview, in particular, is used by many Spark Hire customers for the early stage of their interview process.

Below are answers to questions that you may have about your one-way interview so you can fully prepare and ace it:

Will there be someone else on the other end?

A one-way video interview is sometimes referred to as an “asynchronous interview” because only you, the job seeker, are present and doing all the talking. The interview questions will be presented to you in either text or video form. Once you have recorded and submitted your responses, the recruiter or hiring manager will review your interview on their own time.

When is my one-way interview due? How long do I have to complete it?

The due date for your one-way interview is set by the recruiter or hiring manager who invited you. The amount of time that you have to complete the one-way depends on the date and the time they have chosen for the interview to be completed by. You can find this information on the landing page for your one-way interview.

Where should I do my interview?

Ideally, you should record your one-way interview in a quiet area with no other people around. A recruiter or hiring manager will not appreciate being distracted by people coming in and out of the room you recorded in. The company wants to know more about you, therefore, you need to be the sole focus of the video interview. It’s also important to make sure that the space you are recording in looks clean and professional.

What if I don’t have a webcam? Can I use my phone?

If you don’t have access to a computer and webcam, you can conveniently complete your one-way interview by using your mobile device. Just simply download the Spark Hire mobile app and you’re ready to go! The mobile app supports iOS or Android devices. You can also check out your local library for a computer to use for free to complete your interview.

How many questions are there? Do I see the questions ahead of time? How much time do I have to answer?

The number of questions for a one-way interview is decided by the recruiter or hiring manager. Once you start the interview, you will be told the number of questions you will need to answer. The most questions you will be asked is ten. The questions will be presented to you one at a time so you will have an opportunity to think about your response before recording.

The length of time to answer a question varies from interview to interview. You can have as much as three minutes to respond or as little as thirty seconds — the amount of time is decided by the recruiter or hiring manager. Don’t worry too much about whether you’ll be able to say all you need to in the time given or if you will have enough to say at all. Focus on answering the question as best you can.

How many times can I re-record?

Depending on how the company sets up your interview, you will have anywhere from 1 to unlimited attempts at answering a question. The number of takes will be indicated before you answer a question. However, don’t get caught up trying to perfectly record your responses. You’re going to do great!