How to change your life at 60 years old and feel proud of yourself

How to change your life at 60 years old and feel proud of yourself

We all experience turns in life–some good, some bad. When the bad ones come along, it’s up to us to do something about it. To choose to stay stuck, or to turn the ship around. It’s up to us to choose.

You may be feeling you’re too old to make significant changes in your life. But it doesn’t matter what age you are, you can always turn your life around. Even people in the final months and years of their lives and started in new directions. Who knows how far any of us will get down the path, anyway?

Here are 11 powerful thoughts to help you change direction at any age.

1. The present is what matters.
When you’re busy on concentrating on what has been, or what will be, you rob yourself of the moment. Be here with the present, because right here, right now is where the change you want begins.

2. Everything changes.
Life rarely goes as planned, and most of us end up in a career that’s nothing like we expected. If you can accept that change will be happening at every step, you can turn anything around. You don’t have to linger in your failures or wallow in the things that went wrong.

3. We all get derailed.
We all put on such a good front for each other, but if you ask people about their failures and truly listen to what they’ve been through, you’ll realize that everyone has struggles, wrong turns that left them on uncharted roads, and detours that they had no clue how to navigate. If you can accept your derailment as a new path instead of an obstacle, you’ll have an easier time getting through it.

4. Start in small increments.
If you’re turning around something big, start small. Give yourself baby steps and small wins, until you start to build momentum.

5. Focus on the journey, not the destination.
If all you can think about is where you’re headed, you’ll lose touch with where you are. Every step of the way has its own wisdom and lessons and beauty, so don’t miss out by getting ahead of yourself.

6. Don’t make excuses.
It’s natural to try to explain away why you may have messed up or failed. Excuses might help you save your pride (that is, assuming the people around you accept them), but they will do absolutely nothing to advance you toward your goals. Far better to simply own it and move on in a spirit of self-acceptance.

7. Risks are worth taking.
Especially if you’ve been burned before you might be understandably wary of risk-taking behavior, but in most situations the best thing you can do is take another chance–or even a different version of the same chance again. You cannot protect yourself from failure without also protecting yourself from your happiness.

8. Discomfort is OK.
There’s a strange but widespread idea that success comes without difficulty, but with rare exceptions that’s far from truth. When you learn to be okay with discomfort is the moment you turn that feeling into an action of personal growth.

9. Safety is an illusion.
We all seek to be safe, but that safety is always an illusion. The moment you accept this is the moment you can be free to try all the things you were scared to try. The false seduction of safety is always more dangerous than the alternative.

10. Surround yourself with right kind of people.
You can surround yourself with the wrong people and keep doing the wrong things, or surround yourself with the right people and start doing the right things. You’re only as good as the people you surround yourself with, so be brave enough to let go of those who weigh you down and stick with the ones who reflect who you want to be and how you want to feel.

11. Uncertainty is the only certainty.
You can’t possibly know exactly how things will turn out, so if you give in to your desire to see the path ahead, you’ll avoid life-changing opportunities for the safer, more predictable options. It is how we embrace uncertainty in our lives that leads to great transformation of our souls.

Wherever you find yourself, if it’s not where you want to be, start working now for a change of direction. It’s never too late.

I first heard of the term reinvention when I entered the More magazine’s February 2010 Reinvention story contest. My story about how I returned to work outside my home and began to write regularly after the suicide death of my son came in 11th in the number of votes received out of more than 500 entries. With that, the term reinvention became part of my vocabulary. I write about it frequently and am happy to share 10 ways to reinvent yourself after turning 60.

Nora Ephron said it’s good for women to reinvent themselves every 10 years. She also said reinvention seems easier for women than for men and I happen to agree. In fact, seven years after I went back to work full-time I retired and was able to reinvent myself again. I now have a wonderful career as a poet, author, and web journalist – finally doing the work I aspired to do way back in high school and college.

I’ve also experienced other ways we can reinvent ourselves – some through myself and some through people I know. Here are some ways to reinvent yourself after 60!

1. Retire entirely and move to an area of the country geared to the over 55 and 60 crowd – then spend your days playing golf or tennis, gardening, painting, or reading. We have friends who live in Palm Desert, California who love their busy retired social lives.

2. Move to another country – this is on my list. I very much want to live in Italy for six months to a year. I love the people, food, and places that are all easily accessible by train. Uprooting yourself can be a great way to reinvent yourself. As soon as I can get my husband to decide to reinvent himself into a real retired person, we’re going.

3. Get a divorce – this is not on my list, but some friends of mine got a divorce after a 35 year marriage and raising two sons. But the kicker here it that she decided to leave her marriage for a woman. She finally came out as the woman she always was. I understand this happens a lot with women over 60.

4. Get married – I’m not looking to do this either, but I do know some folks who have or who are getting ready to have a late-in-life marriage. One woman was divorced for a long time and she recently found her second husband online. This man is a great catch. Our next-door neighbor whose wife died a couple of years ago also found a match online. They’ve been together for almost a year, and she just moved in with him. I can hear the faint sounds of wedding bells already.

5. Volunteer – I’ve always gotten so much personal value from volunteering. I suggest doing something you’ve always wanted to do, and I guarantee you won’t mind not being paid. The satisfaction of doing good work is worth way more than money. And by the way, being a volunteer or an intern is likely to be a stepping-stone to a paying job in the same organization.

6. Care for aging parents – I know someone who left her job, moved in with her mother, and took care of her during her escalating dementia leading to her death. She ended up writing a wonderful book about it. It sounds like there is always a pony lurking around in our piles of muck.

7. Change your body image – Changing behavior is tantamount to changing your body. Get off of the couch, eat healthy, take a walk, ride your bike, go to the gym to do some resistance training, try some yoga or pilates, and drink lots of water. The chips and beer won’t cut it anymore. A healthy diet and active lifestyle is a great way to reinvent yourself.

8. Become computer and Internet/social media savvy – Get a smart phone, learn how to text, look up stuff on Google, join Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or Pinterest. You’d be surprised how many other 60 year olds don’t know the first thing about getting around on the Internet. Trying new things is always a great way to reinvent yourself. When I told a woman my age the best way to get her grandson to respond to her was to text him, she looked at me like I was nuts. But she finally learned and now he gets back to her.

9. Write a book – Journaling, taking writing workshops, and going on writing retreats became my therapy after my son’s death. At first I never dreamed that I would have the makings of a book. When one of my instructors and classmates encouraged me to get my story out, I finally took the steps needed to put a book together. It took a long time but in the end I’m glad that I did. I reinvented myself from a technical writer and editor to a published author and poet. I couldn’t be happier.

10. Start a website and blog – Believe me, this will change your life. You’ll be tied to your deadlines – even if they are self-inflicted, and you’ll always be looking for ideas on interesting things to write about. My blog Choices, my first foray into blogging, has been active since 2007. It is a lot of fun and quite a challenge. Now I write regularly for several other websites, including Naturally Savvy. It is why I can call myself a web journalist.

How to change your life at 60 years old and feel proud of yourself

How to change your life at 60 years old and feel proud of yourself

Turning 60 is a milestone that we love to celebrate. But how do we take that happy moment into the years that follow turning 60 and live life to the fullest?

By doing more of the following things, you will smile, laugh, love life and yourself, just like you should.

1. Make an effort to make some new friends that will put a smile on your face

If you are looking around and feeling a little lonely, or just want some new fun in your life, there are plenty of ways you can step out to find some new friends that will make you laugh… Seek out a club or group that has a culture that looks like fun to you… maybe the Red Hat ladies in your area look like fun, or the local Mens’ Shed, or you might consider Probus, Rotary or a local volunteering group like Surf Lifesavers or Coastguard. Ring up, find out what they have coming up and get involved.

2. Arrange special moments with an old friend

Have you rung up and old friend lately and suggested to catch up for a good old chat? There’s nothing like reminiscing the old times with someone special to you… Anything from a winery trip, to a weekend in a local cabin, a camping and fishing adventure, or a bushwalking weekend can give you an opportunity to reconnect and reminisce.

3. Conquer your greatest fear

What your greatest fear in life that you feel an urge to conquer? Are you scared of heights? Terrified of sharks? Or afraid of people telling you your writing isn’t good? Well, there is no time like the present for putting those fears to bed. Take

If you’re scared of heights, go and skydive, or at least challenge yourself to new heights. If you’re scared of sharks, seek out your local aquarium and swim with some. If you’re scared of sharing your writing, join a writers group or become an online blogger by submitting an article to a publication. Conquering your fear will be an achievement like no other and it sure is one story you’ll love sharing with your friends!

4. Tick off your bucket list destinations

We all have some destinations that are on our bucket list… India, Paris, Machu Picchu or Tassie are just a couple of the popular ones. If you can afford it, why not take the trip of a lifetime and travel abroad while you’re in the mindset of living well. There are so many ways to travel now and with careful planning you can see the world on a budget and tick off your bucket list items. Plan a retirement trip and do everything you’ve always dreamed of.

5. Smile and give out more compliments

Sometimes, all it takes to change someone’s day is a smile and a nice word. Smiling is infectious, as is a good mood and there’s no better way to share the love than giving out compliments people deserve. It is one of the simplest things you can do but you’ll be amazed at how happy it makes you feel. Try giving at least five compliments every single day and spread the happiness.

6. Do something for someone or something else every week

Something small like planting trees, cleaning up the local park or reading books to children at schools and hospitals can be incredibly enriching and rewarding. Even if you are short on time, give just a little bit of your time every week to something greater and more in need than yourself. If you’re not sure where to start, make contact with the local charity shops, church, hospital or school to make some connections and see where you can start helping.

7. Only exercise with a smile on your face and your friends by your side

An over 60 friend once said that unless she has a smile on her face and good friends by her side, she refuses to exercise no matter how good it is for her health. And it is quite a nice message. We all do our best to keep fit and healthy but don’t forget to make it fun. There’s a bigger chance you’ll do it more often if you can do it with a smile. Get your friends together and enjoy a walk, a yoga class or some laps at the local pool for some healthy fun.

8. Take time out to treat yourself

Do you love sitting on a blanket under a tree, reading your favourite novel with a cup of tea in a park? Do you love having your nails done? Do you love treating yourself to a delicious bakery treat? Whatever your favourite “me time” is, you should do it more often. The little things make us the happiest so try and schedule and hour or two just for yourself every week.

9. Embrace life long learning

Lifelong learning doesn’t just take up time; it keeps your mind and body healthy and is a great way to challenge yourself while you go. There are so many options to help you learn like trying a free online course or even completing a university degree as many over 60s have done. The university of the third age is another great way to keep learning, find out if there is one set up in your local area and join in new classes.

10. Celebrate every birthday in a big way

It can be so much fun treating every birthday like a big deal. Celebrate in style and celebrate with your family and friends. It doesn’t have to be about you, it becomes a celebration of your life and the people in it. It’s also a great way to make sure you see everyone every year. Do different things like a picnic lunch, a dinner out with friends and family a brunch at home or organise everyone to meet at the local park for a picnic.

This article was sponsored by Apia. It was prepared by an independent Starts at 60 writer specifically for over 60s. We bring you this article to share insights into what we feel is relevant and interesting to our community. Apia is all about championing over 50s living life at their best. For more information on how Apia can reward your experience click here.

How to change your life at 60 years old and feel proud of yourself

We all experience turns in life–some good, some bad. When the bad ones come along, it’s up to us to do something about it. To choose to stay stuck, or to turn the ship around. It’s up to us to choose.

You may be feeling you’re too old to make significant changes in your life. But it doesn’t matter what age you are, you can always turn your life around. Even people in the final months and years of their lives and started in new directions. Who knows how far any of us will get down the path, anyway?

Here are 11 powerful thoughts to help you change direction at any age.

1. The present is what matters.
When you’re busy on concentrating on what has been, or what will be, you rob yourself of the moment. Be here with the present, because right here, right now is where the change you want begins.

2. Everything changes.
Life rarely goes as planned, and most of us end up in a career that’s nothing like we expected. If you can accept that change will be happening at every step, you can turn anything around. You don’t have to linger in your failures or wallow in the things that went wrong.

3. We all get derailed.
We all put on such a good front for each other, but if you ask people about their failures and truly listen to what they’ve been through, you’ll realize that everyone has struggles, wrong turns that left them on uncharted roads, and detours that they had no clue how to navigate. If you can accept your derailment as a new path instead of an obstacle, you’ll have an easier time getting through it.

4. Start in small increments.
If you’re turning around something big, start small. Give yourself baby steps and small wins, until you start to build momentum.

5. Focus on the journey, not the destination.
If all you can think about is where you’re headed, you’ll lose touch with where you are. Every step of the way has its own wisdom and lessons and beauty, so don’t miss out by getting ahead of yourself.

6. Don’t make excuses.
It’s natural to try to explain away why you may have messed up or failed. Excuses might help you save your pride (that is, assuming the people around you accept them), but they will do absolutely nothing to advance you toward your goals. Far better to simply own it and move on in a spirit of self-acceptance.

7. Risks are worth taking.
Especially if you’ve been burned before you might be understandably wary of risk-taking behavior, but in most situations the best thing you can do is take another chance–or even a different version of the same chance again. You cannot protect yourself from failure without also protecting yourself from your happiness.

8. Discomfort is OK.
There’s a strange but widespread idea that success comes without difficulty, but with rare exceptions that’s far from truth. When you learn to be okay with discomfort is the moment you turn that feeling into an action of personal growth.

9. Safety is an illusion.
We all seek to be safe, but that safety is always an illusion. The moment you accept this is the moment you can be free to try all the things you were scared to try. The false seduction of safety is always more dangerous than the alternative.

10. Surround yourself with right kind of people.
You can surround yourself with the wrong people and keep doing the wrong things, or surround yourself with the right people and start doing the right things. You’re only as good as the people you surround yourself with, so be brave enough to let go of those who weigh you down and stick with the ones who reflect who you want to be and how you want to feel.

11. Uncertainty is the only certainty.
You can’t possibly know exactly how things will turn out, so if you give in to your desire to see the path ahead, you’ll avoid life-changing opportunities for the safer, more predictable options. It is how we embrace uncertainty in our lives that leads to great transformation of our souls.

Wherever you find yourself, if it’s not where you want to be, start working now for a change of direction. It’s never too late.

Does the meaning of life change after 60? That’s the question I found myself asking, recently, as I sat in a small cafe, writing and preparing for the week to come. As I wrote, teenagers walked past the window, arms filled with shopping bags. Moms navigated the busy street with toddlers and buggies. Women in their 30s and 40s hustled past on their way to work. Some people looked organized and purposeful. Others looked frantic and vaguely confused. But, regardless, they all seemed to be going somewhere. Whether they knew it or not, their lives had a purpose — perhaps a purpose defined by their life stage — but, a purpose all the same. With so many options available, life after 60 feels entirely different. So, the question struck me.

When our purpose is no longer defined by the roles we used to play, how do we find meaning in life after 60?

On the surface, the answer seems obvious. The meaning of life at any age can be defined by what is most important to us. Some women over 60 find meaning in their hobbies . Others continue to make their family or career the center of their lives, just as they always have. But, there is also a wonderful freedom that comes from being over 60. You finally have the opportunity to look beyond the role that society asks you to play. You get to ask yourself the question. What is most important to me?

So, ask yourself: “If I forget about what the world thinks, what do I value most in life?” Is it family, health, relationships, security, travel, music, art, simplicity, wisdom or love? If you have identified your top priority and already have it in your life, treasure it. Hold it close. Embrace it. If you don’t know where to start, perhaps it would help to consider what some other amazing women, just like you, believe in. I recently asked the 43,000 members of the Sixty and Me community what they felt was most important to them as this stage of life.

Their answers were as varied as their personalities. Perhaps you will find inspiration in the simple things that many women value. For many, health and family are the primary source of meaning. Perhaps 34 says it all. Or maybe it’s as basic as 24.

  1. Elizabeth: Being with the ones I love.
  2. Mindy: Downsizing.
  3. Nuala: Appreciate the here and now.
  4. Yvonne: Relationships.
  5. Carolyn: Health.
  6. Trinita: Family.
  7. Susan: Growing an online business.
  8. Fran: Maintaining health and vitality.
  9. Susan: Recovering from a loss.
  10. Rose: Family, friends, health.
  11. Anne: Mental capacities.
  12. Hedy: Health.
  13. Toni: Staying cancer free.
  14. Gina: Freedom.
  15. Sandra: Doing things that make me happy.
  16. Monica: Good health and happiness.
  17. Sue: Being financially secure.
  18. Carol: Keeping my memory.
  19. Kathy: Being in control.
  20. Angela: Finding peace.
  21. Susan: My husband.
  22. Marilyn: Being open to new adventures.
  23. Dolores: My grandkids.
  24. Mea: Waking up.
  25. Pauline: Good social life with my good friends.
  26. Zsuzsi: Happiness of my children and my grandchildren.
  27. Gail: Lots of laughter.
  28. Tessa: The love of a good man.
  29. Patricia: Enhance my coaching business.
  30. Richelle: My relationship with God.
  31. Susan: Inner peace.
  32. Helen: Friends.
  33. Meli: Pursuing my interests
  34. Lauraine: Being true to who I am.
  35. Steffi: Enjoying every day.
  36. Lyn: Good health.
  37. Francine: Health and financial security.
  38. Pam: Keeping my mind busy.
  39. Barb: Freedom to do what I want, when I want.
  40. Lynda: Friendship.
  41. Pat: Being able to do things I like.
  42. Abbey: Health.
  43. Anita: Loving my family.
  44. Susan: My grandchildren and 2 great granddaughters.
  45. Frieda: Wealth.
  46. Carol: My children and grandchildren.
  47. Marillyn: Family and extended family.
  48. June: Sanity.
  49. Trish: Enjoy my grandchildren growing up.
  50. Judy: Spending time with my grandchildren.
  51. Carol: Friendship.
  52. Wardene: My husband.
  53. Shelley: Spiritual knowledge.
  54. Cheryl: Move back to my hometown.
  55. Alix: Sense of humor.
  56. Gwen: Having fun.
  57. Sandra: My eyesight.
  58. Hermanda: Getting my PhD.
  59. Gail: Unconditional love.
  60. Barb: Having Money.

What do you feel is different about life after 60? What is the most important thing to you in this stage of your life? Please share your thoughts in the comments section below or join the conversation on Sixty and Me or our Facebook page.

I first heard of the term reinvention when I entered the More magazine’s February 2010 Reinvention story contest. My story about how I returned to work outside my home and began to write regularly after the suicide death of my son came in 11th in the number of votes received out of more than 500 entries. With that, the term reinvention became part of my vocabulary. I write about it frequently and am happy to share 10 ways to reinvent yourself after turning 60.

Nora Ephron said it’s good for women to reinvent themselves every 10 years. She also said reinvention seems easier for women than for men and I happen to agree. In fact, seven years after I went back to work full-time I retired and was able to reinvent myself again. I now have a wonderful career as a poet, author, and web journalist – finally doing the work I aspired to do way back in high school and college.

I’ve also experienced other ways we can reinvent ourselves – some through myself and some through people I know. Here are some ways to reinvent yourself after 60!

1. Retire entirely and move to an area of the country geared to the over 55 and 60 crowd – then spend your days playing golf or tennis, gardening, painting, or reading. We have friends who live in Palm Desert, California who love their busy retired social lives.

2. Move to another country – this is on my list. I very much want to live in Italy for six months to a year. I love the people, food, and places that are all easily accessible by train. Uprooting yourself can be a great way to reinvent yourself. As soon as I can get my husband to decide to reinvent himself into a real retired person, we’re going.

3. Get a divorce – this is not on my list, but some friends of mine got a divorce after a 35 year marriage and raising two sons. But the kicker here it that she decided to leave her marriage for a woman. She finally came out as the woman she always was. I understand this happens a lot with women over 60.

4. Get married – I’m not looking to do this either, but I do know some folks who have or who are getting ready to have a late-in-life marriage. One woman was divorced for a long time and she recently found her second husband online. This man is a great catch. Our next-door neighbor whose wife died a couple of years ago also found a match online. They’ve been together for almost a year, and she just moved in with him. I can hear the faint sounds of wedding bells already.

5. Volunteer – I’ve always gotten so much personal value from volunteering. I suggest doing something you’ve always wanted to do, and I guarantee you won’t mind not being paid. The satisfaction of doing good work is worth way more than money. And by the way, being a volunteer or an intern is likely to be a stepping-stone to a paying job in the same organization.

6. Care for aging parents – I know someone who left her job, moved in with her mother, and took care of her during her escalating dementia leading to her death. She ended up writing a wonderful book about it. It sounds like there is always a pony lurking around in our piles of muck.

7. Change your body image – Changing behavior is tantamount to changing your body. Get off of the couch, eat healthy, take a walk, ride your bike, go to the gym to do some resistance training, try some yoga or pilates, and drink lots of water. The chips and beer won’t cut it anymore. A healthy diet and active lifestyle is a great way to reinvent yourself.

8. Become computer and Internet/social media savvy – Get a smart phone, learn how to text, look up stuff on Google, join Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, or Pinterest. You’d be surprised how many other 60 year olds don’t know the first thing about getting around on the Internet. Trying new things is always a great way to reinvent yourself. When I told a woman my age the best way to get her grandson to respond to her was to text him, she looked at me like I was nuts. But she finally learned and now he gets back to her.

9. Write a book – Journaling, taking writing workshops, and going on writing retreats became my therapy after my son’s death. At first I never dreamed that I would have the makings of a book. When one of my instructors and classmates encouraged me to get my story out, I finally took the steps needed to put a book together. It took a long time but in the end I’m glad that I did. I reinvented myself from a technical writer and editor to a published author and poet. I couldn’t be happier.

10. Start a website and blog – Believe me, this will change your life. You’ll be tied to your deadlines – even if they are self-inflicted, and you’ll always be looking for ideas on interesting things to write about. My blog Choices, my first foray into blogging, has been active since 2007. It is a lot of fun and quite a challenge. Now I write regularly for several other websites, including Naturally Savvy. It is why I can call myself a web journalist.

How to change your life at 60 years old and feel proud of yourself

“The saddest summary of life contains three descriptions: could have, might have, and should have.”

We all have something stored in our memory banks of the past that we wish we could have done differently, or something we wish we didn’t do.

As we get older we learn and grow, but that doesn’t mean we have to regret what we did before we learned how to do things differently. If we didn’t go through those experiences, we might not have grown into the strong and knowledgeable people we are today.

What I’m proposing is that we get rid of the negative thoughts—the could haves, might haves, and should haves—and start living a life that won’t make us feel regretful. Not even at an older, wiser age.

Here is a list of things you can do to practice living life with no regrets:

1. Realize that it’s okay to make mistakes. Just make sure to learn from them, forgive yourself, and move on.

2. Make your health and wellness a top priority and always take care of yourself so you’re ready to take care of others.

3. Follow your own path, not one that others want you to follow.

4. Find the humor in life and laugh like there is no tomorrow.

5. Relax and move with the flow of life by being unafraid of change.

6. Be adventurous by trying new things and taking more risks.

7. Have more intellectual curiosity and embrace creativity.

8. Try to find happiness with as many different people as you can.

9. Think for yourself instead of letting other people’s opinions influence you too much.

10. Try not to judge people before you get to know them.

11. Be thankful for what you have now instead of thinking about what you don’t have.

12. Wish well upon everyone equally and try to admire without envy.

13. Share your happiness with others instead of hoarding it all for yourself.

14. Don’t try to change someone—love who they are now.

15. Enjoy the journey, not just the destination.

16. Know that happiness is bigger than any bank account.

17. Control negative thoughts so that they don’t contribute to the outcome of your life.

18. Use your energy wisely because spending energy complaining, worrying, or being impatient is just wasted energy.

19. Be bold. Find the courage to change things that should be changed and accept that there are some things that cannot be changed.

20. Love your work. If you don’t currently love what you do, figure out what you would love and take the first step toward that life.

21. Turn your discontent into a mystery and enjoy trying to solve it.

22. Face problems from different angles in order to find solutions.

23. Gain independence by realizing that on this earth we are all dependent upon each other.

24. Change your perspective by taking on a wider view of things.

25. Don’t waste time trying to bring disagreeable people around to liking you.

26. Become the person you would like to spend the rest of your life with.

27. Be honest with yourself and others by saying what you mean and meaning what you say.

28. Treat people with respect and compassion.

29. Live in the now by loving the present and being aware of your thoughts and actions. Think happy thoughts and speak powerful words.

30. Try not to put things off until later.

31. Never hold grudges.

32. Face your fears head on and try to do the things that you think you cannot do.

33. Spend time with people who make you happy while also not depending on other people for your own happiness.

34. Stand up for yourself and others and don’t let anyone or anything hold you back.

35. Be yourself and love who you are now.

36. Be a participant in life rather than an observer.

37. Do the things that you love to do as much as you can.

38. Write out a list of goals and achieve them by doing them step by step. Don’t give up when things get difficult.

39. Do something every day that makes you feel proud of yourself—commit random acts of kindness whenever you get the chance.

40. And always keep on moving forward.

I know it seems like a rather large list of things to take on, but you can accomplish a lot on this list by doing just one thing. For example, right now as I’m typing this I’m putting into practice at least eighteen things.

Put these things into practice and see where life takes you, without regrets. And please comment below. I’d love to read your thoughts on this.

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How to change your life at 60 years old and feel proud of yourself

Life can begin, and can change significantly at any age, because of loss of a loved one, loss of a job role or the realization that the direction you were headed, was not working. Regardless of what led you to start life over, this process can be terrifying – and exhilarating. Starting over at 60 can actually be easier than trying to start over at a younger age, when your priorities and confidence were less mature than they are now. The alternative to not starting your life over is to make a choice to live the status quo and to ask yourself, “Is this good enough?”

Develop a Sense of Optimism

Change requires courage to look at yourself and your life with an objective, but critical eye. You can best improve and change your life for the better by emphasizing the positive features in your past, present and future. This is not to suggest that you forget your past, but it is important that you place it your past in context – because the future is the only thing you can control. Approaching it in a spirit of adventure and discovery, and embracing opportunities to learn who and what you are, can make a real difference. A 2014 study published in academic journal PLOS One showed that making a deliberate choice to focus on positivity plays an important role in your well-being as you age.

Evaluate Social Supports and Acquire New Ones

Social supports, which include — but are not limited to friends and family — are a vital source of resistance to stress. In addition, support networks are a context by which we determine our mood. Social support systems enhance health but there is a tendency for individuals in their 50’s and 60’s to lose some of these social supports. That’s a serious risk, because social isolation – whether real or perceived – can increase your likelihood of premature ill health or even death. Some of your longtime friends will fall away when you’re starting over, whether you’re widowed or divorced, and this is perfectly natural. Your best response is to seek out new circles of acquaintance, online or especially offline, and reconstruct your emotional support system.

Maintain or Improve Your Physical Health

Preparation for starting your life over at age 60 should make your physical health a priority. Physiological changes after age 60 include a 15 percent decrease in the responsiveness of your neurological system, according Len Kravitz, Ph.D., in his article, “The Age Antidote,” in “Age and Exercise.” Being or becoming physically active at age 60 does not prevent certain changes, but exercising continues to have preventative benefits. These benefits include a reduction in the risk of chronic and preventable conditions such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes Type 2. Taking charge of your health can increase your sense of self-efficacy, which is a sense of motivation that comes from within.

Identify What’s Important to You

As you start your life over at age 60, keep in mind that at this stage, you have more knowledge and experience than you had in your youth. You also have the opportunity to make different choices, based on your experiences and how earlier decisions made you the person you are now. Focus less on your age and more on possibilities that you can explore now when in your past, you could not or were too afraid. Consider that it is time for you to try out a new career direction, indulge a new hobby or live in an area that provides activities and opportunities that are important to you.

When I turned 50, I was confused: Could I still wear jeans? Do I still want sex? Will I ever be able to run in a marathon? Could I finally lose those last 10 pounds that piled on after menopause? Is this the when I become invisible? (Answers: yes, yes, yes, yes, and not a shot in hell.)

Now that I’m turning 60, there’s no confusion in my life. It’s been replaced with a delicious sense of calm, confidence, and clarity of purpose. What an extraordinary turn of events! Who knew that turning 60 would actually be a welcome milestone instead of a dreaded one? Certainly not me.

When I turned 50 I was filled with fear, mostly of the unknown. Instead of pulling the proverbial blanket over my head, I forced myself to embrace it, and make fear work for me. Feeling unnerved by the future pushed me to find the answers. But, when I didn’t get the tools I needed to forge ahead, I did my own research, developed my own conclusions, and wrote my first book —The Best of Everything After 50–which became the call to positive action and healthy aging for many women, including me.

Ten years later, life is different. I’m different. My body is changing once again, and so are my dreams and goals. Instead of slowing down, I’m finding new ways to jolt my body, mind and spirit into action, so I will be stronger and more powerful as I get older.

Now that I’m turning 60, I’ve embraced a few smart and healthy habits to meet the new physical, mental and emotional challenges head on. Here are the ones I recommend you incorporate into your own life, starting today:

Ramp up your workout: Don’t think that because you’re older, you should slow down. On the contrary, it’s essential to push yourself even more if you want to keep your brain sharp and body fit. Long walks are great, but running is even better, especially if you combine the two (learn more about the Jeff Galloway Run/Walk/Run program here). I started running when I turned 50, taking the slow and steady approach. But, now that I’m turning 60, I give my body a jolt with runs that are longer and faster. A body of research shows that running is one of the best ways to get and stay fit, balance your moods, sleep better, and keep your brain sharp. Bonus? My skin always looks great after a good run. This past November — one month before turning 60 — I ran my third NYC Marathon and scored a personal best. How to change your life at 60 years old and feel proud of yourself

Do jumping jacks and push-ups: Osteoporosis is a potentially debilitating disease that is caused by bones that get weak and thin over time. Bone loss starts in our late 20s and really speeds up when estrogen levels decline due to menopause. The best defense is to nourish your body with How to change your life at 60 years old and feel proud of yourselfcalcium-rich foods, take vitamin D supplements, and do exercises that will help maintain the health of your bones, such as jumping jacks, push-ups, and my favorite, the plank. Remember: bone loss doesn’t happen only to women. One in four men will also break a bone due to osteoporosis. For the most up-to-date information on how to prevent or treat osteoporosis visit the National Osteoporosis Foundation website.

Rethink your eating: Here’s a two-word mantra to guide you — eat less. As you get older, you need fewer calories, and the calories you do eat should fuel your body, giving it the energy it needs to live an active and engaged life. Consider an extra jolt by doing an “occasional fast” every few months. While this might not work for everyone, it does for me, keeping weight down and energy levels up. Research also shows that intermittent fasting can help prevent diabetes. As with any new eating plan, always consult your doctor first.

How to change your life at 60 years old and feel proud of yourself
Drink water at the right time: Your digestive system will change as you get older. For example, you may find that drinking milk or eating garlic now causes bloating or worse. While any significant shifts in your body should be discussed with a doctor, you can also try this simple trick to kickstart your system: after waking up, drink a full glass of room temperature water. Wait 45 minutes before drinking or eating anything else. To help pass the time, do what I do: go for a run, then do 20 push-ups, 20 jumping jacks and hold a 60-second plank.

Have sex: At this age, we know what we want, and know how to ask for it. And now, it’s all about you (and having fun)! However, sex can be a bit more challenging for a few reasons: vaginal dryness (a common complaint after menopause, but easily remedied with topical treatment; talk with your doctor about options) can make sex uncomfortable, or you might not have a sexual partner in your life right now. If you do, have as much sex as you can muster because the benefits are many and well-documented: better sleep, clearer skin, healthier vagina, and closer connections to your partner. If you don’t have someone to have fun with right now, don’t lock that door and throw away the key. Instead, get a vibrator and get all the benefits.

Embrace your age: Since turning 50 and writing my first book, my mission has been to convince the world to “embrace your age” and love who you are now, which, in my view, is the key to happy, healthy and positive aging. Now that I’m 60, this is even more important to my well-being. I don’t want to turn back the clock; I want to give myself the gift of a well-lived life. By embracing just a few smart and simple healthy habits, I know I’m doing everything I can to stay younger longer. Don’t you deserve this gift, too?

Lastly, remember this: We can’t control getting older . . . but . . . we can control how we do it.