How to alleviate pressure by making it work for you

How to alleviate pressure by making it work for you

Dealing with pressure is something we all must do daily. For example, the pressure of making it to work on time, navigating traffic so you don’t get stuck yelling at other drivers and delivering your next presentation and not sounding hungover. Pressure pushes us and places demands on our physical, mental and emotional well-being that can feel, well, less than ideal.

We all must learn to perform under pressure to be not only successful, but effective. After all, pressure is such a natural occurrence that if we don’t learn to manage ourselves then we risk falling behind those who do (competitively speaking).

The common belief of dealing with pressure is to elevate your performance to that level and just “do better,” yet this hardly ever works out. We begin to think too much about the task at hand and what others think, then we place even more pressure upon ourselves to perform.

The startup world is certainly no different. In fact, there may be even greater pressure to deliver as an entrepreneur because, well, your survival — personally and professionally — depends on how well you deal with uncertainty. Here are four ways to ensure you’re on the right track:

1. Focus on the fundamentals.

You never really become better in the moment. With so much uncertainty glaring you in the face, developing new insights and awareness at the time of delivery is about as effective as reading a book at an all out sprint and remembering it. Instead of focusing on the pressure of the moment, focus on what you already know, on the content and on the skills and knowledge that put you at the forefront in the first place (not all at the same time, of course).

2. Redefine the value of pressure.

Rather than seeing the pressure of the moment as a threat toward your self-worth, look at it as an opportunity to challenge yourself. Have fun with it.

In the book Performing Under Pressure: The Science of Doing Your Best When It Matters Most, the authors note, “When you see the pressure situation as a challenge, you are stimulated to give the attention and energy needed to make your best effort.”

After all, will the world really end tomorrow if you don’t perform up to par today? Not likely — you’ll just have less friends (just kidding).

3. (Re)Affirm yourself.

Standing in front of the mirror telling yourself how great you are more often than you already do is a scientifically proven path toward enhanced self-confidence and self-efficacy.

In a study conducted by Stanford University, minority students in the seventh grade were asked to focus on the positive aspects of their lives — family, friends, hobbies — during times of relative stress such as the holidays, just before exams and at the start of the school year. The results? A 30 percent improvement in overall tests scores.

Who says vanity doesn’t help?

4. Reframe the task as temporary.

The self-imposed pressure of performing well often comes from the limiting belief of, “This is it! This is my one and only shot at success!” It isn’t. Nothing in life is certain, save death, taxes and bad city traffic. When you view a deliverable as a means to an end rather than the end itself, you see there’s wriggle room to learn, grow and improve. More so, you see a road ahead full of opportunities rather than a dead end.

Dealing with pressure ultimately boils down to personal perspective and the importance you place on the task at hand relative to your own self-identity and self-worth. Don’t put too much pressure on yourself.

How to alleviate pressure by making it work for you

Pressure is a part of every day, whether it is a small, ordinary inconvenience or an overwhelming personal or professional burden that stretches over weeks, months and perhaps years. But only a small part of life is dictated by what happens to you, the vast majority of life is dictated by how you handle what happens to you. This principle also applies to pressure; it is inevitable, so its impact is dictated by how you react to it. Here are five healthy, productive ways to respond to pressure:

Prioritize

If you are confronted with a major source of pressure: a project, a personal crisis, etc., instead of thinking about the entire situation and getting overwhelmed, immediately start to break things down into steps, and determine what needs to be done right now and what can wait. Then determine what needs to be done first, second and third. Breaking up a larger situation into smaller tasks will make an overwhelming situation feasible, and as you check these things off of your to-do list you will gain composure and get a handle on things.

Foster Healthy Responses

When we are stressed and overwhelmed it is easy to fall into bad habits: eating and drinking unhealthy things, consuming too much caffeine, not sleeping, not exercising, generally not taking care of ourselves at all. It is easy to rationalize these habits when you’re stressed, but taking care of yourself when you’re under pressure actually gives you more energy and helps you focus. Make sure you’re eating fresh, healthy food like lean proteins, vegetables and healthy carbs, drinking lots of water and setting aside some time to exercise. Taking some time to meditate at the beginning and end of each day also helps clear your mind and is a peaceful, healthy way to beginning and end your day—especially when life is chaotic. Spend time with friends and family. Go outside and breathe fresh air. You will handle pressure with more focus and grace if you cultivate healthy responses to stress, and make sure to take care of yourself.

Set Boundaries

If you are under pressure because people are delegating too much work to you or are asking too much of you personally, it is time to draw some boundaries. With phones and laptops, many of us feel on-call 24/7. Maybe don’t answer emails after you go to bed, put your phone in another room. Try and manage the expectations of friends and family who ask a lot of you, so you are not burning the candle at both ends. If you haven’t spent time with your family because work has been hectic, tell them you will come over for dinner after your project deadline, and tell friends you haven’t seen in awhile the same. It lets people know you’re thinking about them while also giving yourself some space and time to finish work priorities.

Take Time To Recharge

No one stays on the treadmill forever. We all have to set aside time to recover and recharge from life’s stressful and chaotic moments, whether it is simply sleeping in, going to get a massage, going outside to get fresh air or taking a vacation. No one is perpetually at the top of their game, when you are worn down, you will be a better person and professional if you take some time to recharge.

Seek Support

If life and work are simply too much for you to handle, you should reach out for help. Delegate some tasks to colleagues or people under you and tell your boss you’ve reached a breaking point. If you are struggling with some personal issues, if you have the means call a therapist who can help you work through them. Spend time with loved ones you will support and will help you through difficult and stressful times. You do not have to handle things by yourself, you can reach out for help.

How to alleviate pressure by making it work for you

I’m a twentysomething freelance journalist, writer and blogger in New York City. I write about everything I’ve done wrong as a twentysomething woman here in the trenches.

I’m a twentysomething freelance journalist, writer and blogger in New York City. I write about everything I’ve done wrong as a twentysomething woman here in the trenches. Take my advice at your own risk.

Cut Down on Self-Imposed Stress

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Amy Morin, LCSW, is the Editor-in-Chief of Verywell Mind. She’s also a psychotherapist, the author of the bestselling book “13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do,” and the host of The Verywell Mind Podcast.

We face enough stress in life without putting more on ourselves, but that’s exactly what many of us do, in one way or another, sometimes without even realizing it. The first step toward easing off of yourself is to realize when you might be making things harder on yourself unnecessarily.

Without blaming yourself, why not learn what you can do to stop the self-sabotage and be your own strongest ally in stress relief? Here are some of the best ways to make the most of your life and cut down on self-imposed stress.

Understand High Achievement vs. Perfectionism

Many people slip into perfectionistic habits, not realizing that there is a better way to do their best without beating themselves along the way. Many perfectionists, on some level, believe that they need to attain perfection or they have failed; this belief can not only lead to stress, it can actually lead to less success than the attitude of a regular high-achiever!

An important first step is to recognize the difference between perfectionism and high-achievement and really understand why perfectionism is more a form of self-sabotage than an asset. When it comes to stress, “do your best” is better than “be perfect,” and in the long run, it’s healthier as well.

If you find yourself emotionally “holding onto” mistakes you’ve made, noticing more of what you’ve done wrong than what you’ve gotten right, and getting anxious when you do a good-but-not-perfect job, be aware that there is a better way.  

Last Updated: June 2, 2020 References

This article was co-authored by Peter D’Aquino, L.Ac, MS, NCCAOM. Peter D’Aquino is an Acupuncturist and Diplomate in Oriental Medicine based in New York City. Peter is licensed to practice in New York State and holds board certification by the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture (NCCAOM) and Oriental Medicine in acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine. He has 10 years of experience practicing holistic pain management and sports medicine. He specializes in treating pain and orthopedic conditions along with rehab, fitness, weight loss, and digestive issues. He is also certified as a Personal Trainer by The National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) and certified in Functional Range Conditioning (FRC) and Functional Range Release (FRR) movement therapy. He holds an MA in Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine from Pacific College of Oriental Medicine in New York (PCOM).

There are 21 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

This article has been viewed 38,834 times.

Acupressure is a traditional Chinese therapy which is used to relieve pain by applying pressure to certain parts of the body, and it is often used alongside more conventional medical treatment. The idea behind acupressure is that by applying pressure to various pressure points, you can balance the energy in your body to improve your health. [1] X Research source Although you should still see your doctor for serious health problems, you can try acupressure at home by studying these pressure points and the techniques used to stimulate them!

High blood pressure is a common health concern. People can reduce their blood pressure in several ways, including diet, exercise, and blood pressure medication.

How long it takes to lower blood pressure depends on different factors, including:

  • how high someone’s blood pressure is at the start
  • what methods they used to lower it
  • other individual health factors

While blood pressure medications work relatively quickly, people usually need to stick to certain changes in their diet and lifestyle to keep their blood pressure down long term.

This article looks at how long it takes to lower blood pressure with different methods.

How to alleviate pressure by making it work for you

Share on Pinterest Regular exercise can help reduce a person’s blood pressure.

A doctor diagnosing high blood pressure, or hypertension, may prescribe one or more drugs to help control it and reduce the risk for heart attack and stroke.

These drugs may include diuretics, beta-blockers, and ACE inhibitors, alone or together.

Medication helps lower blood pressure quickly, typically within a few days. However, it may not be the best long-term treatment due to side effects.

Medication can help manage high blood pressure while a person changes their underlying lifestyle that may be causing high blood pressure.

Diet changes can quickly lower blood pressure in many cases.

A study in the journal Hypertension reported that people following the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) diet lowered their blood pressure by 1–4 millimeters of mercury (mm Hg) in 1 week.

The same study noted that reducing sodium intake gradually decreased blood pressure over 4 weeks.

Making consistent, long-term changes to diet and lifestyle can help keep blood pressure in a healthy range.

The following sections discuss how to reduce blood pressure using various methods.

A healthful diet can reduce the risk of high blood pressure and can help lower blood pressure. Conversely, certain diets can increase a person’s blood pressure by causing water retention or weight gain.

Diets high in the following components can increase blood pressure:

  • salt or sodium
  • saturated fats
  • trans fats
  • sugars

A healthful diet includes plenty of heart healthy foods, including:

Many doctors will include diet plans as part of treatment for high blood pressure. For instance, the DASH diet plan incorporates heart healthy eating while also reducing foods that increase blood pressure.

Taking steps towards eating a heart healthy diet is a good way to reduce blood pressure. Anyone having trouble changing their diet may want to talk to a dietitian for guidance.

HIGH blood pressure is a silent condition that can raise your risk of heart disease. Fortunately, you can easily reverse a high reading by making natural dietary adjustments.

High blood pressure: Lifestyle changes to reduce reading

When you subscribe we will use the information you provide to send you these newsletters. Sometimes they’ll include recommendations for other related newsletters or services we offer. Our Privacy Notice explains more about how we use your data, and your rights. You can unsubscribe at any time.

High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, is where the pressure of blood in your arteries is too high. Although your blood pressure fluctuates throughout the day, a consistently high reading indicates your heart is being forced to work too hard to pump blood around your body. This can pose grave health problems if left untreated, such as an increased risk of heart problems.

Related articles

How to alleviate pressure by making it work for you

How to alleviate pressure by making it work for you

READ MORE

How to alleviate pressure by making it work for you

Fortunately, you can easily reverse a high reading by making healthy lifestyle changes.

Improving your diet is top of the pile and there are some general dietary principles you should heed.

Holland and Barrett have outlined a number of natural remedies for high blood pressure.

The health body has whittled it down to six dietary adjustments that can contribute to normal, healthy blood pressure.

How to alleviate pressure by making it work for you

High blood pressure: Follow a DASH eating plan to reduce hypertension (Image: Getty Images)

One of its most important recommendations is to follow a DASH eating plan.

DASH stands for ‘Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension’ – it’s an approach to healthy eating that’s specifically aimed to help lower your blood pressure.

In particular, this encourages following correct portion sizes, reducing sodium in your diet and eating a variety of nutrient-rich foods.

A DASH diet mainly consists of the following:

  • Vegetables, fruits, and whole grains
  • Choosing fat-free or low-fat dairy products, fish, poultry, beans, nuts, and vegetable oils
  • Avoiding or limiting foods that are high in saturated fat (e.g. fatty meats, full-fat dairy products, and tropical oils such as coconut, palm kernel, and palm oils)
  • Reducing sugar-sweetened beverages.

Trending

According to Holland and Barrett, you should also:

  • Reduce salt intake
  • Add beetroot to your diet
  • Embrace Omega-3
  • Cut out caffeine.

Other key lifestyle tips

In addition to eating healthily, you should also engage in physical exercise to lower a high reading.

If you already have hypertension, regular physical activity can bring your blood pressure down to safer levels.

In addition to keeping your heart and arteries healthy, exercise promotes weight loss, which can help to lower high blood pressure.

How to alleviate pressure by making it work for you

What avoid: Reduce your salt intake to lower hypertension (Image: Getty Images)

READ MORE

How to alleviate pressure by making it work for you

The Mayo Clinic explains: “Blood pressure often increases as weight increases. Being overweight also can cause disrupted breathing while you sleep, which further raises your blood pressure.”

In fact, according to the health body, losing even a small amount of weight if you’re overweight or obese can help reduce your blood pressure.

“In general, you may reduce your blood pressure by about one millimetre of mercury (mm Hg) with each kilogram (about 2.2 pounds) of weight you lose,” it adds.

What do these numbers mean?

A high blood pressure reading is measured in millimetres of mercury (mmHg).

Related articles

How to alleviate pressure by making it work for you

How to alleviate pressure by making it work for you

How to alleviate pressure by making it work for you

High blood pressure chart: How to gauge your blood pressure (Image: Getty Images)

Blood pressure is recorded with two numbers.

The systolic pressure (higher number) is the force at which your heart pumps blood around your body.

The diastolic pressure (lower number) is the resistance to the blood flow in the blood vessels.

According to the NHS, high blood pressure is considered to be 140/90mmHg or higher (or 150/90mmHg or higher if you’re over the age of 80).

Ideal blood pressure is usually considered to be between 90/60mmHg and 120/80mmHg, says the heath body.

HIGH blood pressure is a silent condition that can raise your risk of heart disease. Fortunately, you can easily reverse a high reading by making natural dietary adjustments.

High blood pressure: Lifestyle changes to reduce reading

When you subscribe we will use the information you provide to send you these newsletters. Sometimes they’ll include recommendations for other related newsletters or services we offer. Our Privacy Notice explains more about how we use your data, and your rights. You can unsubscribe at any time.

High blood pressure, also known as hypertension, is where the pressure of blood in your arteries is too high. Although your blood pressure fluctuates throughout the day, a consistently high reading indicates your heart is being forced to work too hard to pump blood around your body. This can pose grave health problems if left untreated, such as an increased risk of heart problems.

Related articles

How to alleviate pressure by making it work for you

How to alleviate pressure by making it work for you

READ MORE

How to alleviate pressure by making it work for you

Fortunately, you can easily reverse a high reading by making healthy lifestyle changes.

Improving your diet is top of the pile and there are some general dietary principles you should heed.

Holland and Barrett have outlined a number of natural remedies for high blood pressure.

The health body has whittled it down to six dietary adjustments that can contribute to normal, healthy blood pressure.

How to alleviate pressure by making it work for you

High blood pressure: Follow a DASH eating plan to reduce hypertension (Image: Getty Images)

One of its most important recommendations is to follow a DASH eating plan.

DASH stands for ‘Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension’ – it’s an approach to healthy eating that’s specifically aimed to help lower your blood pressure.

In particular, this encourages following correct portion sizes, reducing sodium in your diet and eating a variety of nutrient-rich foods.

A DASH diet mainly consists of the following:

  • Vegetables, fruits, and whole grains
  • Choosing fat-free or low-fat dairy products, fish, poultry, beans, nuts, and vegetable oils
  • Avoiding or limiting foods that are high in saturated fat (e.g. fatty meats, full-fat dairy products, and tropical oils such as coconut, palm kernel, and palm oils)
  • Reducing sugar-sweetened beverages.

Trending

According to Holland and Barrett, you should also:

  • Reduce salt intake
  • Add beetroot to your diet
  • Embrace Omega-3
  • Cut out caffeine.

Other key lifestyle tips

In addition to eating healthily, you should also engage in physical exercise to lower a high reading.

If you already have hypertension, regular physical activity can bring your blood pressure down to safer levels.

In addition to keeping your heart and arteries healthy, exercise promotes weight loss, which can help to lower high blood pressure.

How to alleviate pressure by making it work for you

What avoid: Reduce your salt intake to lower hypertension (Image: Getty Images)

READ MORE

How to alleviate pressure by making it work for you

The Mayo Clinic explains: “Blood pressure often increases as weight increases. Being overweight also can cause disrupted breathing while you sleep, which further raises your blood pressure.”

In fact, according to the health body, losing even a small amount of weight if you’re overweight or obese can help reduce your blood pressure.

“In general, you may reduce your blood pressure by about one millimetre of mercury (mm Hg) with each kilogram (about 2.2 pounds) of weight you lose,” it adds.

What do these numbers mean?

A high blood pressure reading is measured in millimetres of mercury (mmHg).

Related articles

How to alleviate pressure by making it work for you

How to alleviate pressure by making it work for you

How to alleviate pressure by making it work for you

High blood pressure chart: How to gauge your blood pressure (Image: Getty Images)

Blood pressure is recorded with two numbers.

The systolic pressure (higher number) is the force at which your heart pumps blood around your body.

The diastolic pressure (lower number) is the resistance to the blood flow in the blood vessels.

According to the NHS, high blood pressure is considered to be 140/90mmHg or higher (or 150/90mmHg or higher if you’re over the age of 80).

Ideal blood pressure is usually considered to be between 90/60mmHg and 120/80mmHg, says the heath body.

Last Updated: June 2, 2020 References

This article was co-authored by Peter D’Aquino, L.Ac, MS, NCCAOM. Peter D’Aquino is an Acupuncturist and Diplomate in Oriental Medicine based in New York City. Peter is licensed to practice in New York State and holds board certification by the National Certification Commission for Acupuncture (NCCAOM) and Oriental Medicine in acupuncture and Chinese herbal medicine. He has 10 years of experience practicing holistic pain management and sports medicine. He specializes in treating pain and orthopedic conditions along with rehab, fitness, weight loss, and digestive issues. He is also certified as a Personal Trainer by The National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) and certified in Functional Range Conditioning (FRC) and Functional Range Release (FRR) movement therapy. He holds an MA in Acupuncture and Herbal Medicine from Pacific College of Oriental Medicine in New York (PCOM).

There are 21 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

This article has been viewed 38,834 times.

Acupressure is a traditional Chinese therapy which is used to relieve pain by applying pressure to certain parts of the body, and it is often used alongside more conventional medical treatment. The idea behind acupressure is that by applying pressure to various pressure points, you can balance the energy in your body to improve your health. [1] X Research source Although you should still see your doctor for serious health problems, you can try acupressure at home by studying these pressure points and the techniques used to stimulate them!

FYI: Staying hydrated is key.

If you’ve ever had a sinus infection, you know what it feels like to have sinus pressure so bad you think your face might actually explode. Luckily, it doesn’t; but all the aching, throbbing, and stabbing pain can make you seek out the nearest blanket to hide under indefinitely.

Unfortunately, sinus infections aren’t the onlyreason behind nagging sinus pain—allergies, environmental changes, and even anatomical differences can also leave you feeling pain and pressure, Christopher Thompson, MD, an otolaryngologist at Mission Hospital in Orange County, tells Health.

But regardless of what’s causing your sinus pain, one thing’s for sure: You want it to go away ASAP. Here, medical experts weigh in on what’s going on in your sinuses, and how to make the pain go away—fast.

Where are your sinuses—and what is sinus pressure?

When it comes to sinus pressure, it’s essentially swelling in your sinuses in response to three different scenarios: a pressure change between the air inside your sinuses and the air outside your sinuses (like when you fly in an airplane), when irritants invade your sinuses (through allergies or illnesses), or when you have an anatomical issue (like a deviated septum or nasal polyps).

Unfortunately, you can’t cater your sinus pain treatments to what’s causing it—but the good news is that most available remedies can work to reduce inflammation and swelling in your sinuses regardless of what’s causing it. Here’s a guide, according to doctors, on the best ways to treat sinus pain so you can start feeling better ASAP.

1. Use some steam—but don’t expect a long-term cure.

Steam—whether from a humidifier or a hot shower—can provide some symptomatic comfort, but isn’t really a long-term solution, Mas Takashima, M.D., chair of otolaryngology at Houston Methodist Hospital, tells Health.

“Certain areas are moist anyway and you can cause an overgrowth of mold [which can worsen allergies or swelling],” he explains. But for people who feel dry air or excessively dry sinuses are contributing to their pain, steam can be helpful.

2. Try nasal irrigation.

Dr. Takashima describes your nose as an air filter for your lungs: It filters out particulates, like allergens and irritants, but if you’re allergic to the particulates that get trapped in your nose it will always feel irritated (and swollen, and congested, and uncomfortable).

A quick way to rinse out those irritants? Nasal irrigation—and there are three different types, according to Dr. Takashima:

  • Saline irrigation flushes out your nose to eliminate many of the irritants hanging out there. It can also clear nasal blockages of mucus and thin out mucus overall to make breathing much easier. It works great for pretty much all sinus problems.
  • Steroid irrigation mixes saline with a topical steroid to really get into the depths of your sinuses. This allows the steroid (often budesonide) to get to the root of the problem and reduce swelling in some of the harder-to-reach cavities. Steroids are the best medication to treat allergies, so this method is great for seasonal sinus sufferers.
  • Xylitol irrigation means flushing with sugar alcohol, a method which has antibacterial and antiviral effects. Xylitol draws water out of the nasal tissues and can decongest you better than saline irritation; it’s a good approach for people with chronic sinus issues, especially when they are starting to get sick, because it might help them avoid a serious flare-up.

3. Stay hydrated (seriously).

Yeah, yeah, you already know it: You should be drinking more water. But when it comes to your sinuses, there’s a legit reason why: “The way the nose protects the body is by recognizing irritating things trapped there—the brain then sends a signal to your body get rid of it, and your body produces mucus to clear out the foreign irritant,” explains Dr. Takashima.

If you’re dehydrated, though, your mucus will be too thick to help you clear out irritants. Instead, it will get stuck in your sinuses, causing congestion and possibly infection from bacterial growth. So one more time for the people in the back: hydrate, hydrate, hyrdate—then hydrate some more.

4. Use decongestants, but only temporarily.

You can definitely pop some Sudafed tablets or even spritz some Afrin into your nose, but beware: you can’t do this forever.

“In an acute infection, a decongestant can be useful, but Afrin can become addicting if used for more than a few days and oral decongestants used regularly can have cardiovascular effects,” says Dr. Thompson. “These are targeted for short-term use.”

Also, FYI, patients with high blood pressure shouldn’t use these OTC products, and people who are sensitive to stimulants, like caffeine, might have trouble sleeping when using them, per Dr. Takashima.

5. Pop a pain reliever like aspirin or ibuprofen.

If your sinus pressure is causing you serious pain, you can also take an OTC pain reliever. Dr. Takashima says NSAIDs like Aleve or ibuprofen typically work better than Tylenol, because NSAIDs are designed to reduce swelling and inflammation. (Tylenol might numb the pain, but it won’t actually help with the cause of the pain.)

6. Opt for a nasal steroids

Allergy sufferers, this one’s for you: Dr. Takashima strongly recommends nasal steroids for people with allergy-related sinus pressure, so if you’re not already using an OTC spray (like Flonase, Nasonex, or Nasocort), you might want to reconsider.

“The only thing to keep in mind is that these don’t work well if you only use them occasionally. you need to use it on a consistent basis,” he says, recommending that patients figure out when their allergies are bad (like during the month of October, for example), premedicate before symptoms appear, and then keep using it throughout the season to avoid symptoms.

7. Go under the knife for sinus surgery.

The word “surgery” is scary, but if you have chronic sinusitis, you should consider seeing an ear, nose, and throat doctor to ask about sinus surgery. “Surgery can be helpful in opening up the sinuses to allow better drainage,” says Dr. Thompson. “You can use as much saline as you want, but if you need surgery and you’re using saline, you’re only flushing out your nose, not your sinuses.”

Just FYI: Chronic sinusitis is defined as having sinus symptoms for more than three months or having more than three sinus infections per year. A 2004 study published in JAMA Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery found that endoscopic sinus surgery reduced major and minor symptoms of 100 patients with chronic rhinosinusitis who had undergone the procedure one to two years earlier.

One final note: Dr. Thompson says that facial pain, including pain in your sinuses, can also be related to migraines, neck tension, or bruxism, aka grinding your teeth. So if you’re having zero luck remedying your pain with traditional sinus treatments, you should talk to your doctor—he or she may diagnose you with a totally unrelated condition that could bring relief.

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