How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

The page you’re viewing describes extensions using Manifest V2. Now that Manifest V3 has launched, we strongly recommend that you use it for any new extensions that you create.

To use most chrome.* APIs, your extension or app must declare its intent in the “permissions” field of the manifest. Each permission can be either one of a list of known strings (such as “geolocation”) or a match pattern that gives access to one or more hosts. Permissions help to limit damage if your extension or app is compromised by malware. Some permissions are also displayed to users before installation, as detailed in Permission Warnings.

If an API requires you to declare a permission in the manifest, then its documentation tells you how to do so. For example, the Storage page shows you how to declare the “storage” permission.

Here’s an example of the permissions part of a manifest file:

The following table lists the currently available permissions:

Makes Chrome start up early and shut down late, so that apps and extensions can have a longer life.

When any installed hosted app, packaged app, or extension has “background” permission, Chrome runs (invisibly) as soon as the user logs into their computer—before the user launches Chrome. The “background” permission also makes Chrome continue running (even after its last window is closed) until the user explicitly quits Chrome.

You typically use the “background” permission with a background page, event page or (for hosted apps) a background window.

Chris Hoffman
How to control a chrome extension’s permissionsChris Hoffman
Editor-in-Chief

Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He’s written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami’s NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times—and that’s just here at How-To Geek. Read more.

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

Google promised control of each Chrome extension’s permissions back in October, and that long-promised feature finally arrived near the end of December. Extensions no longer require “all your data on the websites you visit.”

You won’t see any sort of prompt when installing an extension. If that extension asks to “Read and change all your data on the websites you visit,” all you can do is agree and click “Add Extension.” But, after the extension is installed, you can now revoke that permission.

How to Change an Chrome Extension’s Permissions

To control an extension’s access to your data, right-click the extension’s icon on your toolbar and point to “This can read and change site data.” Choose your preferred option:

  • When you click the extension: The extension can’t see any of your data until you click it. When you do, it can access data from the current tab. If an extension does something automatically whenever you visit a website, it won’t work until you click it.
  • On [current website]: The extension can only run and see data from the current website. It can’t see data from all websites.
  • On all sites: This is the default. The extension can see and change data on all websites. It can automatically run and do things whenever you load any website.

Which option you choose depends on what you use the extension for and how much you trust it. But you now have a choice. You can now install an extension but only give it access to your data on a handful of websites, or just when you click it.

The “Learn more about site access” button takes you to a Google support page that explains how this works.

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

How to Customize the Websites an Extension Can Access

You can also manage the list of specific sites an extension can run on from the Extensions page. To access it, click menu > More Tools > Extensions.

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

Click the “Details” button for the extension you want to control.

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

To the right of “Allow this extension to read and change all data on the websites you visit,” choose “On specific sites.”

You can now control the specific list of sites the extension can access from the “Allowed sites” list. Click the “Add” button and type an address to add a website, or click the menu button and click “Remove” to remove an allowed website from the list.

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

This is the same as choosing the “On [current website]” option from the extension’s context menu, but you can see all websites the extension has access to and easily manage them.

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How to control a chrome extension’s permissions Chris Hoffman
Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He’s written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami’s NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times—and that’s just here at How-To Geek.
Read Full Bio »

As a Chrome Enterprise admin, you can control which apps or extensions users can install on managed Chrome Browsers or Chrome devices.

This article gives a high-level overview of how to set policies for all users or customize settings for different groups. For more detailed information, see the guide Managing Extensions in Your Enterprise.

Before you begin

  • To make settings for a specific group of users or enrolled Chrome Browsers, put the user accounts or browsers in an organizational unit.
  • To apply settings for Chrome Browser users on Windows, Mac, or Linux computers, turn on Chrome Browser management for the organizational unit that they belong to. See Turn on Chrome Browser management.
  • Make sure that the Chrome Web Store service is turned on. Otherwise, your users can’t access the Chrome Web Store to browse or install apps and extensions, including ones that you allow.
    By default, the Chrome Web Store service is turned off in some Education domains. For details about turning on Chrome Web Store service for users, see Additional Google services.
    Note: Even if Chrome Web Store service is turned off, force-installed apps and extensions continue to automatically install and users can still sideload extensions.

Set policies in the Admin console

Can apply for signed-in users on any device or enrolled browsers on Windows, Mac, or Linux. For details, see Understand when settings apply.

These steps assume you’re familiar with making Chrome settings in your Admin console.

Sign in using your administrator account (does not end in @gmail.com).

  • Allow all other apps and extensions—Users can install all apps and extensions from the Google Play store and Chrome Web Store except the ones that you block.
    Note: Not available for Google Workspace for Education Fundamentals or Google Workspace for Education Plus customers.
  • Allow other apps from the Google Play Store only—Users can install all apps from the Google Play store except the ones that you block. Users can only install apps from the Chrome Web store that you allow.
    Note: Not available for Google Workspace for Education Fundamentals or Google Workspace for Education Plus customers.
  • Allow other apps & extensions from the Chrome Web Store only—Users can install all apps and extensions from the Chrome Web store except the ones that you block. Users can only install apps from the Google Play store that you allow.
  • Block all other apps & extensions—Users can only install the apps and extensions that you allow.

These steps assume you’re familiar with making Chrome settings in your Admin console.

Tip: To block or allow an extension for enrolled browsers, it’s easier to use the apps and extensions usage report. For details, go to View app and extension usage details.

Sign in using your administrator account (does not end in @gmail.com).

These steps assume you’re familiar with making Chrome settings in your Admin console.

You can prevent users from running apps or extensions that request certain permissions that your organization doesn’t allow. For example, you can block extensions that connect to USB devices or access cookies.

In December 2018, Google finally made good on its promise to provide users with the ability to control extensions on the Chrome browser. Typically, when you install extensions, you are forced to give them privileges that allow them to read all the data on the websites you visit. Some changes are on the way.

During the installation operations for an extension, a prompt often shows up to get the required permissions. Now, given the changes made in the new Chrome update, users are no longer expected to see such prompts when they are installing an extension.

If the extension is specific enough in requesting access to read and change the data on all the websites you visit, you will have to agree (and click on the Add extension button). Nevertheless, the most important thing here is that you can now easily revoke the permission you once afforded to a particular extension.

Pro Tip: It is possible to fix many PC issues by using the PC Repair tool. PC Repair is easy to use and reliable Windows optimization software developed to fix hundreds of system issues.

How to control Chrome extensions permissions?

Here, we have to assume that the extension (whose permissions you are trying to control) is currently active and its icon is visible on your toolbar on the Chrome program window. In that case, go through the steps below:

Right-click on the extension icon on your toolbar, then point to “This can read and change site data.” At this stage, you get to select your preferred option for this extension. See the choices below:

  • When you click the extension: If you go with this option, the extension will be allowed to view your data only after you click on it. Invariably, the accessed data comprises of the content of your current tab (the tab you are on when you click on the extension).
  • If you installed an extension to perform a specific task whenever you visit a site, the extension will not do its job unless you click on it (if this option is in use).
  • On (your current website): This option implies that the extension gets to see or work with the data from your current site. In other words, the capabilities to access data from other sites are severely restricted.
  • On all sites: This option is the default setting for the vast majority of extensions. With this setup in place, the extension is allowed to view data from all sites and alter things if it wants to. This way, the extension can execute operations or perform specific tasks whenever you load up websites without any input from you.

Well, we have just provided a brief explanation on the options that are available to control the privileges afforded to extensions on Chrome. Carefully go through the details and make the right choice. Factors like how frequently you use the extension, what you use it for, and how strongly you trust it should influence your decision.

Now, you can still push through the installation of an extension fast enough, then later decide on the permissions you want to give it.

How to see all the websites an extension has access to on Chrome; How to customize the allowed websites list?

Besides the recently introduced options that let you provide extensions with varying level of privileges, Chrome also allows you to manage the list of specific websites that an extension is allowed to view data from or work on. The required parameters or settings are accessible from the main Extension menu.

Go through the instructions below:

  • First, you have to click on the Menu icon (the image formed from 3 dots arranged vertically on your Chrome program window). Wait for a list of options to show up, then click on More tools. Select Extensions (from the short list).
  • At this point, we have to believe you are on the Extensions screen. Go through the extensions there and locate the extension that you want to control. Click on the Details button for it.
  • You should see the Allow this extension to read and change all data on the websites you visit setting. Click on the drop-down menu on the right to see the available options. Select On specific sites.
  • Under the Allowed sites menu, you should see the list of websites the extension is currently allowed to view data from or alter things. You should be able to take things up from here.

If you want to put a website on the list, all you have to do is click on the Add button and input the URL of the site. Similarly, if you want to get rid of an allowed website on the list, you have to locate its URL, then click on the Remove button beside it.

We know too well that Google Chrome is ahead of the curve when it comes to providing options that users can employ to control and manage extensions. Besides being the first browser to introduce a permission system for its extensions, it has gone a step further to provide the capabilities needed to control extensions individually.

Since you are on this page to find out how to change extension permissions in Google Chrome, we can safely infer that your privacy is somewhat important to you. In that case, you might be interested in installing Auslogics Anti-Malware.

By introducing an excellent anti-malware program (like the one we recommended), your system will end up with an additional line of defense against threats or malicious programs. Even if you have an antivirus running on your PC already as your primary security program, you should not pass up on the chance to take your security setup several levels up.

When you install or update apps and extensions, a warning to access your data may appear. The warning doesn’t mean the app is dangerous, just that it can be. Accept the warning to allow permission or deny to prevent the app or extension from accessing your information.

Recognize permission levels

Below are the permissions apps and extensions may request and their potential risk levels.

When the permission requires access to all data on your computer and the websites you visit, it means that the app or extension can access almost anything. This could be your webcam or personal files, inside or outside of your browser.

These alerts may request access to:

  • Your data on all the websites you visit gives access to read, request or modify data from every page you visit (bank account, Facebook).
  • Your data on a list of websites gives access to read, request or modify data on pages you visit on a list of specified websites.

This requests access to:

  • Your list of installed apps, extensions and themes: The app or extension can enable, disable, uninstall or launch themes, extensions, and apps you have installed.
  • Your bookmarks: The app or extension can read, change, add to, and organize your bookmarks.
  • Your browsing history: The app or extension can read and erase your browsing history.
  • Your tabs and browsing activity: The app or extension can see the URLs and titles of websites you visit. It can also open and close tabs and windows, as well as navigate to new pages in open tabs and windows.
  • Your physical location: The app or extension can use the current location of your computer or device.
  • Data you copy and paste: The app or extension can access information you’ve copied and pasted

Optional permissions will ask you to deny or allow permissions after the app or extension has been installed. When you allow optional permissions, you can’t change them after.

Now you don’t need to worry about adding a few more extensions in Chrome. You can now control the permissions after installing an extension. Earlier, extensions require to access all data on the websites you visit. Meaning they were able to change or read the data on every site that you visit. Now Google has given this feature that will help you to customize this option according to your need. In this article, you will know how to control the permission of a Chrome extension.

Though, at the time of installation, you have to agree on the “Read and change all your data on the websites you visit” permission. But later on, after the installation, you can change it.

How to Alter a Chrome Extension’s Permissions?

The quick way to alter the permission of a Chrome Extension is to right click on it and hover your mouse on “This can read and change site data” option then select the options according to your need. These options are explained below.

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

When you click the extension

If you choose this option, the extension will not be able to see any data on any website. To allow it to access the information on a site you have to click on the extension. Then it will be able to access the data on the current tab website. This option is helpful in reducing the system resource usage as well as protecting your confidential information.

If you want the extension to work only on a particular website, then choose this option. The extension will be able to read and change data on the website that you opened in the current tab. It will not work on other websites.

On all sites

This is the default option. If you choose this option, the extension can read and change the data on every website that you open. Meaning, it will do the desired job on all sites in every tab.

Besides these options, you can furthermore customize the permissions on the Extension page. Follow below guidelines to do that.

How to Customize the Extension Permissions on Chrome?

If you want an extension to run on particular websites, then you can add the list on the extension page. Click on the Menu button, hover your mouse on More tools, then click on Extensions.

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

Now locate the extension which settings you want to customize and click on Details button.

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

In the Permissions section, locate “Allow this extension to read and change all your data on websites you visit” click on the drop-down option besides this setting and choose On specific sites.

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

Now enter the URL of the website and click on Add button.

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

To add another website in the allowed list, click on Add option. To Edit or Remove a site from the list, click on the three vertical dots beside the URL.

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

To know more about the Site Access go to Google Answer Page.

How will this Feature help you?

Well, if you are like me who has almost half a dozen of extensions in the Chrome, then it is going to help you a lot. When you open a new website, all these extensions starts working on that websites; they consume RAM and Processor to do the desired job. When you open a few more tabs, you will feel it. Your PC becomes sluggish and unresponsive.

Now you can enable a particular extension when you want it to do the job. It will not consume the resources on the websites that you don’t want the extension to run.

If you are experiencing an adware problem then check – How to remove Adware from Google Chrome.

The page you’re viewing describes extensions using Manifest V2. Now that Manifest V3 has launched, we strongly recommend that you use it for any new extensions that you create.

# Summary

# What’s changing?

Beginning in Chrome 70, users have the ability to restrict extension host access to a custom list of sites, or to configure extensions to require a click to gain access to the current page.

# Which APIs are affected?

This change affects any APIs that are affected by the host permissions specified in your extension’s manifest, as well as content scripts. APIs that require host permissions include webRequest, cookies, tabs.executeScript() and tabs.insertCSS(), and performing cross-origin requests, such as through an XMLHTTPRequest or the fetch() API.

# Restricting access

# How can the user restrict access?

Users can choose to allow your extension to run on click, on a specific set of sites, or on all requested sites. These options are presented to users on the chrome://extensions page as well as in the extension context menu.

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

# What happens if a user chooses to run my extension “on click”?

The extension essentially behaves as though it used the activeTab permission. The extension is granted temporary access to any host the user clicks the extension on, if that host was requested by the extension (and isn’t a restricted site, like chrome://settings). When set to run on click, Chrome badges your extension with a circle and drop shadow (see below) to indicate that is requesting access on a particular site.

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

# What happens if a user chooses to run my extension on specific sites?

Your extension is allowed to run automatically on any sites the user has chosen, and can access the site without further user action. On other sites that your extension requested, but the user did not grant permission to, the behavior is the same as if the user had set the extension to run on click.

# What happens if a user chooses to run my extension on all sites?

The extension can automatically access any sites requested in the manifest.

# API behaviors

# Web request API

The extension can still intercept, modify, and block any requests from sites it has access to. For sites the extension does not have access to, Chrome badges the extension to indicate that the extension requests access to the page. The user can then grant access to the extension; Chrome then prompts the user to refresh the page to allow your extension to intercept the network requests.

# Content scripts, tabs.executeScript(), tabs.insertCSS()

The extension can still inject scripts and style sheets automatically for any sites it has access to. For sites the extension does not have access to, Chrome badges the extension to indicate that the extension requests access to the page. The user can then grant access to the extension. If the content script was set to inject at document_idle, the script will inject immediately. Otherwise, Chrome prompts the user to refresh the page to allow your extension to inject scripts earlier in page load (at document_start or document_end). The callbacks for the tabs.executeScript() and tabs.insertCSS() methods are only invoked if the user grants access to the site.

# Cookies and background page XHR

The extension can still read and modify any cookies from and perform a cross-origin XHR to sites it has access to. Because there is no tab associated with an extension page accessing another origin’s cookies or XHRing to another host, Chrome does not badge the extension to indicate to the user that the extension is requesting to access a site. Trying to access a cookie for another site or make a cross-origin XHR will fail with an error as if the extension’s manifest did not include the host permission. For these cases, we encourage you to use optional permissions in order to allow the user to grant runtime access to different sites.

The example below illustrates how this may work for the cookies API.

# Migration

# What are best practices to avoid being negatively impacted?

Extensions can use the optional permissions, activeTab, and declarativeContent APIs to follow best practices. Optional permissions are granted at runtime, and allow the extension to request specific access to a site. The activeTab permission is not affected, and extensions using it continue to work normally. The declarativeContent API is a substitute for many needs to inject scripts into every page.

# What happens to my current users’ settings?

This change will not immediately affect any current permissions granted to your extension. That is, it will continue to operate as before unless the user takes action to restrict the sites it is allowed to access. In future releases, Chrome will provide more controls to users to adjust settings.

Brady Gavin
How to control a chrome extension’s permissionsBrady Gavin
Writer

Brady Gavin has been immersed in technology for 15 years and has written over 150 detailed tutorials and explainers. He’s covered everything from Windows 10 registry hacks to Chrome browser tips. Brady has a diploma in Computer Science from Camosun College in Victoria, BC. Read more.

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

One of the best things about Google Chrome is the ability to extend its capabilities by adding a myriad of extensions to help improve functionality, usability, privacy, and productivity. Here’s how to install and manage your Google Chrome extensions.

How to Install Chrome Extensions

Download official Chrome extensions from the Chrome Web Store from sources you know or trust. You should make sure it’s safe before installing it by doing a little due diligence and checking the developer’s website—if they have one—ratings, and even skimming through the source code if you’re so inclined.

Head on over to the Chrome Web store for extensions and use either the search bar or browse by category to find the right extension for you. If you’re not sure where to start, Google does a pretty good job of curating the store and recommending extensions on the front page.

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

After you’ve found an extension, you want to add, click the icon to be redirected to its page.

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

Once you’re on the extension’s page, click “Add to Chrome” to add the extension to your browser.

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

A window will pop up and prompt you with the permissions needed by the extension. Read the permissions carefully and decide whether you want to give this extension access, then click “Add Extension.”

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

After the extension finishes installing, an icon is usually added to your Chrome browser in the top right corner, next to the settings icon.

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

As you install more extensions, this area may start to get cluttered. Fortunately, you can right-click the extension’s icon and select “Hide in Chrome menu” to move it into the menu and out of Chrome’s toolbar.

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

How to Manage Chrome Extensions

To open up your extensions page, click the menu icon (three dots) at the top right of Chrome, point to “More Tools,” then click on “Extensions.” You can also type chrome://extensions/ into Chrome’s Omnibox and press Enter.

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

Scroll through your extensions to find the one you want to manage and click on the “Details” button to pull up its settings.

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

Otherwise, if you know which extension you want to change—and it’s already docked on your browser— you can right-click the extension’s icon on Chrome’s shelf, then click “Manage Extensions” to circumvent going to the main extensions landing page.

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

In the settings window, you can turn the extension on or off, allow it in Incognito Mode (most apps are disabled there by default), access an extension’s options, open the extension’s website, and allow site access.

Site access lets an extension have permissions to certain sites to access site data. This is a recent update that lets people take a more granular approach to the type of data an extension can read and change. You’re able to choose from three options: when you click the extension, on a specific website, or on all websites.

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

That’s all there is to it. If you’re looking to uninstall any extensions you no longer need, start misbehaving, or were accidentally installed, head on over to chrome://extensions/ , click “Remove,” and then click “Remove” again in the popup confirmation window. Similarly, you can right-click on the extension in Chrome’s menu and choose “Remove from Chrome.”

How to control a chrome extension’s permissions

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How to control a chrome extension’s permissions Brady Gavin
Brady Gavin has been immersed in technology for 15 years and has written over 150 detailed tutorials and explainers. He’s covered everything from Windows 10 registry hacks to Chrome browser tips. Brady has a diploma in Computer Science from Camosun College in Victoria, BC.
Read Full Bio »

When your child has a Google Account, they can sign in to Google Chrome on their Android device or Chromebook.

Important: Children can’t sign in to Google Chrome on an iPhone or iPad. Learn how iPhones and iPads work with your child’s Google Account.

How Chrome works on Android or Chromebook

Children signed in to their Google Account on an Android device or Chromebook have a similar experience to adults. Available features may be updated from time to time, but some of the differences include:

  • Children won’t have access to apps and extensions from Chrome Web Store.
  • Children can’t use incognito mode.
  • Parents can manage the websites their children can visit on Chrome, and limit their children’s ability to grant permissions to websites.
  • If “Try to block explicit sites” has been turned on for your child in Family Link, Chrome browsing tries to block sexually explicit and violent sites.

Manage your child’s activity on Chrome

Important: You can only use Family Link to restrict websites or permissions if your child uses Chrome on an Android device or a Chromebook.

Manage your child’s browsing on Chrome

  1. Open the Family Link app .
  2. Select your child.
  3. Tap Manage settingsGoogle Chrome.
  4. Choose the setting that’s right for your family:
    • Allow all sites: Your child can visit all sites, except the ones you block.
    • Try to block explicit sites: No filter is perfect, but this should help hide sexually explicit and violent sites.
    • Only allow approved sites: Your child can visit the sites you allow.
  5. To manually allow or block certain sites, tap Manage sites.

Tip: You can also manage your child’s account when you click on your child’s name at g.co/YourFamily.

If you block a certain site, your child can ask for parental permission to visit it. You’ll get a notification in the Family Link app where you can approve or deny their request.

  • Websites: If you block or allow a specific website, like www.google.com , the permission doesn’t apply to sites that begin or end differently, like www.google.co.uk or photos.google.com .
  • Domains: If you block or allow an entire domain, like google , the permission does apply to sites that begin or end differently, like www.google.com and images.google.fr .

Block or allow a site

  1. Open the Family Link app .
  2. Select your child.
  3. Tap Manage settingsGoogle ChromeManage sitesApproved or Blocked.
  4. At the bottom right, tap Add an exception .
  5. Add a website, like www.google.com or domain, like google . If you add a website, you should include the www. portion of the URL, like www.google.com instead of google.com .
  6. At the top left, tap Close .

Tip: You can also manage your child’s account when you click on your child’s name at g.co/YourFamily.

Change website permission settings

You can decide whether your child can give site permissions to websites they visit, including permission to use location, camera, and notifications.

  1. Open the Family Link app .
  2. Select your child.
  3. Tap Manage settingsGoogle ChromeChrome dashboard.
  4. Turn Permissions for sites and apps on or off.

Tip: You can also manage this setting when you click on your child’s name on the Chrome dashboard.

When “Permissions for sites and apps” is off, children won’t be able to grant permissions to websites. However, permissions they already granted will still be in place.

Find or delete your child’s Chrome history

Find Chrome history

Important: If you added supervision to your child’s previously existing Google Account, you’ll need their help to do this.

  1. On your child’s device, open the Chrome app .
  2. Tap More History. This page shows your child’s recent Chrome history.

Clear Chrome history & data

From an Android device or Chromebook

  1. Open the Family Link app .
  2. Select your child.
  3. Tap Manage settingsGoogle ChromeChrome dashboard.
  4. In the “History” section, tap Clear history.

Tip: Your child’s Google Account might have other kinds of browsing history saved at myactivity.google.com.

From an iPhone or iPad

Important: If you added supervision to your child’s previously existing Google Account, you’ll need their help to do this.

  1. On your child’s iPhone or iPad, open the Chrome app .
  2. At the bottom right, tap More History.
  3. At the bottom left, tap Clear browsing data.
  4. Select Browsing history and any other data you want to delete.
  5. Tap Clear browsing data.

Tip: Your child’s Google Account might have other kinds of browsing history saved at myactivity.google.com.

Browsing data

You can clear your child’s browsing data, like cookies, saved passwords, and autofill form data.

Important: If you added supervision to your child’s previously existing Google Account, you’ll need their help to do this.

I am developing a Chrome extension for work, and one of the things it needs to do is to read (only read, not modify) an object that we send back to the website after it makes an asynchronous request to our servers. Basically I need to read the window. object and get what’s in there.

Now, I know this is possible, because I did this in a Tampermonkey script that I wrote. I was able to console.log(window.) and it came in.

Tampermonkey is a Chrome extension, so there’s no intrinsic reason why it can access something and another extension can’t.

But when I try to access this object, both from content scripts and from injected code, I get nothing. When I get the window object only, it comes up only partially, as if the extension were blind to certain parts of it. But if I’m in the console on the page, and I call window , I get a full window object back. Infuriating.

So if content scripts don’t work, and injected scripts don’t work, and there’s no reason why popup scripts would be any good here, how does one do this?

UPDATE: As requested, here is the manifest.json (I took the page_redder example and worked off that to make sure I wasn’t making any weird mistakes):

And here is content.js:

And here is background.js:

From content script: undefined From injected script: undefined

But if I do window. from the console, I get it. I even added a timeout to make sure that the content script wasn’t trying to get something that hadn’t loaded in yet. But I can retrieve the object manually before the script runs, and it still gives me undefined.