How to actually get things done with your to-do list

As a career girl, it’s important to know how to get things done with your to-do list. Scheduling means planning your activities so that you can achieve your goals and priorities in the time you have available. When it’s done effectively, it helps you to understand what you realistically achieve with your time and make sure you have enough time for essential tasks.

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So how do you start?

Before we can start, you should know how much time you’re spending on your activities right now. Take your smartphone and clock how much time is used and wasted for each task. Facebook & Instagram is not being productive ladies. Start with scheduling every beginning of the week. You can even do this at the beginning of the month and make a more detailed version weekly. Nothing beast a pen and notebook.

Next what medium are we using?

Do you need a yearly diary like the Goals 2020/2021 Diary , a daily planner like the Getting Stuff Done planner , a daily project planner like The Project Book , or a weekly desk pad like the Getting Stuff Done weekly desk pad ? It all depends on your personal preferences. The most important thing when choosing your planner is that it lets you enter data easily, and allows you to view an appropriate span of time (day/week/month) in the level of detail that you need. Once you have decided which tool you want to use, prepare your schedule in the following way:

#1 – What to do?

Make a list of everything that needs to be done this week. Make your to-do’s specific actions as if you’re instructing a personal assistant on her first day on the job as to what you need to be done. Include as much information as possible and make sure you put items on the list that you’re definitely doing.

#2 – How much time

Fill in how much time it will take to do each task. Your to-do list should be short, to-the-point commitments that involve no more deciding as to whether you’re actually serious about doing them.

#3 – Prioritize

Prioritize your tasks in order. Schedule in high-priority and urgent activities, as well as essential maintenance tasks that cannot be delegated or avoided. Schedule your time with understanding when you are most energetic and when you are not. It may seem silly to assign a number or letter to your tasks, and you shouldn’t think of these as mega important, but giving each task a simple 1-4 when you create it makes your to-do list organize itself. That way, when you get to work and look at your to-do list, you don’t need to think about what to do first—you just start at the top of the list and start working your way down.

What’s on your to-do list this week? Share your top goals with us in the comment section below…

How to actually get things done with your to-do list

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Now that the sparkly ball has long since hit the ground, we’re supposedly off and running on those New Year’s resolutions. Unfortunately, between work, family, and other real-life obligations, achieving our goals is almost always harder than it seems. But the problem may have started way back in 2012, when we first jotted down those goals on a piece of loose leaf or a dirty bar napkin. Creating an efficient to-do list is a feat in itself, and that’s where we come in. We’ve prepared 13 tips to help you organize your life into a manageable list, then cross off each entry in time to make some new resolutions for next year.

TO DO OR NOT TO DO — THE NEED-TO-KNOW

List-making is a pretty personal thing. Some of us border on obsessive, organizing even our bathroom runs into a series of numbered bullet points. Others prefer to wing it, writing important telephone numbers on the backs of their hands. But even the most basic outline of must-do tasks can help us tackle our most important goals. For one thing, writing out a bunch of to-do’s forces us to set concrete goals (take out the trash), which can be way more effective than just thinking about vague objectives (get cleaner). Plus, making a written list can help us remember important information (meaning that trash won’t sit waiting in the kitchen for weeks).

The problem is that even those of us who believe fervently in the power of to-do lists might not know how to make a successful one. Luckily Greatist is here to help, with a step-by-step guide to creating — and completing — an awesome list of stuff to get done.

As a Career girl it’s important to know how to schedule. Scheduling means planning your activities so that you can achieve your goals and priorities in the time you have available. When it’s done effectively, it helps you to understand what you realistically achieve with your time and make sure you have enough time for essential tasks.

How to actually get things done with your to-do list weheartit.com

So how to start start?
Before we can start, you should know how much time you’re spending on your activities right now. Take your smartphone and clock how much time is used and wasted for each task. Facebook & Instagram is not being productive ladies. Start with scheduling every beginning of the week. You can even do this at the beginning of the month and make a more detailed version weekly. I know there are different websites and apps around there, which are great. But sometimes I still love to use a pen and notebook.

Next what medium are we using?
A notebook and pen or software and apps like Google Calender or Wunderlist(my personal favourite). It all depends on your personal preferences. The most important thing when choosing your planner is that it lets you enter data easily, and allows you to view an appropriate span of time (day/week/month) in the level of detail that you need. Once you have decided which tool you want to use, prepare your schedule in the following way:

#1 – What to do?
Make a list of everything that needs to be done this week. Make your to-do’s specific actions as if your instructing a personal assistant on her first day on the job as to what you need done. Include as much information as possible and make sure you put items on the list that you’re definitely doing.

#2 – How much time
Fill in how much time it will take to do each tasks. Our to-do list should be short, to-the-point commitments that involve no more deciding as to whether you’re actually serious about doing them.

#3 – Prioritize
Prioritize your tasks in order. Schedule in high-priority and urgent activities, as well as essential maintenance tasks that cannot be delegated or avoided. Schedule your time with understanding when you are most energetic and when you are not. It may seem silly to assign a numbers or letter to your tasks, and you shouldn’t think of these as mega important, but giving each task a simple 1-4 when you create it makes your to-do list organize itself. That way, when you get to work and look at your to-do list, you don’t need to think about what to do first—you just start at the top of the list and start working your way down.

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How to actually get things done with your to-do list

We start out each day with the best intentions to get it all done, but sometimes it feels like the world may be conspiring against us. As entrepreneurs and self-employed individuals, we have a myriad of tasks on our plate at any given moment, not to mention trying to balance this workload with your personal life. If you’re looking for a few ways to help you actually cut through the fluff and get your real work done, try out these ten tips:

1. Just do it!

This is probably the simplest way to start getting more things done. Instead of spending time debating what you should be doing, pick one thing and just do it. Then pick another and do it. Don’t worry about what’s next on your list or the other things that need your attention. They’re not going anywhere. Just focus on the one task at hand. You may be surprised at how well this simple approach works.

2. Work in chunks of time.

You may not be able to block of an entire half or whole day for your project or tasks. However, you should be able to squeeze in 60 to 90 minutes sessions of work. At the start of each day, look over your to-do list and start grouping your tasks into 60 -90 minute chunks of activity. Then schedule in as many of these productivity chunks into your schedule that you can. During those time periods make sure you work without distractions. Afterwards, take a break and do something else such as return phone calls, answer emails, etc. When you’re ready, start your next 60- 90 min chunk of time. This method works really well when your day has scattered phone calls and conference meetings. It helps you turn those in-between times into highly focused productivity sessions.

3. Keep it accurate.

Over time (or even throughout the day) your to-do list may not reflect what you actually need to do. To focus on getting the stuff done that “really” needs to get done, check in on your to-do list at least once a day. You’ll want to check for priority and relevancy. If it’s not relevant to your goals or needs, take it off or put it on a “to do if you have time” list. If you’re doing tasks that aren’t a real priority to completing your goals, shuffle some things around and make sure you’re working on tasks that will move you closer to your end goal.

4. Do the big task first.

For some people, having the “dreaded” task done first helps them complete their to-do list easier. When you start with the biggest task first, once it’s complete, the rest of the tasks don’t seem as daunting and are easier to confront. The side benefit from this approach is that studies have shown we have an allotment of willpower. Once it’s used, it’s gone for the day. Conquering your big task first helps you work with your willpower instead of against it. Therefore, it decreases the odds that you’ll put the task off one more day.

5. Do everything else first.

While the “big task first” idea works well for many, others respond better to clearing their mind of all the little things first. There’s something self-satisfying about seeing all those tasks checked off as complete. This approach allows you to focus on the “big task” without any other mental distractions, so you’re able to just get it done.

6. Get in the mood.

Sometimes it can be difficult to shift back to work mode, especially after a holiday or in-between different types of tasks. When that happens there are few things you can do speed up the mental transition.

  • Take a minute and clear your desk.
  • Look over the tasks you need to do and see which ones will only take a few minutes and get those done first.
  • Take a few minutes and read a few blogs or magazine articles related to your industry.

7. Clear your head.

If you have a lot going on, you may just need to take a break to clear your head so you can focus. Go out and take a brief walk or exercise. Sometimes just talking with someone about what’s going on in your life is enough to help you refocus. Even better, do a hobby or some type of repetitive work that doesn’t take a lot of concentration to give your mind a break.

8. Reward yourself.

If you find yourself struggling to get through your to do list on a regular basis, it may just be because there’s no reward or fun in doing it. Help combat that by scheduling something fun that you enjoy doing for the end of every day. That way when you finish your to-do list, you’ll not only feel productive, but you’ll also be rewarded with an activity or task you love doing.

9. Don’t set yourself up for failure.

As entrepreneurs and self-starters, we tend to have bigger dreams and ideals than what’s physically possible. We want it all. However, feeling like you’re never accomplishing what you set out to do can take its toll on your psyche. Make sure you’re being realistic about what you’ve set out for yourself and the time frame you’ve allowed yourself to complete it. If you find that you are continually not able to complete certain tasks, take a closer look and make sure you haven’t set yourself up for failure by asking too much.

10. Keep track of your time.

You may find yourself surprised at where your time goes in the day. Keeping a log helps you discover areas where some changes or improvements can be made. It also lets you accurately predict how long something will take you in the future, making planning more effective in the long run.

What tips and practices do you do to get through your list? You can share your thoughts in the comments section below!

When you take on Internet Marketing, there are all sorts of things that you have to do if you want to actually realize the goals and objectives you set for yourself. Organizing all of your tasks in just one place is important because if you do not do that you will not have the right direction for moving ahead. Here are some tips that you can use to create a commotion list that will actually help you organize and finish your tasks.

These few things to consider will make a difference in your knowledge as they relate to wedding photography. They are by no means all there is to learn, as you will quickly discover. Nonetheless, you will discover them to be of great utility in your search for information. Gaining a high altitude overview will be of immense benefit to you. Continue reading because you do not want to miss these critical knowledge items.

How to actually get things done with your to-do list

List Things You are Not Supposed to Do: A great way to shine a new light on the usual commotion list is including all of the things that you are not supposed to be doing. However, how does that help you? It will help you focus first on what you need to be done and what you should not do. To use one example, let us say that you are in the habit of checking your e-mail all the time; this can be a major distraction and keep you from finishing your commotion list. You can include a line item that reads “check email twice a day” and then if you follow that direction, you can cross the item off of your list at the end of the day. The truth is that there are many things that can distract your focus but that gets in the way of your being able to be productive so try to cut down on this as much as possible.

Collect Your To-Do List: If you allow your tasks to be spread out, it will be difficult to understand or even to figure out what all you have to be done. Beyond that, you will need to focus just on the tasks that actually will help you get to your main goals. Therefore, if you do not have your tasks in one place, you will have to first gather them up so that you are clear of what all needs to be done to finish your project. You are allowed to have more than one commotion list as long as you focus on just one of them at a time. Not being clear is one of the biggest reasons that a person will have a difficult time in finishing their commotion list but you can only be clear once you have gotten all of your tasks together so that you can focus on the project as a whole.

Start Your Day with Your To-Do List: An effective way to make you are to do list work is to start your day with it. That’s right; if you make it a habit to compose your to-do list as soon as you sit down to work each morning you will find that you have a lot more energy about moving forward and sticking to your primary goals. Because your productivity is typically best when your day is just starting out so that is the best time to organize your list as best as you can. What matters most is how well you can create your list and how much work you put into making sure you finish it each day. Building a commotion list is just a fancy way of planning your day and increasing your productivity while you do so it makes sense that you create the list at the beginning of your day.

Overall, your aim should be to get it done today at any cost and finish off your commotion list, and if for some reason, it does not work out then there is always a tomorrow.

How to actually get things done with your to-do list

Guest post by: Amy Trager, Certified Professional Organizer

To-do lists can be daunting. But I think we can all agree there’s a small joy in scratching something off that list. Lists can help us complete larger projects by breaking them down, and help us manage our time and figure out priorities. How can that not be a good thing?

When creating the ultimate to-do list, the first thing is having a place to put it all. It doesn’t really matter if it’s on your phone in an app or on a legal tablet on your desk. What matters is that it’s all in one spot. Get rid of all the sticky notes and scraps of paper. Get rid of all the texts to self and reminders on the calendar. Gather it all in one place. If this is a list you’re hoping to share with others (maybe so they can help scratch things off the list, too), make sure it’s a format that everyone is comfortable using and to which they have access.

The second thing is knowing what exactly belongs on that list. Don’t hold back – dump everything onto your list, no matter how big or mundane. Anything still left to tackle from those sticky notes and scraps should be rewritten to the master list and tossed out. For household projects, walk around the house, room by room, closet by closet, and mark down every little thing you see and think of that begs to be completed. Don’t just rush through either; take a couple minutes and make sure everything is really getting a look. That box in the corner – what’s in there? Those frames stacked behind the couch – aren’t they supposed to be hung on the wall? Mark it down. Whether it’s something you plan to do or not, if it needs to get done, it goes on the list.

From here, you can start to curate your list – think about which items are attainable or “doable” now vs. later on. Maybe re-landscaping the entire yard isn’t in the budget this year, but a smaller spot resodding or planting project might be. Even if it’s a big task, it can be broken down into smaller sequential projects as needed.

So, instead of listing your task as “Re-landscape backyard”, try to break it down like this:

Backyard Re-Landscaping:

Trim back bushes and replace dead ones

Professionally trim trees

Create cement or brick walkway

Buying and assembling new patio furniture

Your list probably still looks pretty overwhelming at this point. That’s ok. You captured everything, and that’s the goal at this point. Here are two useful ways to break this master to-do list into manageable parts. It can be divided up by category or by priority.

Read through your list. Maybe your line items can be categorized by interior design projects, organizing tasks, and handywork. Or, maybe it makes more sense to group by priority. Items can be urgent, important, both or neither. Some tasks or projects may be relegated to the “someday” list, but it’s ok, the idea is to capture everything and then narrow down to what’s attainable.

How to actually get things done with your to-do list

Categorically, list groups in whatever order you choose. For priorities, list items in this order:

Urgent and important (there’s a deadline and it’s crucial to complete)

Urgent, but not important (there’s a deadline, but it’s not crucial it’s completed)

Important, but not urgent (there’s no deadline, but it’s crucial to complete)

Not important and not urgent (it would be nice to get this done)

Color coding can also come in handy here. Group items by color of ink or highlighter to see how much is in each group. This can be helpful in paper format or digital. Urgent/important items are red and wishful thinking is blue. Or, household repairs are purple and purchases are green.

The last part is figuring out how to get it all done. Think about what can be delegated, and ask for help – remember the goal is to get it completed and you should be rewarding yourself for crossing it off! Decide if some projects would go more smoothly with a skilled expert onsite. For many of the home or handy projects that may be on your list, remember you can always contact the great Concierge team at Fixer, either online or by text at 312.216.5999. Fixer can accurately estimate the time and cost for your entire list, and send a skilled team member to knock them out in a quick visit.

There will likely be some items you’ve just got to power through on your own. Schedule these into your calendar as you would any other appointment and commit to completing them, being mindful of how much energy and time you realistically can give to the project.

Now, get ready to scratch off things as completed! It’s the best feeling in the world.

How to actually get things done with your to-do list

Amy Trager is a Certified Professional Organizer® based in Chicago . Certified in 2007, she is also a NAPO member and past president of the Chicago chapter. Since 2006, she has been guiding individuals through the stress of their stuff.

How to actually get things done with your to-do list

Disclaimer: This site contains affiliate links from which we receive a compensation (like Amazon for example). But they do not affect the opinions and recommendations of the authors.

Wise Bread is an independent, award-winning consumer publication established in 2006. Our finance columns have been reprinted on MSN, Yahoo Finance, US News, Business Insider, Money Magazine, and Time Magazine.

Like many news outlets our publication is supported by ad revenue from companies whose products appear on our site. This revenue may affect the location and order in which products appear. But revenue considerations do not impact the objectivity of our content. While our team has dedicated thousands of hours to research, we aren’t able to cover every product in the marketplace.

For example, Wise Bread has partnerships with brands including, but not limited to, American Express, Bank of America, Capital One, Chase, Citi, Discover, and Amazon.

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It’s far too easy to wind up with a to-do list that seems to go on forever. Just as you finish one task, you think of three more that need to get done. I don’t know too many people who successfully complete every single item they would like to get done, especially if you look at their to-do lists over time.

If you want to accomplish more of the tasks on your to-do list, you have to create a reasonable list — one that’s actually in line with what is practical to handle. (See also: The Secret to Time Management and Work-Life Balance)

Who’s Putting Tasks on Your To-Do List?

The first question you have to address is exactly who is allowed to add to your to-do list. Most of us may be in charge of writing out our own lists, but anyone able to send us a quick email can add to our lists. All it takes is a “could you please do this?” and our lists get that much longer.

It is OK to say no to most people, especially if your to-do list is getting out of hand. An employer may not be easy to deny, but if your boss is being unreasonable about what you can accomplish in a short period of time, it’s worth pointing out to that person you can’t actually accomplish everything on your list in a timely manner.

Your significant other may fall into a similar category as your boss. You can’t just tell a spouse or partner that you’re not going to do something, at least without explaining why. You may need to discuss tasks as they come up. Everyone else, though, it’s worth saying no or that you’ll have to see — your own tasks should be a priority.

Prioritization Makes the Difference

Within your to-do list, you need to prioritize what must be accomplished. There are things you have to do today and things that you can put off indefinitely. In general, it’s best to focus on what you must accomplish today. But if you only ever do what must be handled today, those tasks without deadlines won’t actually be accomplished — you may get to a few things with deadlines this week or next ahead of time, but that’s it. In order to prioritize effectively, you need to set deadlines for every task, and they must be real deadlines. If you just make up a deadline for a given task, the odds of it being completed are incredibly slim.

But if you tie a task to an external deadline, such as knowing that you need to clean out the guest room before your mother’s next visit, the odds of it actually getting done go up significantly.

Break Down Big Tasks Into Little Ones

To any extent possible, you want to break down tasks into the smallest concrete steps you can assign to yourself. We tend to look at something big, like “paint the house,” and put it off as long as possible because there are so many elements to crossing a task like that off of our to-do list. But if we can break it down into steps like buying paint and taping off electrical sockets, we can tell ourselves that we only need to work for a few minutes to accomplish each little task.

We get the added bonus of being able to cross more items off of our lists. That feeling of knowing that we’ve finished tasks is crucial. It’s the main thing that keeps us moving down that list. If we can build up momentum, the whole list is easier to handle.

Don’t Be Afraid to Drop Tasks

At the end of the day, there’s no punishment for not completing many of the tasks that wind up on our to-do lists. So if something hasn’t gotten done and you don’t see a clear problem with not doing it, the best way to keep your to-do list under control is to drop that task. Take the time to think about the consequences of actually not doing some of your tasks, and you may find that many of them are things you’d like to do, rather than need to do.

If there’s a task that is important to you but that doesn’t absolutely need to be done — that you can’t tie to a deadline and that there’s no consequence for not doing it — take it off your to-do list. Add it to a separate list that you can look at and work on when there’s room on your to-do list. That way, you’re not cluttering up your main list and not getting depressed every time you have to put off a particular task.

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How to actually get things done with your to-do list

Disclaimer: This site contains affiliate links from which we receive a compensation (like Amazon for example). But they do not affect the opinions and recommendations of the authors.

Wise Bread is an independent, award-winning consumer publication established in 2006. Our finance columns have been reprinted on MSN, Yahoo Finance, US News, Business Insider, Money Magazine, and Time Magazine.

Like many news outlets our publication is supported by ad revenue from companies whose products appear on our site. This revenue may affect the location and order in which products appear. But revenue considerations do not impact the objectivity of our content. While our team has dedicated thousands of hours to research, we aren’t able to cover every product in the marketplace.

For example, Wise Bread has partnerships with brands including, but not limited to, American Express, Bank of America, Capital One, Chase, Citi, Discover, and Amazon.

How to actually get things done with your to-do list

May 17, 2019 11:28 AM EST | 6 min read

If you’re like me, you love to plan and write so many to do lists but I think generally, people struggle with drawing up an effective list and letting it aid you in getting things done throughout the day.

Below are a few hacks to help you use and conquer your to-do list.

Step 1: Prioritize

I think it’s safe to say that it is inevitable that we will have so many responsibilities in a day. As long as you’re an adult, you always have something to do.

But, I think the key to writing an effective to do list and also having a productive day is to prioritize. Prioritization is key. Before you write out your to-do list, ask yourself ‘What matters most at this present time?’ ‘What is urgent?’

For you, it might be working on your assignment due in a couple of weeks or for another, it might be spending an hour of your evening with your family. We all have different priorities. Find out yours and aim to work on it each day.

Also, this is where the dividing line between working hard and working smart comes in. Having a random set of responsibilities on your list and trying to get those things ticked off can be seen as working hard and you might be genuinely trying to hit those goals but, with working smart, it is narrowing down your priorities and what matters most; finding out what actions will yield the most results.

What step or strategy will get the most clients? What action will yield a higher turnover for your business? Which revision strategy will help with exam preparation? Prioritize. Hustle smart. So, the next time you write your to-do list, ask yourself ‘what is the most urgent thing I need to get done?’ And, it doesn’t have to be a ‘big’ goal and I think this is where the whole idea of being realistic and practical comes in.

You might have guests coming over for the weekend and your priority for the day could be deep cleaning the house, so you see it differs from person to person. The key is hustle smartly. VISIBILITY

Step 2: Visibility

Now, I’m someone who writes like a million and one to do lists and what happens is that they are all over the place and I end up forgetting the things I need to do. Take for example grocery shopping. I write up my grocery list, and I leave it somewhere. I end up going to the grocery store and realizing ‘Snap! What else do I need to get, where’s my list’. . I’m sure I’m not the only one who does this. Or you could be working on a project at work and you’ve left your to-do list or your notes somewhere, it can be annoying.

But, recently I started using the ‘Mover’ designed by Bravestorming and it is a cool magnetic memo brick that is movable; you can attach the memo brick to your computer. The aim of the ‘mover’ is to accelerate people’s thinking in a physical and concentrated way. The memo brick has a variety of templates for personal use.

It is perfect for young professionals to middle-aged entrepreneurs. So whenever I’m working on my computer, my ‘mover’ is attached so I can clearly see what I have to do and I’m able to stay focused without constantly trying to remind myself of what else I need to do. They also have the ‘Moverbook’ where you can stick all your to-do lists and important notes. Thus, when I’m on the go, I would have my mover book which I can carry around with me and keep all my important notes.

I would recommend you check out their products if you would like to keep an organized to do list or if you are someone prone to forget the things you set out to do and you need to have it visual and by you.

Step 3: Write Down Specific Goals

Personally, I have found out that the more specific my goal is or my to-do lists are, the more likely I am to get it done. And besides, there is little or no motivation when you pick up a generalized to list and you feel overwhelmed with where to start.

An example of a general and vague ‘to do’ would be ‘Write two articles by 6 pm or make more profit today.’ This can be overwhelming whereas, although this might be your ‘big goal’, you might want to write down a more specific or should I say smaller action steps to achieve that goal. It could be ‘select a theme for the article, write a list of topics that interest you or write the introduction of two articles.’

So, with this goal narrowed down, you get to know exactly what you have to do and there is more motivation to get the work done since there are clear, ‘smaller’ action steps you can take. It links back to the principle of working smart.

Step 4: Tick Things Off As You Get It Done

What better feeling! What better motivation do you need to keep working on the other things you have to do? Ticking things off your to do list gives you that feeling of ‘yes, I did that!’ Another thing is that it helps you gain clarity on what it is you have accomplished and what else needs to be done, that’s why writing out your list as opposed to keeping all your ‘to do’s’ in your head is ideal.

And when you do follow #tip 1 by prioritizing your responsibilities, you’ll find out you lead a productive life and you are able to tackle the most pressing things of the day. Yes, there will be times when you can’t get all your ‘priorities’ done.

It happens to the best of us but, just having those urgent responsibilities clearly defined and at the top of the list is one step to getting them done. So, do take it easy on yourself. I think the aim every day should be productivity; learning how to work smart and asking yourself those important questions outlined in the earlier part of the article.

Which step resonated with you the most? I would love to know, drop your thoughts in the comment section and let’s keep the conversation going.A

When you need to finish big, daunting projects, you need to make your list clear, concise, and specific . A big list can still feel difficult and endless, however, and sometimes you just need a little less structure in your day to feel creatively accomplished. That’s where a vague to-do list comes in.

How to Make Your To-Do List Doable

There’s no better feeling than checking something off your to-do list. Done! Finished! Mission…

The nice thing about a vague to-do list is that you can just re-use the same one every day you need it. You can also add to it as you go along. The idea is to keep as little structure as possible so you can just go through the items and pick something that you want, then add the details yourself. Adding those details requires you to think, and when you come up with a fun idea on the spot it feels a lot better than checking off a minor task. So what goes on a vague to-do list? Here’s an example:

  1. Learn a new, impressive trick.
  2. Pick a room in your house and do something to make it look better.
  3. Choose a web site in your bookmarks and complete one task related to it.
  4. Write anything.
  5. Think about food you’d like and complete a related task (e.g. find a recipe, make the food, make plans to go to a restaurant that serves it with friends).
  6. Take a trip to your bookshelf (virtual or otherwise).
  7. Open up a drawer in your home and decide what to do with what you find inside.
  8. Print something.
  9. Start moving.
  10. Think of things that scare you and do one of them.
  11. Spend five minutes alone and do whatever comes to your mind most often.

A vague list offer starting points, which is enough to get you thinking of ideas. When you’re thinking of ideas with a tiny bit of structure, you’ll consider what matters most. A vague list provides the option of picking a small or large task depending on the time available to you. There are no restrictions regarding order, and you can do as much or as little of the list as you want. When you need to get something specific done you can use a normal to-do list, or whatever method works best for you. When you just want to accomplish what matters to you in the present moment, leaving out the details makes a big difference.