How to check your router for malware

Your router is a prime target for hackers who want to freeload off your WiFi connection or infiltrate your network. If it’s compromised, they can redirect your personal or business internet requests to malware-infected servers.

However, most people don’t realize the magnitude of the problems that come with a router that has been hacked. Manufacturers are also mass-producing different devices and don’t bother to update them, which leaves them open to attack. In fact, cybercriminals take advantage of this to attack many routers.

How to check your router for malware

The most recent example of router malware attacks is the VPNFilter threat. Following the massive malware attack that compromised thousands of WiFi routers and networked devices worldwide, the FBI issued an urgent request to home and small office owners to reboot their routers in a bid to disrupt a massive malware attack.

Among the threats such malware poses include rendering routers inoperable, blocking network traffic, and collecting information passing through the routers. You could lose your sensitive or confidential information and data, which could cause a huge problem for you or your business.

Obviously, nobody wants to be in such a situation, which is why we’ve put together this guide on how to check your router for malware and what you can do to make it harder to hack.

Signs That Your Router Is Infected With Malware

How to check your router for malware

If you suspect something is off with your router, there are some common telltale signs that indicate a possible hacking or malware attack. Among the red flags to check for include:

  • Computer runs slower than usual.
  • Internet searches readdressed to strange sites. demanding a sum of money in exchange for unlocking your data.
  • Online account passwords aren’t working.
  • Some funds are missing from your online banking account.
  • Computer programs crash randomly.
  • New toolbar names that you don’t recognize appear on your web browser.
  • Several popup windows with fake antivirus messages appear on your screen.
  • New software installed unexpectedly on your computer.

One major sign that your router has been compromised is in its DNS server. Attackers “hijack” your router’s DNS seeking to modify them without your consent. The idea is to control, monitor and redirect your internet traffic to a phishing site.

How to check your router for malware

For example, if you’re connecting to your online banking account through a device connected to your router, you’ll be redirected to a fake version of the banking site. If you’re alert enough, you may even notice that such malicious sites don’t have HTTPS encryption. From the phishing site, the attacker can access your banking session and take out money without your knowledge.

Here’s what to look out for if your router’s DNS has been hijacked:

  • Inappropriate ads like porn ads and others appear on your screen while you’re browsing the usual pages you visit. These ads can also be modified to trick you.
  • You get warnings or notifications that indicate possible problems with your computer.
  • Your browser redirects from popular web pages like online banking sites and social media to fake versions of the sites. These phishing sites collect your personal information, login credentials, sometimes even your banking credentials and credit card information.

If you’re still not sure whether your router has malware or has been hacked, you can the F-Secure Router checker. It’s a simple online tool that quickly checks the health of your router for potential malware threats and vulnerabilities. Although it’s not the most thorough tool to use, it’s a good place to start when checking if your router is infected.

What To Do If Your Router Is Infected With Malware

If you discover your router has malware, here are some simple steps to take to minimize the damage.

Backup Your Data And Files

How to check your router for malware

Before trying to fix your computer or remove malware, backup your data and files to a cloud storage service or to an external hard drive.

Restart Your Computer In Safe Mode

How to check your router for malware

If you get a false antivirus message and suspect your router has malware, turn off your computer and restart it in safe mode to uninstall any suspicious software.

When you’re done, restart in regular mode and check if the messages are gone, and then scan your computer again to pick out any remaining malware threats.

Secure Your Router And Install a Strong Antivirus

How to check your router for malware

This is your first line of defense as it protects your devices online. Create a strong SSID (network name) and password, and turn on your router’s firewall.

You can also get a VPN (virtual private network) for your home or business if you want to be extra cautious.

Change Your Passwords

How to check your router for malware

If there are accounts that have been hacked as a result of the router attack, request a password reset immediately and create a stronger one. You can also use two-factor authentication for added security.

Look closely at any links in your emails before clicking on them. If you use one password for multiple accounts, change them too. A secure password manager comes in handy if you’re not able to manage different passwords for all your accounts.

Other steps you can take include:

  • Enable WPA2 encryption instead of the original WAP or the outdated WEP.
  • Set your router to Stealth Mode making it harder for attackers to find it online.
  • Install firmware updates to protect your router from any patched flaws.
  • Turn off UPnP in your router. This setting can be used to change your DNS server as it usually trusts all requests from your local network.
  • Alert your family, friends and colleagues not to accept fake email invitations, downloads or social media requests and messages.

Final Thoughts

Once you’ve checked your router for malware, and you find most of the signs mentioned above are present, you need to disinfect your computer to restore it to normal functioning.

Stay informed about routers, malware, hacking and other cybersecurity issues to help protect your devices from future risks and keep you alert and informed. This way, you can make the best decisions about protecting your router, computer and mobile devices.

Elsie is a technology writer and editor with a special focus on Windows, Android and iOS. She writes about software, electronics and other tech subjects, her ultimate goal being to help people out with useful solutions to their daily tech issues in a simple, straightforward and unbiased style. She has a BCom degree in Marketing and currently pursuing her Masters in Communications and New Media. Read Elsie’s Full Bio

Your router stands between your devices and the internet, which makes it an appealing target for hackers. However, we usually don’t pay it too much attention unless something goes wrong. Routers can be attacked and infected with malware, putting your whole network in danger. Here’s how to tell if your router has viruses and tips for how to start afresh with a clean slate.

Dec 04, 2020 · 4 min read

How to check your router for malware

How can a router get a virus?

You can buy a router for anything from $20 to several hundred dollars. Cheap options have poor security, their firmware can’t be updated automatically, and it’s easy to attack them. While high-end routers are more secure, they can also be hacked.

Many people use default passwords on their routers and don’t bother to change them. Perpetrators can crack your password, connect to the router, modify its settings, and infect the whole network with viruses. A single router can support your phone, laptop, smart home system, or even your electricity meter. It gives hackers a wide range of possible attack vectors, and by the time you notice that something’s wrong, it might already be too late.

Router virus examples

VPNFilter is one of the most notorious pieces of router malware. It has infected more than half a million routers and network-attached storage drives in more than 50 countries since 2016. This virus exploited known system vulnerabilities to install malware on affected devices and even steal users’ sensitive information such as passwords and credit card details. VPNFilter is very persistent, as it still can damage your network after a router is rebooted and it takes effort to remove malware from your router.

The attacks can also be conducted the other way around: perpetrators can hack your phone and then infect your router. This is exactly how the Switcher Trojan works. In 2016, hackers created a few fake Android apps that impersonated Baidu (a Chinese search engine) and a Wi-Fi password sharing app. Once they got into the person's phone and managed to connect to a router, they changed the default DNS server address to a malicious one. This caused the victim’s traffic to be redirected so that hackers could see everything they do online.

How to tell if your router is infected

Your computer is running slow. If you noticed that your computer is lagging or even crashing, it’s one of the first signs that you have a virus. Viruses, whether they reside on your router or a hard disk, consume your computing resources, but it’s not always easy to notice the difference.

Unknown programs on your device. Hackers can install all types of software to monitor your activities and steal your credentials. It might even be hard to tell if you have any unwanted visitors. Even a thorough check of your program list may not be enough.

Your DNS server address is changed. If you don’t recognize your DNS server address, there’s a chance that it was changed to one operated by hackers.

You are redirected to websites you didn’t want to visit. Your compromised router can redirect you to fake or unwanted sites. Hackers want you to click on the malicious links on those websites, download malware, and reveal even more sensitive information. They can also set fake sites of popular services, making you believe that you’re communicating with the original ones.

Fake antivirus messages appear. If suspicious messages and pop-ups start to appear out of the blue while you’re browsing, it could be that your router has been infected. A criminal can hack your router and redirect you to fake websites designed to convince you that you have malware. In reality, you might end up paying for a useless antivirus software or even have your credit card details stolen.

You can’t access certain services. A hacker can change your passwords, so they can be in control of your accounts and extract sensitive information. If you’re sure that your credentials are correct, but you can’t login, this might be a sign of an infected system.

How to remove a virus from your router

  1. Reset your router to factory settings

If you’re confident that you have a virus on your router, resetting it to factory settings may delete most malware.

If your router has been compromised, you need to change all your passwords. Start from your administrator credentials and then move to your accounts. Avoid short passwords such as “kangaroo” or “james200” as hackers can crack them in a snap. Look at no less than 12-character passwords and be sure to use special symbols and numbers along with lower- and uppercase letters.

Whether it’s your phone or computer that has been infected through your router, you need to perform a full scan of your system. Use a dedicated antivirus software to search for anything suspicious. Otherwise, a virus can sit silently on your machine and continue doing its dirty job.

While your router might have the latest firmware version installed, it’s better to check this for yourself. You can download the updates from the manufacturer's website.

If you’re looking for extra security, configure a VPN for your router. It will mask your IP address and encrypt traffic, thus mitigating the risk of getting attacked again. Not all routers are VPN-compatible, but if they are, you can use a VPN to protect your whole router network with encryption.

Alternatively, a VPN on your device can keep you safe from any snoopers using a router to snoop on your traffic. However you want to use it, a VPN will go a long way towards helping to keep you safe.

Protect your router and enhance your privacy with a VPN.

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How to check your router for malware

Based on experts who sell electronics, the security of consumer router is fairly bad. Attackers take advantage of the general careless manufacturing of suppliers and target copious amounts of routers.

If you think your router is compromised, read on so you’ll know what to do.

Attackers typically aim to change the setting of the DNS server on your router to let the malware

in. When this attempt comes to fruition, the toxic DNS server directs you to a phishing site

instead of a valid website.

The toxic DNS server doesn’t automatically answer all queries. The malware may simply time out on many requests and then reroute queries to the default DNS server of your ISP.

Uncommonly slow DNS requests can be an indicator that your router has an infection.Furthermore, attackers can also instantly insert ads, reroute servers, or try to inject malicious downloads. They can hook requests to various scripts used by major websites and reroute them to a web server with an ad-infected script. For instance, if you see porn ads on a legitimate

website like the New York Times, you are most likely attacked by a malware, either on your PC or your router.

Several router strikes take advantage of cross-site request forgery attacks. The malware embeds a nasty JavaScript onto a page, the same script will then try to load the web-based administration page of the router and change its settings. As the script runs on a gadget connected to your local network, the malicious code can easily connect to the interface that is only accessible in your network.

The main identifying sign that a router has been affected is the change in its DNS server. You need to check out the web-based interface of your router and have a look at its DNS server

settings. To do this, simply:

 Access the web-based setup page of your router. Look at the gateway address of your network connection to find out how.

 Log in using the username and password you’ve setup on your router.

 Search for the “DNS” setting. Look at the WAN setting screen or the Internet Connection settings.

If the setup is fixed to “Automatic,” you’re in good hands. If it’s fixed to “Manual” and you find custom DNS servers inserted there, that may well be an issue.

If you find DNS servers there that you are not familiar with, that is a sure sign that a malware has altered your router to attack DNS servers. If uncertain, conduct an internet search for the DNS server addresses and verify if they are legitimate or not.

Tech professionals recommend checking this setting occasionally to determine whether your router has been affected or not.

If you have a malicious DNS server, it is possible to disable it and setup your router to make use of the automatic DNS server from your internet provider. You may also type in the addresses of legitimate DNS servers such as Google DNS. Alternatively, you can just wipe out the settings of your router and do a factory reset.

How to check your router for malware

Reports of hackers infiltrating personal routers for nefarious activities have been in the news lately. Our friends at HowtoGeek recently posted a great article on how to determine if your home router has been compromised and we thought it was something our readers would find informative.

Consumer router security is pretty bad. Attackers are taking advantage of lackadaisical manufacturers and attacking large amounts of routers. Here’s how to check if your router’s been compromised.

The home router market is a lot like the Android smartphone market. Manufacturers are producing large numbers of different devices and not bothering updating them, leaving them open to attack.

How Your Router Can Join the Dark Side

Attackers often seek to change the DNS server setting on your router, pointing it at a malicious DNS server. When you try to connect to a website — for example, your bank’s website — the malicious DNS server tells you to go to a phishing site instead. It may still say bankofamerica.com in your address bar, but you’ll be at a phishing site. The malicious DNS server doesn’t necessarily respond to all queries. It may simply time out on most requests and then redirect queries to your ISP’s default DNS server. Unusually slow DNS requests are a sign you may have an infection.

Sharp-eyed people may notice that such a phishing site won’t have HTTPS encryption, but many people wouldn’t notice. SSL-stripping attacks can even remove the encryption in transit.

Attackers may also just inject advertisements, redirect search results, or attempt to install drive-by downloads. They can capture requests for Google Analytics or other scripts almost every website use and redirect them to a server providing a script that instead injects ads. If you see pornographic advertisements on a legitimate website like How-To Geek or the New York Times, you’re almost certainly infected with something — either on your router or your computer itself.

Many attacks make use of cross-site request forgery (CSRF) attacks. An attacker embeds malicious JavaScript onto a web page, and that JavaScript attempts to load the router’s web-based administration page and change settings. As the JavaScript is running on a device inside your local network, the code can access the web interface that’s only available inside your network.

Some routers may have their remote administration interfaces activated along with default usernames and passwords — bots can scan for such routers on the Internet and gain access. Other exploits can take advantage of other router problems. UPnP seems to be vulnerable on many routers, for example.

How to Check

The one telltale sign that a router has been compromised is that its DNS server has been changed. You’ll want to visit your router’s web-based interface and check its DNS server setting.

First, you’ll need to access your router’s web-based setup page. Check your network connection’s gateway address or consult your router’s documentation to find out how.

Sign in with your router’s username and password, if necessary. Look for a “DNS” setting somewhere, often in the WAN or Internet connection settings screen. If it’s set to “Automatic,” that’s fine — it’s getting it from your ISP. If it’s set to “Manual” and there are custom DNS servers entered there, that could very well be a problem.

It’s no problem if you’ve configured your router to use good alternative DNS servers — for example, 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 for Google DNS or 208.67.222.222 and 208.67.220.220 for OpenDNS. But, if there are DNS servers there you don’t recognize, that’s a sign malware has changed your router to use DNS servers. If in doubt, perform a web search for the DNS server addresses and see whether they’re legitimate or not. Something like “0.0.0.0” is fine and often just means the field is empty and the router is automatically getting a DNS server instead.

Experts advise checking this setting occasionally to see whether your router has been compromised or not.

Help, There’ a Malicious DNS Server!

If there is a malicious DNS server configured here, you can disable it and tell your router to use the automatic DNS server from your ISP or enter the addresses of legitimate DNS servers like Google DNS or OpenDNS here.

If there is a malicious DNS server entered here, you may want to wipe all your router’s settings and factory-reset it before setting it back up again — just to be safe. Then, use the tricks below to help secure the router against further attacks.

Hardening Your Router Against Attacks

You can certainly harden your router against these attacks — somewhat. If the router has security holes the manufacturer hasn’t patched, you can’t completely secure it.

Install Firmware Updates: Ensure the latest firmware for your router is installed. Enable automatic firmware updates if the router offers it — unfortunately, most routers don’t. This at least ensures you’re protected from any flaws that have been patched.

Disable Remote Access: Disable remote access to the router’s web-based administration pages.

Change the Password: Change the password to the router’s web-based administration interface so attackers can’t just get in with the default one.

Turn Off UPnP: UPnP has been particularly vulnerable. Even if UPnP isn’t vulnerable on your router, a piece of malware running somewhere inside your local network can use UPnP to change your DNS server. That’s just how UPnP works — it trusts all requests coming from within your local network.

DNSSEC is supposed to provide additional security, but it’s no panacea here. In the real world, every client operating system just trusts the configured DNS server. The malicious DNS server could claim a DNS record has no DNSSEC information, or that it does have DNSSEC information and the IP address being passed along is the real one.

How to check your router for malware

We talk a lot about software designed to attack our smartphones and computers, but it turns out your router might also be at risk. That’s right.

The home router market is a lot like the Android smartphone market. Manufacturers are producing large numbers of different devices and not bothering updating them, leaving them open to attack.

How Your Router Can Join the Dark Side

Attackers often seek to change the DNS server setting on your router, pointing it at a malicious DNS server. When you try to connect to a website — for example, your bank’s website — the malicious DNS server tells you to go to a phishing site instead. It may still say bankofamerica.com in your address bar, but you’ll be at a phishing site. The malicious DNS server doesn’t necessarily respond to all queries. It may simply time out on most requests and then redirect queries to your ISP’s default DNS server. Unusually slow DNS requests are a sign you may have an infection.

Sharp-eyed people may notice that such a phishing site won’t have HTTPS encryption, but many people wouldn’t notice. SSL-stripping attacks can even remove the encryption in transit.

Attackers may also just inject advertisements, redirect search results, or attempt to install drive-by downloads. They can capture requests for Google Analytics or other scripts almost every website use and redirect them to a server providing a script that instead injects ads. If you see pornographic advertisements on a legitimate website like How-To Geek or the New York Times, you’re almost certainly infected with something — either on your router or your computer itself.

Many attacks make use of cross-site request forgery (CSRF) attacks. An attacker embeds malicious JavaScript onto a web page, and that JavaScript attempts to load the router’s web-based administration page and change settings. As the JavaScript is running on a device inside your local network, the code can access the web interface that’s only available inside your network.

Some routers may have their remote administration interfaces activated along with default usernames and passwords — bots can scan for such routers on the Internet and gain access. Other exploits can take advantage of other router problems. UPnP seems to be vulnerable on many routers, for example.

How to Check

The one telltale sign that a router has been compromised is that its DNS server has been changed. You’ll want to visit your router’s web-based interface and check its DNS server setting.

First, you’ll need to access your router’s web-based setup page. Check your network connection’s gateway address or consult your router’s documentation to find out how.

Sign in with your router’s username and password, if necessary. Look for a “DNS” setting somewhere, often in the WAN or Internet connection settings screen. If it’s set to “Automatic,” that’s fine — it’s getting it from your ISP. If it’s set to “Manual” and there are custom DNS servers entered there, that could very well be a problem.

It’s no problem if you’ve configured your router to use good alternative DNS servers — for example, 8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4 for Google DNS or 208.67.222.222 and 208.67.220.220 for OpenDNS. But, if there are DNS servers there you don’t recognize, that’s a sign malware has changed your router to use DNS servers. If in doubt, perform a web search for the DNS server addresses and see whether they’re legitimate or not. Something like “0.0.0.0” is fine and often just means the field is empty and the router is automatically getting a DNS server instead.

Experts advise checking this setting occasionally to see whether your router has been compromised or not.

Help, There’ a Malicious DNS Server!

How to check your router for malware

If there is a malicious DNS server configured here, you can disable it and tell your router to use the automatic DNS server from your ISP or enter the addresses of legitimate DNS servers like Google DNS or OpenDNS here.

If there is a malicious DNS server entered here, you may want to wipe all your router’s settings and factory-reset it before setting it back up again — just to be safe. Then, use the tricks below to help secure the router against further attacks.

Hardening Your Router Against Attacks

You can certainly harden your router against these attacks — somewhat. If the router has security holes the manufacturer hasn’t patched, you can’t completely secure it.

How to check your router for malware

Do you think that computers and smartphones are the only devices vulnerable to malicious attacks? ; Think again, hacking isn’t just for computers and phones: Wi-Fi routers can also be hacked.

Wi-Fi routers are among the most common pieces of equipment in every home today, these small devices are increasingly targeted by hackers. And since hacking a router can affect an entire Wi-Fi network, it can be even more dangerous.

Not only will this affect the speed of your internet connection, it also exposes your personal information.

Besides, it allows hackers to monitor and control your online activity, and also redirect you to clones of popular websites to recover your passwords.

In this new tutorial, you will discover how to tell if your router is hacked and how to protect yourself against this type of attack.

Table of Contents

How to detect if your router is hacked?

Thanks to the tool F-Secure Router Checker, it is possible to easily know if your router has been hacked by a hacker.

F-Secure Router Checker is an online tool that will scan your Windows system’s router settings and check if your DNS settings or your router have been hacked or compromised.

The tool is easy to use and you don’t need to download or install any software.

To use this tool, visit this link and click on the “ Check your router “. Within seconds, you will be told whether your internet connection is secure or not.

How to check your router for malwareF-secure router checker interface

Your DNS server’s IP address details along with your IP address details will also be listed.

What should I do if my router is hacked?

Disconnect from the Internet

By disconnecting your router from the Internet, the hacker loses his ability to access the router since there is no longer a connection.

Reset your router

By performing a factory reset, your router will reset your settings and passwords. This action will also remove certain types of router malware.

There should be a reset button directly on the router to help you accomplish this task.

Change the administrator password

Once your router is reset, log into your router’s administration interface. There should be a sticker on your router that details the default login credentials for reference.

After logging in, immediately change the administrator password to a complex password. Thus, the hacker will not be able to reconnect to the administration interface of the router.

Update your router firmware

Routers don’t always update themselves, which is why it’s important to update their firmware manually.

Firmware is software that controls certain aspects of your router’s hardware. Updates are important because they help patch vulnerabilities, which could be a prime target for a hacker looking to regain control of your router.

How to check your router for malware

One of the first things a system or network administrator needs to learn is how to monitor router traffic – whether you just want to better understand the traffic or increase the network speed. This task is relatively easy these days thanks to the preponderance of available tools and network monitoring software, but you still need to know how these tools work and what you’re looking for when they give you the results. In case you cannot get access to your router , click to follow our detailed guide.

This article will go over some of the finer points of network monitoring and answer some of those questions.

How to Monitor Your Router Traffic Efficiently

Monitoring network traffic in your network router is much easier if you check out the top-rated network monitoring tools and software, but there is still quite a bit of analysis left for the administrator. Let’s take a look now.

Definition, Tools, and Alternatives

The definition of network traffic is basically how much data and traffic flows across your network and the router at any given moment in time. It’s usually set and received in packets, which will take care of the load in the network. It’s the main aspect of measuring your traffic and controlling it.

Tons of data move through a network, especially ones that are owned by businesses and other large organizations. This can consist of visitors to your website, emails, videos, pictures, data and files sent between departments, and more. Administrators need to find ways to optimize the flow of this information to keep your network running at peak performances. This starts with monitoring.

Administrators are constantly looking for some great tools that they can use to measure, observe, and analyze their network traffic, data and IP addresses activity. Some of these tools are free while others charge more money for more advanced features. These tools will allow network administrators to get a detailed picture of what their network’s data and all the traffic patterns look like in real-time, which they can use to hunt for problems and choke points in the network’s efficiency.

These can be really difficult unless you know exactly what you’re looking for, so a lot of the paid tools come with very clear data that records over long periods of time so you can start seeing patterns more easily. They also report using graphs so professionals can clearly explain to people outside of the IT department.

When it comes to internet traffic monitoring, administrators are constantly hunting the best way to handle as much as they can with a few tools as they can. After all, some of these tools add demand to the network and the system resources or network usage, so if one tool can do everything it’s far more convenient to both the network and its administrator. Still, sometimes a smaller and more specialized tool is better equipped to show specific data, so that may be a more favorable option.

Network Traffic Monitoring: Active or Passive?

Active network traffic monitoring requires a great deal from the network administrator. If something goes wrong, they are instantly putting out the fire. Basically, if the network crashes, everything grinds to a halt. Emails don’t get sent; they just stick in the outbox as a draft or pending send. Applications stop working or crawl slowly. Data won’t load, and tech support is getting an earful from everywhere in the company demanding to know why stuff isn’t working and how they can fix it and how soon it will all be back up and running.

This type of monitoring means that the network administrator will start working instantly when things happen. They will hunt for the tool showing the network’s traffic and check everything that could have gone wrong at every point in the network until he eventually finds what they are looking for. Then, they can go to work on fixing the problem and put everything back in order.

With passive network monitoring, you use a tool to monitor network traffic 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. This tool allows the network administrator to keep their finger on the pulse of the traffic constantly. He will be able to tell the moment the volume of data going through the network climbs and be able to locate the error before everything grinds to a complete stop. As soon as it looks like a disruption is imminent, he can take some measures to avoid it. This could involve upgrading the weak points in the network, performing some load balancing adjustments to keep things flowing, or more. This is a great way to monitor network traffic from your system.

Display Network Traffic: Is there one tool for everything?

When you are looking to monitor network traffic and all aspects of your network you need something that can handle speed, uptime, routers, traffic, servers, and switches. If you find an all in one monitoring tool for your network performance monitoring, then you will find it much easier to monitor your entire network than using several different tools that each monitor one or two aspects. When something goes wrong, you will have real time data that overviews your entire network, making it much faster to pinpoint the problem spot. This will save you tons of time and effort, not to mention reduce stress.

The Internet has become the foremost element in our day-to-day lifestyle. It is hard for the majority of people to pursue a day without the Internet. Presently everyone is installing Wi-Fi to get a stable and additional internet connection for everyday purposes. But in this active environment, threats are rising every day. Therefore, it is important to keep your cyber-security up to date. Incident response is a quick overview of how to test vulnerability and assess the risks with a strategic plan and structure. For that, you would need to know the kinds of anti-virus scans or basic tests to run on your computer. These include a quick QuickHeal scan for viruses, malware, unprotected files, and the like so that your PC is in the safest hands.

We all love downloading freebies from the Internet, from a minimal calendar app to a jazzy media VCR or a favorite PC game. And this common interest of ours is just well too known by attackers.

Cyber-security is the protection of the network system from information leaks, theft, virus infestation, etc. In addition, this security prevents foreign elements from infiltrating the base. Downloadable files on the Internet are among the most popular mediums used by attackers to spread viruses and malware. An attacker can inject a malicious code into a file that could be a word doc, image, or any other normally considered innocuous file. Once the attacker has compromised a file, they may distribute it via email, websites, torrent links, social media channels, etc. The type of malicious code launched by the attacker depends on the result they want to achieve. For instance, if a hacker is after your data like usernames, passwords, bank statement information, etc., then they would trick you into downloading a spyware-infected file on your computer. Once inside the system, the spyware will accumulate all possible information about you and transfer it to the attacker.

Here are some tips to check if your home router is vulnerable to infiltration or not.

Table of Contents

Malware Scan:

It is important to scan your router now and then for malware files or devices. Attackers can infiltrate easily if there is no antivirus to protect the devices. A routine scan every once or twice a week will scan all unknown files for threats. This scan would analyze any malicious files for threats to keep your device safe. If the antivirus captures any suspicious file as a threat, it would be wise to wipe out the file. Many antiviruses like Norton, McAfee, Quick Heal, Kaspersky, etc., to keep your devices safe. Know more about how to perform the best antivirus scan with a PC. Quickheal makes sure it has processed all files for viruses and repairs threats instantly. This clears up disk space, advances up virus scans, and defeats malware on these temporary files.

Authentication for all Devices:

Another important aspect would be to keep tabs on all the devices connected to the router. Attackers could infiltrate your devices through third-party applications. Therefore, it is highly recommended to identify all the trusted devices connected to the router, “Better safe than sorry.” If any intruder gets inside the system, it will cause information leaks and a reduction in internet speed. You can authenticate better by logging into 192.168.1.254.

Third-Party Usage:

The use of third-party applications is a common activity now. Many websites provide free software, which may be restricted or paid for by the software company. This greed for free products may benefit your temporal need, but it may cause permanent damage to your device. In addition, this third-party application uses personal information which could leak without your permission. You can prevent the use of this personal information by terminating the use of these third-party applications.

Security Protocol:

You should always check a router with security measures. It is important to keep the security in check to save the devices from any online threats. A low-security device would be the target for hackers to infiltrate. The higher the security is, the more complex it would be for hackers to infiltrate and any third-party apps. Learn more about security protocols here.

There are a lot of different ways to secure your router from vulnerability. The more secure you are about your personal information, the more it would be hard for foreign elements to infiltrate your devices. Always keep your devices up to date and in check for suspicious activities. If any suspicious files are found, they should be dealt with immediately to prevent further information leaks.

How to check your router for malwareLinksys

Your router isn’t as safe as you think — malware has infected many of them, and could put you at risk. Here’s how to check your router for malware and keep it safe.

There have been many reported malware attacks on routers, including routers made by Linksys and Asus. Malware can not only harm your network and systems, but it can use your router to launch denial of service (DDoS) attacks against Web sites. This spring, the Web security firm Incapsula discovered a botnet composed of tens of thousands of routers that had been used to launch such exploits.

There are ways to keep yourself safe, though, and it’s not tough to do. How you do it varies from router to router, but the same general techniques apply to all. I’ll show you how to do it with a Linksys.

First, upgrade your router’s firmware — that will have the latest security patches. Check the manufacturer’s Web site, or else your router itself. On my Linksys, I do it by logging into the router, then clicking Administration –> Firmware upgrade.

Next, make sure remote administration is turned off. On many Linksys routers, log in, then select Administration. Make sure remote administration is set to Disabled. Some routers might not clearly tell you whether remote administration is disabled or enabled. If the remote management IP address is 0.0.0.0, it’s disabled. If it’s an IP address other than that, turn it off.

It’s a good idea to check what DNS server your router is using, if any, because a hijacked DNS is a potential sign your router has been hacked. Check the DNS setting. On a Linksys router, after you log in, go to Setup. You’ll see your DNS settings down near the bottom of the page. If they all have 0.0.0.0, you’re OK. So are DNS settings for Google DNS (8.8.8.8 and 8.8.4.4), and for OpenDNS (208.67.222.222 and 208.67.220.220). If you see unfamiliar settings, it could mean trouble. You might want to do an Internet search for them, and see if they’re reported as being linked to malware.

Make sure to change the default password on your router — hackers know all the defaults, and you don’t want to leave your front door open for them. And make sure to use a strong password

You should also turn off universal plug and play (UPnP). It’s a well-known security risk on routers. On a Linksys router, log in, then go to Administration and makes sure that the UPnP setting is disabled.

This story, “Worried about malware on your router? Here’s how to keep it safe.” was originally published by ITworld .

Preston Gralla is a contributing editor for Computerworld and the author of more than 45 books, including Windows 8 Hacks (O’Reilly, 2012) and How the Internet Works (Que, 2006).