How to answer the tough question what are your salary requirements

How to answer the tough question what are your salary requirements

Did you know the “salary range” question posed in the early stages of the interview process can be a way for hiring managers to eliminate candidates early on? If your salary requirement is too high, they might say, “So long dear applicant.” But if you lowball your worth, you could sell yourself short.

So how do you answer the question, “What is your expected salary range?”

As a career coach who helps leaders land their dream jobs, I’ve seen that many people struggle with this question. Here are five steps I’ve found to be especially useful when the topic of salary comes up during an interview:

1. Remember the first rule of negotiating a salary.

I have a simple, but firm, rule that I’ve found works a high percentage of the time when it comes to salary: “He who speaks first loses.” So, as a job seeker, I would encourage you not to bring the salary up at the interview stage. Let the interviewer be the first to mention it and take the lead here.

Don’t begin negotiating a salary until you have a firm offer in hand. An interview is not the time to shout out a magic number if you can avoid it. But since recruiters and hiring managers might ask this question in the beginning stages of the interview process, you need to know how to gracefully navigate this line of questioning to advance to the next stage.

2. Turn the question on its head.

Put the question back in their corner. For example, you could say something along the lines of, “My salary is negotiable, depending on the duties and responsibilities that are expected with this position. May I ask what the budget is for this position?” Or you can ask, “Can you share the salary range being offered for this position?” The idea is to let them know the salary is negotiable for you and give them the opportunity to take the lead in answering the question.

Practice the delivery of this before you go to the interview. Talking about money can be uncomfortable for many people, and you want you to ensure you come off as friendly, approachable and cool as a cucumber when you try to turn the question around. To shake off your nerves, practice answering the question in a mirror or with family or friends.

3. Be prepared to answer the question anyway.

Sometimes refocusing the question is all you need to do. But in some cases, the interviewer might come back and say they truly need an answer they can document, which means you will be forced to give an answer. In instances like this, what do you do? When you are locked in and have to respond to the question, what should you say?

Here is how you answer this all-important question: You don’t — until you do your research. And that research should be done prior to any phone interview and before you step a foot into the door of your meeting.

4. Research wisely.

You can do your salary research online at various websites, such as Glassdoor, Salary.com or LinkedIn. Sites such as these allow you to research what a proper salary range is by companies and job titles. For example, LinkedIn’s salary tool allows you to search the company with which you’re interviewing, along with your desired position and location, to see the actual salary the company is paying their employees in that position currently.

That information is gold and is what you need to answer that salary range question. But if you can’t find the company that you are applying to on these types of websites, look for a competitor in or around the same location, and look at the wages they are currently paying.

5. Take a wider view of your negotiations.

If a “firm” salary offer has been made by the employer, I’ve found that many hiring managers still have a bit of wiggle room in what you receive. It won’t immediately knock you out of the running to try to negotiate an additional 10% to 15%. Do keep in mind that this “wiggle room” does not always appear in the form of direct payments. If the company is not able to pay you an increase in direct wages, you can try to negotiate additional benefits or perks, such as extra vacation time or personal days.

Remember, you will need to do your salary research before each interview because you want to know what the company you are interviewing with is currently paying. Make this a part of your job interview preparation, and do the research each time. Be able to answer the critical questions so you can be the one to move on the next step in the hiring process and get that job offer.

How to answer the tough question what are your salary requirements

The right answer to the question, “What’s your salary range?” is almost always some version of “I’m not telling you.”

It’s true that you can look on PayScale to figure out the going range for the job, but you can never guess how much the company values the position for which they are interviewing you. So don’t give the first number.

Because if you request a salary lower than the range for that position, the interviewer will say nothing, and you’ve just lost money.

Do You Know What You’re Worth?

That’s why you want the interviewer to tell you the range for the position, because then you can focus on getting to the high end of that range. But you can’t work to the high point if you don’t know it.

When there are two good negotiators in the room, each person will try to get the other to give the first number.

Each time you deflect the question, the interviewer will try again. Your goal is to outlast the interviewer until they finally tell you the salary range for the job. Here is how to respond:

Question: What salary range are you looking for?
Your Answer: “Let’s talk about the job requirements and expectations first, so I can get a sense of what you need.” That’s a soft answer to a soft way to ask the question.

Question: What did you make at your last job?
Your Answer: “This position is not exactly the same as my last job. So let’s discuss what my responsibilities would be here and then determine a fair salary for this job.” It’s hard to argue with words like “fair” and “responsibilities”—you’re earning respect with this one.

Question: What are you expecting to make in terms of salary?
Your Answer: “I am interested in finding a job that is a good fit for me. I’m sure whatever salary you’re paying is consistent with the rest of the market.” In other words, I respect myself and I want to think I can respect this company.

Question: I need to know what salary you want in order to make you an offer. Can you tell me a range?
Your Answer: “I’d appreciate it if you could make me an offer based on whatever you have budgeted for this position and we can go from there.” This is a pretty direct response, so using words like “appreciate” focuses on drawing out the interviewer’s better qualities instead of her tougher side.

Question: Why don’t you want to give your salary requirements?
Your Answer: “I think you have a good idea of what this position is worth to your company, and that’s important information for me to know.”

You can see the pattern, right? If you think you sound obnoxious or obstinate by not answering the question, think of how he feels asking the question more than once.

Also, by the time the interviewer has asked two or three times, the interviewer will know that hiring you means having a tough negotiator on his team — another reason to make you a good salary offer.

And that is the ultimate glass-ceiling breakthrough.

April 10, 2015 / 3:35 PM / nerdwallet

Few questions strike fear in the hearts of job seekers like the bombshell “What are your salary requirements?” Give a number that’s too low, and you risk selling yourself short; offer a number that’s too high, and you could take yourself out of consideration for the job. But if you give the right answer, you’ll win points with your potential employer and set yourself up for the salary you deserve. Here’s how.

Give a broad salary range

Some employers ask about your salary expectations in an online form when you first apply for a job. Others request that you list your salary requirements in a cover letter, or a recruiter will ask you about it during the first phone screen after you’ve sent in your resume. While it might sound scary to suggest a number so early, it’s better to give your potential employer a salary range than to avoid answering at all, says Pattie Kim-Keefer, assistant director of career services at Swarthmore College in Pennsylvania.

“They don’t want to go through the application process and interview process if your expectations don’t align with theirs,” she says.

Respond with a wide range, one that covers about $10,000, so you have wiggle room during negotiations later on. But how do you come up with the right range for the position?

Know what you’re worth

Putting your cards on the table can backfire if you haven’t researched how much your employer is likely to offer you. Ask other students or your school’s alumni what they’ve been offered for similar positions. Many colleges collect salary data from students and recent grads on the job market, Kim-Keefer says, which can help you figure out the going rate for the job you applied for.

You can also search online for salaries that others have self-reported in your industry. Make sure the numbers you find are in the same ballpark as your possible salary. Compensation takes into account your experience, the location of the job, the size of the company, your potential responsibilities and how the company is doing financially. So tailor the information you find to your own position.

If you discover that the average salary for a paralegal at a midsize firm in Chicago is $50,000, for example, give a range of $45,000 to $55,000. If you feel extremely qualified for the position, consider suggesting a range on the higher end, such as $48,000 to $58,000. Employers are likely to offer you a salary at the bottom of your range down the line, so be mindful of how low you’re willing to go.

Leave room for negotiation

Always couch your response with the explanation that your salary is flexible. If you’re asked to provide a number in a blank text box on an online application, add “negotiable” at the end. If that’s not possible, make sure you state it elsewhere on your application. You want to let your employer know that you’re willing to have a conversation about compensation, and that you recognize there are factors beyond salary that make a job offer attractive.

“Salary is important, but just think more broadly about the position and what you’re going to get out of it,” Kim-Keefer says.

Before locking yourself into a salary range, Kim-Keefer recommends taking into account what experiential benefits you’ll get out of the job, like mentorship opportunities and career mobility. The company is likely to pick up the tab for other benefits, too, like health care, vacation days and travel to professional conferences, which will bump up your overall compensation when a job offer comes.

Also, while it’s a good idea to stand firm on your salary range, don’t assume a higher-paying job is automatically better. The experience you’ll get in a position that pays $70,000 isn’t necessarily going to be more beneficial to you than what you’ll learn at a job that pays $50,000, Kim-Keefer says.

“It’s like applying to colleges,” she says. “Just because it says ‘Ivy League’ on it doesn’t mean it’s going to be the best fit for everyone.”

First published on April 10, 2015 / 3:35 PM

How do you answer when the interviewer asks you difficult interview questions about your salary requirements and expectations?

In a large number of job interviews the subject of salary is brought up and it is tricky trying to formulate the right response.

How to answer the tough question what are your salary requirements

Answering the salary expectations question is easier and more straightforward for candidates with a career salary history than for a candidate who has not previously had a permanent job.

We look at each situation separately and show you how to answer the salary question during an interview.

For candidates who have previously earned a salary these are the guidelines when responding to the salary interview question:

“What salary are you looking for?”

If this is asked early on in the interview process you could suggest that there is time to discuss it later in the interview process but that right now you are interested in learning more about the position and job responsibilities.

Additionally, more information about the job tasks and responsibilities is necessary before being able to properly answer salary questions.

If the interviewer presses you on the salary question you can ask if there has been an amount budgeted for this position or ask if there is a salary grade attached to the job and see if it fits your requirements.

When there is no indication of salary and the interviewer continues to probe, you will have to respond with a number. If you don’t, you may create the impression that it is unimportant what you get paid and any offer is acceptable.

When responding to difficult interview questions about your salary requirements, rather than confining yourself to a specific figure, state a range:

“The range for this sort of position is between $X and $Y.”

How to determine the correct salary range

Consider what salary you want, your most recent salary and the market-related salary for the job. Don’t undervalue yourself but continue to emphasize that the position is the most important factor. Money should not be perceived as the most important thing to you.

“I am currently earning $. I would obviously like to better that figure but my main interest is the actual position.”

Taking a new job does not automatically make you worth more money. Link any reference to an increase on your previous salary to increased job responsibilities and demands.

Stick to the facts when stating your previous salary, it is within the rights of a prospective employer to request proof of your former salary.

You have the right to decline the request but this is likely to be perceived negatively in the job interview.

For candidates with no real salary history

You could suggest a range to the employer but your suggested range needs to be based on good research to make sure it is current and industry-related. Do your homework before the interview and make some notes.

The National Association of Colleges and Employers (NACE) collates and publishes comprehensive information on new graduate salaries based on regular surveys.

You can go to the NACE website to view how to access this information.

salaryexpert.com is another useful research site but be specific about the area you are searching for, the cost of living differs greatly between areas and is a critical factor in determining average salaries. This data helps you to confirm that your salary requirements and what you are being offered are in line with the industry averages in the particular geographical area.

Back up your salary suggestion with details of how you got that figure, for example:

“I have reached this figure through some extensive research, I have used the NACE stats and information from recent salary surveys in this area.”

Backing up your job interview answers about salary expectations with concrete data makes them both reliable and valid.

4 good answers to the salary question in your interview

How to answer the tough question what are your salary requirements

Preparing yourself for the salary requirement question by doing your research and considering your financial needs enables you to deal professionally with difficult interview questions about your compensation expectations.

What should I put for salary requirements on a job application?

Job applicants find it tricky to include a salary number on their job applications if asked. The best way to handle this is to include a fairly wide range, based on your research, with the explanation that your salary is negotiable depending on the job responsibilities and the entire package being offered.

How to respond to salary expectations in an email

If you have been asked to state your expected salary in writing it is best to respond with a well-researched salary range and the explanation of how you have arrived at this figure. For example:

“I believe that my 5 years experience in this industry together with the skills and expertise I bring to this position qualify me for a salary in the range of $35,000 to $40,000. This amount is supported by my recent research into the compensation that comparable jobs are offering. I am, of course, open to some negotiation depending on the total compensation package and job-related factors.”

How to answer difficult interview questions

Other difficult interview questions you may face in your job interview include explaining lay offs, being fired and gaps in employment. These good interview answers will help in preparing for these questions.

How to answer the tough question what are your salary requirements

Did you know the “salary range” question posed in the early stages of the interview process can be a way for hiring managers to eliminate candidates early on? If your salary requirement is too high, they might say, “So long dear applicant.” But if you lowball your worth, you could sell yourself short.

So how do you answer the question, “What is your expected salary range?”

As a career coach who helps leaders land their dream jobs, I’ve seen that many people struggle with this question. Here are five steps I’ve found to be especially useful when the topic of salary comes up during an interview:

1. Remember the first rule of negotiating a salary.

I have a simple, but firm, rule that I’ve found works a high percentage of the time when it comes to salary: “He who speaks first loses.” So, as a job seeker, I would encourage you not to bring the salary up at the interview stage. Let the interviewer be the first to mention it and take the lead here.

Don’t begin negotiating a salary until you have a firm offer in hand. An interview is not the time to shout out a magic number if you can avoid it. But since recruiters and hiring managers might ask this question in the beginning stages of the interview process, you need to know how to gracefully navigate this line of questioning to advance to the next stage.

2. Turn the question on its head.

Put the question back in their corner. For example, you could say something along the lines of, “My salary is negotiable, depending on the duties and responsibilities that are expected with this position. May I ask what the budget is for this position?” Or you can ask, “Can you share the salary range being offered for this position?” The idea is to let them know the salary is negotiable for you and give them the opportunity to take the lead in answering the question.

Practice the delivery of this before you go to the interview. Talking about money can be uncomfortable for many people, and you want you to ensure you come off as friendly, approachable and cool as a cucumber when you try to turn the question around. To shake off your nerves, practice answering the question in a mirror or with family or friends.

3. Be prepared to answer the question anyway.

Sometimes refocusing the question is all you need to do. But in some cases, the interviewer might come back and say they truly need an answer they can document, which means you will be forced to give an answer. In instances like this, what do you do? When you are locked in and have to respond to the question, what should you say?

Here is how you answer this all-important question: You don’t — until you do your research. And that research should be done prior to any phone interview and before you step a foot into the door of your meeting.

4. Research wisely.

You can do your salary research online at various websites, such as Glassdoor, Salary.com or LinkedIn. Sites such as these allow you to research what a proper salary range is by companies and job titles. For example, LinkedIn’s salary tool allows you to search the company with which you’re interviewing, along with your desired position and location, to see the actual salary the company is paying their employees in that position currently.

That information is gold and is what you need to answer that salary range question. But if you can’t find the company that you are applying to on these types of websites, look for a competitor in or around the same location, and look at the wages they are currently paying.

5. Take a wider view of your negotiations.

If a “firm” salary offer has been made by the employer, I’ve found that many hiring managers still have a bit of wiggle room in what you receive. It won’t immediately knock you out of the running to try to negotiate an additional 10% to 15%. Do keep in mind that this “wiggle room” does not always appear in the form of direct payments. If the company is not able to pay you an increase in direct wages, you can try to negotiate additional benefits or perks, such as extra vacation time or personal days.

Remember, you will need to do your salary research before each interview because you want to know what the company you are interviewing with is currently paying. Make this a part of your job interview preparation, and do the research each time. Be able to answer the critical questions so you can be the one to move on the next step in the hiring process and get that job offer.

By Amy Levin-Epstein

Updated on: May 4, 2011 / 10:21 AM / MoneyWatch

How to answer the tough question what are your salary requirementsJob interviews are a theatrical performance. In this case, a stutter could mean bad reviews — and cost you a perfect position. And in a competitive market, interviewers are inundated with qualified candidates, so they’re throwing out tougher questions than ever. Here are five of the toughest questions you may likely face during your job search — and how experts say you should answer them.

Tough Question #1: Why Should I Hire You? How To Answer: Listen and learn, then use that information. “Throughout the interview, ask them specific questions on who they are looking for, what specific attributes stand out for them, discuss a day-in-the-life of the position, etc. Then once you understand their terms, their methodology, their process — you use those exact attributes in answering [that famous] last question, ‘Why should I hire you?'” says Laura Rose, founder of Rose Coaching.

Tough Question #2: What is your greatest fault? How To Answer: Keep it relevant and simple. “Stay away from personal weaknesses, and don’t use a fake ‘weakness’ such as ‘I work too hard,'” says Charles Purdy, senior editor and career expert at Monster.com. If possible, mention something that you’re working to improve. Purdy’s example: “I am always working on improving my communication skills to be a more effective presenter. I found that joining Toastmasters was very helpful.”

Tough Question #3: What three historical figures would you invite to dinner and why? How To Answer: If you’re asked a real off-the-wall question like this, the one thing you must do is remain calm. “When an interviewer asks you a bizarre or oddball question, they’re typically looking to see how well you think on your feet. Often, there is no ‘correct’ answer to what they’re asking. This is often your chance to incorporate a little humor into your answer or show your personality — so try not to stress too much about being ‘right,'” says Heather R. Huhman, founder and president of Come Recommended.

Tough Question #4: What are your salary requirements?
How To Answer: Your goal here should be to set yourself up for the most they can offer, without pricing yourself out of a job. To do this, let your interviewer lead. “If at all possible, you should try to find out the other person’s hand first,” says Jonathan Mazzocchi, a manager at the staffing firm Winter, Wyman. Then, be direct without pinpointing a required salary. “You can simply state your current salary and explain that your main focus isn’t salary but finding the right job where you can have a direct impact on the company and bottom line,” says Mazzocchi, adding that you can also ask what someone with your experience would expect to earn. “The bottom line is, you want to get to the offer stage. Once you know they want you and have made you an offer, you will have much more leverage,” says Mazzocchi.
Tough Question #5: Where do you see yourself in five years? How To Answer: Here, you want to show you have ambition but not appear to be aggressively pursuing your interviewer’s job. This is one of the few areas where being a bit vague can be valuable. Tracy Cashman, a partner in the informational technology division of Winter, Wyman, suggests saying this: “I [have] been fortunate enough to find good companies to work for where I have been able to progress and be continually challenged. I would hope that my next role allows for that to continue over the next 5 years. Based on what I’ve heard from Joe and Susie in my interviews with them, this seems like just that kind of place.”

Got any impossible questions — or useful answers — to add? Please sign in below and share them.

More on MoneyWatch:

First published on May 4, 2011 / 10:21 AM

© 2011 CBS Interactive Inc. All Rights Reserved.

You may be asked salary information on an application form, or be faced with a “current salary” or “desired salary” field on an online application. Or, you may be asked the same question by a legal recruiter. The answer you provide may be used in the screening process—answer too high and you may not be considered for the position at all.

This number will also likely come into play at the interview/offer stage. It can establish the range for the offer the employer makes. And if you’re underpaid and undervalued at your current employer, then there’s the risk that your low level of pay will follow you when you move on.

On a paper application form—or if the online form allows you to type in whatever you want—you can write “Negotiable.” This gives you the opportunity to discuss your salary history and expectations later.

If it’s not a required field on an online form, leave it blank. If the “desired salary” field requires you to enter a figure, however, you have a couple of options. Each has it’s own benefits and drawbacks:

  • Enter $0, $1, or $10 (the minimum number you can). It will be clear you’re not answering the questions (most employers will know you aren’t offering to work for free).
  • Enter $999,999 (or the highest number you can). Like answering $0, this shows you are purposely avoiding the question.
  • You can enter your desired salary, based on not only your personal needs and wants, but also on your market research of your value and salaries. But know that it may lead to you being screened out (if it’s too high), or being offered a lower salary in the interview.
  • If you can, enter a range. Some online forms will allow you to enter two numbers. Entering a salary range is often the best option, because it reduces the chances of you being screened out, allows room for negotiation, and recognizes that some of the most valuable compensation (vacation time, signing bonuses, tuition reimbursement, insurance, company cars, travel, child care, insurance, and more) isn’t included in the salary.

How to answer the tough question what are your salary requirements

Impress recruiters with your disruptive cover letter! Download your FREE cover letter samples now!

How you answer the salary question on a job application will depend on your situation and what format is allowed on the online form. But if you can, entering a salary range is always the best option.

Struggling to find a job? We can help! Join our career growth club today!

If you want FREE career advice in your inbox, subscribe to our newsletter The Daily Dose!

This post was originally published at an earlier date.

Do your research and mention an appropriate salary range.

Editor’s note: This article is one in a series on how to answer some of the toughest job interview questions. Read previous articles in the series here and here.

You’ve reached the part of the job interview where it’s time to discuss compensation. It can be hard to know how to answer if you’re asked, “What salary are you looking for?” State too high a figure and your potential employer might think they can’t afford you; mention too low a figure and you may end up being paid less than you should.

“This is always a tough question,” admitted Lindsay Gaal, chief human resources officer at accounting firm Friedman LLP in New York City.

It can be tempting to answer by simply saying, “It’s negotiable,” but Gina Curtis, executive recruiting manager at JMJ Phillip Group and career coach for the career coaching firm Employment BOOST in Troy, Mich., advised against that tactic. “It can be very hard for hiring managers to move you forward in the process if you do not give a specific answer,” she said.

There are ways to tackle this thorny question without waffling, though. To start, it helps to understand why hiring managers ask it.

What the hiring manager wants to learn

Unlike many challenging interview questions, this one is pretty straightforward, said Michelle Armer, chief people officer at the job website CareerBuilder, based in Chicago: the hiring team needs to know how much money you want to make if you are offered the job.

They also want to learn if your salary expectations are a match with what they are offering and with your level of experience, said Curtis.

Good strategies for answering the question

Instead of pulling a number out of thin air, formulate a good answer by doing your research, said Curtis. Websites such as Glassdoor, Salary.com, PayScale.com, and the Bureau of Labor Statistics offer salary ranges that can be helpful. You can also consult accounting-specific salary guides such as the ones produced by Robert Half and Accounting Principals.

“Keep in mind the size of the hiring organization, its location, and your level of experience” when determining an appropriate salary, said Curtis.

Once you are armed with information, you can take a couple of different approaches to answer the salary question.

“If you are being underpaid in your current role you may want to give a target salary and not share your current compensation,” said Curtis. “If you feel like you are being compensated well and are looking for something competitive, then it may be appropriate to share your current salary.”

Armer suggests providing the hiring manager with a salary range that would be acceptable to you.

“Giving a range shows that you are flexible,” she said. Though it can feel awkward to talk about money, she said, “it is important that you don’t leave the ball in the hiring manager’s court. They could come in with a low offer that will be hard for you to negotiate up to what you want.”

Once you state a range, you can follow up by asking if it falls within the organization’s target, said Gaal.

“If the answer is ‘no,’ ask what they were thinking” of offering, she said.

If you are offered a salary at the top of your range, “you should be willing to accept that offer,” Armer said.

Another good strategy for answering this question is to inquire about the total compensation package, including benefits, said Armer. Some companies offer benefits such as free child care or student loan reimbursement, and knowing these perks can give you more context around the salary you need.

“In many cases, benefits can provide a lot of value on top of the salary offer,” she said.

What not to say

Avoid giving a flat number; it removes the opportunity for negotiation if your target is met from the get-go, said Armer.

And while it’s a good strategy to provide a salary range, make sure the range is not too large, said Curtis. A wide range can make it “difficult to determine what you are actually looking for” and the organization “may offer you the lower end of the range,” she said.

Remember, while talking about money can be awkward, it’s an important part of your job search. By finding a position that fits both your professional and financial goals, you can make an investment in your future.

You may be asked salary information on an application form, or be faced with a “current salary” or “desired salary” field on an online application. Or, you may be asked the same question by a legal recruiter. The answer you provide may be used in the screening process—answer too high and you may not be considered for the position at all.

This number will also likely come into play at the interview/offer stage. It can establish the range for the offer the employer makes. And if you’re underpaid and undervalued at your current employer, then there’s the risk that your low level of pay will follow you when you move on.

On a paper application form—or if the online form allows you to type in whatever you want—you can write “Negotiable.” This gives you the opportunity to discuss your salary history and expectations later.

If it’s not a required field on an online form, leave it blank. If the “desired salary” field requires you to enter a figure, however, you have a couple of options. Each has it’s own benefits and drawbacks:

  • Enter $0, $1, or $10 (the minimum number you can). It will be clear you’re not answering the questions (most employers will know you aren’t offering to work for free).
  • Enter $999,999 (or the highest number you can). Like answering $0, this shows you are purposely avoiding the question.
  • You can enter your desired salary, based on not only your personal needs and wants, but also on your market research of your value and salaries. But know that it may lead to you being screened out (if it’s too high), or being offered a lower salary in the interview.
  • If you can, enter a range. Some online forms will allow you to enter two numbers. Entering a salary range is often the best option, because it reduces the chances of you being screened out, allows room for negotiation, and recognizes that some of the most valuable compensation (vacation time, signing bonuses, tuition reimbursement, insurance, company cars, travel, child care, insurance, and more) isn’t included in the salary.

How to answer the tough question what are your salary requirements

Impress recruiters with your disruptive cover letter! Download your FREE cover letter samples now!

How you answer the salary question on a job application will depend on your situation and what format is allowed on the online form. But if you can, entering a salary range is always the best option.

Struggling to find a job? We can help! Join our career growth club today!

If you want FREE career advice in your inbox, subscribe to our newsletter The Daily Dose!

This post was originally published at an earlier date.