How to continue reading the new york times online for free

The NY Times is flipping the switch on its digital paywall right now, and the Grey Lady don’t come cheap: $15/month for the website and the phone app, $20/month for the website and the iPad app, or a wallet-singeing $35 for web, phone, and iPad. But there are loopholes! And they are generous. Here’s your game plan.

The New York Times Will Charge $15+ for Its Website Paywall

A bizarrely-staggered paywall will come into effect from March 28th, with readers getting 20 free…

Read For Free: Easy Version

As much as a paywall might get your hackles up, the folks running the Times understand that no amount of digital subscription revenue would make up for the sting an page view exodus. That’s why—in addition to 20 free articles a month, which is pretty generous for your average casual reader—they built in this little clause:

• Readers who come to Times articles through links from search, blogs and social media like Facebook and Twitter will be able to read those articles, even if they have reached their monthly reading limit. For some search engines, users will have a daily limit of free links to Times articles.

That’s similar to the model that’s been employed by the Wall Street Journal and Financial Times, and means that if there’s ever an NYT article you’re blocked from? You can just copy and paste the headline into Google for free and easy access. Even if you hit your unspecified daily limit on Google, you can head on over to Bing or, if you’re feeling 2002 about it, Alta Vista.

If that’s too labor intensive (all that clicking!), then it’s time to make Twitter your new best friend. Between individual journos, print sections, and blogs, there are a whopping 252 Twitter accounts associated with the NYT—none of them shy about pushing out their content. Pick and choose your favorites, or for the full firehose of every single NYT article just follow @freenyt @freeUnnamedNews (@freenyt got taken down recently).

Read For Free: Advanced Version

As it so happens, the NYT paywall is even leakier than we first thought. In fact, just two little lines of code are all that separate you from paper-of-record freedom, and there are a few ways to bust them.

First is the aptly named New York Times Paywall Smasher, a Chrome extension that automates the process of getting around the paywall.

You can also install the NY Times Paywall userscript here , using Greasemonkey in Firefox and Chrome or Greasekit in Safari.

How to Work Around the New York Times’ 20-Article-per-Month Paywall

The New York Times launches its digital subscription packages today at 2 p.m. Eastern time.. That…

Lastly, there’s the handy NYTClean bookmarklet . Just drag it to your bookmarklet bar, and click it every time nytimes.com asks you to become a subscriber. You’ll be redirected to a free version of the page with no fuss and/or muss.

Read For Cheap

If you’re dead set on getting yourself a digital subscription, that’s fine. Getting around the firewall is doable, but not seamless, and you may rather just avoid the hassle. Remember, though, that only suckers pay retail.

The trick here is that any home delivery package includes a full digital subscription. And—conveniently enough—a Monday-Friday home delivery costs you just $3.70/week for the first 84 days, or $14.80/month. That’s less than the cheapest digital plan, and gives you unlimited web, phone, and iPad access. And when the full price kicks in, iPad and phone users are still saving a significant amount, and anyone else can just cancel home delivery switch back to pure digital.

Don’t need the dead tree version? I bet you know someone who does. Just sign up your parents or your technophobic neighbor for home delivery as a gift—after they’ve promised to sign away their digital rights, of course.

Also, if you sign up now (or any time before the offer expires) for any digital subscription, your first month will just be a buck . After which, you can cancel and reread this guide to get back on the free and cheap.

And remember that these loopholes are actually in place to help the Times. More home delivery subscribers, higher social media attach rates, more app downloads; these are all things that advertisers drool over. And it’s their money—not yours—that keeps newspapers afloat.

Well, you’ll get 20 free articles a month, of course, and that’s a lot more New York Times than a lot of folks want to read.

And you’ll also get unlimited access to the front page and section fronts and blogs and search results and reader contributions and other stuff.

And. beyond that, you’ll be able to access whatever article you want for free through a search engine. (Because the New York Times wants to encourage folks to read articles they find through search engines.)

So how do you do that?

Just go to the New York Times front page the way you normally do. Then, if you see a headline you want, highlight it, copy it, and then dump it into your Google search window. The headline should be returned as the first search result. Then just click it and read.

(This is how lots of folks read the FT and WSJ for free. And the papers don’t actually mind it because they know that even people who know how to do this–like you–are usually too lazy to do it).

So, if you’re a New York Times lover, no worries! You’ll still be able to read it for free.

(NOTE: Over at MediaMemo, Peter Kafka says the NYT will limit free referrals from Google to 5-per-day. So that means you might have to use Bing, too, for some of your free reading. But who reads more than 5 NYT articles per day?)

Below is a tutorial we put together on how to read the Wall Street Journal for free. When the New York Times finally launches its paywall, on March 28, we’ll run a detailed version for the NYT.

Want to read the Wall Street Journal (or New York Times) online for free? No worries! You can!

The WSJ wants to be indexed in and accessible via Google. This is great for Google traffic. But it also means you don’t really need a WSJ subscription to read any of its content online.

(The little secret that the WSJ understands that most newspapers don’t is that the vast majority of readers will never bother to do this. The ones that have to read the WSJ for work will buy a subscription. The rest won’t check it often enough to know what to search for. But their little secret shouldn’t stop YOU from enjoying the content.)

Here’s how to do it:

Step 1: Go to WSJ.com and click around till you see a story with a key icon next to the headline. These are stories you have to have a subscription to read. Click on the story headline.

Step 2: On the story page, highlight and then copy the story headline.

Step 3: Paste the story headline into the Google search box at your browser’s top right. Click through.

Step 4: On the Google search results page, click on the story’s headline again.

Step 5: Boom, you’re done. Repeat as necessary.

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

This is the month of the digital news paywall.

The Daily will start requiring subscriptions to access its tablet newspaper today and the New York Times will begin enforcing its paywall on March 28.

We suppose it was only a matter of time. You can’t get great content for free forever, after all, and online advertisements aren’t cutting it any more for some big budget newspapers.

So how are you supposed to get your news without signing up for a subscription, at least until the papers bond together to chain down all content?

We rounded up a few ways around the paywall with some useful news apps and aggregators, plus a way to trick the Times into letting you read everything for free.

If you don’t want to pay for news content, start relying on news websites with free content.

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

Google News is a great place to start. The site has links to the most important articles on a variety of news websites. Find some sites you like and stick with them.

These sites will always allow you to access their RSS feeds, but will be ad-supported. You can feed RSS feeds into some apps we’ll show you next.

Newspapers has links to official newspaper websites around the country

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

Newspapers is an incredible app which is essentially a directory of links to every newspaper in the country that has an online website.

Inside the app, you can choose to read articles through Safari or you can send articles to Instapaper for reading later.

Price: $1.99 for iOS

Use Reeder to aggregate your favourite news websites, which will constantly pipe in new content.

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

Reeder is both a beautiful and smart RSS reader.

The app makes reading RSS feeds feel like a real newspaper, and the app does the hard work removing ads and reformatting your favourite sites so they look clean as a whistle.

Price: $2.99, iOS

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

When you open Zite, you can add Twitter and Google Reader to start ‘customising’ news feeds curated by Zite. You don’t need these services, however, for Zite to start recommending news articles for you to read.

As you pick articles to read (within a variety of unique sections like Gadgets, Social Media, Mac, and more), the app learns your interests. You can even give the ‘thumbs up’ or ‘thumbs down’ to any article to further personalise the experience.

Price: free for iPad

Use fan-favourite Flipboard to bring in all your Google Reader RSS Feeds

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

Flipboard quickly turns your RSS feed collection into a colourful news magazine.

The app has traditionally been used for social news (streaming from twitter, Facebook, etc.) but in December a new features was added to expand Flipboard’s functionality to include any news you can grab using an RSS feed!

Price: free for iPad

The Associated Press’ mobile app combines worldwide and local news

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

The Associated Press’ mobile app lets you customise your news feed: you can select which local or national broadcasters and news are your favourites, then combine them with national and international AP content.

We love this feature, and we also like the slick interface and ‘Categories’ tab on the bottom to help find what you’re looking for, fast.

Price: free, for iOS and free for Android

Use Twitter? This loophole makes it easy to get New York Times content for free

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

While there’s no guarantee that they’ll keep this easy once the paywall goes up on March 28th, you can create a list of each New York Times Twitter feed. Since articles you visit from links in blog postings or Twitter don’t count towards your 20 articles per month limit, you’ll be able to access them all for free.

Check out this list of 40 New York Times feeds, via Lifehacker.

CNN’s app is one of the premier news apps in the App Store

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

New features for this iOS and Android app include streaming video, weather and traffic,and social network integration.

CNN even lets readers get involved from their devices with the iReport feature, which lets you submit photos and videos of your opinions to CNN. The app also uses push notifications to send breaking news your way, as well as local news options.

Price: free for iOS and for Android

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

The Daily just put up their subscription paywall today (after a while of free trial use).

The day after The Daily was debuted, we discovered you could read all of its content for free on a computer anyway.

Apparently the guy running ‘The Daily: Indexed’ decided to call off his Daily subscription, but two others are taking the reins and stepping in very soon to continue the site (as of March 19th). Let’s hope they start it up again soon.

Here’s how to read the New York Times online for free

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

Even once the paywall officially goes up, you’ll still be allowed to read 20 articles per month on the New York Times’ website.

If you want more (but aren’t willing to splurge on a subscription), you can use a search engine trick to read up to 5 New York Times articles per day. Since NYT allows you more five visits per day when linked from a search engine, you can paste headlines directly into Google.

So combining these two options, you can read 170 articles per month on the New York Times’ website. The New York Times is allowing unlimited access to their front page online too.

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

Has this ever happened to you? You are putting together information for a crucial presentation at work. Then, you stumble across an insightful piece of journalism, from The New York Times, no less, which could give you the missing piece of information that you need to nail your presentation from a very credible source. You click, expecting to end your chase. Instead, you receive a now familiar, and slightly frustrating message, “Get unlimited access when you subscribe to The Times. Subscribe now.” You may not necessarily want to subscribe to The New York Times, yet this particular piece of information is crucial for your data search.

Today, the best websites have moved away from the open web principles that first gave rise to the Internet. Most of these have in fact moved to a subscription model, where topnotch content is guarded by a paywall. In fact, The New York Times leads this segment, with 4 million subscriptions worldwide, which it hopes to grow to 10 million subscribers. While this might seem like a betrayal to many who believe in the free commons, there are still others who choose to appreciate great content by funding it. But for those who disagree, there remain several ways to work around such payment walls, which allow you to access content on any website, including The New York Times, without being coerced into a subscription. Let’s look at some of the new york times paywall smasher methods.

Three ways to bypass the NY Times payment wall

There are a variety of approaches that have been used to bypass paywalls, and most of these have been discussed at length online like ny times paywall user script etc. But here are three surefire ways that I know never fail to work, and where most websites, such as The New York Times, have no restrictions.

1. Using mobile apps data technique:

Typically, The New York Times, just like any other leading publication, lets you read five articles free every month, which is better known as a metered payment wall approach. This is different from a hard payment wall that prevents readers from viewing any content without a subscription.

Especially in the context of The New York Times metered payment wall, if there’s an additional article that you would like to read, you can reset your count after clearing your history. While in the past, you could access blocked content by using Chrome or Firefox in Private/Incognito mode, this loophole has now been plugged. So currently, it seems to be best to erase your history of accessing content on The New York Times website. One way to do this is by using a mobile app.

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

When you are using a mobile app, you can erase the count of content that you have accessed by clearing the app cache and app data on your device. This should quite easily reset your content access count to zero, giving you access to five new pieces of content every time.

2. Using a VPN technique :

The New Times tracks your access count of articles on the website through your IP address. So switching your IP address would make it difficult for the website to track your usage history. That’s where a VPN or virtual private network comes in, as it gets you multiple IPs by changing your IP through a VPN. This could be one of several reasons why 26% of all Internet users rely on some free VPN services to access content and browse the Internet anonymously.

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

Today, the Chrome extension section makes scores of free VPN Extensions available. Together, these give you hundreds of new IPs, which bypass paywalls as required, giving you access to five times the number of new articles every time.

3. Using web archives technique:

If you are looking to access older content, the best way to reach it could be through Wayback Machine. As the name suggests, the website is a great tool to access data that goes way back in time. So, if you need to read an older content piece, another great way to do this is to enter the URL at WayBack Machine and check whether it has been archived at any time in the past. If it has been, you can definitely still access it using this website, which is quite simply an online archive tool. So even when a website disables cached versions of its web pages, this is still one place where you could pull all of these right back. This also makes it a very valuable resource when you want to capture a web page as it appears now for later use as a trusted citation in the future.

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

What’s more, even beyond exploring older news from The New York Times, you can also use this method to explore over 451 web pages that have been saved over time. In addition, WayBack Machine’s subscription service also enables you to capture, manage, and search these collections of digital content without any technical expertise or hosting facilities. So, it’s simple functionality makes this technology that anyone can use at any time.

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

An interesting alternative use of this website also springs from its ability to throw back web pages long after they have been removed from the original website. So, if you are looking at how you can evade online censorship, this is your online archive tool. But it’s also equally handy when you need to keep a link from an article in The New York Times in your presentation, article, or a research piece always available long after its current use.

From now on, you will find us at a new address: nytimes.com/world. We will continue to produce web-only India Ink sketches, analyses, narratives and news stories, but they will appear on the World page, along with the rest of the newspaper’s coverage.

Join us at our new home, and continue to follow us at @nytindia on Twitter.

Image of the Day: June 27

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

At the Month-Mark, Modi Reflects

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

NEW DELHI — On Thursday, as the government headed by Prime Minister Narendra Modi completed 30 days in office, Mr. Modi, with a perceptible confidence in his political persona, reached out to the public through a blog post.

His message was marked by a theme of his campaign — that of the political outsider, beset by hostile critics, but nonetheless eager to transform the country through its highest office. He wrote of the “honeymoon period” that previous governments enjoyed — “up to a hundred days and beyond.”

“Not unexpectedly I don’t have any such luxury,” he wrote. “Forget hundred days, the series of allegations began in less than a hundred hours.” He did not specify what those allegations were. Read more…

After 25 Years, Modest Gains at Mumbai Breast Milk Bank

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

MUMBAI — On a recent afternoon, 27-year-old Ashwini Agarwal adjusted her sari as she emerged from the crowded outpatient department at the Lokmanya Tilak Hospital, a public facility that houses the oldest of India’s roughly 14 breast milk banks, established a quarter of a century ago.

She had just donated her breast milk to the bank, to be consumed by another patient’s newborn, a woman who would be unable to breastfeed her own child.

Mrs. Agarwal’s second child was delivered at the hospital four months ago through a caesarean operation, and for a few days after the birth, she was unable to breastfeed her own child. Her newborn was fed mother’s milk from the bank in the initial days.

“The doctors told me how important it was,” she said, expressing her relief that they had breast milk in house.

Her husband, who accompanied her to the appointment, was surprised.

“You mean it was another woman’s milk?” he asked. “Is that even safe?”

Dr. Armida Fernandez, 70, who helped to start the bank in 1989 and now runs her own nonprofit, said that the answer to this common reaction was simple. Read more…

An Icon of Indian Roads Is Set Out to Pasture

Road Ends for India’s Ambassador

After more than 50 years, Hindustan Motors ended production of the iconic Ambassador, the first car solely sourced and produced in India.

By Vikram Singh on Publish Date June 26, 2014. Photo by Manjunath Kiran/Agence France-Presse — Getty Images.

“When the Ambassador car was born in 1957 to a newly independent India, it was the height of style and status,” Nida Najar wrote in The New York Times. “It was standard issue to senior civil servants and government officials; its possession implied status, and its ubiquity was a sign of an earlier, seemingly simpler India.”

“But that icon of the Indian road may have reached the end of the line, pushed from its dominance by changing consumer tastes, an opening marketplace for automobiles and fierce competition,” she wrote.

“In May, the car’s manufacturer,Hindustan Motors announced that it would suspend production of its Ambassador, the final stage in a long decline,” she wrote. Read more >>

Image of the Day: June 26

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

A Mobile Developer Looks To Indian Languages

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

MUMBAI — A call center worker far from his native Hyderabad; a Chennai-based developer checking out e-books in Tamil; and a young, homesick cab driver in Mumbai who keeps track of comings and goings in his village in Uttar Pradesh — all are customers of a mobile news application trying to tap into a growing market of online Indian-language readers.

NewsHunt, which can be accessed on smartphones, delivers 100 newspapers and 10,000 books in 11 Indian languages and English. It was started in 2009 by its parent company, Verse Innovation, to serve the growing literate population — 74 percent of India, according to the latest census.

In December of 2013, NewsHunt began offering its readers a selection of 10,000 books, adapted for mobile reading, in nine Indian languages and English.

But Virendra Gupta, the chief executive officer of Verse, said that while 70 percent of its users are bilingual — accessing newspapers in both English and an Indian language — they tend to read Indian languages eight to nine times as frequently as English content. Read more…

Image of the Day: June 25

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

Sanskrit Newspaper Sees Business Model in New Government

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

The Saturday after Narendra Modi and his Bharatiya Janata Party’s historic victory in the country’s parliamentary elections was announced, some 40,000 subscribers to a weekly Sanskrit newspaper woke up to a resounding headline:

“Miracle, Miracle, Miracle,” printed in bold Sanskrit over the top of Sajal Sandesh, which means “Gentle Message.”

But for Deven Khatri, who manages an edible oil export business as his day job, there may have been a double meaning in the headline. He saw the election of the Hindu nationalist leader and his right-of-center party as not just a political windfall, but also an economic one.

Mr. Khatri, 42, started Sajal Sandesh in May 2013, partly in anticipation of a new government, which is likely to be friendly toward the revival of the ancient language, and therefore could provide a much-needed platform, promotion and advertising to his fledgling paper.

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

This is the month of the digital news paywall.

The Daily will start requiring subscriptions to access its tablet newspaper today and the New York Times will begin enforcing its paywall on March 28.

We suppose it was only a matter of time. You can’t get great content for free forever, after all, and online advertisements aren’t cutting it any more for some big budget newspapers.

So how are you supposed to get your news without signing up for a subscription, at least until the papers bond together to chain down all content?

We rounded up a few ways around the paywall with some useful news apps and aggregators, plus a way to trick the Times into letting you read everything for free.

If you don’t want to pay for news content, start relying on news websites with free content.

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

Google News is a great place to start. The site has links to the most important articles on a variety of news websites. Find some sites you like and stick with them.

These sites will always allow you to access their RSS feeds, but will be ad-supported. You can feed RSS feeds into some apps we’ll show you next.

Newspapers has links to official newspaper websites around the country

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

Newspapers is an incredible app which is essentially a directory of links to every newspaper in the country that has an online website.

Inside the app, you can choose to read articles through Safari or you can send articles to Instapaper for reading later.

Price: $1.99 for iOS

Use Reeder to aggregate your favourite news websites, which will constantly pipe in new content.

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

Reeder is both a beautiful and smart RSS reader.

The app makes reading RSS feeds feel like a real newspaper, and the app does the hard work removing ads and reformatting your favourite sites so they look clean as a whistle.

Price: $2.99, iOS

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

When you open Zite, you can add Twitter and Google Reader to start ‘customising’ news feeds curated by Zite. You don’t need these services, however, for Zite to start recommending news articles for you to read.

As you pick articles to read (within a variety of unique sections like Gadgets, Social Media, Mac, and more), the app learns your interests. You can even give the ‘thumbs up’ or ‘thumbs down’ to any article to further personalise the experience.

Price: free for iPad

Use fan-favourite Flipboard to bring in all your Google Reader RSS Feeds

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

Flipboard quickly turns your RSS feed collection into a colourful news magazine.

The app has traditionally been used for social news (streaming from twitter, Facebook, etc.) but in December a new features was added to expand Flipboard’s functionality to include any news you can grab using an RSS feed!

Price: free for iPad

The Associated Press’ mobile app combines worldwide and local news

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

The Associated Press’ mobile app lets you customise your news feed: you can select which local or national broadcasters and news are your favourites, then combine them with national and international AP content.

We love this feature, and we also like the slick interface and ‘Categories’ tab on the bottom to help find what you’re looking for, fast.

Price: free, for iOS and free for Android

Use Twitter? This loophole makes it easy to get New York Times content for free

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

While there’s no guarantee that they’ll keep this easy once the paywall goes up on March 28th, you can create a list of each New York Times Twitter feed. Since articles you visit from links in blog postings or Twitter don’t count towards your 20 articles per month limit, you’ll be able to access them all for free.

Check out this list of 40 New York Times feeds, via Lifehacker.

CNN’s app is one of the premier news apps in the App Store

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

New features for this iOS and Android app include streaming video, weather and traffic,and social network integration.

CNN even lets readers get involved from their devices with the iReport feature, which lets you submit photos and videos of your opinions to CNN. The app also uses push notifications to send breaking news your way, as well as local news options.

Price: free for iOS and for Android

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

The Daily just put up their subscription paywall today (after a while of free trial use).

The day after The Daily was debuted, we discovered you could read all of its content for free on a computer anyway.

Apparently the guy running ‘The Daily: Indexed’ decided to call off his Daily subscription, but two others are taking the reins and stepping in very soon to continue the site (as of March 19th). Let’s hope they start it up again soon.

Here’s how to read the New York Times online for free

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

Even once the paywall officially goes up, you’ll still be allowed to read 20 articles per month on the New York Times’ website.

If you want more (but aren’t willing to splurge on a subscription), you can use a search engine trick to read up to 5 New York Times articles per day. Since NYT allows you more five visits per day when linked from a search engine, you can paste headlines directly into Google.

So combining these two options, you can read 170 articles per month on the New York Times’ website. The New York Times is allowing unlimited access to their front page online too.

You can log in to The New York Times website (nytimes.com) as well as any device with your digital or home delivery subscription. Visit this page to download the NYTimes app for your smartphone or tablet.

Other subscriptions

How to log in to nytimes.com

1. In your preferred web browser, go to nytimes.com.
2. In the top right corner of your browser window, select the blue Log In button.
3. You may choose to log in with your Facebook or Google account credentials (for more information, visit our Social Login FAQs). Otherwise, enter the email address associated with your subscription and your password, then select Log in.

How to log in to the NYTimes app for iOS

1. Launch the NYTimes app from your iOS device.
2. Tap the hamburger icon (three lines) on the top left corner of your screen to open the section list and then tap the gear icon to reach the Settings menu.
3. At the top of the Settings menu, tap Log In.
4. You may choose to log in with your Facebook or Google account credentials (for more information, visit our Social Login FAQs). Otherwise, enter the email address associated with your subscription and your password, then select Log in.

How to log in to the NYTimes app for Android

1. Launch the NYTimes app from your Android device.
2. Tap the overflow icon (three vertical dots) in the top right corner of your screen and select Log In or Create Account from the drop-down list.
3. You may choose to log in with your Facebook or Google account credentials (for more information, visit our Social Login FAQs). Otherwise, select Log in with email instead. Enter the email address associated with your subscription and your password, then tap Log in.

Sponsored Links

Can’t get enough New York Times over your Whispernet? Worry not, dear Kindle reader, for Amazon’s on a roll with its announcements today, the latest of which is that a subscription to the NYT on its world-conquering e-reader will also grant users access to the paywall-protected NYTimes.com online portal. No complex rules or conditions, you’ll just be one of the insiders who get unfettered access to all the fine old school journalism practiced at Times towers. See Amazon’s press release after the break or hit the source link to learn more about the $28-a-month (for international users) subscription.

Update: The sub price is $20 in the USA, the $28 cost we first saw relates to those signing up from the UK and other international markets. Thanks, russke!

Kindle New York Times Customers to Receive Free Access to NYTimes.com

Kindle New York Times subscription will include online access at no additional charge
SEATTLE, Mar 28, 2011 (BUSINESS WIRE) —

(NASDAQ:AMZN)–Amazon.com, Inc. today announced that customers who subscribe to The New York Times for Kindle will be receiving access to The New York Times Web site at no additional charge. The date for Kindle New York Times subscribers’ free online access is yet undetermined; subscribers will receive further communication via e-mail in the coming weeks.

“Customers love reading The New York Times on their Kindles,” said Russ Grandinetti, Vice President of Kindle Content. “Given The Times’ transition to a digital subscription model, we’re excited to be able to offer Kindle subscribers online access to all the digital content available at NYTimes.com at no additional cost.”

“The Times’ digital subscription plan was designed to offer access to our high-quality journalism across a variety of platforms,” said Yasmin Namini, senior vice president, marketing and circulation, and general manager, reader applications, The New York Times Media Group. “New York Times readers on Kindle are a very loyal and important audience, and we are pleased be able to include online access as part of their subscription experience.”

The New York Times is the bestselling newspaper in the Kindle Store.

iOS app ditches subscription model a year after launch

Share this story

  • Share this on Facebook
  • Share this on Twitter

Share All sharing options for: NYT Now is the best way to read The New York Times without a subscription

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

Just over a year ago, The New York Times launched a grand experiment called NYT Now. The iPhone app was part of a major push to make the paper’s digital offerings more than just an online home for articles that appeared in the print edition. But now, the Times is rebooting that experiment, with an update to the app called NYT Now 2.0.

Instead of trying to recreate the print edition on the web, NYT Now is designed to make the Times‘ journalism appealing and accessible to people who’d never even consider picking up a paper at the newsstand. In the process of making the Times friendly for the internet of today, the company hoped to generate new subscriptions. A low-cost subscription, priced at $7.99 per month, was made to bring the social media generation into the fold.

NYT Now is essentially a highly curated Twitter feed full of good journalism

That’s changing today. The subscription model is being tossed to the curb, and NYT Now is going free. A representative from the Times says that the subscription numbers simply weren’t there: “We have seen very high engagement and retention among our NYT Now users, [but] we have not seen the number of subscriptions we were hoping for.” She added that the app “provided great insight into . our goal of reaching a wider and younger audience.” It’s been reported that the paper secured just 20,000 or so NYT Now subscriptions, and a representative has confirmed that “the majority” of the app’s core users had full New York Times subscriptions.

How to continue reading the new york times online for free

Other than the change to an ad-based model, the core of the app remains the same, and that’s a good thing. NYT Now is essentially a highly curated Twitter feed, with witty commentary from Times editors. Select articles from the paper make it into the app, and are presented with not just a headline and a photo, but also a couple of bullet points of key facts and a custom sub-headline. In addition to choosing and commentating on stories that get posted to the app, NYT Now’s editors highlight stories from around the web.

Updated free app will have fewer Times articles than before

There are some other changes though. While The Verge is told that staffing for NYT Now will not change with the switch to a subscription-free model, the number of Times stories that make it into the app will decrease. There will be roughly 10 stories from the paper in the app at any one time, down from a maximum of 25 stories in the original app. Even with the change, the app offers quite a bit for free users: unlike the full website, there will be no monthly cap on the number of articles you can read in NYT Now. That means that you could read well over a hundred Times articles a month through the app without a subscription, whereas the highly publicized nytimes.com paywall limits you to ten every month. Full digital subscriptions cost between $15 and $35 per month.

Version 2.0 also brings a few minor tweaks to the app itself. The separate tabs for Times articles and stories from around the web have been scrapped — all articles now appear in the main stream. The app also has a darker theme, and a prominent bar at the top of the screen lets you know how many new stories have been added since the last time you checked the feed.

Unfortunately, NYT Now remains an iPhone-only app. According to a Times spokesperson, an Android version “is not off the table, but we’re devoting our resources to making the iOS experience the best it can be.” You can download the new version now over at the App Store.