How to build and operate the millennium falcon

Introduction: How to Build a Millennium Falcon Wall Light

How to build and operate the millennium falcon

How to build and operate the millennium falcon

How to build and operate the millennium falcon

I’ve always admired the Millennium Falcon and wanted a novel way to display it. The model can be mounted on the wall and the colours changed via remote control – guess who’s lost the remote though! Anyway, hopefully you’ll enjoy my first Instructable. Simon.

Step 1: Buy a Battered Millennium Falcon

I bought this one from eBay and it’s seen better days. It’s a Kenner original from 1979 and they’re a decent size and full of interesting detail. This one was destined to be scrapped, but I thought I could give it a new lease of life. All of the old stickers were removed using white spirit.

Step 2: Get Filing!

Using a Dremel and Black&Decker power file you’ll need to strip out most of the interior to make way for the lighting system. This includes removing the sunken sections, in both the top and bottom sections. The battery compartment can also be removed too, but take care not to remove the support columns, that hold the top and bottom together.

Step 3: Fill the Gaps

On the base the sunken sections can be filled with flat plastic sheeting, which will give the rear legs somewhere to sit. On the top section, I’ve filled all of the sunken sections with circuit boards cut down to shape, 1cm wider than the holes they’re covering. They were all mounted using spacers to allow light through.

The front leg will need to be cut down and set in its upright position.

Step 4: Add New Legs

You will need to cut down the orginal rear legs and re-seat them, otherwise the model will sit too far from the wall and look odd. To line up the legs I drew a central line, followed by marking out where the rear legs should sit. The rear legs were then stuck to the aluminium plate using double-sided sticky tape and the Falcon was placed on top of the legs and glued in place using epoxy resin.

Step 5: Add the Lighting Kit

There’s an additonal step, that I need to add pics for and that’s the rear engine perspex cover. The original engine bay plastic had to be removed, but the two central upright’s were left in place. I foolishly used super glue to keep the perspex panel in place, but it shattered within minutes of gluing!

Anyway, the lighting kit came from eBay, just search for LED 5050 strip. The kit is semi-waterproof, runs off 12v and can be controlled via a small remote control, giving 16 different colours (as well as strobe and fade effects). It’s a metre in length and I used small pieces of wire to tie it down. Additional lights have been added and I need to finish this part of the model off, but will all be connected to the mains adapter. The IR sensor has been poked through the front leg and remains hidden from view.

Step 6: All Lit Up!

Not the best pics, but you get the idea. Using the remote control you can choose 16 colours, strobe it or fade it slowly between the available colours.

Step 7: Super Detailing

The following steps will show you how to add some extra details to your Millennium Falcon, after all it needs to look like it’s a rust bucket. The pictures speak for the themselves and it’s certainly worth doing, but feel free to ask any questions or offer me some tips in return. Simon.

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  • How to build and operate the millennium falcon

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How to build and operate the millennium falcon

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Han Solo brags that his Millennium Falcon is the fastest hunk of junk in the galaxy that is able to reach point 5 beyond light speed. Have you ever wondered what and how much it would take us in real life to build a spaceship like Millennium Falcon with our existing technology?

The guys at Varooma.com did some research and came up with the infographic below to break it all down for us. So here is the logistics of building and operating the Millennium Falcon.

Since the technologies that Millennium Falcon uses do not exist till date, they have been substituted for the next best things we have in the real world.

In the universe of Star Wars, Millennium Falcon is manufactured by Corellian Engineering Corporation. It is actually a cargo vessel that can carry up to 100 metric tons of cargo and it has the maximum speed of 1050 kilometers per hour (later customized by Han Solo and Chewbacca to suit their smuggling business). Its Hyperdrive System is “Isu-Sim SSP05 Hyperdrive” and is rated “Class 0.5.” It spans around 34.75 meters from head to tail.

First off, the costs of the raw material, the talent, the team and the space to construct the ship. Since it is a spaceship, obviously, NASA scientists are to be given the job. A full time salary for approximately 100 NASA trained construction crew would cost around 5.2 million pounds and another million pounds for leasing a NASA airfield and building a hanger. It would need approximately 23 tons of steel and titanium for construction which would cost us around 900 thousand pounds.

Our real-life Falcon would have Magnesium 5 inch plating as the substitute for the Millennium Falcon’s Armor Plating. It would cost us 750 thousand pounds. A high-power phone jammer costing 1000 pounds could work for the communication jammer. Our Titan supercomputer could replace Falcon navicomputer which would cost 68 million pounds. There’s Trophy active protection for 200,000 pounds to function as the Falcon’s deflector shield. Nuclear Propulsion Reactor is our closest real world equivalent of the falcon’s quadex power core which bags up another 63 million pounds. We would need 110 million pounds for two Falcon heavy rockets to substitute Girodyne Sublight Engines, 1.8 billion pounds to substitute the hyperdrive generator with the FTL travel research center technology, 230 million for cannons plus 2.5 million pounds for missiles and 500 thousand pounds for the Falcon Dish Antenna. In total, the technology department would cost us roughly around 2.5 billion pounds.

Staffing the Falcon with two fully trained NASA pilots and two gunners would cost about 170 thousand pounds a year. Now, wear and tear is inevitable in any kind of ship. So, maintenance of our Falcon would cost us around 2.9 million pounds per year.

Assuming that the ship docks at the imperial class spaceports for fuel, fluids and food for the crew and stays in the space at least 3 months per year, it would set us up for 5000 pounds per annum at the rate of 0.37 pounds for 1 Galactic Credit.

To lift the Falcon up to space, we need to set up a control center and a full ground crew of 15–20 crucial positions. The cost of salaries and all for the ground crew would go up to around 750 thousand pounds per year. According to NASA, the average cost to launch a space shuttle is approximately 310 million pounds.

All in all, the cost of building a real-life Millennium Falcon would be a whopping sum of around 2.8 billion pounds (4 billion US dollars approximately). And the annual expense would be almost 5 million pounds (7.15 million US dollars approximately).

Actually, there is someone in Tennessee who is attempting to build a life-sized working model of the Falcon. It looks like you can have your own Millennium Falcon after all, only if you have the dough.

The Solo: A Star Wars Story Skin Pack is here, and you can make a beautiful bucket of bolts for your new crew.

How to build and operate the millennium falcon

Solo: A Star Wars Story skins arrive today in Minecraft, and there are enough to fill Lando’s closet. (Which is saying something!) We’re talking Han, Calrissian himself, Chewie (with goggles!), Enfys Nest, Dryden Vos, the Cloud-Riders, stormtroopers, L3-37, and more new droids and characters from the film — for a total of 30 new skins. So if you’re putting together a crew, you’ll have a lot to choose from. Check out a preview in the gallery below:

How to build and operate the millennium falcon How to build and operate the millennium falcon
How to build and operate the millennium falcon How to build and operate the millennium falcon
How to build and operate the millennium falcon How to build and operate the millennium falcon

But there’s a bonus to this deal: In celebration of the release of the Solo: A Star Wars Story Skin Pack — available now in the Minecraft Marketplace — we asked Microsoft/4J Studios for some tips on how to build the Millennium Falcon. So get your blocks ready and prepare to make the fastest hunk of junk in the galaxy.

Spoiler warning: This version is an approximation of how the ship appears at the end of the film.

How to build and operate the millennium falcon

The general aim of this Millennium Falcon build is to hint that there is more detail than there really is. The Falcon itself is covered in large flat areas with lots of little bits of detail that are smaller than the blocks available, so the idea is to use the texture of the blocks to convey the overall look of the ship.

Materials:

Stone Slabs

With the predominant color being gray, use Minecraft‘s stone and cobble blocks as the main building blocks. Stone slabs have a flat gray color with an edge to give the Falcon a paneling effect; the half-slab also helps to convey the gradual slope of the Falcon body without needing full blocks and making the ship even larger overall.

Stone Steps

Stacked on top of each other with the top step inverted, stone steps can help give the impression of the strong paneling rim and additional detail around the edge of the Falcon.

Build Process:

How to build and operate the millennium falcon

How to build and operate the millennium falcon

Start by measuring out the shape of the Falcon with a circular wireframe and add additional shapes, such as the side indents and nose section.

How to build and operate the millennium falcon

Position the landing legs underneath and begin filling in the bottom of the ship’s hull.

How to build and operate the millennium falcon

Add depth to the ship, leaving the interior hollow for future decoration. Using a variety of materials to match the Falcon, begin refining the side details of the ship and nose section.

How to build and operate the millennium falcon

Build the cockpit on the side of the ship, as well as the access corridor to reach it.

How to build and operate the millennium falcon

As an extra addition, light up the back of the ship with the classic blue afterburn. The afterburner effect is first created by building the engines out of sea lanterns and then layering flat colored glass panels on top. The flat glass panels are affected by nearby light sources differently than glass blocks or any other block, in that they glow brighter when close to light blocks. If you place different colored stained glass planes atop each other, you can build up a softer gradient effect, such as the blue and the white used on the Falcon.

Check out this week’s episode of The Star Wars Show to see a timelapse of this build!

Introduction: How to Build a Millennium Falcon Wall Light

How to build and operate the millennium falcon

How to build and operate the millennium falcon

How to build and operate the millennium falcon

I’ve always admired the Millennium Falcon and wanted a novel way to display it. The model can be mounted on the wall and the colours changed via remote control – guess who’s lost the remote though! Anyway, hopefully you’ll enjoy my first Instructable. Simon.

Step 1: Buy a Battered Millennium Falcon

I bought this one from eBay and it’s seen better days. It’s a Kenner original from 1979 and they’re a decent size and full of interesting detail. This one was destined to be scrapped, but I thought I could give it a new lease of life. All of the old stickers were removed using white spirit.

Step 2: Get Filing!

Using a Dremel and Black&Decker power file you’ll need to strip out most of the interior to make way for the lighting system. This includes removing the sunken sections, in both the top and bottom sections. The battery compartment can also be removed too, but take care not to remove the support columns, that hold the top and bottom together.

Step 3: Fill the Gaps

On the base the sunken sections can be filled with flat plastic sheeting, which will give the rear legs somewhere to sit. On the top section, I’ve filled all of the sunken sections with circuit boards cut down to shape, 1cm wider than the holes they’re covering. They were all mounted using spacers to allow light through.

The front leg will need to be cut down and set in its upright position.

Step 4: Add New Legs

You will need to cut down the orginal rear legs and re-seat them, otherwise the model will sit too far from the wall and look odd. To line up the legs I drew a central line, followed by marking out where the rear legs should sit. The rear legs were then stuck to the aluminium plate using double-sided sticky tape and the Falcon was placed on top of the legs and glued in place using epoxy resin.

Step 5: Add the Lighting Kit

There’s an additonal step, that I need to add pics for and that’s the rear engine perspex cover. The original engine bay plastic had to be removed, but the two central upright’s were left in place. I foolishly used super glue to keep the perspex panel in place, but it shattered within minutes of gluing!

Anyway, the lighting kit came from eBay, just search for LED 5050 strip. The kit is semi-waterproof, runs off 12v and can be controlled via a small remote control, giving 16 different colours (as well as strobe and fade effects). It’s a metre in length and I used small pieces of wire to tie it down. Additional lights have been added and I need to finish this part of the model off, but will all be connected to the mains adapter. The IR sensor has been poked through the front leg and remains hidden from view.

Step 6: All Lit Up!

Not the best pics, but you get the idea. Using the remote control you can choose 16 colours, strobe it or fade it slowly between the available colours.

Step 7: Super Detailing

The following steps will show you how to add some extra details to your Millennium Falcon, after all it needs to look like it’s a rust bucket. The pictures speak for the themselves and it’s certainly worth doing, but feel free to ask any questions or offer me some tips in return. Simon.

1 Person Made This Project!

  • How to build and operate the millennium falcon

Did you make this project? Share it with us!

The epic history of the biggest piece of junk in the galaxy.

How to build and operate the millennium falcon

The Millennium Falcon has always been defined by Luke Skywalker’s first impression of the YT-1300 freighter in 1977’s Star Wars: A New Hope: “What a piece of junk!” But more than 40 years later, Luke’s dismissive words have been adapted by Star Wars fans and filmmakers into a refrain of endearment. There are bigger, sleeker, more imposing vehicles in Star Wars, but on the eve of what might be its final flight in The Rise of Skywalker, the Millennium Falcon remains the most iconic ship from George Lucas’ galaxy far, far away.

“That was always George’s description of it: a piece of junk,” says Roger Christian, the Oscar-winning set decorator on the original Star Wars. “This wasn’t a smooth, beautiful ship.”

Maybe not, but to paraphrase its pilot, the Falcon has it where it counts. According to the authoritative Millennium FalconOwner’s Workshop Manual” published in 2011, a typical YT-1300 reaches a maximum speed of about 500 mph, but the Falcon has been clocked at 650 mph. With its Quadex power core, Isu-Sim SSP05 hyperdrive generator and dual Girodyne SRB42 sublight engines, it can outrun Imperial starships and, according to Han Solo, “make point-five past lightspeed.” About 113 feet long from the tip of its mandibles to its wide-bar engines, the Falcon is souped-up and battle-tested thanks to military-grade deflector shields, twin CEC AG-2G quad laser cannons, a pair of Arakyd ST2 concussion missile tubes, and a BlasTech Ax-108 blaster cannon. And for some reason, it has a radar dish.

How to build and operate the millennium falcon

How to build and operate the millennium falcon

When Christian and the rest of the Star Wars creative team were dreaming up the Falcon, they didn’t discuss specs. In the early days of Star Wars, Lucas and his colleagues were more concerned with design than mechanics. The movie’s tight production schedule meant the ship’s look took precedence. “Any science fiction film of this size would have nine months to a year’s worth of preparation,” Christian says. “We had two-and-a-half months.”

The first Falcon design seemed an ode to a classical starship, but Lucas wanted something more distinctive, says Christian. “George said, ‘Make it like a hamburger,’ which gave it a unique, flying-saucer element. That round shape was aerodynamic, and it had a kind of authenticity. It seemed like something that, if it jumped to hyperspeed, it wouldn’t get damaged.”

How to build and operate the millennium falcon

The Falcon’s interior, meanwhile, emphasized the practical above the aesthetic, so Christian looked at the compact functionality of naval vessels, space shuttles, and race cars. “The interiors of submarines are practical—just pipes, tubes, and dials—and the original Apollo capsules were crammed,” he says. “In Formula 1, speed is equivalent to weight, not just the power of the engine, so they would strip everything out. I thought about the Falcon logically. Things have to work and be accessible. This is a utilitarian transport ship. Han didn’t buy a jetliner.”

Aye, that’ll about do it.
And so.

The required link to the finished model gallery pic link page.
60 pics for your viewing pleasure so enjoy!

And to the last bit.

Final Round up, Meandering Musings And General Waffle
For The ‘Out Of The Box’ Build Thing!
So then, that complete’s the OOB build version.
To all intents and purposes,
this is the kinda thing you can get with some grunt work,
a fair bit of paint, the odd head scratch and some messing about.

Now as to how good or otherwise it is, well that’s up to you dear readers.
Speaking for myself, even without the multitude of extras available out there for this beast,
it can build in to rather an impressive big assed model of the Falcon
and I for one am rather happy with how it’s turned out.

But for the sake of argument, i’ll be as objective as I can for the following:
There’s no real dispute that the engineering is rather good on this thing.
The parts fitting is overall excellent with only a few hiccups but easily solved
if some time is taken and above all, patience and care exercised.

As far as accuracy is concerned, well that’s a matter for much and continual debate
but it depends on your expectations and requirements.

if you go by the official blurb on their Official Website, it states that

“With its unique molded metal and resin construction, this is the most detailed Millennium Falcon model ever.
Your 1:1 scale movie prop replica is 808mm long, 596mm wide, 192mm high and it weighs 24 pounds.
it has pre-painted hull parts,
with working electronics and removable panels to view the interior.
it’s just like the prop from The Empire Strikes Back.”

As such what they say is correct. to a point..but i’ll get to that in due course so moving on.

“The exterior of your model includes a number of fully articulated parts that can be moved into a variety of positions.”

in basics, all correct.

“Your model includes internal wiring and switchable LED’s that can be connected to an internal battery or external low-voltage power source.”

Spot on at face value and cannot really be argued with.

“The large scale of the model means that the cockpit is approximately 101mm long and 76 in diameter with a fully detailed interior.”

All true on the face of it so moving on.

“While the outer shell of the Falcon is exactly like the prop used in the movies,
it also features removable upper panels that reveal finely modeled parts of the interior.”

Got no prob with the removable panels and interiors bit but stating that

“the outer shell of the Falcon is exactly like the prop used in the movies”

is another matter.
Now here is where it comes down to expectations and no two people have 100% that same so.
if you are wanting the exterior of your Falcon to
look ‘exactly’ like the 32″ VFX model used on screen,
it will not exactly do so just using the parts provided.

Now I have shown some of the differences in pages on this build log so far
but if you are really going for a full on accurate rendition of the VFX Falcon miniature used in the movie
then you will have a bit of work on your hands tracking down some
plastic kits to get the parts that are not present.
Of which there are more than a few small parts required.

I can’t give you a full list as I know of only some
so you’ll have to look about for yourselves to find them.

On top of that, a lot of the details molded in will need reworking/replacing to a large degree.

Some of the inaccuracies are addressed by parts available on Shapeways for example
but by no means do I know if what’s available.
at least at this time of scribbling.
is fully comprehensive enough to assist in making a bang on accurate Falcon.

Now this model was based very heavily on the Master Replicas 32″ Falcon,
which by all accounts is a top notch collectable but lacks some
of the parts that were missing at the time MR did all their work to make their model.
This was just due to age and handling of the real deal 32″ Falcon over the time it was
in storage and being carted about to exhibitions all over the world.

The DeAgostini one was supposed to have those parts so making it even more accurate
to the VFX model used for filming.

They did exactly that so one up for DeAgostini.

Sadly they left a hell of a lot of small detail parts out so a large one down for DeAgostini.

So overall, what do we have here?
Well a large model of the Millennium Falcon obviously but beyond that
one could ask how does it score over the competition?

Well the Master Replicas Falcon is really the only contender apart from some offered resin kits out there.
I would say the resin garage kit is one route to go but unless you are an experienced model maker
then best to avoid so that really leaves us with just the DeAg and MR one in the running for a 32″ Falcon.

With both, there’s parts to get to bring them up to the mark of the VFX studio Falcon
so it’s an evens deal there from what I can see.
One has to ask oneself what one wants in a 32″ Falcon and/or what you would be happy with.

From a purely collectors point of view, that’s up to the collector
and I am in no position to pass comment as i’m not a collector.

Of course the DeAg scores over the MR with the internal details, working ramp and so on.

Also the cost may be of consideration to some.
The MR one, when you can get one as they are not being made anymore,
can run to several thousand pounds depending on whether it’s a standard or
signature type which usually adds some more money on top.

With the DeAg one, about 900 UK beer tokens (pounds) for the full set of issues.

With the MR if you have that kinda cash to spend,
buy from wherever you can get it, unpack, display and it’s a done thing.

The DeAg, buy the issues on subscription,
one or two years to get it all depending on what kind of deal you have in your part of the world,
assemble, paint as you wish, display and it’s a done thing.

Granted all the above is rather simplifying it but that’s it in a nutshell.

All I can say on a personal note is the above OOB Falcon was almost 1000 quid spent and two years to complete.

That said, if you remove the time between waiting for issues to arrive and so on,
I would reckon about 300 hours straight worth of work for me all told, give or take a few hours.

Well that’s it for one build, the ‘full on build’ will be another matter.

Full gallery on this build ASAP but
more on that at a later date so you merry mob go easy out there now and
have a top notch Christmas/holidays/eat/drink/be merry or whatever you do at this time of the year.

Have a top notch one!

Page Number

Last Year, De Agostini the model makers launched their subscription based Build Millennium Falcon model.

The weekly magazine Build the Millennium Falcon guides you to build a 1:1 full scale Millennium Falcon model similar to the model used for special effects shots in the movies comes in at 808mm long or nearly 32 inches!

Building the Millennium Falcon model

The best part of a meter, the model is not only huge but also extremely detailed using metal and resin parts.

The build millennium falcon model is an exact replica of the one used in the movies for the flying scenes. A larger 5 foot model was used in the original movie, until they needed a smaller model for the more acrobatic stunts of the later films.

You also get electronics included with the model and also pre-painted hull parts.

So what is involved in building a full-scale Millennium Falcon model prop?

De Agostini Millennium Falcon

Well, the subscription model is not cheap. Each issue comes with a small section of the ship with detailed instructions on how to piece it together.

However, this is a two year project in which you have to pick up a magazine each week from the store, or if you subscribe you get one months worth of magazines sent together.

Because of the length of the project if you do the math, the whole thing will set you back a cool $1500 or £800.

If you don’t fancy forking out such an investment for a Millennium Falcon model, youtube is here to help you watch somebody else build one!

There are a few channels to choose from, but I have a particular favorite that I have been watching, although I think this guy will only be updating once a month from now on.

Check out his latest video update here :

This guy is an experience model maker, so he is doing extra stuff to the model like light blocking and adding additional lighting features to his full scale model!

Latest Update 5/26/16

The build has now progressed to the point where both the top and bottom ring structures are complete and the hull plating for both sides are almost finished.

The motorised boarding ramp has also been installed. The build should now get a lot more interesting as the top and bottom shells will eventually come together with lots of internal compartments in between!

10 Replies to “Build Millennium Falcon model step by step each week!”

Wow thats amazing. I never thought about making a model. I do think that many are too expensive to buy parts for but my main concern is how complex they can be without help.

I live in a household of Star Wars fan – I guess I am too. Modelling is great fun.

Good times ahead with the new movies huh Sonia? 😉

Just a heads up your first photo on here of the Falcon with the engines illuminated, is actually a photo of my Master Replicas Falcon. I recognize my coffee table and living room in the background.

Nice one Mike! Are you happy for me to keep the image, or do you want me to take it down?

I don’t care if you leave it. I was just trying to let you know that’s it’s not the Deagostini.

Where’s your build? You commented on my youtube video, and I come here and see nothing that you have done. Please tell me what’s going on . . . . .

Hey Chris, I shared the build by ‘Movie Models’ which is the one I’m following. I don’t claim to be building my own. Thanks for the comment though. 🙂

Thanks for posting on my youtube site . . . . . . .

Remember the full scale Millennium Falcon project we wrote about approximately a year ago? Well, the project has progressed quite a bit and even though the builders undertaking the massive project only do it on their spare time, they have still managed to build something quite amazing. Even though I personally wouldn’t call the Millennium Falcon cockpit “done” by any extent of the imagination, it still is a cockpit after all, don’t you agree?

The project which received viral success about a year ago has not exactly been sparse when it comes to updates, but the project is long, and every detail is being meticulously incorporated. It is called The Full Scale Millennium Falcon Project , and it is a daunting task of building, which I think would make any fan or model builder weak in the knees. If a deadline has been set as to when they are to have the whole ship done, I can’t imagine that it will be anytime soon.

So what about the progress? Well, there has been a lot done, and the level of detail that goes into their build is nothing less than mind-boggling, so every update is a hefty pile of information to take in. For a Star Wars fan that is of course quite appealing, and I can’t keep myself from checking it out every couple of days. The minute this build is done it is going to go viral for sure. For now, we’ll have to settle our craving with the fact that the Millennium Falcon cockpit is “done”. As explained, the cockpit in itself is done, but everything in it still needs a little bit more attention.

I am sure that when the whole thing has been built, all the lights and functionalities are going to be put in as well, not exactly a small job either. I guess the only thing that would impress Star Wars fans even more than this Millennium Falcon cockpit build is probably a real functioning ship that could actually fly. Well, that is not going to happen anytime soon so settle down and wipe that drool from your chin. Welcome to the world of awesomeness, a Star Wars legend is being brought into the real world, and it is utterly exciting.

Aye, that’ll about do it.
And so.

The required link to the finished model gallery pic link page.
60 pics for your viewing pleasure so enjoy!

And to the last bit.

Final Round up, Meandering Musings And General Waffle
For The ‘Out Of The Box’ Build Thing!
So then, that complete’s the OOB build version.
To all intents and purposes,
this is the kinda thing you can get with some grunt work,
a fair bit of paint, the odd head scratch and some messing about.

Now as to how good or otherwise it is, well that’s up to you dear readers.
Speaking for myself, even without the multitude of extras available out there for this beast,
it can build in to rather an impressive big assed model of the Falcon
and I for one am rather happy with how it’s turned out.

But for the sake of argument, i’ll be as objective as I can for the following:
There’s no real dispute that the engineering is rather good on this thing.
The parts fitting is overall excellent with only a few hiccups but easily solved
if some time is taken and above all, patience and care exercised.

As far as accuracy is concerned, well that’s a matter for much and continual debate
but it depends on your expectations and requirements.

if you go by the official blurb on their Official Website, it states that

“With its unique molded metal and resin construction, this is the most detailed Millennium Falcon model ever.
Your 1:1 scale movie prop replica is 808mm long, 596mm wide, 192mm high and it weighs 24 pounds.
it has pre-painted hull parts,
with working electronics and removable panels to view the interior.
it’s just like the prop from The Empire Strikes Back.”

As such what they say is correct. to a point..but i’ll get to that in due course so moving on.

“The exterior of your model includes a number of fully articulated parts that can be moved into a variety of positions.”

in basics, all correct.

“Your model includes internal wiring and switchable LED’s that can be connected to an internal battery or external low-voltage power source.”

Spot on at face value and cannot really be argued with.

“The large scale of the model means that the cockpit is approximately 101mm long and 76 in diameter with a fully detailed interior.”

All true on the face of it so moving on.

“While the outer shell of the Falcon is exactly like the prop used in the movies,
it also features removable upper panels that reveal finely modeled parts of the interior.”

Got no prob with the removable panels and interiors bit but stating that

“the outer shell of the Falcon is exactly like the prop used in the movies”

is another matter.
Now here is where it comes down to expectations and no two people have 100% that same so.
if you are wanting the exterior of your Falcon to
look ‘exactly’ like the 32″ VFX model used on screen,
it will not exactly do so just using the parts provided.

Now I have shown some of the differences in pages on this build log so far
but if you are really going for a full on accurate rendition of the VFX Falcon miniature used in the movie
then you will have a bit of work on your hands tracking down some
plastic kits to get the parts that are not present.
Of which there are more than a few small parts required.

I can’t give you a full list as I know of only some
so you’ll have to look about for yourselves to find them.

On top of that, a lot of the details molded in will need reworking/replacing to a large degree.

Some of the inaccuracies are addressed by parts available on Shapeways for example
but by no means do I know if what’s available.
at least at this time of scribbling.
is fully comprehensive enough to assist in making a bang on accurate Falcon.

Now this model was based very heavily on the Master Replicas 32″ Falcon,
which by all accounts is a top notch collectable but lacks some
of the parts that were missing at the time MR did all their work to make their model.
This was just due to age and handling of the real deal 32″ Falcon over the time it was
in storage and being carted about to exhibitions all over the world.

The DeAgostini one was supposed to have those parts so making it even more accurate
to the VFX model used for filming.

They did exactly that so one up for DeAgostini.

Sadly they left a hell of a lot of small detail parts out so a large one down for DeAgostini.

So overall, what do we have here?
Well a large model of the Millennium Falcon obviously but beyond that
one could ask how does it score over the competition?

Well the Master Replicas Falcon is really the only contender apart from some offered resin kits out there.
I would say the resin garage kit is one route to go but unless you are an experienced model maker
then best to avoid so that really leaves us with just the DeAg and MR one in the running for a 32″ Falcon.

With both, there’s parts to get to bring them up to the mark of the VFX studio Falcon
so it’s an evens deal there from what I can see.
One has to ask oneself what one wants in a 32″ Falcon and/or what you would be happy with.

From a purely collectors point of view, that’s up to the collector
and I am in no position to pass comment as i’m not a collector.

Of course the DeAg scores over the MR with the internal details, working ramp and so on.

Also the cost may be of consideration to some.
The MR one, when you can get one as they are not being made anymore,
can run to several thousand pounds depending on whether it’s a standard or
signature type which usually adds some more money on top.

With the DeAg one, about 900 UK beer tokens (pounds) for the full set of issues.

With the MR if you have that kinda cash to spend,
buy from wherever you can get it, unpack, display and it’s a done thing.

The DeAg, buy the issues on subscription,
one or two years to get it all depending on what kind of deal you have in your part of the world,
assemble, paint as you wish, display and it’s a done thing.

Granted all the above is rather simplifying it but that’s it in a nutshell.

All I can say on a personal note is the above OOB Falcon was almost 1000 quid spent and two years to complete.

That said, if you remove the time between waiting for issues to arrive and so on,
I would reckon about 300 hours straight worth of work for me all told, give or take a few hours.

Well that’s it for one build, the ‘full on build’ will be another matter.

Full gallery on this build ASAP but
more on that at a later date so you merry mob go easy out there now and
have a top notch Christmas/holidays/eat/drink/be merry or whatever you do at this time of the year.

Have a top notch one!

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