How to beat procrastination 29 simple tweaks to make

How to beat procrastination 29 simple tweaks to make

How to beat procrastination 29 simple tweaks to make

Have you tried to get a task done, and you kept postponing it until you’ve got little to no time left? Procrastination will always get you to do work at late hours and sometimes, miss deadlines and start looking for excuses to make up for your bad time and task management skill.

Procrastinators live under the delusion of working at the right time, but it is just a figment of their imagination. If you’re a procrastinator and want to beat it, then you’re on the right page. Plant team brings you the guide on how to beat procrastination.

What a mind thinks, it can achieve it — hope you’ve heard this before. Well, in the case of fighting procrastination, it is very much applicable. If you can control your mind and get it to know you do not want to procrastinate, then you’re a step away from procrastinating.

However, if you consider yourself a procrastinator and you haven’t thought about changing your mind and getting it to know you want to stop procrastinating, then you will end up procrastinating. If you are a procrastinator, you need to think about it and let your mind know you want to change from being a procrastinator to a smart and dedicated worker.

In many cases, you can tell why you’re procrastinating. Things as simple as having a movie to watch or the desire to have a nice time with a loved one can get us to procrastinate and shift the starting time of a project. So anytime you start procrastinating, try to figure out why you’re in such a mood. Knowing why you’re in a particular state of mind can help you fine-tune your feelings.

I have had times I procrastinated not because I have any other thing to do but because my mind is occupied with some thoughts. Mere taking a walk for 30 minutes or so will help put me in the right state of mind to accomplish the task at hand. You know yourself better than I do. You know what triggers your procrastinating habit — fight it and see how you will start getting jobs done.

The only way to fight procrastination is to start working immediately; it is time to do the job. Many times we are given a task to do, and our conscious mind will ask for one hour to cool off. As you give it the requested one hour, it keeps asking for more until you have none left then you’ll realize you have been under the influence of procrastination.

However, in most situations, what our mind actually needs to get a job done is starting. You wouldn’t know, but there’s a connection between starting a task and having the mindset to finish. However, without starting, there’s no way you will finish. Like the popular adage says: the right time to plant a tree is 20 years ago; If you missed it don’t worry, the right time is now.

Are you aware that you can procrastinate because the task you intend to do is big? You can get overwhelmed and start looking for excuses to shift your starting time if the size of the project is large. This is because you have numerous questions to answer that will end up becoming the reason you’ll procrastinate.

However, dividing the task into smaller units and then tackling each one after the other can prevent you from being overwhelmed by the size of a project since you’ll be dealing with smaller units. It is also easier to tell if you are progressing and if you are to give yourself a treat for a job well done or not. These are things you won’t enjoy when working with a large project without dividing it into units.

For a long time in the history of animals, reward is seen as one of the best ways to train their brains to continue doing something. This is also applicable to human beings. I stated above that you should divide big projects into small units in the form of milestones. After completing each one, you can reward yourself and make yourself feel good.

This will better prepare you for the next milestones and get you to finish them. However, make sure the milestones and their deadlines are realistic to avoid negative feelings popping up, which can become counterproductive and lead you into the procrastination you were trying to avoid in the first place.

I doubt if you can focus on a job if you’re in the wrong environment — that’s if you can start in the first place. The environment we find ourselves can either get us to work or slow down our working pace. You shouldn’t even deceive yourself by thinking yourself as some kind of genius that can operate in any environment, the environment you are is very important when it comes to working.

Try as much as possible to avoid distractions. Turn down the TV set, avoid those sets of friends, and drop that gamepad. After you’re done with your work, you can always come back to them. Avoiding these distractions that help you start work immediately and get them done as fast as you should.

As humans, we tend to have a flair for perfectly done jobs and want to create one ourselves. However, do not get carried away by the thought of creating a perfectly done work that you start having bad feelings about your work. In some cases, perfectionism kills and encourages negative feelings toward a good job.

Instead of being perfect, you should have your eyes on getting results that fit requirements. Be result oriented and know when to stop. No one cares about a perfectionist if he’s unable to meet deadlines because he was trying to create what will be the best among its kind — no one!

Indeed, Procrastination is a time waster and get us to work efficiently and spend more time the required time on a project if you procrastinate then your task and time management skill is questionable and you cannot be trusted with time-critical jobs. One good thing about procrastination is that it can be managed and reduced to the barest minimum.

At Plant, we urge you to work on your mindset, start work at the allocated time immediately, avoid environments that get you distracted, and focus on getting results, among other things.

What might explain this relationship?

THE BASICS

  • What Is Depression?
  • Find a therapist to overcome depression

If I were to name two common problems or experiences that many people share, they would be depression and procrastination. Not surprisingly, they’re related. Here’s some recent research and personal experiences that provide some insight into this relationship.

I’ve been depressed the past few months. You can measure the time since my last blog post. I haven’t felt like writing. I haven’t felt like doing much of anything.

They’re not unexpected, these feelings. My mother became ill late January. She died in late March. Between the exhausting travel and emotional drain of palliative care, depression can be expected. Although it wasn’t a surprise, it ran me over pretty hard.

During this time, life marched on, of course. I supervised theses, did my administrative work, etc. Before I explain how some things got done, I want to tell you a bit about one of the theses that I supervised.

It was a project that we put together last fall. One of my many talented — and one of the most intelligent — students who worked with me this past year began a study on the relationship between depression, procrastination, and self-regulation skills.

She collected data from undergraduate students using self-report measures. Of course, the sample and data have limitations, but the findings are of interest nonetheless. As expected, she found that scores on the measure of depression were significantly correlated with scores on the measure of procrastination.

This positive correlation indicates that the more depressed we are, the more we report procrastination, and vice versa. No surprises there. Previous research has reflected this as well, and who hasn’t experienced how these two dark knights can ride together?

What was interesting was that when we statistically controlled for the measure of self-regulation skills, the relationship between depression and procrastination essentially disappeared (from a statistical standpoint).

This analysis indicates that the relationship between depression and procrastination is indirect. It is mediated by self-regulation. Self-regulation is a key factor related to both of these psychological constructs.

Lower scores on the measure self-regulation skills are related to higher depression and procrastination scores. Hmm.

These thesis results were emerging as I was doing a nose dive emotionally over the winter term. My experiences were an embodiment, of sorts, of these results. The thing is, I managed to turn it around a bit.

I knew I felt depressed. I often felt like crying. My eating and sleep habits were wacky. I was sad, distracted, not able to concentrate. So, I focused on self-regulation skills. I focused on putting one foot in front of the other, so to speak.

(Others in my life focused on helping me in a variety of ways, so don’t read this as an individual’s efforts alone. I’m just writing about a part of this experience here — the part that I experienced inside of me, if you will.)

I’d set an intention, and I’d simply get started . despite how I was feeling. I edited text. I attended meetings. I made the kids’ breakfast, walked them to the bus. I did the chores around the farm.

No joy in most or any of it, but I did each thing as intended. Showing up is half the battle with self-regulation.

As I succeeded despite my feelings each day, I avoided most of the procrastination. With time, my sadness lifted, as exogenous depression will. And, I hadn’t fed that beast with procrastination. Nothing like not getting things done to drag myself down deeper into that darkness.

So, I’m writing now. I set the intention to write. I’m writing.

Is it this simple? Yes, and no.

Yes, it’s that simple. I do have to exert my own agency moment to moment. That’s life. I put my fingers on this keyboard, and I began to type. Typing, thinking, more typing, more thinking, some momentum. That’s how it goes.

No, it’s not that simple. As Al Mele explains in his excellent recent book, Backsliding: Understanding Weakness of Will, “ . core weak-will action is free, sane, intentional action that, as the nondepressed agent consciously recognizes at the time of the action, is contrary to his better judgment based on practical reasoning (p. 57; emphasis added).”

Depressed agents are different in important ways. We understand that their self-regulation is undermined somehow, their practical reasoning impaired, perhaps. Depression complicates our consideration of procrastination or weak-willed action. It’s not only or “just” about putting one foot in front of the other.

The thing is, a focus on simple self-regulation skills can help. The research indicates this important relationship. My experiences show it to be a personal truth.

Little self-control “wins” around intentional action fuel us. It is truly “one foot in front of the other.” Just showing up. Pretty good steps in the right — or should I say “write?” — direction.

What might explain this relationship?

THE BASICS

  • What Is Depression?
  • Find a therapist to overcome depression

If I were to name two common problems or experiences that many people share, they would be depression and procrastination. Not surprisingly, they’re related. Here’s some recent research and personal experiences that provide some insight into this relationship.

I’ve been depressed the past few months. You can measure the time since my last blog post. I haven’t felt like writing. I haven’t felt like doing much of anything.

They’re not unexpected, these feelings. My mother became ill late January. She died in late March. Between the exhausting travel and emotional drain of palliative care, depression can be expected. Although it wasn’t a surprise, it ran me over pretty hard.

During this time, life marched on, of course. I supervised theses, did my administrative work, etc. Before I explain how some things got done, I want to tell you a bit about one of the theses that I supervised.

It was a project that we put together last fall. One of my many talented — and one of the most intelligent — students who worked with me this past year began a study on the relationship between depression, procrastination, and self-regulation skills.

She collected data from undergraduate students using self-report measures. Of course, the sample and data have limitations, but the findings are of interest nonetheless. As expected, she found that scores on the measure of depression were significantly correlated with scores on the measure of procrastination.

This positive correlation indicates that the more depressed we are, the more we report procrastination, and vice versa. No surprises there. Previous research has reflected this as well, and who hasn’t experienced how these two dark knights can ride together?

What was interesting was that when we statistically controlled for the measure of self-regulation skills, the relationship between depression and procrastination essentially disappeared (from a statistical standpoint).

This analysis indicates that the relationship between depression and procrastination is indirect. It is mediated by self-regulation. Self-regulation is a key factor related to both of these psychological constructs.

Lower scores on the measure self-regulation skills are related to higher depression and procrastination scores. Hmm.

These thesis results were emerging as I was doing a nose dive emotionally over the winter term. My experiences were an embodiment, of sorts, of these results. The thing is, I managed to turn it around a bit.

I knew I felt depressed. I often felt like crying. My eating and sleep habits were wacky. I was sad, distracted, not able to concentrate. So, I focused on self-regulation skills. I focused on putting one foot in front of the other, so to speak.

(Others in my life focused on helping me in a variety of ways, so don’t read this as an individual’s efforts alone. I’m just writing about a part of this experience here — the part that I experienced inside of me, if you will.)

I’d set an intention, and I’d simply get started . despite how I was feeling. I edited text. I attended meetings. I made the kids’ breakfast, walked them to the bus. I did the chores around the farm.

No joy in most or any of it, but I did each thing as intended. Showing up is half the battle with self-regulation.

As I succeeded despite my feelings each day, I avoided most of the procrastination. With time, my sadness lifted, as exogenous depression will. And, I hadn’t fed that beast with procrastination. Nothing like not getting things done to drag myself down deeper into that darkness.

So, I’m writing now. I set the intention to write. I’m writing.

Is it this simple? Yes, and no.

Yes, it’s that simple. I do have to exert my own agency moment to moment. That’s life. I put my fingers on this keyboard, and I began to type. Typing, thinking, more typing, more thinking, some momentum. That’s how it goes.

No, it’s not that simple. As Al Mele explains in his excellent recent book, Backsliding: Understanding Weakness of Will, “ . core weak-will action is free, sane, intentional action that, as the nondepressed agent consciously recognizes at the time of the action, is contrary to his better judgment based on practical reasoning (p. 57; emphasis added).”

Depressed agents are different in important ways. We understand that their self-regulation is undermined somehow, their practical reasoning impaired, perhaps. Depression complicates our consideration of procrastination or weak-willed action. It’s not only or “just” about putting one foot in front of the other.

The thing is, a focus on simple self-regulation skills can help. The research indicates this important relationship. My experiences show it to be a personal truth.

Little self-control “wins” around intentional action fuel us. It is truly “one foot in front of the other.” Just showing up. Pretty good steps in the right — or should I say “write?” — direction.

It’s a simple way to stop putting off hard things

How to beat procrastination 29 simple tweaks to make

Nov 12, 2019 · 4 min read

How to beat procrastination 29 simple tweaks to make

How to beat procrastination 29 simple tweaks to makeIf something’s important to us, we want to get it done right. The challenge is, the longer we wait, the more perfect it needs to be to justify the waiting. Perhaps in a bid to stay consistent with our inaction, our brains come up with reasons to wait longer to do something. We build it up in our heads. For example, it must be really difficult to do, that’s why we’ve waited so long.

This is how one form of wr i ter’s block tends to build up. The more time we spend waiting, the more we expect from the final work, the more impossible the expectation is to meet, and the more discouraged we get when we actually write.

The main challenge is, if we don’t take action, nothing happens. And we don’t feel ready to take action today — what if we could do something better tomorrow, when we were more ready (or had more time, researched better options, or had more definitive plans, etc.)?

The solution to this is simple: Change your default to take action, and separate the acts of completing a task and releasing that task. Thanks to the power of technology, we can choose to take action, complete a task, and schedule it to release later into the world. We can always choose to take it back if we change our minds between actually completing the task, and releasing the task into the world.

You can take five minutes to change that with technology by scheduling something to happen in the future.

Example #1: Sending an important email

Let’s say you have someone you want to reach out to. Maybe it’s asking someone you read about how they did something, or whether they know about a related topic you’re researching. You respect them, you see an opportunity to learn, but you don’t want to make a fool of yourself.

Today, you can write up that email in five minutes. With an email finder tool like Norbert, or Name2email, you can find someone’s email in less than one minute. You can then write up a subject line, “Connecting with [insert name here] + topic,” and write up your body text. Or, if you’re really at a loss for where to start, you can Google an email template as a starting point, and tweak it accordingly.

Yeah, the email might not look perfect after five minutes, but that’s ok. With a tool like Boomerang, or Outlook, or the Apple mail app, we can schedule email to go out any time in the future. If we feel ok about it, schedule it to go out two mornings from now. If you feel terrible about it, schedule it to go out a month from now. Then close your email client.

The magic is, the email is now going to go out, until you cancel it. If you want to go back in and change it, you can. You always have the option to cancel it, but if you leave it alone and nothing happens, it’s going to go out, and you may make a new acquaintance.

Example #2: Writing a blog post

If you’re writing up a blog post, just write 250 words in your word processor of choice and toss it up on Medium. Sign in with your Twitter account, and paste your story into Medium. Schedule it to go live a week from now. Or, if you feel terrible about it, schedule it to go live a month from now. Seth Godin publishes everyday at his blog because he has a queue ready to go. Even if he doesn’t feel great about it, it goes up.

Again, the default has changed. Your brain now knows that you have an article scheduled to go live. You will either edit it, add to it, or pull the trigger to cancel it. Either way, you’re making the default to publish your work, instead of letting it wither away in some unused folder on your Google Docs (or in the recesses of your mind).

Example #3: Setting a default, pre-decided option

We all have parts of our lives we need to maintain. For example, if you want to make a choice — a gym, a shirt, someone to come fix your light fixture — do 10 minutes of research today, find someone slightly pricey but reliable (e.g., with good reviews, or potentially a referral), and put time in your calendar (or a task in your to-do list) to move forward on the option.

Sure — the slight premium you might be paying (an extra 10% for not spending 100% more time researching), might mean you might not get the best deal in the world. But it also means you don’t have to hunt around for a gym (and can start working out), you can wear the shirt to occasions, and you no longer have to squint your eyes when watching Netflix.

Make ‘someday’ today

“The four most dangerous words to accomplishing your dreams are: ‘I’ll do it later,’” Shane Parrish from Farnam Street writes on Twitter. But the danger of later expands far beyond dreams. Years later, these things we meant to finish remain undone, trapped by the inertia of our desire for better results.

The best time to have started, and finished, most of these tasks is yesterday. The next best one is today. Remember, for the vast majority of tasks, done is better than perfect. Taking action by default means not letting your tendency for later, or fixation on getting something perfect, be a barrier to you actually getting something done.

What might explain this relationship?

THE BASICS

  • What Is Depression?
  • Find a therapist to overcome depression

If I were to name two common problems or experiences that many people share, they would be depression and procrastination. Not surprisingly, they’re related. Here’s some recent research and personal experiences that provide some insight into this relationship.

I’ve been depressed the past few months. You can measure the time since my last blog post. I haven’t felt like writing. I haven’t felt like doing much of anything.

They’re not unexpected, these feelings. My mother became ill late January. She died in late March. Between the exhausting travel and emotional drain of palliative care, depression can be expected. Although it wasn’t a surprise, it ran me over pretty hard.

During this time, life marched on, of course. I supervised theses, did my administrative work, etc. Before I explain how some things got done, I want to tell you a bit about one of the theses that I supervised.

It was a project that we put together last fall. One of my many talented — and one of the most intelligent — students who worked with me this past year began a study on the relationship between depression, procrastination, and self-regulation skills.

She collected data from undergraduate students using self-report measures. Of course, the sample and data have limitations, but the findings are of interest nonetheless. As expected, she found that scores on the measure of depression were significantly correlated with scores on the measure of procrastination.

This positive correlation indicates that the more depressed we are, the more we report procrastination, and vice versa. No surprises there. Previous research has reflected this as well, and who hasn’t experienced how these two dark knights can ride together?

What was interesting was that when we statistically controlled for the measure of self-regulation skills, the relationship between depression and procrastination essentially disappeared (from a statistical standpoint).

This analysis indicates that the relationship between depression and procrastination is indirect. It is mediated by self-regulation. Self-regulation is a key factor related to both of these psychological constructs.

Lower scores on the measure self-regulation skills are related to higher depression and procrastination scores. Hmm.

These thesis results were emerging as I was doing a nose dive emotionally over the winter term. My experiences were an embodiment, of sorts, of these results. The thing is, I managed to turn it around a bit.

I knew I felt depressed. I often felt like crying. My eating and sleep habits were wacky. I was sad, distracted, not able to concentrate. So, I focused on self-regulation skills. I focused on putting one foot in front of the other, so to speak.

(Others in my life focused on helping me in a variety of ways, so don’t read this as an individual’s efforts alone. I’m just writing about a part of this experience here — the part that I experienced inside of me, if you will.)

I’d set an intention, and I’d simply get started . despite how I was feeling. I edited text. I attended meetings. I made the kids’ breakfast, walked them to the bus. I did the chores around the farm.

No joy in most or any of it, but I did each thing as intended. Showing up is half the battle with self-regulation.

As I succeeded despite my feelings each day, I avoided most of the procrastination. With time, my sadness lifted, as exogenous depression will. And, I hadn’t fed that beast with procrastination. Nothing like not getting things done to drag myself down deeper into that darkness.

So, I’m writing now. I set the intention to write. I’m writing.

Is it this simple? Yes, and no.

Yes, it’s that simple. I do have to exert my own agency moment to moment. That’s life. I put my fingers on this keyboard, and I began to type. Typing, thinking, more typing, more thinking, some momentum. That’s how it goes.

No, it’s not that simple. As Al Mele explains in his excellent recent book, Backsliding: Understanding Weakness of Will, “ . core weak-will action is free, sane, intentional action that, as the nondepressed agent consciously recognizes at the time of the action, is contrary to his better judgment based on practical reasoning (p. 57; emphasis added).”

Depressed agents are different in important ways. We understand that their self-regulation is undermined somehow, their practical reasoning impaired, perhaps. Depression complicates our consideration of procrastination or weak-willed action. It’s not only or “just” about putting one foot in front of the other.

The thing is, a focus on simple self-regulation skills can help. The research indicates this important relationship. My experiences show it to be a personal truth.

Little self-control “wins” around intentional action fuel us. It is truly “one foot in front of the other.” Just showing up. Pretty good steps in the right — or should I say “write?” — direction.

It’s a simple way to stop putting off hard things

How to beat procrastination 29 simple tweaks to make

Nov 12, 2019 · 4 min read

How to beat procrastination 29 simple tweaks to make

How to beat procrastination 29 simple tweaks to makeIf something’s important to us, we want to get it done right. The challenge is, the longer we wait, the more perfect it needs to be to justify the waiting. Perhaps in a bid to stay consistent with our inaction, our brains come up with reasons to wait longer to do something. We build it up in our heads. For example, it must be really difficult to do, that’s why we’ve waited so long.

This is how one form of wr i ter’s block tends to build up. The more time we spend waiting, the more we expect from the final work, the more impossible the expectation is to meet, and the more discouraged we get when we actually write.

The main challenge is, if we don’t take action, nothing happens. And we don’t feel ready to take action today — what if we could do something better tomorrow, when we were more ready (or had more time, researched better options, or had more definitive plans, etc.)?

The solution to this is simple: Change your default to take action, and separate the acts of completing a task and releasing that task. Thanks to the power of technology, we can choose to take action, complete a task, and schedule it to release later into the world. We can always choose to take it back if we change our minds between actually completing the task, and releasing the task into the world.

You can take five minutes to change that with technology by scheduling something to happen in the future.

Example #1: Sending an important email

Let’s say you have someone you want to reach out to. Maybe it’s asking someone you read about how they did something, or whether they know about a related topic you’re researching. You respect them, you see an opportunity to learn, but you don’t want to make a fool of yourself.

Today, you can write up that email in five minutes. With an email finder tool like Norbert, or Name2email, you can find someone’s email in less than one minute. You can then write up a subject line, “Connecting with [insert name here] + topic,” and write up your body text. Or, if you’re really at a loss for where to start, you can Google an email template as a starting point, and tweak it accordingly.

Yeah, the email might not look perfect after five minutes, but that’s ok. With a tool like Boomerang, or Outlook, or the Apple mail app, we can schedule email to go out any time in the future. If we feel ok about it, schedule it to go out two mornings from now. If you feel terrible about it, schedule it to go out a month from now. Then close your email client.

The magic is, the email is now going to go out, until you cancel it. If you want to go back in and change it, you can. You always have the option to cancel it, but if you leave it alone and nothing happens, it’s going to go out, and you may make a new acquaintance.

Example #2: Writing a blog post

If you’re writing up a blog post, just write 250 words in your word processor of choice and toss it up on Medium. Sign in with your Twitter account, and paste your story into Medium. Schedule it to go live a week from now. Or, if you feel terrible about it, schedule it to go live a month from now. Seth Godin publishes everyday at his blog because he has a queue ready to go. Even if he doesn’t feel great about it, it goes up.

Again, the default has changed. Your brain now knows that you have an article scheduled to go live. You will either edit it, add to it, or pull the trigger to cancel it. Either way, you’re making the default to publish your work, instead of letting it wither away in some unused folder on your Google Docs (or in the recesses of your mind).

Example #3: Setting a default, pre-decided option

We all have parts of our lives we need to maintain. For example, if you want to make a choice — a gym, a shirt, someone to come fix your light fixture — do 10 minutes of research today, find someone slightly pricey but reliable (e.g., with good reviews, or potentially a referral), and put time in your calendar (or a task in your to-do list) to move forward on the option.

Sure — the slight premium you might be paying (an extra 10% for not spending 100% more time researching), might mean you might not get the best deal in the world. But it also means you don’t have to hunt around for a gym (and can start working out), you can wear the shirt to occasions, and you no longer have to squint your eyes when watching Netflix.

Make ‘someday’ today

“The four most dangerous words to accomplishing your dreams are: ‘I’ll do it later,’” Shane Parrish from Farnam Street writes on Twitter. But the danger of later expands far beyond dreams. Years later, these things we meant to finish remain undone, trapped by the inertia of our desire for better results.

The best time to have started, and finished, most of these tasks is yesterday. The next best one is today. Remember, for the vast majority of tasks, done is better than perfect. Taking action by default means not letting your tendency for later, or fixation on getting something perfect, be a barrier to you actually getting something done.

. and why a shift in your thinking could make a huge difference.

THE BASICS

  • What Is Procrastination?
  • Find a therapist near me

How to beat procrastination 29 simple tweaks to make

When you look at most people’s list of bad habits they want to break, procrastination is typically one of them. Procrastination is hardly a new trend; it’s been around for centuries. According to Dr. Timothy Pychyl, a master of procrastination (I mean, a master scholar of procrastination), the earliest documented reference of procrastination is in a sermon written in 1682.

What makes procrastination so robust? What makes it so hard to wipe out even though we know how much it affects not only our productivity but our peace of mind? If you struggle with procrastination and wonder why you haven’t been able to break the habit, consider these three things that keep procrastination flowing in our bloodstream.

1. Things Get Done

Procrastination means not starting to do the work until you are dangerously close to the deadline. And then, pushed against the deadline, you start working at a frenetic pace. Fighting the deadline gives you a powerful adrenaline rush. While you couldn’t be bothered with the task before, now you are full of energy. You focus your attention entirely on your almost-late project and ignore everything else. Your body can go for hours without sleep or food—copious amounts of coffee will do just fine.

Eventually, your last-minute frantic action pays off: The work gets done!

This way of getting things done gives you a false sense of confidence. It makes you believe that you can get any job done, regardless of how late you start. The thrill of achieving something that seemed so impossible—like creating an entire presentation for an important meeting in just one night—gives you an unforgettable high. You feel proud, relieved (and probably exhausted). But you did it! And maybe you can do it again . and when you think you are able to get anything done, regardless of how late you start, you have no motivation—no reason—to stop procrastinating

2. Life Goals Have No Deadlines

Procrastination means waiting till the last minute to get things done. But that only works when you know when the “last minute” is. Without a clearly defined and well-established deadline, you risk never getting the task done. Of course, not everything we have to or want to do comes with deadlines.

Consider life goals. Life goals have no deadlines. Early in our lives, there are some rough deadlines. People expect us to start crawling by 10 months and to start talking by about 24 months. We’re supposed to start primary school at about age 6 and finish high school by around 18. And at least some of us have to come to terms with the fact that our parents won’t be supporting us financially forever, so we know that at that point, we need to get a job.

Later in life, the deadlines get even looser. No one tells you exactly when you should start dating, for example, or what age is too late to marry. With more idiosyncratic goals, like taking the next step in your career, starting your own business, writing a book, learning French, becoming a mentor, or helping a charity, the deadlines are non-existent. No deadline means no pressure. No pressure means no action. And no action means no goal.

3. You Think Procrastination Is a Problem

We tend to think of procrastination as a problem—as a bad habit or an irreversible personality trait that will constantly drain our potential and get in the way of our achievements. But procrastination may not a problem at all. It may actually be a solution—a solution that your brain generates in response to the need to take action.

Procrastination is the tendency to delay taking action. It is the disconnect between intention and implementation. To translate a plan into action, your brain analyzes a vast amount of information from your internal and external environment, and makes decisions about what to do next. When you have all the information you need, you start working on a plan. If you don’t, your brain stalls. And that’s when you experience procrastination.

This could be a critical shift in your thinking: Instead of considering procrastination as a big problem, a habit you need to break, or a hardwired part of your personality, think of it as an alarm, or a red flag—a sign that something is missing. Something is preventing you from getting started and getting things done.

Your job is to discover what that is. When you discover it, the odds will be in your favor.

To read more about how to beat procrastination, get my free ebook, Getting Things Done SOONERR TM

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15 Ways Students Can Beat Procrastination Infographic

Procrastination is definitely not students’ friend. It makes students randomly search the web, watch funny youtube videos or constantly check twitter stream instead of doing things that matter. It kills their time and leads to failure. Now it’s time to beat it! The 15 Ways Students Can to Beat Procrastination Infographic presents 15 efficient techniques to get rid of procrastination and be more productive!

Procrastination – Beating Techniques

As many as 1 in 5 adults (not just students!) may be chronic procrastinators. But procrastination doesn’t necessarily equal lazy. Inaction is often caused by anxiety, fear of failure or negative perfectionism. To stop the stress caused by not getting things done, try these simple, scientifically-backed, solutions:

1. Know yourself

How: Understand how procrastination affects your life. Think about the habits that often cause it.
What it helps: Insight prevents you from feeling inadequate. Helps you understand the causes of procrastination.

2. Practice Effective Time Management

How: Create estimates for completing assignments. Compare accuracy of estimates across tasks.
What it helps: Simplifies working pattern with effective planning. Improves quality of work and avoids stress.

3. Change Your Perspective

How: Think about what attracted you to your assignments. Look beyond the grades to what interests you.
What it helps: Identifying personal goals improves engagement. Reassessing an assignment makes it less intimidating.

4. Commit to Assignments

How: Lis tasks that you’re confident you will complete. Make a point of crossing each task off.
What it helps: Rebuilds faith in your own abilities. Commits to making good on promises.

5. Work in Productive Environments

How: Choose where you work and with who wisely. Don’t study in places filled with distractions. e.g. TV.
What it helps: Helps focus on the immediate task. Removes obstacles to studying.

6. Be Realistic

How: Set reasonable targets to measure achievement. Be patient, change won’t come overnight.
What it helps: Avoids self-sabotage from unrealistic expectations. Unrealistic goals feed procrastination; why try the impossible?

7. Self-Talk Positively

How: Notice how you talk to yourself when procrastinating. Replace negative talk with positive.
What it helps: Stops negative thinking before it starts. Encourages you towards achieving goals.

8. Un-Schedule

How: Develop a flexible schedule that only includes important tasks. Keep plenty of time free for extracurricular activities.
What it helps: Rigid schedule can leave you feeling overwhelmed. Greater happiness from the work done.

9. Swiss-Cheese Tasks

How: Devote small chunks of time to a big task. Achieve as much as possible, without pressure.
What it helps: Tasks seem smaller with holes punched in them. Builds momentum and reduces obstacles.

10 . Don’t Indulge Fantasies

How: Stop fantasizing about desired results. Instead, devise practical steps to achieve them.
What it helps: Imagination is the enemy of motivation. Viewing outcomes objectively improves working energy.

11. Plan for Obstacles

How: List possible obstacles for completing assignments. Plan countermeasures, e.g., “Whenever I look at Twitter,I go for a break”.
Why it helps: Mentally prepares you in advance. Effectively counters procrastination.

12. Improve Learning Behavior

How: Focuses less on gratification. Focus more on learning for the future.
Why it helps: Develops correct behaviors in assessing mistakes. Improve behavior in combating procrastination.

13. Help Yourself

How: Ask your roommates or family not to indulge your habit. If you mess up, deal with the consequences alone.
Why it helps: People who expect help procrastinate more. Teaches self-sufficiency and independence.

14. Reward Progress

How: Create a reward system to celebrate successful tasks. Similarly, arrange small punishments for failures.
Why it helps: Positively reinforces effort and progress. Provides incentive and drive to achieve.

15. Learn to Forgive Yourself

How: If you slip up, don’t be hard on yourself. Understand that there is no quick-fix solution.
What it helps: Procrastination is often I rooted in your psychology. Forgiveness can improve future results.

Procrastination is more than putting off tasks; it’s a fear of action. The solution? Have faith in yourself, live in the present and set realistic goals you can successfully achieve.

How to beat procrastination 29 simple tweaks to make How to beat procrastination 29 simple tweaks to make

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Here is a buffet of tactics that can keep that career killer under control.

Posted Apr 22, 2015

THE BASICS

  • What Is Procrastination?
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How to beat procrastination 29 simple tweaks to make

A major reason why many of my career counseling clients have trouble finding and keeping work is that they’re procrastinators.

Indeed, procrastination is a career killer. I remember giving a talk to unemployed people and asking them to raise their hand if they considered themselves to be a procrastinator. Most of them raised their hand. In contrast, when I asked an audience of college presidents to raise their hand if they were a procrastinator, only a few did.

Do you want to procrastinate less? Really? If so, here are 11 strategies that may help:

1. Ask yourself, “Why don’t you procrastinate MORE?” For example, you might answer, “Because I’m afraid I’ll end up a bag lady.” Or “because my wife will divorce me.” Whatever. Often the reasons you come up with for why you don’t procrastinate more may be more persuasive to you than any reason I could suggest.

2. Have a conversation with your wiser twin: What do you tell yourself that rationalizes your procrastinating? The most common rationalization is: “I’ll feel more like doing it later.” How would your wiser twin respond to that?

3. Replace your Core Principle. Many procrastinators operate from the principle, “Work as little as I can get away with.” They opt to seek pleasure even if it means they’ll be only minimally productive.

Even if that doesn’t get them fired, they fail to realize how central productivity is to the life well led. I often try to explain that to clients this way:

Imagine there are two clones of you. Clone 1 strives for as much pleasure as possible and when feeling uncomfortable—for example when working on something hard—tries to escape to something pleasurable. Clone 2 realizes that you can have a lifetime of 100 percent pleasure by doing nothing but watching sitcoms, eating, laughing, getting stoned and having sex but, because the person who has done nothing for others, indeed been a parasite on others, is unlikely to feel good about how he or she is living life. So Clone 2 accepts that tackling some tasks will be uncomfortable in the service of being as productive as possible.

Is your core principle: Be as productive as possible or, get away with doing as little as possible? Do you want to change?

4. Procrastinate consciously. When tempted to procrastinate, ask yourself if the short-term pleasure of avoiding the task is worth sacrificing the long-term benefits of getting it done—whether pleasing your boss, reducing your risk of getting fired, or simply the good feeling of having gotten it done.

5. Make yourself do the first one-second task, even if it’s just to turn on the computer. Then do the next one-second task. You may well find yourself building momentum. Often, the hardest part is getting started.

6. If you get stuck, struggle for only one minute. If you don’t make progress by then, you probably won’t. Instead, you’ll get frustrated and thereby be more likely to procrastinate in the future. So when you hit a roadblock that you can’t solve in a minute, get help or see if you can complete the task without solving that problem.

7. Find the fun way to do it. Because procrastinators seek pleasure over responsibility, whenever a client is facing a task on which he might procrastinate, I encourage him to ask himself, “What’s a fun way to do it?” If you’re choosing a career, what’s the most fun career that would be realistic for you to aim for? If you’re looking for a job, would you find it more fun to schmooze, cold-contact employers, or answer ads? If you have a report to prepare, would you find it more fun to review the literature or to interview people?

8. Remember that if you don’t try, you guarantee failure. If you don’t try because that will allow you to save face: “I could have succeeded if I tried, ” ask yourself if that’s worth the price of guaranteed failure?

9. Break it into baby steps. Although that advice has become cliché, most people, especially procrastinators, are more likely to complete tasks when they break tasks into bits. Maybe even create a chart in which you list all the baby steps, so you can get the pleasure of checking them off and seeing your progress.

10. The Pomodoro Technique. This technique gets its name from those tomato-shaped kitchen timers—Pomodoro means tomato in Italian. You set a timer for 20 minutes—that’s called a pomodoro. You work until the bell goes off, then take a 5-minute break. Work another pomodoro and take another five minutes off. After the third pomodoro, you get 10 minutes off. Sounds hokey but it often works.

11. Try a to-do-list app, for example, Wunderlist or Todoist.

In sum, if you can make yourself use one or more of this article’s 11 tactics, you’ll likely soon get in the habit of trying to be as productive as possible and, in turn, be happier about yourself and the life you’re leading.