How to become an early riser and stay energetic

How to become an early riser and stay energetic

When I walked into the London offices at 7:25 a.m. that first day, I expected the place to be deserted. I was surprised to find the lights already on – and when I approached my temporary office, I saw that Ben, Nick, Gary, and Woody were already there working.

“Good morning!” I chimed, feeling that I had come upon new members of my secret fraternity. “You boys are here early!”

“Early bird catches the worm and all that,” Nick said.

I went into my office with a smile on my face. These four early risers comprised half the creative team. The fact that they were at work more than 90 minutes before 9:00 a.m. impressed me. Their good mood impressed me even more.

“I am going to be able to accomplish something here,” I thought.

You’ve seen the studies: Early risers are happier, healthier, and more productive at work. They stay in better shape, earn more money, and report that they are more satisfied with their lives. And even if you haven’t seen the studies, you’ve read about them in ETR.

“Get up early and seize the day!” we keep telling you.

Lots of ETR readers I’ve talked to say they can rationally accept the argument that early rising is good. But they can’t muster up the emotional or physical energy to actually do it.

They tell me they are “night” people. They have more energy at midnight, they say, than they do at 9:00 a.m. In fact, they say, they’d prefer to go to bed in the wee hours and wake up at noon if their jobs/spouses would allow it.

There is some scientific evidence to suggest they may be correct. Lots of research has been devoted to sleeping patterns in the past few years, and it’s clear that for some people (about 15 percent, I’ve read), “late to bed and late to rise” really is more natural.

But just because it’s a little harder for you to be an early riser doesn’t mean you shouldn’t try. The benefits are just too great and too numerous to ignore:

  • You will get more work done.
  • You will accomplish more important tasks.
  • You will advance your career more quickly.
  • You will be more respected at work.
  • You will make more money.
  • You will have more time to exercise.
  • You will be healthier.
  • You will be happier.

If you’d like to become an early riser but are having a difficult time convincing your body to cooperate, follow this 12-step program:

Early Riser Step 1: Stop blaming yourself.

It may not be a lack of willpower that is making you want to sleep till noon. It is more likely a combination of your genes, blood sugars, hormones… and bad habits. But aside from your genes, these are all things you have some control over.

Early Riser Step 2: Take melatonin, not chemicals, at night.

To get up early, you have to get to sleep early. If you have trouble falling asleep, try taking a melatonin supplement instead of a sleeping pill. Dr. Sears calls this hormone – which is produced by the body in response to darkness – “nature’s sleep regulator.”

Early Riser Step 3: Sleep in the dark.

The less light, the more melatonin your body naturally produces. So block out as much light as possible in your bedroom. Use blackout curtains or shades, and open them as soon as the alarm goes off.

Early Riser Step 4: Get plenty of fresh air.

Fresh air is good for sleeping and for wakefulness. If you sleep with the windows closed, get outside and breathe in some fresh air first thing in the morning.

Early Riser Step 5: Don’t eat before you sleep.

Your last meal or snack should be about three hours before you go to sleep. You’ll sleep sounder and feel much better in the morning.

Early Riser Step 6: Don’t use the snooze button.

According to the Sleep Disorders Center at Children’s Hospital in Philadelphia, you will have a much easier time getting up when the alarm first rings, rather than waking up, falling asleep again, and then waking up a second time.

Early Riser Step 7: Put flowers in your bedroom.

Researchers at Harvard reported that “non-morning people” said they were happier and more energetic if they woke in a room with fresh flowers.

Early Riser Step 8: Brighten up your walls.

Some studies have indicated that vibrant colors help activate the energy cells, so paint your bedroom a bright, cheery color to wake up to.

Early Riser Step 9: Stretch.

Five to 15 minutes of stretching in the sunlight will do wonders to get rid of any stiffness that may have settled in overnight. Yoga stretches are especially good.

Early Riser Step 10: Exercise.

Supplement the stretching with exercise. After stretching, I alternate between calisthenics and a PACE routine – usually sprinting or stair climbing.

Early Riser Step 11: Start the day with a smile.

Before you even wash your face, do a set of 25 smile repetitions. Just stand in front of the mirror and smile as brightly as you can… 25 times. The physical act of smiling produces endorphins that will give you energy and drive.

Early Riser Step 12: Wake up just one minute earlier every day.

It wasn’t until I hit my thirties that I came to understand the value of waking up early. I was bringing home the bacon, as they say, having mastered the art of making money. But rising at 8:30 every morning left me no time to accomplish other goals. So I started setting my alarm for one minute earlier every day.

Soon I was up at 8 a.m…. then 7:30… then 6:30… and, eventually, at one point in my career, 5:30. (These days, I wake up a little later – usually 6:00 or 6:30.)

Rising early has given me the time to write fiction, study Spanish, get in great physical shape, spend more time with my family, and more. Become an early riser yourself, and there’s no telling what you can accomplish.

Mark Morgan Ford

Mark Morgan Ford was the creator of Early To Rise. In 2011, Mark retired from ETR and now writes the Wealth Builders Club. His advice, in our opinion, continues to get better and better with every essay, particularly in the controversial ones we have shared today. We encourage you to read everything you can that has been written by Mark.

At first, I saw being an early riser as nothing more than a bootcamp.

Everyone reading this know exactly why I felt like that, and I know you saw it in a similar way too.

But when I do wake up early, I experience tons of benefits including marathon runner energy throughout the day and having more time to do what I want.

Here are 5 tips I’ve discovered to be most helpful in making the transition from a night owl into a rooster.

1. Get up when you wake up

I don’t recommend using an alarm clock, it doesn’t let you wake up naturally and in general it pisses me off.

Get up your ass immediately when you wake up, yes I know it feels heavy, your bed feels so comfortable it feels divine, you want to continue that dream with your crush.

Go do something immediately, drink a lot of water, open up that curtain, turn on the lights, go brush your teeth and splash your face with cold water, make up your bed immediately.

Easier said than done? Oh yes, of course.

If it’s easy then everyone can do it, and it would be difficult only for the first few times, once it becomes a habit you would feel wrong not to get up immediately.

2. Make an early plan

Okay now you are awake, and you have several more hours for the day.

So now what? What are you going do with these extra times?

If you don’t know what to do, you didn’t plan it at all then you would risk of getting to sleep again which eliminates all the effort that you just did to wake up.

Before you become an early riser, make a note on what you would like to do when you succeeded on waking up early.

Maybe you want to exercise, read a book, work on your side business, create a new habit, or simply clean out your home.

Make a clear plan on what to do so you will know what to do, the results and difference that you make will fuel your burning desire to make waking up early a habit.

3. Make it a Social Activity

You can go out and run, and meet other people who are doing the same thing, socialize with them and help you motivate yourself.

Maybe your neighbors whom you never talked to is an early riser and you meet them during morning walk, you can even build a new relationship.

The more people you get involved in making your new habit a daily part of your life, the easier it’ll be to succeed

4. Sleep Early

This may not be surprising, but yes especially if you are people who go moody when you don’t get enough sleep.

If you sleep for 7 to 8 hours and you want to wake up at 5 A.M then you should go to sleep no more than 10 P.M

You need to sleep early if you want to wake up early.

5. Start Gradually

Have you seen people who never exercise going to the gym for the first time and do 100 kg of bench press? Me neither, at most they would be injured and quit.

If you usually wake up at 9 A.M or even during high noon, you don’t want to blast your way immediately to 5 A.M

Start off gradually, wake up 1 hour earlier than your usual routine. Then another hour, another, and another until you reach the time when you want to wake up regularly.

If you can blast your way off immediately to 5 A.M by all means I encourage you to do so.

6. Move, move, move!

No you don’t need to have expensive gym membership to be productive.

It doesn’t take much space and time to move your body and pump up your energy out of the roof, all it takes is you and your body.

If you are an outdoor person, you can walk around your house, ride a bike, or jog your way up to the new you.

If you choose to stay in your house, or you don’t know how to exercise, you can boot up your YouTube and search up an indoor cardio workout.

Waking up early as a habit can be the new experience that you are looking for, it is simply refreshing, energizing, and a wonderful feeling to have to know that you accomplished much early in the day!

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Is Being a Night Owl a Myth (And Why Become an Early Riser)

  • April 8, 2013
  • by Lidiya Kesarovska

There are two kinds of people in the world according to the time they get up: an early riser and a not so early one.

Thоse from the first group have tried hard to make it a habit and a lifestyle. While the second group of people is either struggling with that, or people simply think they are more productive in the evening/night and can’t make themselves wake up at dawn.

This, like most of the things we do, is just a strong habit that we tend to avoid giving up because of many previous failures.

The inability to rise up early is a result of staying up late the night before.

A few reasons we go to bed late and can’t fall asleep easily are:

  • We watch TV/stay in front of the computer right before going to bed.

That makes our mind think we are still in the active part of the day and doesn’t let it rest.

  • We eat/drink before falling asleep.

That is an inexcusable behavior towards our body because it overloads the digestive system. A dinner before bed also wastes a lot of the organism’s energy which it needs for other functions while we sleep.

The body is detoxicating and resting during the night and although our digestion is still working pretty fine, we shouldn’t put so much pressure on it.

A light dinner 1-2 hours before bed and a reasonable amount of water would be perfect.

  • Stress is ruining our sleep.

Engaging the mind at that time is not a good idea as this way we won’t be able to fall asleep and our heads will be full of thoughts (mostly negative), problems, plans and so on.

What you need in the evening is a relaxed mind and body.

Saying that we are most productive in the evening is just an excuse.

How to become an early riser and stay energetic

Many people stay up late at night, and I mean really late. As a result, on the next day it’s not only great agony for them to get up, but their work is at a low level. They just can’t concentrate on anything.

Then as the day goes by, they become more energetic and active, but at what price?

In the beginning I also thought I was doing everything better in the second part of the day – in the evening and mostly by night.
I’ve been living like that for years, always postponing waking up early (although the desire to develop this habit never got out of my head).

I even had a period of 2-3 months in which I had turned nights into days. Actually, I did my best writing at that time, but I gave up on everything else. It was just me and the night. Every next day I was full of regrets, I soon started getting depressed.

Luckily, it was just a phase, and it went away.
After that I continued the fight with my sleeping routine. It was hard, but I just knew it was the right thing to do.

I was seeing all these energetic people jogging at the park, drinking their coffee on the way to work, starting the day with a smile and gratitude. And all this was happening in the early morning.

After I did some reading and researching, I saw a tendency – successful and positive people tend to get up early and do most of their work then.

Eventually, I achieved that. Soon I found the power of the morning routine and my days became meaningful.

After including breakfast some time after I rise up, I managed to change my whole eating plan and got over the late-night visits to the fridge, which was one of my biggest problems.

I simply moved every meal of mine to an earlier hour. Now I am doing all the work and writing (that I thought I was able to produce only late in the evening) early in the morning. And it is even better.

So as you see there is no such thing as being a night owl.

Don’t waste your precious days and don’t forget that the body needs just around six hours to rest, not more. Develop this habit and you will be a new person in a couple of weeks.

Another plus is what John Steinbeck says:

“It is a common experience that a problem difficult at night is resolved in the morning after the committee of sleep has worked on it”.

There is no recipe for success here and a lot of persistence, patience and will is needed. But I assure you that if I can do it, you can too!

Change your sleeping routine for good and soon you will be surprised by your own results and accomplishments.

There will be no more disappointments, wasted days and bad mood. This is an important step to success and without it you can go no further.
I believe in you but I think nothing will ever happen unless you believe in yourself! So come out of the dark and embrace the daylight.

What is your sleeping routine? Are you an early riser? And if not, do you want to become one?

How to become an early riser and stay energetic

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Hey, I’m Lidiya

How to become an early riser and stay energetic

Thanks for stopping by. I’m Lidiya, a blogger, course creator and founder of Let’s Reach Success.

I help high vibe women create an abundant, value-driven business so they can live a fearless life and provide epic value.

Are you an early riser?

Or would you rather hit that snooze button for as long a possible?

“Lose an hour in the morning, and you will be all day hunting for it.”

It’s well established that becoming an early riser is one of the key factors to being healthier, happier, and more productive.

It seems that as I think of most highly successful people, just about all of them are early risers.

It’s been written that the majority of people that are early risers – or become early risers – will be more productive, more creative, have more energy, and potentially live healthier.

The reason I am writing about this is because of the challenges people have with exercise and nutrition.

By getting up earlier and starting the day with exercise and proper nutrition, wouldn’t you agree that you’re setting the stage for the entire day?

In my experience, when my mornings start off with the right morning rituals – proper fuel (a nutrition dense breakfast), some type of physical activity, and the proper positive mindset (reading, writing, thinking) – the rest of the day seems energized.

I seem to have a much more productive and vibrant day ahead.

Yes, there are going to be people that are “night owls.”

But, most people are healthier and more productive by establishing clear morning rituals.

To learn learn more about early morning routines or “positive energy rituals” as Tony Schwartz describes, check out the great book, “The Power of Full Engagement.”

Anyway, here’s 5 simple steps to help you become more healthier, more energetic, and more productive with your day-to-day lifestyle.

  1. Take a look at why you may not be an early riser. Are you staying up too late? Are you not motivated to get up earlier? Do you have a reason to get up earlier? Is the reward great enough for you to do this? What will you gain? How will you feel? Can you commit to just 1 week of getting up earlier?
  2. Go to sleep earlier. An obvious step, but it has to be mentioned. Maybe it’s as simple getting to bed just a little earlier each night.
  3. If you eat before bed, make sure it’s the right foods. Don’t eat a large meal before bed. Don’t eat a big carbohydrate meal prior to bed. Nuts, vegetables, lean protein, or small glass of milk are all great options. You want your hormones to be stable and allow your body to optimally recover during sleep. Don’t gorge before retiring, but feed your body with the right nutrients for muscle growth and repair.
  4. Sleep well. Make sure it’s dark in your room to elevate the levels of melatonin in your body. Melatonin is elevated at night when it becomes dark and by keeping things dark in your room will help to produce more melatonin – “nature’s sleep regulator.” The darker, the more melatonin your body produces.
  5. Start getting up earlier, slowly. What I mean here is to start to set your alarm a few minutes earlier each day, maybe just 5 or 10 minutes earlier until you get up at your desired time. So, if you typically get up at 7:30 and you want to get up and 6:30, then you start by getting up just a little earlier each day, until you are where you need to be. You do this after you have planned out exactly what you are going to do with the “extra” time you now have to be productive in the morning.

Getting up earlier will do you a world of good and can change your life significantly.

This isn’t really a question.

Having a clear morning ritual that sets up the day can be life-changing.

Again, the benefits are vast in terms of being more productive, energetic, healthy, and fit.

If you’re challenged by not having the time to train or workout the way you want to, try these simple 5 steps and work to become an early riser.

Until we can find a way to extend the day, I’ve found that becoming an earlier riser can help you gain some extra time for your personal goals.

Benefits of Waking Up Earlier

Even waking up an hour early can make a huge impact on your day. The biggest ones I noticed personal are:

  • Productivity: Let’s start with the obvious – you have an extra hour carved out to get your goals done. Having this time has given me a chance to set up and plan the day without feeling rushed.
  • Creativity: This quiet time allows me to ruminate more and I feel I can tap into my creative space easier.
  • Stress Relief: Having this extra time for myself has alleviate some stress. I read and reflect on some scriptures which has helped me be more positive.
  • Healthy Habits: While I don’t exercise in the morning, I have been better with eating better, starting with breakfast. Since I’m not in a rush I can enjoy a real meal.

Finding My Path as an Early Riser

While I don’t typically sleep in (little ones will make sure of that!), I struggled with getting up earlier.

It seemed like I could do it once in a blue moon, but I usually woke up feeling groggy and unfocused.

However I have finally broken through this past month and have been able to wake up early and energized (with no alarm clock needed).

5 Ways to Become an Early Riser

  • Have a purpose. Waking up early in itself isn’t motivation for me. I needed to have a specific reason and for me having an extra hour for my writing gave me the push and desire to see this through.
  • Adjust slowly. I built up waking up over a week, choosing 15 minute increments. That allowed my body to accept this new change easier.
  • Create a bedtime routine. To make sure I woke feeling refreshed, I began going to bed a little earlier. I wound down by reading some fiction.
  • Make a goal for the next day. It doesn’t have to be big or complicated, just have something in mind for what you want to accomplish in the morning. I found looking forward to something energized me.
  • Savor the morning. I take a short break from writing to watch the sun rise. It’s a simple, but powerful way to reset yourself before the daily chaos comes in.

These tips helped me to overcome my hurdles and become an early riser. I hope they give you a way to creating productive and less stressful mornings.

Thoughts on Becoming a Early Riser

How many of you are natural early risers? How many of you had to adjust before you made the change? What helped?

Are you an early riser?

Or would you rather hit that snooze button for as long a possible?

“Lose an hour in the morning, and you will be all day hunting for it.”

It’s well established that becoming an early riser is one of the key factors to being healthier, happier, and more productive.

It seems that as I think of most highly successful people, just about all of them are early risers.

It’s been written that the majority of people that are early risers – or become early risers – will be more productive, more creative, have more energy, and potentially live healthier.

The reason I am writing about this is because of the challenges people have with exercise and nutrition.

By getting up earlier and starting the day with exercise and proper nutrition, wouldn’t you agree that you’re setting the stage for the entire day?

In my experience, when my mornings start off with the right morning rituals – proper fuel (a nutrition dense breakfast), some type of physical activity, and the proper positive mindset (reading, writing, thinking) – the rest of the day seems energized.

I seem to have a much more productive and vibrant day ahead.

Yes, there are going to be people that are “night owls.”

But, most people are healthier and more productive by establishing clear morning rituals.

To learn learn more about early morning routines or “positive energy rituals” as Tony Schwartz describes, check out the great book, “The Power of Full Engagement.”

Anyway, here’s 5 simple steps to help you become more healthier, more energetic, and more productive with your day-to-day lifestyle.

  1. Take a look at why you may not be an early riser. Are you staying up too late? Are you not motivated to get up earlier? Do you have a reason to get up earlier? Is the reward great enough for you to do this? What will you gain? How will you feel? Can you commit to just 1 week of getting up earlier?
  2. Go to sleep earlier. An obvious step, but it has to be mentioned. Maybe it’s as simple getting to bed just a little earlier each night.
  3. If you eat before bed, make sure it’s the right foods. Don’t eat a large meal before bed. Don’t eat a big carbohydrate meal prior to bed. Nuts, vegetables, lean protein, or small glass of milk are all great options. You want your hormones to be stable and allow your body to optimally recover during sleep. Don’t gorge before retiring, but feed your body with the right nutrients for muscle growth and repair.
  4. Sleep well. Make sure it’s dark in your room to elevate the levels of melatonin in your body. Melatonin is elevated at night when it becomes dark and by keeping things dark in your room will help to produce more melatonin – “nature’s sleep regulator.” The darker, the more melatonin your body produces.
  5. Start getting up earlier, slowly. What I mean here is to start to set your alarm a few minutes earlier each day, maybe just 5 or 10 minutes earlier until you get up at your desired time. So, if you typically get up at 7:30 and you want to get up and 6:30, then you start by getting up just a little earlier each day, until you are where you need to be. You do this after you have planned out exactly what you are going to do with the “extra” time you now have to be productive in the morning.

Getting up earlier will do you a world of good and can change your life significantly.

This isn’t really a question.

Having a clear morning ritual that sets up the day can be life-changing.

Again, the benefits are vast in terms of being more productive, energetic, healthy, and fit.

If you’re challenged by not having the time to train or workout the way you want to, try these simple 5 steps and work to become an early riser.

How to become an early riser and stay energetic

How to become an early riser and stay energetic

by Jordan Lejuwaan

It is well to be up before daybreak, for such habits contribute to health, wealth, and wisdom.
– Aristotle

Are morning people born or made? In my case it was definitely made. In my early 20s, I rarely went to bed before midnight, and I’d almost always sleep in late. I usually didn’t start hitting my stride each day until late afternoon.

But after a while I couldn’t ignore the high correlation between success and rising early, even in my own life. On those rare occasions where I did get up early, I noticed that my productivity was almost always higher, not just in the morning but all throughout the day. And I also noticed a significant feeling of well-being. So being the proactive goal-achiever I was, I set out to become a habitual early riser. I promptly set my alarm clock for 5AM…

… and the next morning, I got up just before noon.

I tried again many more times, each time not getting very far with it. I figured I must have been born without the early riser gene. Whenever my alarm went off, my first thought was always to stop that blasted noise and go back to sleep. I tabled this habit for a number of years, but eventually I came across some sleep research that showed me that I was going about this problem the wrong way. Once I applied those ideas, I was able to become an early riser consistently.

It’s hard to become an early riser using the wrong strategy. But with the right strategy, it’s relatively easy.

The most common wrong strategy is this: You assume that if you’re going to get up earlier, you’d better go to bed earlier. So you figure out how much sleep you’re getting now, and then just shift everything back a few hours. If you now sleep from midnight to 8am, you figure you’ll go to bed at 10pm and get up at 6am instead. Sounds very reasonable, but it will usually fail.

It seems there are two main schools of thought about sleep patterns. One is that you should go to bed and get up at the same times every day. It’s like having an alarm clock on both ends — you try to sleep the same hours each night. This seems practical for living in modern society. We need predictability in our schedules. And we need to ensure adequate rest.

The second school says you should listen to your body’s needs and go to bed when you’re tired and get up when you naturally wake up. This approach is rooted in biology. Our bodies should know how much rest we need, so we should listen to them.

Through trial and error, I found out for myself that both of these schools are suboptimal sleep patterns. Both of them are wrong if you care about productivity. Here’s why:

If you sleep set hours, you’ll sometimes go to bed when you aren’t sleepy enough. If it’s taking you more than five minutes to fall asleep each night, you aren’t sleepy enough. You’re wasting time lying in bed awake and not being asleep. Another problem is that you’re assuming you need the same number of hours of sleep every night, which is a false assumption. Your sleep needs vary from day to day.

If you sleep based on what your body tells you, you’ll probably be sleeping more than you need — in many cases a lot more, like 10-15 hours more per week (the equivalent of a full waking day). A lot of people who sleep this way get 8+ hours of sleep per night, which is usually too much. Also, your mornings may be less predictable if you’re getting up at different times. And because our natural rhythms are sometimes out of tune with the 24-hour clock, you may find that your sleep times begin to drift.

The optimal solution for me has been to combine both approaches. It’s very simple, and many early risers do this without even thinking about it, but it was a mental breakthrough for me nonetheless. The solution was to go to bed when I’m sleepy (and only when I’m sleepy) and get up with an alarm clock at a fixed time (7 days per week). So I always get up at the same time (in my case 5am), but I go to bed at different times every night.

I go to bed when I’m too sleepy to stay up. My sleepiness test is that if I couldn’t read a book for more than a page or two without drifting off, I’m ready for bed. Most of the time when I go to bed, I’m asleep within three minutes. I lie down, get comfortable, and immediately I’m drifting off. Sometimes I go to bed at 9:30pm; other times I stay up until midnight. Most of the time I go to bed between 10-11pm. If I’m not sleepy, I stay up until I can’t keep my eyes open any longer. Reading is an excellent activity to do during this time, since it becomes obvious when I’m too sleepy to read.

When my alarm goes off every morning, I turn it off, stretch for a couple seconds, and sit up. I don’t think about it. I’ve learned that the longer it takes me to get up, the more likely I am to try to sleep in. So I don’t allow myself to have conversations in my head about the benefits of sleeping in once the alarm goes off. Even if I want to sleep in, I always get up right away.

After a few days of using this approach, I found that my sleep patterns settled into a natural rhythm. If I got too little sleep one night, I’d automatically be sleepier earlier and get more sleep the next night. And if I had lots of energy and wasn’t tired, I’d sleep less. My body learned when to knock me out because it knew I would always get up at the same time and that my wake-up time wasn’t negotiable.

A side effect was that on average, I slept about 90 minutes less per night, but I actually felt more well-rested. I was sleeping almost the entire time I was in bed.

I read that most insomniacs are people who go to bed when they aren’t sleepy. If you aren’t sleepy and find yourself unable to fall asleep quickly, get up and stay awake for a while. Resist sleep until your body begins to release the hormones that rob you of consciousness. If you simply go to bed when you’re sleepy and then get up at a fixed time, you’ll cure your insomnia. The first night you’ll stay up late, but you’ll fall asleep right away. You may be tired that first day from getting up too early and getting only a few hours of sleep the whole night, but you’ll slog through the day and will want to go to bed earlier that second night. After a few days, you’ll settle into a pattern of going to bed at roughly the same time and falling asleep right away.

So if you want to become an early riser (or just exert more control over your sleep patterns), then try this: Go to bed only when you’re too sleepy to stay up, and get up at a fixed time every morning.

କେତେବେଳେ ଶଯ୍ୟାତ୍ୟାଗ କରିବା ଉଚିତ ? ବ୍ରହ୍ମ ମୁହୁର୍ତ୍ତ କ’ଣ ? ଶଯ୍ୟାତ୍ୟାଗ ପୂର୍ବରୁ ଧରିତ୍ରୀ ମାତାଙ୍କୁ ପ୍ରଣାମ କାହିଁକି କରାଯାଏ ? ଶାସ୍ତ୍ର ଏବଂ ବିଜ୍ଞାନର ଏହା ଉପରେ କ’ଣ ରହିଛି ମତ ? ପଢ଼ନ୍ତୁ, ଜାଣନ୍ତୁ ଏବଂ ଦୈନନ୍ଦିନ ଜୀବନରେ କାମରେ ଲଗାଇ ସ୍ୱାସ୍ଥ୍ୟବାନ ରୁହନ୍ତୁ.

How to become an early riser and stay energetic

ମୋନିକା ମହାନ୍ତି, ନୂଆଦିଲ୍ଲୀ: ଏକଥା ତ ଆମେ ସମସ୍ତେ ଜାଣିଛେ କି ଯଦି ଆମର ସକାଳ ଟି ଖରାପ ହୋଇ ଥାଏ, ତାହେଲେ ଦିନଯାକର ସବୁ କାମ ବିଗିଡି ଯାଏ । ତାହାଠୁ ଭଲ କି ନିଜର ସକାଳ ଭଲ ବନାନ୍ତୁ, ଦିନଟି ଆପେ ଆପେ ଭଲରେ କଟିବ । ଆଜି କାଲିର ଯୁବ ପିଢ଼ି ଶାସ୍ତ୍ରରେ ଲିଖିତ କଥାବସ୍ତୁ ଉପରେ ବିଶ୍ୱାସ କରନ୍ତି ନାହିଁ । କିନ୍ତୁ ପ୍ରକୃତରେ କଥାବସ୍ତୁ ଆଜି ମଧ୍ୟ ବହୁତ ସଫଳ ଓ ଉପଯୋଗୀ ଅଟେ । ସବୁ କାର୍ଯ୍ୟ କିପରି ବା କେଉଁ ଉପାୟରେ କରାଯିବା ଉଚିତ, ତାହା ଶାସ୍ତ୍ରରେ ଉଲ୍ଲେଖ ଅଛି । ଯାହା ଏକ ମନୁଷ୍ୟକୁ ତାହାର ସଫଳତା ପର୍ଯ୍ୟନ୍ତ ପହଞ୍ଚାଇ ଦେଇଥାଏ ।

ଶଯ୍ୟାତ୍ୟାଗ ପୂର୍ବରୁ କାହିଁକି ଧରିତ୍ରୀ ମାତାଙ୍କୁ ପ୍ରଣାମ କରାଯାଏ ?

ଶାସ୍ତ୍ରରେ ଲେଖା ଯାଇଛି କି ଯେତେବେଳେ ଆମେ ସକାଳୁ ଶେଯରୁ ଉଠିଥାଉ, ପ୍ରଥମେ ଧରିତ୍ରୀ ମାତାଙ୍କୁ ପ୍ରଣାମ କରିବା ଉଚିତ । ଆମେ ଯେତେବେଳେ ତା ଉପରେ ପାଦ ଦେଇଥାଉ, ତାହାର ଅପମାନ ହୋଇଥାଏ । ତେଣୁ ଆମେ ତାଙ୍କଠୁ କ୍ଷମା ମାଗିବା ଉଚିତ । ଏ ସବୁ ତ ରହିଲା ଆମ ଶାସ୍ତ୍ରର କଥା । କିନ୍ତୁ ଏହା ପଛରେ ଏକ ବୈଜ୍ଞାନିକ ତଥ୍ୟ ମଧ୍ୟ ଲୁଚି ରହିଛି । ଯେତେବେଳେ ଆମେ ଶେଯରୁ ଉଠି ସଙ୍ଗେ ସଙ୍ଗେ ପାଦ ତଳେ ରଖିଥାଉ, ସେତେବେଳେ ଶାରୀରିକ ହିସାବରେ କିଛି ହଇରାଣ ହୋଇଥାଉ । କାରଣ ସେତେବେଳ ଆମର ଶରୀରର ତାପମାତ୍ରା ଚଟାଣର ତାପମାତ୍ର ଠାରୁ କମ ହୋଇଥାଏ । ଯଦି ଏହି ଅବସ୍ଥାରେ ଆମେ ତଳେ ପାଦ ରଖିବା, ତାହେଲେ ଥଣ୍ଡା ଜ୍ୱର ଭଳି ରୋଗ ହେବାର ସମ୍ଭାବନା ଥାଏ । ତେଣୁ ଆମେ ଶେଯରୁ ଓହ୍ଲାଇ ତଳେ ପାଦ ରଖିବା ପୂର୍ବରୁ ଆମକୁ ଶେଯରେ କିଛି ସମୟ କଟେଇବା ଉଚିତ । ଯାହା ଫଳରେ କି ଶରୀର ଏବଂ ଚଟାଣର ତାପମାତ୍ରା ସମାନ ହୋଇଯିବ ।

କେତେବେଳେ ଶଯ୍ୟାତ୍ୟାଗ କରିବେ ?

ଶାସ୍ତ୍ର ଅନୁଯାୟୀ ଆମକୁ ବ୍ରହ୍ମ ମୁହୂର୍ତ୍ତରେ ଶଯ୍ୟାତ୍ୟାଗ କରିବା ଉଚିତ । ଯେଉଁ ସମୟରେ କି ସୂର୍ଯ୍ୟ ଉଦୟ ହୋଇନଥାଏ । ଶୁଣିବାରେ ତ ଏହି କାମ ବହୁତ କଠିନ ଅଟେ କିନ୍ତୁ ଆମେ ଏହାକୁ ନିତିଦିନ ଆପଣେଇ ନେବା ଉଚିତ । ଯଦି ଆପଣ ସକାଳ ୬ ରୁ ୭ ଭିତରେ ଉଠିଯାଆନ୍ତି, ତାହାଲେ ଏହା ମଧ୍ୟ ଠିକ କଥା । ଦେବା ଦେବୀ ଏହି ସମୟରେ ବିଚରଣ କରିଥାନ୍ତି । ଏହି ସମୟରେ ସତ ଗୁଣର ପ୍ରଧାନତା ରହିଥାଏ । ତେଣୁ ପ୍ରମୁଖ ମନ୍ଦିର ଗୁଡ଼ିକର ଦ୍ୱାରା ବ୍ରହ୍ମ ମୁହୂର୍ତ୍ତରେ ଖୋଲା ଯାଇଥାଏ । ଠାକୁର ପୂଜା ମଧ୍ୟ ଏହି ମୁହୂର୍ତ୍ତରେ ହୋଇଥାଏ । ଏହି ସମୟରେ ଆପଣ ଯଦି ଉଠନ୍ତି, ତାହାଲେ ଆପଣ ସ୍ୱଚ୍ଛ ବାତାବରଣର ଲାଭ ଉଠାଇ ପାରିବେ । ବ୍ରହ୍ମ ମୁହୂର୍ତ୍ତରେ ଉଠିବାର ଆହୁରି ବହୁ ଫାଇଦା ରହିଛି । ଏହି ସମୟରେ ଉଠିଲେ ଆପଣ ବିଦ୍ୟାବାନ, ସ୍ୱାସ୍ଥ୍ୟବାନ ଏବଂ ସୁନ୍ଦର ହୋଇପାରିବେ ।

It is well to be up before daybreak, for such habits contribute to health, wealth, and wisdom.
– Aristotle

Are morning motivation people born or made? In my case it was definitely made. In my early 20s, I rarely went to bed before midnight, and I’d almost always sleep in late. I usually didn’t start hitting my stride each day until late afternoon.

But after a while I couldn’t ignore the high correlation between success and rising early, even in my own life. On those rare occasions where I did get up early, I noticed that my productivity was almost always higher, not just in the morning but all throughout the day. And I also noticed a significant feeling of well-being. So being the proactive goal-achiever I was, I set out to become a habitual early riser. I promptly set my alarm clock for 5AM…

… and the next morning, I got up just before noon.

I tried again many more times, each time not getting very far with it. I figured I must have been born without the early riser gene. Whenever my alarm went off, my first thought was always to stop that blasted noise and go back to sleep. I tabled this habit for a number of years, but eventually I came across some sleep research that showed me that I was going about this problem the wrong way. Once I applied those ideas, I was able to become an early riser consistently.

It’s hard to become an early riser using the wrong strategy. But with the right strategy, it’s relatively easy.

The most common wrong strategy is this: You assume that if you’re going to get up earlier, you’d better go to bed earlier. So you figure out how much sleep you’re getting now, and then just shift everything back a few hours. If you now sleep from midnight to 8am, you figure you’ll go to bed at 10pm and get up at 6am instead. Sounds very reasonable, but it will usually fail.

It seems there are two main schools of thought about sleep patterns. One is that you should go to bed and get up at the same times every day. It’s like having an alarm clock on both ends — you try to sleep the same hours each night. This seems practical for living in modern society. We need predictability in our schedules. And we need to ensure adequate rest.

The second school says you should listen to your body’s needs and go to bed when you’re tired and get up when you naturally wake up. This approach is rooted in biology. Our bodies should know how much rest we need, so we should listen to them.

Through trial and error, I found out for myself that both of these schools are suboptimal sleep patterns. Both of them are wrong if you care about productivity. Here’s why:

If you sleep set hours, you’ll sometimes go to bed when you aren’t sleepy enough. If it’s taking you more than five minutes to fall asleep each night, you aren’t sleepy enough. You’re wasting time lying in bed awake and not being asleep. Another problem is that you’re assuming you need the same number of hours of sleep every night, which is a false assumption. Your sleep needs vary from day to day.

If you sleep based on what your body tells you, you’ll probably be sleeping more than you need — in many cases a lot more, like 10-15 hours more per week (the equivalent of a full waking day). A lot of people who sleep this way get 8+ hours of sleep per night, which is usually too much. Also, your mornings may be less predictable if you’re getting up at different times. And because our natural rhythms are sometimes out of tune with the 24-hour clock, you may find that your sleep times begin to drift.

The optimal solution for me has been to combine both approaches. It’s very simple, and many early risers do this without even thinking about it, but it was a mental breakthrough for me nonetheless. The solution was to go to bed when I’m sleepy (and only when I’m sleepy) and get up with an alarm clock at a fixed time (7 days per week). So I always get up at the same time (in my case 5am), but I go to bed at different times every night.

I go to bed when I’m too sleepy to stay up. My sleepiness test is that if I couldn’t read a book for more than a page or two without drifting off, I’m ready for bed. Most of the time when I go to bed, I’m asleep within three minutes. I lie down, get comfortable, and immediately I’m drifting off. Sometimes I go to bed at 9:30pm; other times I stay up until midnight. Most of the time I go to bed between 10-11pm. If I’m not sleepy, I stay up until I can’t keep my eyes open any longer. Reading is an excellent activity to do during this time, since it becomes obvious when I’m too sleepy to read.

When my alarm goes off every morning, I turn it off, stretch for a couple seconds, and sit up. I don’t think about it. I’ve learned that the longer it takes me to get up, the more likely I am to try to sleep in. So I don’t allow myself to have conversations in my head about the benefits of sleeping in once the alarm goes off. Even if I want to sleep in, I always get up right away.

After a few days of using this approach, I found that my sleep patterns settled into a natural rhythm. If I got too little sleep one night, I’d automatically be sleepier earlier and get more sleep the next night. And if I had lots of energy and wasn’t tired, I’d sleep less. My body learned when to knock me out because it knew I would always get up at the same time and that my wake-up time wasn’t negotiable.

A side effect was that on average, I slept about 90 minutes less per night, but I actually felt more well-rested. I was sleeping almost the entire time I was in bed.

I read that most insomniacs are people who go to bed when they aren’t sleepy. If you aren’t sleepy and find yourself unable to fall asleep quickly, get up and stay awake for a while. Resist sleep until your body begins to release the hormones that rob you of consciousness. If you simply go to bed when you’re sleepy and then get up at a fixed time, you’ll cure your insomnia. The first night you’ll stay up late, but you’ll fall asleep right away. You may be tired that first day from getting up too early and getting only a few hours of sleep the whole night, but you’ll slog through the day and will want to go to bed earlier that second night. After a few days, you’ll settle into a pattern of going to bed at roughly the same time and falling asleep right away.

So if you want to become an early riser (or just exert more control over your sleep patterns), then try this: Go to bed only when you’re too sleepy to stay up, and get up at a fixed time every morning.

Edit (5/31/05): Due to the (mysterious) popularity of this post, I’ve written a follow-up with some extra detail and clarifications: How to Become an Early Riser – Part II. And if you really want to take sleep to the next level, read about my experiences with Polyphasic Sleep, where you only sleep 2-3 hours a day by taking 20-minute naps every few hours, around the clock.