How to advance your career (and the big mistakes you may be making)

How to advance your career (and the big mistakes you may be making)

Do you think of yourself as a perfectionist? You’re not alone. Based on my completely unscientific observations, it seems like a lot of people do—myself included. And I’ve never considered it a bad thing—in fact, I prided myself on it until very recently.

Last week, I had the opportunity to hear Marilyn Tam, PhD, speak at the opening session of the National Career Development Association’s annual conference. With a career that spans working as a child laborer in Hong Kong to being the CEO of Aveda Corp., I was ready to be inspired by Dr. Tam’s story. Really, I was ready for her to tell me that being meticulous and working hard was what got her ahead.

And in a way, that’s what she said. It just didn’t really come out that way.

Dr. Tam explained that, throughout her career, she’s followed four life and work principles that have guided her to success (they’re actually outlined in her book, How to Use What You’ve Got to Get What You Want). She started with, “Tell the truth all the time” and “Make partners,” but it was her third principle that really surprised me.

“Make big mistakes.”

To paraphrase, you should (obviously) try to avoid small mistakes, which indicate carelessness. But if you’re making no mistakes and striving for perfection all the time? That just means you’re playing it safe. Big mistakes, on the other hand, are the good stuff. Or, in her own words:

Small mistakes are the thoughtless things we all do when we’re not paying attention… On the other hand, big, planned, highly organized mistakes are valuable… Making big mistakes is the occasional byproduct of making big strides. Big mistakes can only occur when you’ve planned and thought things through. If your carefully laid plan turns out to be a mistake, it may cost you. But it will also give you exactly the information you need to modify your strategy or change your course. You learn, you adjust, and you come back with a stronger, more impactful strategy that works. In the long run, big mistakes are the best feedback we ever get. The most successful people in life are those who make the best use of their mistakes.

So, how do you translate this into your own day-to-day thinking—especially if you’re a perfectionist? Understand that making big mistakes isn’t anti-perfectionism. In fact, it is completely in line with it. Dr. Tam doesn’t advocate for recklessness—she sees big mistakes as evidence of methodically made plans. So, make sure that’s the case. Take comfort that while big mistakes are indeed about being ambitious and taking risks, they’re also about being thorough, making contingency plans, and getting feedback.

In fact, Dr. Tam’s last principle was, “Die by your own sword,” which further supported the notion you should fight for your ideas, especially if you’ve done the legwork and research to support them.

In the end, I got it. It’s all the same—being a perfectionist, making big mistakes, dying by your own sword—it’s about being stubborn when you know you’re on to something good. In other words, if you want to “use what you’ve got to get what you want,” nothing beats work hard and persistence. Take it from Dr. Tam.

Photo of arrow courtesy of Shutterstock.

How to advance your career (and the big mistakes you may be making)

Lily Zhang is a career counselor at the MIT Media Lab, where she works with a range of students from AI experts to interaction designers on crafting their own unique career paths. When she’s not indulging in a new book or video game, she’s thinking about, talking about, or writing about careers. You can find her on LinkedIn, Twitter, and her website.

When you’ve chosen the wrong career or romantic partner.

Posted May 23, 2019

How to advance your career (and the big mistakes you may be making)

One of a prestigious university’s brightest and nicest students got tired of engineering and so, because he’s good at school, went back to school: law school. Now he’s a corporate lawyer and hates it.

The same guy had a wonderful girlfriend in college: pretty, smart, kind, well-adjusted, headed for career success. He broke up with her after graduation and married someone sexier. Soon after the rice had been cleaned up, and especially after they had two kids, he said, “She is so cruel to me. There are grains of truth in what she says about me but she magnifies my every error and weakness to cause me maximum pain and, in turn, get brownie points for herself.”

When asked, “Why not divorce her, go back to engineering, or combine your law and engineering expertise and do intellectual property law?” he yes-butted. So despite being brilliant and a great guy, he’s now committed himself to a lifetime of professional and personal misery.

We’re all subject to commitment bias. We commit to a career or spouse, and, understandably, it’s scary to change. It’s been said that the only person who likes change is a wet baby.

Sure, people change careers and people divorce, but at the risk of being contrarian, I don’t think they do it enough.

Think of all the miserable couples who stay together only for the kids. Now really, is that enough of a reason to endure a lifetime of misery? Even for the kid, it may be better to grow up with a peaceful single parent than a fire-breathing couple. And think of all the people who stay together out of inertia—That’s even a sillier reason. And now think of all the couples who stay together for fear of an endless, bloody, expensive legal battle. Now, there’s a reason to stay together.

But seriously, so often couples, even before they marry, know that the union ain’t made in heaven. It’s barely above ground and that’s before they start taking each other for granted, let alone the Promethean-boulder burden of having kids. Your freedom and energy go bye-bye: Kids first and foremost! Unless your relationship is hella strong, wouldn’t the God or Goddess within you say, “Break free!?”

Same with career. Compensation for all but the top 10 percent is shaky now, with the future shakier still thanks to accelerating automation and short-term contract work, which increasing replaces job security and its monthly fat check auto-deposited ka-ching, ka-ching. The replacement: dots and dashes with varying spaces in between. So you better put yourself in a career and with an employer where you are likely to be in that top 10 percent, okay, top quarter. That’s your best insurance for having a contented work life and not having to eat ramen and cat food.

As usual, the way to cope with the fear of a big change is baby steps, low-risk baby steps. No one’s asking you to leave your spouse or live-in partner tomorrow. Privately, list the pros and cons of staying together. Show and discuss it with a trusted friend or relative. Picture your next years single or with a likely replacement versus with your spouse. If leaving still feels good, have a weekend away with a platonic friend and see how it feels being without your spouse. Then maybe try a week. If that’s pushing you further out the door, have a conversation with your partner about the wisdom of a trial separation, perhaps a month. You get the point.

And if you do decide to split permanently, puhleeze try, really try, to let your statesman self tamp down your vindictive self and see if the two of you can work out a divorce agreement with a mediator. Lawyers too often inflame the situation thereby inflating their fee.

Same story in evaluating a career change. Play around on mynextmove.org or my book, Careers for Dummies and see what careers emerge. Compare those with options you already were considering. Then Google-search one or more prospective careers to get more info—videos can be particularly instructive. Then perhaps job-shadow someone in that career. Check out what’s involved in retraining: Do you need another degree or would a few online courses on LinkedIn Learning or Udemy be enough to make you viable for a first job in your new career.

I reiterate that I am well aware of how difficult it is to contemplate making a major life change—I resist changing even my seat at the dinner table! But if a clear-eyed look at your life suggests it’s worth investigating a change of career or relationship, at least take that first, low-risk baby step. Until you’ve taken a lot of those steps, you can always turn around.

How to advance your career (and the big mistakes you may be making)

Oct 22, 2019 · 6 min read

The best way to deal with a mistake is to avoid making it in the first place. Though we don’t make mistake intentionally and we know that they are evitable but it doesn’t mean that you become so carefree towards everything we do. There are some mistakes we make and think after making them that this mistake could easily be avoided if we paid a little extra concentration in what we were doing.

How to advance your career (and the big mistakes you may be making)

So, how can you stop yourse l f by making mistakes or can decrease the probability of making the most of the time? There are some effective strategies for this and by applying them in work life, I am sure that the count of the daily mistakes you make at work can be reduced.

I still remember the moment when I used to work in a consultancy firm and I mistakenly sent an email filled with the files of confidential data of our client to another client because their names were the same. It was my first week of working there when I did that and felt so much embarrassed as the data was so crucial for our client and had to apologize from many ends: from my boss, client of which I sent data and from the client to which I emailed by mistake.

Mistakes are part of our life. We all make them, especially at our work. We all have made such mistakes on which we mulled over for lack of attention and our silliness. One of the key importance of mistakes in our life we all know is that we actually learn from our mistakes and they lead us towards better consequences when we do our task after having a bad experience we learned from our mistakes. But if someone is repeated then it is not something encouraging. Some mistakes can lead us towards bad performance turning into a hindrance in our successful career. So it is important to avoid them as much as possible by making ourselves more concerned about our work.

Some of the simplest 10 ways to avoid making mistakes at your workplace are:

Do one job at a time. Although multitasking is sometimes considered a good thing. It does affect our job by keeping us distracted. If you keep jumping back and forth between many tasks then there are more chances of mistakes in any one of them or more worse in all of them. Because at the end of the day, getting a single job done with perfection is better than doing many jobs with many errors in them.

2. LEARN FROM OTHER’S MISTAKES

Before starting any new project, try to ask some colleagues to get to know if they have done that kind of project before and can share their experience and mistakes from which they learned. No matter how you, learning from the mistakes of others is always important. Try to take notes of the important things your colleagues tell you to avoid and try to apply them during your project. In short, pay attention to learn from what they did wrong and what right.

3. KEEP YOUR RESEARCH UPDATED

In this fast-growing world, everything keeps evolving. No matter how well you know about your given task always make your research before starting it. Learning from your trials and errors are now old-school thoughts if you do it wrong that means you didn’t have your research right as now almost everything can be found on the internet.

4. ASK QUESTIONS & CLEAR ALL YOUR DOUBTS

Try to make yourself crystal clear about the given task by asking as much as questions you need to understand the given task. The main reason that we normally find errors in our work is that either we are too afraid to ask or our ego doesn’t let us ask the most important questions about the given work. Don’t think about what my boss will think if I ask this. If you aren’t sure about the next step to be taken in your task you can also ask your seniors for directions. This will help you in getting clarity about your next steps to be taken.

There’s a reason that breaks exist. If you indulge yourself in the nonstop working schedule where you cannot even find out some time to a take break and chill then there are chances that you are ruining your physical health.

Harvard Business Review writes: “Overwork may hasten the aging-related decline in memory and thinking skills, according to a long-term study of British civil servants.”

Too much work can harm your brain and when your brain will not work in the right way then you are certainly going to make mistakes. Try to ease your stress response, interact with your colleagues, and connect with your friends or family or anything that makes you happy for a break from work.

To keep the track of all your steps you have to do to complete your task, make the checklist. This will help you whether you have completed all the procedures or any one of them is remaining that you skipped mistakenly. This will also help you to review the final work.

Often we make mistakes because we were working on a tight deadline and we didn’t give ourselves even time to proofread or review. Don’t ever send forward your work without proofreading or reviewing it. This often feels irritating but it is as important as that.

This is my personal experience that whenever I work in tight deadlines, I am most probably going to make a few mistakes in my work. Try to manage your time in such a way that you don’t have to do work in a great rush or with a pressure of time running out. If you think that the deadline is too short for you to work then try to ask for some more time from your boss at that exact time when your task is given to you. In this way, you will have enough time to work without pressure and stress which will lead you towards your work without any error.

Even you have given your best in reviewing and proofreading your work still there are chances of minor mistakes. So try to get a second eye, especially from the one who is seniors from you and you think that has enough experience of the work that you have done. Getting the other set of eyes to check any mistakes will be quite helpful.

10. BE CLEAR OF YOUR ROLE IN THE ORGANIZATION

Be clear about your role and position in the organization. Always try to be sure about your roles and responsibilities in the organization. If you are not sure about your role in the organization then you are certainly going to make big mistakes. When you know what and how you are supposed to do your work exactly then things get much easier at work.

After all the above-mentioned ways of avoiding mistakes at work, keep in mind that we are humans and mistakes are inevitable. Our mistakes let us learn from our bad experience and if we know how to cope well with our mistakes and what we learn from them is where you know how to avoid them in the future. I mostly write about technology and how it is affecting our lifestyles in all the best possible ways. I have previously written about the internet and its providers mainly, Viasat Exede, HughesNet, and Xfinity

How to advance your career (and the big mistakes you may be making)

I know what you’re thinking: Isn’t the point of reading advice-based articles online to avoid major mistakes?

But sometimes, lessons don’t really stick unless you experience that mistake—and all the consequences that result from it—first hand.

At least, that’s what I’ve experienced so far in my career. I’ve made some pretty big mistakes—but each one has taught me something extremely valuable that I probably wouldn’t have truly internalized if I’d just read about it from someone else’s perspective. And each was enough of a reality check for me to make sure I never made the same blunder again.

So, if you’re going to make mistakes in your career, make these three—but only once.

Mistake #1: Overpromising and Underdelivering

If you’re new to the professional world (and really, even if you’re not), it’s pretty likely that you want to impress your boss, clients, and co-workers—and you’ll do almost anything to prove your worth.

I was in that place a few years ago, as a manager at a cleaning and concierge service startup that was launching into the commercial cleaning space. We were thrilled when we were contacted by a large law firm interested in our janitorial services—but when I visited the offices to give an estimate, I knew that our small and minimally experienced team couldn’t realistically handle the job. (Seriously, the office was enormous.)

But, I was eager to please. Eager to please my boss with a huge new contract, and eager to please this potential client, who promised to recommend us to all of its large-office friends. So, to make sure we landed the deal, I raved to the client about how meticulous, detail-oriented, and reliable our employees were. I oversold the startup’s experience in commercial cleaning—by a long shot.

It only took a couple weeks for the law office to figure out we couldn’t deliver what we’d promised. Our teams spent far too long at the office each night (which meant we were losing money), and even still, complaints about the things we’d overlooked—from still-dusty shelves to toilet paper that hadn’t been restocked—skyrocketed.

Needless to say, we lost the contract.

If you, like me, make the mistake of overpromising (and not coming through) once, you’ll never make it again. I learned that it’s far better to be completely realistic about what you can offer, whether it’s to a client, your boss, or your team. Then, the only risk you run is doing even better than you promised and completely thrilling your customers, manager, or colleagues—which is a whole lot better than than disappointing them.

Mistake #2: Going Into an Interview Unprepared

About a year ago, I was in the running for an internal move at my company into a different department. I made it through two rounds of interviews before they told me there would be one final meeting with the senior VP of the department. The recruiter I was working with was super casual about the whole thing, so I assumed it was more of a meet-and-greet than a true, formal interview.

So it caught me a little off guard when the SVP launched into full-force questioning mode the minute I sat down in her office. “What makes you think you’re qualified for this position?” she fired. “What’s the biggest opportunity this department isn’t taking advantage of? What’s a critique you would give to a recent project that we’ve done?”

I looked at her in silence (and utter embarrassment) as I searched for a semi-coherent answer. Since I hadn’t done any research or asked good questions in my prior interviews, I had no idea how to respond.

Take it from me: Nothing will get you in interview-ready shape as quickly as showing up unprepared just once. My experience was terribly embarrassing (and I definitely didn’t get the job), but it knocked some serious sense into me about how to prepare for interviews. Since then, I’d never approach an interview—no matter how casual it may seem—as just a “meet and greet.”

Mistake #3: Turning Down an Opportunity Because You’re Scared

There are plenty of times you may be tempted to turn down an extra project or opportunity because you’re swamped with work already and can’t possibly take on something else. I get it.

But there are also times when, if you dig a bit deeper into your intentions, that you find that you’re actually turning it down because you’re not sure if you can do it and you’re afraid to fail.

Several months ago, I was given the opportunity to take on a new team as part of a special project initiated by my company’s executive team. I was pinpointed as a possible leader and was asked if I was interested in taking on the challenge.

Honestly, it terrified me. I felt comfortable in my current role, wasn’t sure if I’d be successful in the new role, and, overall, felt like it was a safer bet to just stay where I was. It was only after I turned it down that it really hit me how much of an opportunity I’d missed. Here was my opportunity to advance—quickly—and prove to the entire C-suite that I could be a leader. And I missed it because I was scared.

Do that once, and I promise you’ll never do it again. Sure, you may evaluate a role, project, or opportunity and decide it’s truly not right for you or your career goals (and that’s fine)—but you’ll certainly never turn anything down for the sole reason that you’re scared of failing. Because often, you’ll find the risk is worth the reward.

Are career blunders embarrassing? Yes. But are they valuable tools to help you improve as a professional, build confidence, and advance your career? Absolutely. So don’t just take it from me—experience some mistakes (with a bit of caution, of course) and learn for yourself.

This article was originally published on The Daily Muse.

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    5 Ways to Move on After Making a Huge Mistake

    There’s that moment when you realize you made a huge mistake. How do you recover? How do you move forward after such a screwup?

    How to advance your career (and the big mistakes you may be making)

    There’s that moment when you realize you made a huge mistake.

    OK, take a little time to absorb what you did (or didn’t do). But a very little time because the truth is, there are no mistakes, just choices. There is a reason you made that choice — although you may not know it yet. It wasn’t random or an accident, though.

    That choice you made doesn’t require you to go to battle with yourself. That choice or action came from an unacknowledged part of you and was the right one for you in the moment. Maybe you just don’t see how yet.

    So wherever you are in life, value the journey. Even if where you are is the result of what you now see as the biggest mistake of your life. Be where you are, now, in this moment, on this journey. The steps behind you were already taken, and the steps to come are potential waiting to happen. Bring the fullness of this moment into that future.

    Here are some ways to find value in this moment of your journey when you are living with the consequences of a choice or action you’re tempted to view as a mistake:

    1. Appreciate your opportunity to come to know those instincts that caused you to make that decision or take those actions. Appreciate those instincts. While you’re at it, expand your circle of appreciation to include yourself, your family, your friends, your dog or cat, your home, that beautiful flower outside your door, the sun on the water, the fact that you’re alive.

    2. This is a step in your journey. Remember that you’ll see choices or actions in a different way from the vantage point of a place further along your path.

    3. Remember that your journey continues and what you experience in this moment enriches your next moment. Be fully present in it, and take the fullness of the moment forward with you. Every moment of experience gives you more information and knowledge and insight and experience and know-how to use as you continue your journey. Every step makes you who you are.

    4. Think about how you’d like to use the next moment of your life and whatever it brings. Or where you’d next like to place your foot as you continue on your path.

    5. Steps. It’s all about steps. Keep walking that path. Sure, stop to reflect from time to time. Stop to smell the flowers. Enjoy your companions along the way. But continue your journey, and let your “mistakes” contribute positively to it.

    Life is a journey, and our achievements and our mistakes are all steps on the path, all make us who we are, create the moment we are in and can positively influence the rest of our journey if we let them.

    Please share on social media if you found this post helpful. Like this column? Sign up to subscribe to email alerts and you’ll never miss a post.

    Reach your potential by embracing your personality and plotting a new course. Join our free newsletter to take the Leadership for Introverts Test and start building your skills.

    The gist: Humor is a great psychological tool to get and keeping people on your side. Use it wisely, and use it often—especially when you screw up.

    Everyone makes mistakes. But what makes one mistake forgivable and another not?

    You’ve probably seen plenty of instances where big mistakes were ignored. Or the opposite—seemingly insignificant mistakes are blown out of proportion.

    “How does that happen? Where’s the justice?” you might ask yourself.

    You may not realize, though, that when you make a mistake, the way it’s received by everyone around you almost completely depends on how you react to it.

    During the 2014 mid-term elections, Tom Brokaw, a world-famous news reporter, made what would have been a career-limiting mistake on-air.

    The next day, every media outlet in America was talking about it. But instead of criticizing or making fun of him, they were laughing it off with the air of forgiveness.

    How did Brokaw turn his massive flub—what would could have been a career-ending move for any rookie reporter—into an endearing news story? And how can you use the same psychological principle to magically recover the next time you find yourself in the same situation?

    How to advance your career (and the big mistakes you may be making)

    How Humor Can Save Your Career

    Americans love their TV, but there’s one day they love it more than any other: election day! Once every two years, even the most die-hard TV haters—myself included—tune in for one big night of news on who’ll be elected to what offices and which big ballot measures will be passed or defeated.

    It’s a serious day, and all the news networks bring out their most popular reporters to cover the night’s events. This year, MSNBC brought out the biggest name they have: Tom Brokaw.

    Brokaw is discussing the latest poll results with a panel of anchors when a loud, obnoxious alarm starts to sound. For the first few seconds, they all ignore it. Then, they start looking confusedly at each other. Finally, Brokaw asks, “Could that be me?” before sheepishly realizing the phone in his pocket is the culprit.

    A less experienced news anchor might quickly turn the phone off and pretend like nothing happened (even though everyone knows). They might be deeply embarrassed and apologize profusely before rambling through the rest of the show, thrown off by the flub.

    Everyone will forgive them temporarily in order to get on with the show, but you can be sure they’ll get a dressing down once the cameras are off.

    Brokaw knew better. His years of experience told him to do something different. Watch how he handles the situation:

    Let’s recap what we just saw:

    1. First, Brokaw is clearly shocked when he realizes the sound is coming from his phone.
    2. Next, he pulls the phone out to silence it and acknowledges he made a mistake.
    3. Rather than end on a sour note, though, he takes the next step and turns it into a joke by pretending it’s his wife calling to remind him to pick up the milk and feed the dog.

    When the incident begins, you can see the other hosts laughing nervously. By the end, though, they—and the whole set crew—are honestly cracking up. Finally, he gives a quick apology and gets right back to business.

    Fast talking comedians excel at this. They mess up their lines all the time, but the crowd still loves them because they can laugh their way through it. For an example, watch any episode of The Colbert Report or Robin Williams doing stand up.

    For any host without a sense of humor, the headlines the next day would have read something like, “News host makes a fool of himself in front of the nation.” But Brokaw received none of that. Instead of laughing at or pitying him, everyone who picked up the story focused on how funny the way he handled it was. His humor became more important than the mistake.

    Brokaw is respected enough these days he can probably do anything he wants on TV and get away with it, but had he handled that situation the same way when he was younger, he’d likely be able to say, “Humor saved my career.”

    4 Steps to Recover From a Flub With Humor

    The next time you find yourself staring out at a crowd of people who just saw you make a huge mistake—and they know it was a mistake—don’t ignore it. Don’t try to cover it up. Don’t nervously apologize over and over, dwelling on it and making yourself look like a schmuck.

    Instead, remember everyone watching wants you to succeed. They’re confused right now, but you can win them back—and even endear them to you—if you act quickly. Just follow the Tom Brokaw Method:

    1. Acknowledge the mistake. There’s no hiding it now. Everyone saw!
    2. Correct the mistake. If it’s necessary, make whatever correction you need to get things back on track.
    3. Make a joke. Make fun of yourself. Get everyone laughing and they won’t care anymore.
    4. Move on! And don’t bring up your flub again until you’re totally in the clear.

    Here’s an example:

    I’m a highly distracted walker. When I’m walking around, I love looking at everything except what’s right in front of me. The world is just so interesting. As a result, I’m prone to falling down and running into things.

    When this happens, I like to face everyone who saw and give a deep bow as if to thank them for watching my performance. This way, they spend less time worrying if I’m hurt or thinking I’m a dummy and more time laughing at the funny guy.

    Humor is one of the best psychological tools you have for getting and keeping people on your side. Use it wisely, and use it often—especially when you screw up.

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    The Systems Course is the most efficient and practical training available for busy professionals who want to do more of their best work and worry less about dropping balls.

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    How to advance your career (and the big mistakes you may be making)

    Oct 22, 2019 · 6 min read

    The best way to deal with a mistake is to avoid making it in the first place. Though we don’t make mistake intentionally and we know that they are evitable but it doesn’t mean that you become so carefree towards everything we do. There are some mistakes we make and think after making them that this mistake could easily be avoided if we paid a little extra concentration in what we were doing.

    How to advance your career (and the big mistakes you may be making)

    So, how can you stop yourse l f by making mistakes or can decrease the probability of making the most of the time? There are some effective strategies for this and by applying them in work life, I am sure that the count of the daily mistakes you make at work can be reduced.

    I still remember the moment when I used to work in a consultancy firm and I mistakenly sent an email filled with the files of confidential data of our client to another client because their names were the same. It was my first week of working there when I did that and felt so much embarrassed as the data was so crucial for our client and had to apologize from many ends: from my boss, client of which I sent data and from the client to which I emailed by mistake.

    Mistakes are part of our life. We all make them, especially at our work. We all have made such mistakes on which we mulled over for lack of attention and our silliness. One of the key importance of mistakes in our life we all know is that we actually learn from our mistakes and they lead us towards better consequences when we do our task after having a bad experience we learned from our mistakes. But if someone is repeated then it is not something encouraging. Some mistakes can lead us towards bad performance turning into a hindrance in our successful career. So it is important to avoid them as much as possible by making ourselves more concerned about our work.

    Some of the simplest 10 ways to avoid making mistakes at your workplace are:

    Do one job at a time. Although multitasking is sometimes considered a good thing. It does affect our job by keeping us distracted. If you keep jumping back and forth between many tasks then there are more chances of mistakes in any one of them or more worse in all of them. Because at the end of the day, getting a single job done with perfection is better than doing many jobs with many errors in them.

    2. LEARN FROM OTHER’S MISTAKES

    Before starting any new project, try to ask some colleagues to get to know if they have done that kind of project before and can share their experience and mistakes from which they learned. No matter how you, learning from the mistakes of others is always important. Try to take notes of the important things your colleagues tell you to avoid and try to apply them during your project. In short, pay attention to learn from what they did wrong and what right.

    3. KEEP YOUR RESEARCH UPDATED

    In this fast-growing world, everything keeps evolving. No matter how well you know about your given task always make your research before starting it. Learning from your trials and errors are now old-school thoughts if you do it wrong that means you didn’t have your research right as now almost everything can be found on the internet.

    4. ASK QUESTIONS & CLEAR ALL YOUR DOUBTS

    Try to make yourself crystal clear about the given task by asking as much as questions you need to understand the given task. The main reason that we normally find errors in our work is that either we are too afraid to ask or our ego doesn’t let us ask the most important questions about the given work. Don’t think about what my boss will think if I ask this. If you aren’t sure about the next step to be taken in your task you can also ask your seniors for directions. This will help you in getting clarity about your next steps to be taken.

    There’s a reason that breaks exist. If you indulge yourself in the nonstop working schedule where you cannot even find out some time to a take break and chill then there are chances that you are ruining your physical health.

    Harvard Business Review writes: “Overwork may hasten the aging-related decline in memory and thinking skills, according to a long-term study of British civil servants.”

    Too much work can harm your brain and when your brain will not work in the right way then you are certainly going to make mistakes. Try to ease your stress response, interact with your colleagues, and connect with your friends or family or anything that makes you happy for a break from work.

    To keep the track of all your steps you have to do to complete your task, make the checklist. This will help you whether you have completed all the procedures or any one of them is remaining that you skipped mistakenly. This will also help you to review the final work.

    Often we make mistakes because we were working on a tight deadline and we didn’t give ourselves even time to proofread or review. Don’t ever send forward your work without proofreading or reviewing it. This often feels irritating but it is as important as that.

    This is my personal experience that whenever I work in tight deadlines, I am most probably going to make a few mistakes in my work. Try to manage your time in such a way that you don’t have to do work in a great rush or with a pressure of time running out. If you think that the deadline is too short for you to work then try to ask for some more time from your boss at that exact time when your task is given to you. In this way, you will have enough time to work without pressure and stress which will lead you towards your work without any error.

    Even you have given your best in reviewing and proofreading your work still there are chances of minor mistakes. So try to get a second eye, especially from the one who is seniors from you and you think that has enough experience of the work that you have done. Getting the other set of eyes to check any mistakes will be quite helpful.

    10. BE CLEAR OF YOUR ROLE IN THE ORGANIZATION

    Be clear about your role and position in the organization. Always try to be sure about your roles and responsibilities in the organization. If you are not sure about your role in the organization then you are certainly going to make big mistakes. When you know what and how you are supposed to do your work exactly then things get much easier at work.

    After all the above-mentioned ways of avoiding mistakes at work, keep in mind that we are humans and mistakes are inevitable. Our mistakes let us learn from our bad experience and if we know how to cope well with our mistakes and what we learn from them is where you know how to avoid them in the future. I mostly write about technology and how it is affecting our lifestyles in all the best possible ways. I have previously written about the internet and its providers mainly, Viasat Exede, HughesNet, and Xfinity

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    5 Ways to Move on After Making a Huge Mistake

    There’s that moment when you realize you made a huge mistake. How do you recover? How do you move forward after such a screwup?

    How to advance your career (and the big mistakes you may be making)

    There’s that moment when you realize you made a huge mistake.

    OK, take a little time to absorb what you did (or didn’t do). But a very little time because the truth is, there are no mistakes, just choices. There is a reason you made that choice — although you may not know it yet. It wasn’t random or an accident, though.

    That choice you made doesn’t require you to go to battle with yourself. That choice or action came from an unacknowledged part of you and was the right one for you in the moment. Maybe you just don’t see how yet.

    So wherever you are in life, value the journey. Even if where you are is the result of what you now see as the biggest mistake of your life. Be where you are, now, in this moment, on this journey. The steps behind you were already taken, and the steps to come are potential waiting to happen. Bring the fullness of this moment into that future.

    Here are some ways to find value in this moment of your journey when you are living with the consequences of a choice or action you’re tempted to view as a mistake:

    1. Appreciate your opportunity to come to know those instincts that caused you to make that decision or take those actions. Appreciate those instincts. While you’re at it, expand your circle of appreciation to include yourself, your family, your friends, your dog or cat, your home, that beautiful flower outside your door, the sun on the water, the fact that you’re alive.

    2. This is a step in your journey. Remember that you’ll see choices or actions in a different way from the vantage point of a place further along your path.

    3. Remember that your journey continues and what you experience in this moment enriches your next moment. Be fully present in it, and take the fullness of the moment forward with you. Every moment of experience gives you more information and knowledge and insight and experience and know-how to use as you continue your journey. Every step makes you who you are.

    4. Think about how you’d like to use the next moment of your life and whatever it brings. Or where you’d next like to place your foot as you continue on your path.

    5. Steps. It’s all about steps. Keep walking that path. Sure, stop to reflect from time to time. Stop to smell the flowers. Enjoy your companions along the way. But continue your journey, and let your “mistakes” contribute positively to it.

    Life is a journey, and our achievements and our mistakes are all steps on the path, all make us who we are, create the moment we are in and can positively influence the rest of our journey if we let them.

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