How to add registry editor to control panel

Windows Registry is the heart and soul of the Microsoft Windows Operating system, Windows registry Editor available in every version of Windows since Windows 95. It is a database that stores a wide variety of configuration settings for the Windows Operating system and for applications, which enables developers to organize configuration data in ways that are impossible using other mechanisms, such as INI files, and this is behind of all Windows features and applications. Using registry editor you can tweak or customize windows and applications in ways that you can’t through the user interface. While installing any application windows consult the registry to figure out what to do with the file. Then it stores their settings, and configuration files in Registry Editor. There are many advanced settings are hidden in Registry Editor. Many of the options are exposed in the registry are not available elsewhere in windows.

The Registry Editor hasn’t changed a lot, but recently the latest Preview build for Windows 10 brought improvements to the registry editor. Registry Editor has an address bar, so you can navigate to the registry path easily by copying and pasting the path in the address bar. Also, there are a lot of customization options available to customize the registry editor. You can open registry editor in many ways like from the Run command or from windows search. In this article we are going to see how to add Registry Editor to Control panel.

Add Registry Editor to the control Panel

Note: Modifying the Registry is risky, and it causes irreversible damage to your OS Installation Follow the steps correctly. Friendly advice Before Modifying Registry Creating Restore Point is recommended.

Open Run command by pressing Windows + R and type Notepad. Copy-paste below mentioned script to the Notepad.

How to add registry editor to control panel

Now Save it has Add Registry Editor to control panel.reg on the desktop location. Double click on the registry file and you will get UAC pop up click on Yes, after that you will get one warning message as shown below give Yes and proceed.

To Remove Registry Editor from Control Panel:

Open Notepad and copy the below-mentioned Code and save it as Remove Registry Editor from control panel.reg

Double click and merge the registry file to remove.

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Windows 10 now uses Settings, but many people still prefer the Classic Control Panel. Old habits die hard, and that’s OK. In this tutorial, we show you how to add the Registry Editor (Regedit) to the classic Control Panel in Windows 10, 8, and 7.

TIP : Hard to fix Windows Problems? Repair/Restore Missing Windows OS Files Damaged by Malware with a few clicks

If you’d prefer to discover other ways to open the Registry Editor, see 5 Ways to Open Registry Editor in Windows.

Video tutorial:

Add Registry Editor To Control Panel.reg
Remove Registry Editor To Control Panel.reg (Default)

Double-click Add Registry Editor To Control Panel.reg or Remove Registry Editor To Control Panel.reg to add or remove Registry Editor from the Control Panel.

Click Yes when prompted by User Account Control.
Click Yes when prompted by Registry Editor.

Click OK when prompted by the Registry Editor.

This tweak is included as part of MajorGeeks Registry Tweaks.

Although Microsoft moved several options from Control Panel to the Windows Settings in Windows 10, the former still has a lot of settings that are not available in the latter. If you tend to use the Control Panel a lot, then you can add the Registry Editor to it so that you can use it without the Run prompt or Taskbar search box. It is useful when you need to run the Registry Editor frequently.

Registry Editor is a very handy tool, which comes with the system itself. You can open Registry Editor and make different changes as per your requirements. From changing default image editor in Windows 10 to enabling the Dark Mode, you can do every type of customization using Registry Editor.

In this post, we will show you how you can use Registry Editor to add Registry Editor to the Control Panel. However, you need to create a .reg file with Notepad or any other text editor.

How to add Registry Editor to Control Panel

To add Registry Editor to Control Panel, follow these steps-

  1. Search for notepad in the Taskbar search box.
  2. Click on the corresponding result to open Notepad.
  3. Paste the Registry values.
  4. Go to File
  5. Select Save As from the list.
  6. Select a location where you want to save.
  7. Type a name according to your desire.
  8. Enter .reg at the end of the name.
  9. Select All Files from the Save as type
  10. Click the Save
  11. Double-click on the file to run it.
  12. Select Yes button in the UAC prompt.
  13. Click the Yes button to confirm the addition.

Let’s delve into the steps in detail.

At first, open the Notepad on your computer. For that, search for “notepad” in the Taskbar search box and open the corresponding result. After that, paste the following texts in the Notepad window-

After that, click the File option from the menu and select Save As button. Now, you need to choose a location where you want to save the file, enter a name with .reg extension and choose All Files from the Save as type drop-down list.

After that, click the Save button. Now, you need to open the file to add values to the Registry Editor.

For that, double-click on the newly created .reg file, click the Yes button in the UAC prompt, and the same button in the next window to confirm the addition.

Now, open Control Panel to check if the Registry Editor is added or not. If everything goes correctly, you can see the Registry Editor in the Control Panel. You need to set the View by as Large icons to get the option in your Control Panel.

Author: MajorGeeks.Com
Date: 04/20/2020 10:05 PM
Size: 1 KB
License: Freeware
Requires: Win 10 / 8 / 7
Downloads: 1841 times
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Add Registry Editor to Control Panel in Windows contains the registry files to add or remove Registry Editor from the Classic Control Panel in Windows 10, 8, and 7.

If you’d prefer to discover other ways to open the Registry Editor, see 5 Ways to Open Registry Editor in Windows.

Download Add Registry Editor to Control Panel in Windows, and extract the two files.

Add Registry Editor To Control Panel.reg
Remove Registry Editor To Control Panel.reg (Default)

Double-click Add Registry Editor To Control Panel.reg or Remove Registry Editor To Control Panel.reg to add or remove Registry Editor from the Control Panel.

Click Yes when prompted by User Account Control.
Click Yes when prompted by Registry Editor.

Click OK when prompted by the Registry Editor.

Video tutorial:

This tweak is included as part of MajorGeeks Registry Tweaks.

Are you a person who has a lot of friends and are you a person who shares your computer with your friends then this post might be useful for you. Personal Privacy is very much important nowadays. you can keep your data safe in your computer without accessible for anyone. But if you are sharing your own computer or laptop to your friends keeping Data safe is not enough, you should limit the access for computer setting too. Windows 10 Settings app and Control Panel provide a wide range of settings such as User Accounts, Privacy, Security Settings, etc. which means anyone with access to your PC can modify these settings. Modifying these settings can give access to steal any private data and critical information from your computer. In Big organization these settings are blocked by default by IT admins, this post explains how to Enable or Disable Control Panel and windows 10 settings through various methods.

Method 1: Enable or Disable Control Panel and windows 10 settings using the Registry editor.

Method 2: Enable or Disable Control Panel and windows 10 settings using Group Policy Editor.

Note: Modifying the Registry is risky, and it causes irreversible damage to your OS Installation Follow the steps correctly. Friendly advice Before Modifying Registry Creating Restore Point is recommended.

Method 1: Enable or Disable Control Panel and windows 10 settings using Registry editor.

  • Press Windows + R to open the Run command and type Regedit to open the registry editor.

How to add registry editor to control panel

  • Navigate to the Following path, If you using falls creator Update version and above you can copy this path and directly enter in address bar

HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer

  • Right-click on the Explorer Folder and Create a New D-Word 32 Bit value.

How to add registry editor to control panel

  • Explorer then select New > DWORD (32-bit) value.
  • Name this newly created DWORD as NoControlPanel and hit Enter.

How to add registry editor to control panel

  • Double-click on the DWORD NoControlPanel and change it’s value to 1 then click OK.

How to add registry editor to control panelThen Navigate to the Following path and do the same steps Once again. HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer

  • Right-click on the Explorer Folder and Create a New D-Word 32 Bit value.
  • Explorer then select New > DWORD (32-bit) value.
  • Name this newly created DWORD as NoControlPanel and hit Enter.
  • Double-click on the DWORD NoControlPanel and change it’s value to 1 then click OK.
  • Once everything Done Reboot the PC Once to make it effective. After enabling it you can see the Control panel Icon, but you can’t Open it. It will Prompt an error Like this.

“This operation has been canceled due to restrictions in effect on this computer. Please contact your system administrator.” To revert Follow as Mentioned Below.

  • Press Windows + R to open Run command and type regedit to open the registry editor.
  • Then Navigate to the Following path and do the same steps Once again.

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer

  • Right-click on the Explorer Folder and Create a New D-Word 32 Bit value.
  • Explorer then select New > DWORD (32-bit) value.
  • Name this newly created DWORD as NoControlPanel and hit Enter.
  • Double-click on the DWORD NoControlPanel and change it’s value to 0 then click OK.

If you find any Difficulties in modifying the Registry Key. Download the Reg file to enable or disable the Control Panel. To Enable: Download Zip files here and save it on your desktop and right-click on the reg files to merge it. To Disable: Download Zip files here and save it on your desktop and right-click on the reg files to merge it.

Method 2: Using Group Policy Editor.

Method 2 doesn’t work for windows 10 Home users. This method is only applicable for Windows 10 Pro, Education, and Enterprise Edition. If you are a win10 Home user follow Method 1.

  • Press Windows Key + R then type gpedit.msc and hit Enter.

How to add registry editor to control panelNavigate to the following location: User Configuration > Administrative Templates > Control Panel

  • Make sure to select Control Panel then in the right window pane double-click on “Prohibit access to Control Panel and PC settings” policy.

How to add registry editor to control panel

  • Select “Enabled” under policy settings then click Apply followed by OK.

How to add registry editor to control panel

  • Reboot your PC to save changes.
  • Once everything Done Reboot the PC Once to make it effective. After enabling it you can see the Control panel Icon, but you can’t Open it. It will Prompt an error Like this.

“This operation has been canceled due to restrictions in effect on this computer. Please contact your system administrator.” To revert Follow as Mentioned Below.

  • Press Windows Key + R then type gpedit.msc and hit Enter.

Navigate to the following location: User Configuration > Administrative Templates > Control Panel

  • Make sure to select Control Panel then in the right window pane double-click on “Prohibit access to Control Panel and PC settings” policy.
  • Select “Disabled” under policy settings then click Apply followed by OK.
  • Reboot your PC to save changes.

How to add registry editor to control panel

If you use the Control Panel a lot, you may find it helpful to add it right to the “This PC” section of Windows’ File Explorer window. Here’s how to do it.

Though many important Windows controls are now part of the new settings interface in Windows 10, the old Control Panel is still around and still important. We’ve shown you how you can add it to your taskbar for quick access, but if you want, you can also have it appear in your File Explorer window with nothing but a mild Registry hack.

Add Control Panel to the File Explorer Window by Editing the Registry Manually

To add Control Panel to the “This PC” section of File Explorer—or the “My Computer” section of Windows Explorer if you’re running Windows 7—you just need to add one new key to the Windows Registry.

Standard warning: Registry Editor is a powerful tool and misusing it can render your system unstable or even inoperable. This is a pretty simple hack and as long as you stick to the instructions, you shouldn’t have any problems. That said, if you’ve never worked with it before, consider reading about how to use the Registry Editor before you get started. And definitely back up the Registry (and your computer!) before making changes.

Open the Registry Editor by hitting Start and typing “regedit.” Press Enter to open Registry Editor and give it permission to make changes to your PC.

How to add registry editor to control panel

In the Registry Editor, use the left sidebar to navigate to the following key:

How to add registry editor to control panel

Next, you’re going to create a new key inside the NameSpace key. Right-click the NameSpace key and choose New > Key. The name you give the new key depends on the view you want Control Panel to open with. If you want Control Panel to open in the default Category view, name the new key with the following text:

If you want Control Panel to open in icon view, name the new key with this text instead:

How to add registry editor to control panel

And you can now close Registry Editor. You won’t need to create any additional keys or values. Test the changes by firing up File Explorer and heading to “This PC.” If you already had a File Explorer window open, you may need to refresh it by hitting F5. You can also drag the new Control item to the Quick Access section of the navigation pane to pin it there.

How to add registry editor to control panel

If you ever want to reverse the changes, just head back into the Registry and delete the new key you created. This will remove Control Panel from the “This PC” section of File Explorer. Just note that if you pinned Control Panel to the Quick Access section, it will remain there—and be fully functional—until you remove it by right-clicking and choose “Unpin from Quick Access.”

How to add registry editor to control panel

Download Our One-Click Registry Hacks

How to add registry editor to control panel

If you don’t feel like diving into the Registry yourself, we’ve created some a couple of Registry hacks you can use. The “Add Control Panel Category View to File Explorer” and “Add Control Panel Icon View to File Explorer” hacks create the new keys you need to add Control Panel in either category or icon view. The “Remove Control Panel from File Explorer (Default)” hack deletes those keys, restoring the default. Both hacks are included in the following ZIP file. Double-click the one you want to use and click through the prompts. When you’ve applied the hack you want, restart your computer (or log off and back on).

These hacks are really just the new key we created in the previous section, exported to a .REG file. And if you enjoy fiddling with the Registry, it’s worth taking the time to learn how to make your own Registry hacks.

The Control Panel in Windows is one of the most useful tools on your desktop. To make it even easier to get there, you can add it to your right-click menu from anywhere with a simple tweak to your registry.

As tips site How-To Geek explains, you can add any program to your right-click menu with a very simple registry addition. While this process will work for anything, we’ll go through the steps for adding a shortcut to Control Panel:

  1. Open the Start menu and type “Regedit” to launch the registry editor. Click Yes to give it permission to edit your system.
  2. Navigate to HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\Background\shell
  3. Right-click “shell” and choose New > Key. Name it Control Panel (or the name of the app you want to add).
  4. Right-click the new “Control Panel” folder and choose New > Key. Name this one “command”.
  5. Click “command” in the left-hand panel.
  6. Double-click “Default” in the right-hand panel.
  7. Enter the following in the box that reads “Value data”: rundll32.exe shell32.dll,Control_RunDLL

You should now have a link to Control Panel in your right-click menu immediately. This will show up when you right-click on the desktop or in Explorer, though it might not work in every program. If you want to adapt this to add other shortcuts, simply change the name in step 3, and paste the path to the program you want to add in step 7. If you don’t want to edit your registry manually, How-To Geek has some simple registry hacks you can run to automatically add or remove Control Panel to your context menu at the source link below.

Author: MajorGeeks.Com
Date: 04/19/2020 10:00 PM
Size: 1 KB
License: Freeware
Requires: Win 10 / 8 / 7
Downloads: 2454 times
[ Comments Screenshots ]

TIP : Click Here to Repair/Restore Missing Windows Files

[email protected]
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Report a Bad Link

Add Group Policy Editor to Control Panel in Windows contains the registry files to add Group Policy Editor to the classic Control Panel in Windows 10, 8, and 7.

Windows 10 home does not include Group Policy Editor, but you can Enable Group Policy Editor (gpedit.msc) in Windows 10 Home Edition. If you have Windows 10 Home, please enable Group Policy Editor first.

Download Add Group Policy Editor to Control Panel in Windows and extract the two files.

Add Local Group Policy Editor To Control Panel.reg
Remove Local Group Policy Editor To Control Panel.reg (Default)

Double-click Add Local Group Policy Editor To Control Panel.reg or Remove Local Group Policy Editor To Control Panel.reg to Add or Remove Sleep in Windows 10 Power Menu.

Click Yes when prompted by User Account Control.
Click Yes when prompted by Registry Editor.

Click OK when prompted by the Registry Editor.

Video tutorial:

This tweak is included as part of MajorGeeks Registry Tweaks.

This article is intended for advanced users, administrators, and IT Professionals.

Importing Registration Entries (.reg) files is a feature of Regedit.exe and is not supported by Regedt32.exe. You can use Regedit.exe to make some changes to the registry on a Windows NT 4.0-based or Windows 2000-based computer, but some changes require Regedt32.exe. For example, you cannot add or change REG_EXPAND_SZ or REG_MULTI_SZ values with Regedit.exe on a Windows NT 4.0-based or Windows 2000-based computer. Regedt32.exe is the primary Registry Editor for Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000. If you must use Regedt32.exe, you cannot use Registration Entries (.reg) files to modify the registry. For more information about the differences between Regedit.exe and Regedt32.exe, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

141377 Differences between Regedit.exe and Regedt32.exe

IN THIS TASK

Summary

Important This section, method, or task contains steps that tell you how to modify the registry. However, serious problems might occur if you modify the registry incorrectly. Therefore, make sure that you follow these steps carefully. For added protection, back up the registry before you modify it. Then, you can restore the registry if a problem occurs. For more information about how to back up and restore the registry, click the following article number to view the article in the Microsoft Knowledge Base:

322756 How to back up and restore the registry in Windows This step-by-step article describes how to add, modify, or delete registry subkeys and values by using a Registration Entries (.reg) file. Regedit.exe uses .reg files to import and export registry subkeys and values. You can use these .reg files to remotely distribute registry changes to several Windows-based computers. When you run a .reg file, the file contents merge into the local registry. Therefore, you must distribute .reg files with caution.

A .reg file has the following syntax:

RegistryEditorVersion
Blank line
[ RegistryPath1]

” DataItemName1“=” DataType1: DataValue1”
DataItemName2“=” DataType2: DataValue2”
Blank line
[ RegistryPath2]

” DataItemName3“=” DataType3: DataValue3“

RegistryEditorVersion is either “Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00” for Windows 2000, Windows XP, and Windows Server 2003, or “REGEDIT4” for Windows 98 and Windows NT 4.0. The “REGEDIT4” header also works on Windows 2000-based, Windows XP-based, and Windows Server 2003-based computers.

Blank line is a blank line. This identifies the start of a new registry path. Each key or subkey is a new registry path. If you have several keys in your .reg file, blank lines can help you to examine and to troubleshoot the contents.

RegistryPathx is the path of the subkey that holds the first value you are importing. Enclose the path in square brackets, and separate each level of the hierarchy by a backslash. For example:

[ HKEY_LOCAL_ MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\System] A .reg file can contain several registry paths. If the bottom of the hierarchy in the path statement does not exist in the registry, a new subkey is created. The contents of the registry files are sent to the registry in the order you enter them. Therefore, if you want to create a new subkey with another subkey below it, you must enter the lines in the correct order.

DataItemNamex is the name of the data item that you want to import. If a data item in your file does not exist in the registry, the .reg file adds it (with the value of the data item). If a data item does exist, the value in your .reg file overwrites the existing value. Quotation marks enclose the name of the data item. An equal sign (=) immediately follows the name of the data item.