How to create life goals and put them into action

How to create life goals and put them into action

Grow Your Business, Not Your Inbox

How to create life goals and put them into action

The following excerpt is from the Brian Tracy’s book Million Dollar Habits. Buy it now from Amazon | Barnes & Noble | iTunes | IndieBound

Goal orientation is a way of thinking practiced by optimists and all successful people. In future orientation, you first develop a clear, ideal picture of what you want to accomplish sometime in the future. With goal orientation, you crystallize that image into specific, measurable, detailed goals and objectives you’ll need to accomplish to achieve that ideal future vision.

Successful people develop the habits of personal strategic planning. They sit down and make a list of exactly what they want to accomplish in the short, medium, and long term. They then use a powerful, seven-part goal-setting methodology to create blueprints and plans of action that they follow every day.

Once you develop the habit of setting goals and making plans to accomplish them, it will become as natural for you as breathing. By following a proven goal-setting process, you’ll increase the likelihood of achieving your goals by as much as ten times, by 1,000 percent or more. This isn’t just a theory; it has been proved and demonstrated repeatedly by almost every person who practices it.

In February 2003, USA Today reported on a study of people who had set New Year’s resolutions the year before. They found that only 4 percent of the people who had made New Year’s resolutions, but had not put them in writing, had followed through on them. But 46 percent of those people who had written down their New Year’s resolutions carried them out. This is a difference in success rates of more than 1,100 percent!

The seven-step formula

Many formulas and recipes exist for goal setting. As a rule, “any plan is better than no plan at all.” Here is one of the best and most effective goal-setting plans or formulas you will ever learn.

Step one: Decide exactly what you want in a certain area, and write it down clear­ly, in detail. Make the goal measurable and specific.

Step two: Set a deadline for achieving the goal. If it’s a large goal, break it down into smaller parts and set subdeadlines.

Step three: Make a list of everything you’ll have to do to achieve this goal. As you think of new items, add them to your list until it’s complete.

Step four: Organize your list of action steps into a plan. A plan is a list of activities organized on the basis of two elements, priority and sequence.

In organizing by priorities, you determine the most important things you can possibly do on your list to achieve your goal. The 80/20 rule applies: 20 percent of the things you do will account for 80 percent of your results. If you don’t set clear priorities, you’ll “major in minors” and spend much of your time on small and irrelevant tasks that don’t help you achieve your goal.

In organizing by sequence, you determine what must be done before something else can be done. You create a checklist. There are always activities that are dependent upon other activities being completed in advance. What are they, and what is the logical order or sequence of completion?

Step five: Identify the obstacles or limitations that might hold you back from achieving your goal, both in the situation and within yourself. Ask yourself, “Why have I not achieved this goal already?”

Identify the most important constraint or limitation that’s holding you back, and then focus on removing that limiting factor. It could be a certain amount of money or a key resource. It could be an additional skill or habit you need. It could be additional information you require. It could be the help or assistance of one or more people. Whatever it is, identify it clearly and go to work to eliminate it.

Step six: Once you’ve determined your goal, developed your plan, and identi­fied your major obstacle, immediately take action of some kind toward achieving your goal. Step out in faith. Do the first thing that comes to mind. But do something to start moving toward your most important goal.

Step seven: Do at least one thing every day that moves you toward your most important goal. Make a habit of getting up each morning, planning your day and then doing something, anything, that moves you at least one step closer to what’s most important to you.

The habit of doing something every single day that moves you toward an important goal develops within you the power of momentum. Daily action deepens your belief that the goal is achievable and activates the law of attraction. As a result, you begin moving faster and faster toward your goal, and your goal begins moving faster and faster toward you.

I’ve spoken to people all over the world, for many years, who’ve told me that the habit of acting every day on one or more of their major goals has been life-transforming. They’ve told me that this single habit has been more responsible for their success than any other idea they ever learned. Try it for yourself and see.

Reinvent yourself without starting from scratch with meaningful goals.

How to create life goals and put them into action

One of the gifts I received from yuletide this year was a Bullet Journal.

I’ve dabbled in making spreads on plain paper and slotting them into my disc planner, but it’s never quite the same as having one place with a dot grid, and being able to actually use all of the paper (disc-bound involves cutting away some page sections to attach them to the planner.)

I’ve also been watching bullet journal spread video channels for YEARS because they are pretty, and as someone who likes to be creative but isn’t skilled (i.e. I haven’t practiced enough to be seen as good), this was another avenue for that creativity.

And now I felt I had a reason to explore them further. And in looking to set up my initial spreads for 2021, I realised I don’t have any clear goals for the upcoming year.

And I know I’m not alone, after how 2020 turned out.

I’ve made goals and picked a word of the year for over a decade, and in exploring this with friends, I came to realise that while most of us have heard of S.M.A.R.T goals, actually identifying your desires and then making clear goals from that is a skill on its own.

So in this article I want to summarise a few ways you can consider what you’d like 2021 to look like. If you’re an audio-person, I also have a podcast episode on designing your life and why it’s important, which you can listen to here.

Whether you like to pick goals for the whole year, or just a 90-day or 6-month method; these may help you spark the ideas themselves.

I discovered this in 2009, but it’s definitely been gaining popularity as time goes on. In the simplest terms, you pick a word to “guide” your year. For example, my word for 2020 was ‘steadfast’ because I wanted to feel stable and rooted, and to not lose my own conviction and beliefs.

The idea is that this will be your “am I following ____?” whenever you make a decision or find yourself uncertain throughout the year.

If you need a few ideas, here are my previous words:

  • 2010: ‘quiet focus’
  • 2011: ‘strength’
  • 2012: ‘connect’
  • 2013: ‘improve’
  • 2014: ‘settle’
  • 2015: ‘kindness’
  • 2017: ‘create’
  • 2018: ‘trust’
  • 2019: ‘unfurl’
  • 2020: ‘steadfast’

Taking 2011’s example, Strength, I focused on three aspects: physical strength, strength of mind, and strength of spirit. This shaped my goals of exercising weekly, eating healthier, reading (and/or watching a documentary) weekly and then meditation.

For 2021, my word will be ‘Spirit.’ For me, this is about my wild, natural instincts; my spirit. It’s also about purity and fuel (like vodka is a spirit). It has that’free spirit’ connotation of being true to myself, or walking barefoot across the grass, or dancing in the rain. Similarly, it’s the’spirit’ of something is the core character, to ‘truth’ at the centre. And finally, a focus on my beliefs, on meditation, and ritual.

Using this ‘guide,’ I’m shaping goals of my movement, creative writing, meditation, and connections.

Rather than specify ‘do bodyweight workout A, 3x a week’ my movement goal is ‘stretch for 5 minutes a day’ and ‘3x a week, either dance, do bodyweight, complete a yoga routine, play ring fit adventure, or practise staff spinning.’

Last Updated: March 31, 2021 References Approved

This article was co-authored by Sydney Axelrod. Sydney Axelrod is a certified life coach and the owner of Sydney Axelrod LLC, a life coaching business focused on professional and personal development. Through one-on-one coaching, digital courses, and group workshops, Sydney works with clients to discover their purpose, navigate life transitions, and set and accomplish goals. Sydney has over 1,000 hours of relevant coaching certifications and holds a BBA in Marketing and Finance from Emory University.

There are 38 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

wikiHow marks an article as reader-approved once it receives enough positive feedback. In this case, 98% of readers who voted found the article helpful, earning it our reader-approved status.

This article has been viewed 347,643 times.

Few things are better in this world than setting a goal and achieving it. Just like when athletes experience a type of “runner’s high” after a race, so too does completing any goal produce a sense of elation and pride. This article explores many ways of setting and pursuing goals. Goals won’t just complete themselves. You need to be regimented in your pursuit of them. Get started. Keep going. Achieve your aspirations.

How to create life goals and put them into action

Sydney Axelrod
Certified Life Coach Expert Interview. 30 June 2020. Studies show that when your goals are personally meaningful, you’re more likely to get ahead in life and achieve them. [2] X Research source

  • Oftentimes, this is the hardest part of the goal-making and fulfilling process. What do you want? The answer to this is often a mixture of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. Buzz phrases like “stay true to yourself” clash with familial and work obligations. Find goals that promote a balance in your life – goals that make you happy and benefit your loved ones and others that depend on you.
  • Consider asking yourself some questions, such as “What do I want to offer my family/community/world?” or “How do I want to grow?” These questions can help you determine the direction to take. [3] X Research source
  • It’s okay if your ideas are fairly broad at this point. You’ll narrow them down next.

How to create life goals and put them into action

How to create life goals and put them into action

Sydney Axelrod
Certified Life Coach Expert Interview. 30 June 2020. Research shows that setting a specific goal makes you more likely to achieve it and can even make you feel happier in general. Be as specific and detailed as possible, remembering that you may need to break large goals into smaller sub-goals. [6] X Research source

  • Ask yourself some questions about your goals. What do you need to do to achieve them? Who will need to assist you? When will each stage of your goal need to be accomplished?
  • For example, “Be healthier” is too big and vague to be a helpful goal. “Eat better and exercise more” is better, but it’s still not detailed or specific.
  • “Eat 3 servings of fruit and vegetables a day and exercise 3 times a week” is specific and concrete, making it much easier to achieve.
  • You also need to build the scaffolding for how you will achieve these goals. For example, to achieve your fruit and veg goals, will you bring healthy snacks along to work? Choose a fruit cup instead of fries the next time you eat out? For exercising, will you work out at the gym or go for walks in your neighborhood? Think about the individual actions you need to take to “add up” to your overall goal.
  • If you have multiple stages for your goals, when does each need to be accomplished? For example, if you’re training for a marathon, you need to have an idea of how long each stage of training will take you.

How to create life goals and put them into action

Sydney Axelrod
Certified Life Coach Expert Interview. 30 June 2020.

  • For example, if your ultimate goal is to buy a big house in the country, you will need multiple sub-goals to accomplish this. You’ll need to save up money, build your credit, even possibly increase your income. Write out each of these sub-goals, along with the steps to take for each.

How to create life goals and put them into action

Grow Your Business, Not Your Inbox

How to create life goals and put them into action

The following excerpt is from the Brian Tracy’s book Million Dollar Habits. Buy it now from Amazon | Barnes & Noble | iTunes | IndieBound

Goal orientation is a way of thinking practiced by optimists and all successful people. In future orientation, you first develop a clear, ideal picture of what you want to accomplish sometime in the future. With goal orientation, you crystallize that image into specific, measurable, detailed goals and objectives you’ll need to accomplish to achieve that ideal future vision.

Successful people develop the habits of personal strategic planning. They sit down and make a list of exactly what they want to accomplish in the short, medium, and long term. They then use a powerful, seven-part goal-setting methodology to create blueprints and plans of action that they follow every day.

Once you develop the habit of setting goals and making plans to accomplish them, it will become as natural for you as breathing. By following a proven goal-setting process, you’ll increase the likelihood of achieving your goals by as much as ten times, by 1,000 percent or more. This isn’t just a theory; it has been proved and demonstrated repeatedly by almost every person who practices it.

In February 2003, USA Today reported on a study of people who had set New Year’s resolutions the year before. They found that only 4 percent of the people who had made New Year’s resolutions, but had not put them in writing, had followed through on them. But 46 percent of those people who had written down their New Year’s resolutions carried them out. This is a difference in success rates of more than 1,100 percent!

The seven-step formula

Many formulas and recipes exist for goal setting. As a rule, “any plan is better than no plan at all.” Here is one of the best and most effective goal-setting plans or formulas you will ever learn.

Step one: Decide exactly what you want in a certain area, and write it down clear­ly, in detail. Make the goal measurable and specific.

Step two: Set a deadline for achieving the goal. If it’s a large goal, break it down into smaller parts and set subdeadlines.

Step three: Make a list of everything you’ll have to do to achieve this goal. As you think of new items, add them to your list until it’s complete.

Step four: Organize your list of action steps into a plan. A plan is a list of activities organized on the basis of two elements, priority and sequence.

In organizing by priorities, you determine the most important things you can possibly do on your list to achieve your goal. The 80/20 rule applies: 20 percent of the things you do will account for 80 percent of your results. If you don’t set clear priorities, you’ll “major in minors” and spend much of your time on small and irrelevant tasks that don’t help you achieve your goal.

In organizing by sequence, you determine what must be done before something else can be done. You create a checklist. There are always activities that are dependent upon other activities being completed in advance. What are they, and what is the logical order or sequence of completion?

Step five: Identify the obstacles or limitations that might hold you back from achieving your goal, both in the situation and within yourself. Ask yourself, “Why have I not achieved this goal already?”

Identify the most important constraint or limitation that’s holding you back, and then focus on removing that limiting factor. It could be a certain amount of money or a key resource. It could be an additional skill or habit you need. It could be additional information you require. It could be the help or assistance of one or more people. Whatever it is, identify it clearly and go to work to eliminate it.

Step six: Once you’ve determined your goal, developed your plan, and identi­fied your major obstacle, immediately take action of some kind toward achieving your goal. Step out in faith. Do the first thing that comes to mind. But do something to start moving toward your most important goal.

Step seven: Do at least one thing every day that moves you toward your most important goal. Make a habit of getting up each morning, planning your day and then doing something, anything, that moves you at least one step closer to what’s most important to you.

The habit of doing something every single day that moves you toward an important goal develops within you the power of momentum. Daily action deepens your belief that the goal is achievable and activates the law of attraction. As a result, you begin moving faster and faster toward your goal, and your goal begins moving faster and faster toward you.

I’ve spoken to people all over the world, for many years, who’ve told me that the habit of acting every day on one or more of their major goals has been life-transforming. They’ve told me that this single habit has been more responsible for their success than any other idea they ever learned. Try it for yourself and see.

The bad news? It is likely that your New Year’s resolutions might not pan out the way you planned, if at all. While 60 percent of people abandon their resolutions within six months, 25 percent of people abandon them within a mere 7 days.

If resolutions don’t work, and you want to take your to-do lists to the next level, get serious about goal-setting.

Psychology professor Dr. Gail Matthews, at the Dominican University in California, led a study on goal-setting with nearly 270 participants. The results? You are 42 percent more likely to achieve your goals if you write them down.

Writing your goals down not only forces you to get clear on what, exactly, it is that you want to accomplish, but doing so plays a part in motivating you to complete the tasks necessary for your success. The process of putting your goals on paper will force you to strategize, to ask questions about your current progress, and to brainstorm your plan of attack.

This practice of writing down goals is not unheard of in the business community. In fact, some of the biggest entrepreneurial successes are very specific in the way in which they write their goals down. Grant Cardone, best-selling author of The 10X Rule and self-made millionaire has a special trick: he writes his goals down twice a day — once in the morning, and then once again at night. He explains,

“I want to wake up to it. I want to go to sleep to it and I want to dream with it. I want to write my goals down before I go to sleep at night because they are important to me, they are valuable to me and I get to wake up to them again tomorrow.”

If, like Cardone, you want to start “stretching yourself beyond good and mediocre and average and the way everybody else thinks,” then project into your future. Just make sure you grab a pen first.

When asked what their goals, dreams, and aspirations are, most people have a pretty good idea of what they want. But when asked if they have a plan for achieving their goals, most people haven’t formulated anything concrete.

There’s a big difference between setting goals and achieving goals. And when it comes to setting goals, most of us continue to rely on hope and prayer alone. But to actually achieve your goals, you need to create a plan for success.

There are several techniques you can implement as you design your personal roadmap for success. And if you invest a little bit of time to plan what you’re going to do, versus trying to figure it out as you go along . . . you’re far more likely to persevere and achieve what you set out to do.

Here’s a quick overview of the easy 4-step process to achieving any goal.

How to create life goals and put them into action

The individual goals you set are stepping stones toward your true calling or highest purpose. When you have your goal written down and clear in your mind, it’s time to visualize and strategize with tactics and a timeline.

1. See the “goal achievement” vision of yourself.

Develop a clear vision of what you want to achieve in your lifetime. How do you see yourself once you’ve accomplished your goal(s)?

Mentally rehearse what your life will be like upon goal completion. What do you see, hear, smell, taste, and feel? Use your senses to get clear on the external and internal outcome of personal achievement.

This is your “goal achievement” vision. Once you’ve done this, it’s time to move on to design a strategy.

2. Design a strategy.

A strategy allows you to figure out exactly what you must do in order to achieve your goal. Your strategy is basically the overall game plan. Ask yourself, “How can I achieve my goals?”

3. Develop tactics.

A tactic is a specific action item you’ll follow through with in order to put your strategy into play. Developing tactics is a way to break down the strategy into smaller tasks and to-dos.

Write these down. Once you have your action steps clearly outlined, have a look at your calendar.

4. Create a timeline.

So you’ve set your goal completion date for sometime in 2018 . . . great! To implement your strategy, take your outline of tactics and organize your schedule.

Pencil in time for each individual action step. A timeline will keep you on track to achieving your goal.

Got it? With strong motivation, a plan, and a timeline, you’re ready to achieve any goal you set. You can totally do this!

What’s next?

Now that you’re ready to achieve your goals, learn how to get more done in less time b y retraining your brain for success. Stop standing on the edge of your potential and start fulfilling more of what you are capable of achieving.

Ready to retrain your brain so you can get more done in less time with no stress? Click the button below for life-changing learning. Here’s to your success!

We’d love to hear from you!

Please let us know how the 4-step goal achievement process works for you. Leave your thoughts in the comment section below.

About The Author

NeuroGym Team: NeuroGym’s Team of experts consists of neuroscientists, researchers, and staff who are enthusiasts in their fields. The team is committed to making a difference in the lives of others by sharing the latest scientific findings to help you change your life by understanding and using the mindset, skill set and action set to change your brain.

Last Updated: March 31, 2021 References Approved

This article was co-authored by Sydney Axelrod. Sydney Axelrod is a certified life coach and the owner of Sydney Axelrod LLC, a life coaching business focused on professional and personal development. Through one-on-one coaching, digital courses, and group workshops, Sydney works with clients to discover their purpose, navigate life transitions, and set and accomplish goals. Sydney has over 1,000 hours of relevant coaching certifications and holds a BBA in Marketing and Finance from Emory University.

There are 38 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

wikiHow marks an article as reader-approved once it receives enough positive feedback. In this case, 98% of readers who voted found the article helpful, earning it our reader-approved status.

This article has been viewed 347,643 times.

Few things are better in this world than setting a goal and achieving it. Just like when athletes experience a type of “runner’s high” after a race, so too does completing any goal produce a sense of elation and pride. This article explores many ways of setting and pursuing goals. Goals won’t just complete themselves. You need to be regimented in your pursuit of them. Get started. Keep going. Achieve your aspirations.

How to create life goals and put them into action

Sydney Axelrod
Certified Life Coach Expert Interview. 30 June 2020. Studies show that when your goals are personally meaningful, you’re more likely to get ahead in life and achieve them. [2] X Research source

  • Oftentimes, this is the hardest part of the goal-making and fulfilling process. What do you want? The answer to this is often a mixture of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation. Buzz phrases like “stay true to yourself” clash with familial and work obligations. Find goals that promote a balance in your life – goals that make you happy and benefit your loved ones and others that depend on you.
  • Consider asking yourself some questions, such as “What do I want to offer my family/community/world?” or “How do I want to grow?” These questions can help you determine the direction to take. [3] X Research source
  • It’s okay if your ideas are fairly broad at this point. You’ll narrow them down next.

How to create life goals and put them into action

How to create life goals and put them into action

Sydney Axelrod
Certified Life Coach Expert Interview. 30 June 2020. Research shows that setting a specific goal makes you more likely to achieve it and can even make you feel happier in general. Be as specific and detailed as possible, remembering that you may need to break large goals into smaller sub-goals. [6] X Research source

  • Ask yourself some questions about your goals. What do you need to do to achieve them? Who will need to assist you? When will each stage of your goal need to be accomplished?
  • For example, “Be healthier” is too big and vague to be a helpful goal. “Eat better and exercise more” is better, but it’s still not detailed or specific.
  • “Eat 3 servings of fruit and vegetables a day and exercise 3 times a week” is specific and concrete, making it much easier to achieve.
  • You also need to build the scaffolding for how you will achieve these goals. For example, to achieve your fruit and veg goals, will you bring healthy snacks along to work? Choose a fruit cup instead of fries the next time you eat out? For exercising, will you work out at the gym or go for walks in your neighborhood? Think about the individual actions you need to take to “add up” to your overall goal.
  • If you have multiple stages for your goals, when does each need to be accomplished? For example, if you’re training for a marathon, you need to have an idea of how long each stage of training will take you.

How to create life goals and put them into action

Sydney Axelrod
Certified Life Coach Expert Interview. 30 June 2020.

  • For example, if your ultimate goal is to buy a big house in the country, you will need multiple sub-goals to accomplish this. You’ll need to save up money, build your credit, even possibly increase your income. Write out each of these sub-goals, along with the steps to take for each.

How to create life goals and put them into action

Imagine a tightrope walker in a circus. He is on a rope suspended a few feet above the straw covered floor. His purpose is to walk the rope from one end to other. He holds a long bar in his hands to help him maintain his balance. But he must do more than simply walk. On his shoulders he balances a chair. And in that chair sits a young woman who is balancing a rod on her forehead, and on top of that rod is a plate.

If at any time one of the items should start to drift off balance, he must stop until he can get all of them in perfect alignment again—for the tightrope artist doesn’t begin until all the elements above him are aligned. Only then does he move forward, carefully, slowly, across the rope.

Life is very much a balancing act, and we are always just a step away from a fall. We are constantly trying to move forward with our purpose, to achieve our goals, all the while trying to keep in balance the various elements of our lives.

If any aspect of our life draws a disproportionate amount of energy, we have to shortchange the other aspects. That throws us off—and we are unable to move forward on life’s tightrope until a balance can be reestablished. We have to deal with any areas that are taking too much energy and put them in perspective, align them, so that we have energy available for all areas.

It’s important to understand that others cannot do this for us. No one can think, breathe, feel, see, experience, love or die for us. It’s up to us to balance all the different aspects of our lives. We just have to decide to do it.

How? What’s the first step? To stop and assess how we’re doing. To look at all the various aspects of our lives that we are constantly juggling, constantly trying to keep in balance—marriage and family, money, health, social circles, spiritual development, mental growth.

Are we able to devote ample energy to all areas? Or are we tipped to one side, unbalanced in one direction? Here’s how to balance it all out:

1. Assess your life as it is now.

Looking at ourselves as we really are is the first step in restructuring our lives. Do you feel physically exhausted, mentally stagnant or find yourself without close relationships? Would you call yourself a workaholic? Do you feel a lack of spiritual alignment? If you answer yes to any of these questions, your life is probably out of balance.

2. Make a conscious decision to become balanced.

Choosing reality as our basis of decision is the second step to becoming balanced. Achieving balance allows us to reach our goals and our purpose in life while creating less stress to do so. A conscious decision to change is now in order.

3. And make that decision on a minute-to-minute schedule.

We are all instant forgetters. Remember all those resolutions you made way back in January? Renewing our decisions on a daily, minute-to-minute basis allows us to ease into change, instead of expecting things to change overnight.

4. Set goals in every area of your life.

Set realistic goals in all areas of your life to assist yourself in remembering that your ultimate goal is balance. Your goals should cover:

• Your relationships
• Your physical being
• Your spiritual alignment
• Your mental development
• Your job
• Your finances

5. Be willing to take the risk.

Being willing to assess ourselves and take the risk to change will not only enhance our lives, but you will feel more energy and an expanded awareness of what life is all about. Acknowledging that balance is essential and recreating your life to encompass your decision is worth all the risk.

6. Make time to reassess yourself on a daily basis.

None of us can really know how well we are doing with change in our lives unless we are willing to reassess our position. Don’t feel that your decisions are made in concrete; if something feels that it isn’t working, be willing to look at a new decision. Make time for yourself every day, in a quiet meditative state, to relax and “check yourself out.”

Two weeks ago I covered how to build your annual goal tracking sheet and last week I covered how to turn that goal tracking sheet into a quarterly plan which indicates your action items for each and every week.

Now we are taking it the final step to turn these sheets into daily action item logs. All of this is to help ensure that you are moving closer towards your goals and achieving more in 2020 than you ever have before.

For the audio version of this lesson, check out the BEYOND THE IMAGE PODCAST where I do a deep dive on the topic!

For daily action plans I prefer the bullet journaling method (check out the book all about how to create a bullet journal) – but here is how I tie it into everything we discussed.

I start my bullet journal with listing out the action items that need to happen in any given month. Where do those action items come from? Easy! The 90 Day Roadmaps we created last week. I just copy all of the relevant ones over to the month of January. Now I have a full list of everything I need to get done in that month.

Next, every Sunday I host what I call a WAR ROOM meeting. I start by doing this alone and if I need to bring my team in for a portion of it, I do that at the end. But the idea of a war room meeting is you set your action plan for the week.

From my monthly list, I break out what I need to get done that specific week. You are noticing the trend. I take a goal and I break it into the ridiculous bits to make it easier to manage and digest.

Big goals seem hard AF to get done. But break them into 52 tiny chunks and every week you move forward in your progress.

If I look at my war room action items for this week it involves work across most of my projects. But I have no projects that need to be finished this week, just moved ahead incrementally. However if I don’t accomplish these tasks for this week, everything the following week will now be a week behind.

Once the war room meeting is concluded and I have my list of what I want to focus on that week I open up my Calendar App. I prefer Google Cal as I can share with my team, but whatever way you want to track your time is fine.

I go into the calendar and I start to block out the time throughout the week (and yes, I only work 1 week at a time) that I need to accomplish the week’s worth of action items. I need an hour for this task here, 30 minutes for that task there. I block out my time aggressively but leaving about 30 minute buffers in between blocks to allow some stuff to roll over or stuff to come up (which it always does, naturally).

The war room meeting and calendar build can take me anywhere between 30 minutes and 90 minutes depending on the complexity of the week I have ahead. However it is worth every second as it is what ensures my focus and effectiveness in the week ahead.

Thus I invest this time to SAVE time throughout the week.

Lastly, every day in my bullet journal I will list out the tasks that need to get done that day, from my weekly list and my time blocked calendar. I work quickly, focused and aggressively knocking off each component on my list.

If I planned my day effectively, I finish on my estimated concluding time. The more I do this, the better I get at estimating. It is a muscle that requires work.

Know that early on it will be harder.
Know that early on you will get off track easier.
Know that early on you will be easily distracted.

However the more you focus, the more you customize to your needs, the easier it will get, the more focused you will get and the more accomplished you will become!

As always, we love it when you share this article online or with a friend!