How to create server-side rules in outlook

Rob Woodgate
How to create server-side rules in outlookRob Woodgate
Writer

Rob Woodgate is a writer and IT consultant with nearly 20 years of experience across the private and public sectors. He’s also worked as a trainer, technical support person, delivery manager, system administrator, and in other roles that involve getting people and technology to work together. Read more.

How to create server-side rules in outlook

Server-side rules run on the server rather than in the Outlook client, so they let you apply rules before messages ever hit your system. Here’s how they work and what you can do with them.

What Are Server-Side Rules?

When you set up normal rules in Outlook, they only work when the Outlook app is open on your system. These are called client-side rules because they work in the Outlook client app. They’re great for things like filtering email into different folders because the rules fire off when you open Outlook or when any messages hit your inbox.

But what if you want rules that fire off when Outlook is closed, such as forwarding messages to a colleague while you’re on vacation? For that, you need server-side rules, which work on the server that handles your mail regardless of whether you have Outlook open on your computer. Outlook lets you create those as well, so let’s step through the process.

Caveat: Server-side rules work if you are using Microsoft Exchange for your email server (either cloud-based O365 or an on-premises Exchange server), but not if you’re using Outlook to process mail from a provider like Gmail or Yahoo!. You can still set up an out-of-office reply and rules for a non-Microsoft account, but you’ll have to leave Outlook on and running. If that’s what you need, we’ve got instructions for you.

How to Set Up Server-Side Rules

You create normal (client-side) rules in the Rules Manager by going to Home > Rules, but we’re not using those. Instead, go to File > Options and click the “Automatic Replies” button.

How to create server-side rules in outlook

To start crafting a server-side rule, click the “Rules” button.

How to create server-side rules in outlook

This brings up the Automatic Reply Rules panel, and as you can see, there’s not a lot you can do except click the “Add Rule” button.

How to create server-side rules in outlook

The Edit Rule window that opens is where you can form your new server-side rule.

You’ll see that the options for these rules are much simpler than in the Rules Manager. This is because you are limited to actions that can be performed by the server. If you want Outlook to play a specific sound when a mail from your boss arrives, you can only do that with a client-side rule.

How to create server-side rules in outlook

Let’s say one of the team is away, and they want any mail about How-To-Geek to be moved to a specific folder and forwarded to a specific person. First, they’d select the “Sent directly to me” option. Next, they’d enter “How-To-Geek” in the subject line. They’d then select the “Copy to” option and choose a folder. And finally, they’d check the “Forward” option, select the recipient from the address book, and then click “OK.”

How to create server-side rules in outlook

The rule is added to the list of server-side rules and then will be run regardless of whether Outlook is open.

How to create server-side rules in outlook

You can add as many of these rules as you like. And obviously, you can do more with them than the simple example we’ve shown here. You could use them to change the importance of messages from specific contacts or that contain certain words in the subject. Or you could have a server-side rule delete certain types of messages before they ever reach your inbox.

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How to create server-side rules in outlook Rob Woodgate
Rob Woodgate is a writer and IT consultant with nearly 20 years of experience across the private and public sectors. He’s also worked as a trainer, technical support person, delivery manager, system administrator, and in other roles that involve getting people and technology to work together.
Read Full Bio »

Rules are either server-side or client-only based on the conditions and actions you apply to them.

Server-side rules use conditions and actions handled by the Exchange server, and these rules run whether or not you log in to Outlook on your computer. Here’s an example of a server-side rule:

From , move it to the folder

This rule uses all Exchange server information, like moving a message from a sender who’s in the Global Address List (GAL) to a specific folder that’s in your Exchange mailbox. But if the folder you’re moving the message to exists on your PC only, it becomes a client-only rule.

Client-only rules have at least one condition or action that uses an Outlook feature, and they don’t run until you log into Outlook with the account that you used to create the rule. For example, this is a client-only rule:

From , flag message to

In this example, you ask the rule to play a sound when you receive a message, and this condition can be performed only by Outlook, which makes it a client-only rule.

Examples of common conditions specified in a rule that make it a client-only rule:

With specific words in the subject

Marked as importance

Marked as sensitivity

Flagged for action

With specific words in the body

With specific words in the message header

With specific words in the recipient’s address

With specific words in the sender’s address

Assigned to category

Examples of common actions specified in a rule that make it a client-only rule:

Martin Hendrikx
How to create server-side rules in outlookMartin Hendrikx
Writer

Martin Hendrikx has been writing about technology for years. His freelance career includes everything from blog posts and news articles to eBooks and academic papers. Read more.

How to create server-side rules in outlook

If you are an Outlook.com user, you may be interested to know that setting up rules to manage your incoming and outgoing emails can make your life a whole lot simpler.

What are rules?

In their simplest form, Outlook rules are actions that your email account will automatically perform based on the guidelines that you have specified. There are two main categories of rules that you can create. These are organizational rules and notification based rules. These rules will are not retroactive, which means that they will only apply to unread messages.

  1. Organize your Emails – These rules focus on filing and organizing messages based on senders, subject keywords, and folders in your Outlook account. These are helpful for putting emails into relevant folders or categories.
  2. Keep current – These rules will send you notifications based on your incoming messages. These are useful if you want to get notifications of new emails to your mobile devices.

Creating New Rules in Outlook.com

Once you are logged into your Outlook.com email account, click on the “Settings” button, then on the “Manage Rules” option to create a new rule.

How to create server-side rules in outlook

Now, click on the “New” button to create your first rule. As you can see, there are two main sections. On the left, you will assign a condition or multiple conditions to identify the emails to which your new rule will apply. The right side is where you will define what action Outlook will take with your emails.

How to create server-side rules in outlook

For this example, we will choose two of the nine conditions that the email must meet, as well as two of the eight actions.

How to create server-side rules in outlookHow to create server-side rules in outlook

CONDITIONS ACTIONS

We will first click on the conditions link to add a second condition. Let us say that any emails from “[email protected]” that have the word “apple” in the subject line should be sent to a folder called “Apple Emails” and must be categorized as “IMPORTANT. ”

Do this by editing your rule till the two sections look like the images below.

How to create server-side rules in outlook

How to create server-side rules in outlook

Lastly, click on “Create Rule” and let it take effect. From now on, any emails from [email protected] that have the word apple in them will be classified as important and moved to your “Apple Emails” folder.

If you want to edit any of your previously created rules, all you need to do is click on the rule and edit it in the window that pops up. To delete a rule, simply click on the small recycle bin next to the rule.

Create Rules from Email Messages

The “Manage Rules” page is not the only way to create rules for your emails. Alternatively, if you want to create a rule based on an email you received, simply find it in your Inbox and right-click on it. Next, select the “Create Rule” option.

How to create server-side rules in outlook

Alternatively, you can click on the email to open it and create a rule by selecting the option from the “Extended Menu.”

How to create server-side rules in outlook

Once you have done this, you will see a popup window as shown below, in which you can customize the rule as needed.

Organizing your Rules

It is important to remember that Outlook.com will automatically select the rules you define and implement them based on the order in which they appear on your list of rules. This is why it is important to organize your rules by their order of importance. Simply click on the up and down arrows next to the rules to put them in order as needed.

How to create server-side rules in outlook

Rule Limits

Now that you know how to create and organize your rules, you need to know that there are also some limitations to the rules in the Outlook.com Web App. There is a limit on how many rules you can create. For some reason, you are only allotted 64 KB for your Outlook.com rules. There is no definitive answer on how many rules you can create since the size of the rules will vary based on the length of the rule and how many conditions and actions you have defined. Once you have reached your limit, Outlook.com will let you know that you cannot create any more rules. This is when you will need to consolidate rules or delete old rules that are no longer needed.

In addition to the limit on the amount of rules you are allowed to create, if you also use the Microsoft Outlook desktop application with rules, you may get a warning that your rules conflict with those on the desktop app. You will need to double check to make sure you can disable the conflicting rules or delete them if necessary.

Congratulations, you now know pretty much everything that you need to know about creating, manipulating, and using rules in the Microsoft Outlook Web App. Have fun managing your digital communication with ease on Outlook.com.

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How to create server-side rules in outlook Martin Hendrikx
Martin Hendrikx has been writing about technology for years. His freelance career includes everything from blog posts and news articles to eBooks and academic papers.
Read Full Bio »
Rob Woodgate
How to create server-side rules in outlookRob Woodgate
Writer

Rob Woodgate is a writer and IT consultant with nearly 20 years of experience across the private and public sectors. He’s also worked as a trainer, technical support person, delivery manager, system administrator, and in other roles that involve getting people and technology to work together. Read more.

How to create server-side rules in outlook

Server-side rules run on the server rather than in the Outlook client, so they let you apply rules before messages ever hit your system. Here’s how they work and what you can do with them.

What Are Server-Side Rules?

When you set up normal rules in Outlook, they only work when the Outlook app is open on your system. These are called client-side rules because they work in the Outlook client app. They’re great for things like filtering email into different folders because the rules fire off when you open Outlook or when any messages hit your inbox.

But what if you want rules that fire off when Outlook is closed, such as forwarding messages to a colleague while you’re on vacation? For that, you need server-side rules, which work on the server that handles your mail regardless of whether you have Outlook open on your computer. Outlook lets you create those as well, so let’s step through the process.

Caveat: Server-side rules work if you are using Microsoft Exchange for your email server (either cloud-based O365 or an on-premises Exchange server), but not if you’re using Outlook to process mail from a provider like Gmail or Yahoo!. You can still set up an out-of-office reply and rules for a non-Microsoft account, but you’ll have to leave Outlook on and running. If that’s what you need, we’ve got instructions for you.

How to Set Up Server-Side Rules

You create normal (client-side) rules in the Rules Manager by going to Home > Rules, but we’re not using those. Instead, go to File > Options and click the “Automatic Replies” button.

How to create server-side rules in outlook

To start crafting a server-side rule, click the “Rules” button.

How to create server-side rules in outlook

This brings up the Automatic Reply Rules panel, and as you can see, there’s not a lot you can do except click the “Add Rule” button.

How to create server-side rules in outlook

The Edit Rule window that opens is where you can form your new server-side rule.

You’ll see that the options for these rules are much simpler than in the Rules Manager. This is because you are limited to actions that can be performed by the server. If you want Outlook to play a specific sound when a mail from your boss arrives, you can only do that with a client-side rule.

How to create server-side rules in outlook

Let’s say one of the team is away, and they want any mail about How-To-Geek to be moved to a specific folder and forwarded to a specific person. First, they’d select the “Sent directly to me” option. Next, they’d enter “How-To-Geek” in the subject line. They’d then select the “Copy to” option and choose a folder. And finally, they’d check the “Forward” option, select the recipient from the address book, and then click “OK.”

How to create server-side rules in outlook

The rule is added to the list of server-side rules and then will be run regardless of whether Outlook is open.

How to create server-side rules in outlook

You can add as many of these rules as you like. And obviously, you can do more with them than the simple example we’ve shown here. You could use them to change the importance of messages from specific contacts or that contain certain words in the subject. Or you could have a server-side rule delete certain types of messages before they ever reach your inbox.

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How to create server-side rules in outlook Rob Woodgate
Rob Woodgate is a writer and IT consultant with nearly 20 years of experience across the private and public sectors. He’s also worked as a trainer, technical support person, delivery manager, system administrator, and in other roles that involve getting people and technology to work together.
Read Full Bio »

Server-side rules operate on the server rather than in the Outlook customer, so they let you use guidelines before messages ever strike your system. Here’s how they work and what you can do with them.

What Are Server-Side Rules?

When you set up normal rules in Outlook, they only work when the Outlook app is open on your system. These are called client-side guidelines due to the fact that they work in the Outlook customer app. They’re great for things like filtering email into different folders due to the fact that the rules fire off when you open Outlook or when any messages hit your inbox.

What if you desire rules that fire off when Outlook is closed, such as forwarding messages to a colleague while you’re on getaway? For that, you require server-side rules, which deal with the server that manages your mail regardless of whether you have Outlook open on your computer system. Outlook lets you develop those too, so let’s action through the procedure.

Caution: Server-side guidelines work if you are utilizing Microsoft Exchange for your email server (either cloud-based O365 or an on-premises Exchange server), however not if you’re utilizing Outlook to process mail from a supplier like Gmail or Yahoo!. You can still establish an out-of-office reply and guidelines for a non-Microsoft account, however you’ll have to leave Outlook on and running. If that’s what you need, we’ve got directions for you.

How to Set Up Server-Side Rules

You create typical (client-side) rules in the Rules Manager by going to Home > > Rules, however we’re not utilizing those. Instead, go to File > > Options and click the “Automatic Replies” button.

To begin crafting a server-side rule, click the “Rules” button.

This brings up the Automatic Reply Rules panel, and as you can see, there’s not a lot you can do other than click the “Add Rule” button.

The Edit Rule window that opens is where you can form your brand-new server-side guideline.

You’ll see that the options for these guidelines are much simpler than in the Rules Manager. This is because you are restricted to actions that can be performed by the server. If you want Outlook to play a specific noise when a mail from your employer gets here, you can only do that with a client-side guideline.

Let’s say one of the group is away, and they want any mail about How-To-Geek to be transferred to a specific folder and forwarded to a particular individual. First, they ‘d choose the “Sent straight to me” option. Next, they ‘d go into “How-To-Geek” in the subject line. They ‘d then select the “Copy to” choice and select a folder. They ‘d check the “Forward” option, select the recipient from the address book, and then click “OK.”

The guideline is contributed to the list of server-side guidelines and after that will be run despite whether Outlook is open.

You can add as a lot of these guidelines as you like. And undoubtedly, you can do more with them than the simple example we’ve revealed here. You might use them to alter the importance of messages from specific contacts or which contain specific words in the topic. Or you might have a server-side guideline erase particular kinds of messages before they ever reach your inbox.

Server-side guidelines run on the server rather than in the Outlook customer, so they let you use guidelines before messages ever hit your system. When you set up typical rules in Outlook, they just work when the Outlook app is open on your system. These are called client-side guidelines because they work in the Outlook customer app. What if you desire rules that fire off when Outlook is closed, such as forwarding messages to a coworker while you’re on vacation? For that, you need server-side rules, which work on the server that handles your mail regardless of whether you have Outlook open on your computer system.

Rules are either server-side or client-only based on the conditions and actions you apply to them.

Server-side rules use conditions and actions handled by the Exchange server, and these rules run whether or not you log in to Outlook on your computer. Here’s an example of a server-side rule:

From , move it to the folder

This rule uses all Exchange server information, like moving a message from a sender who’s in the Global Address List (GAL) to a specific folder that’s in your Exchange mailbox. But if the folder you’re moving the message to exists on your PC only, it becomes a client-only rule.

Client-only rules have at least one condition or action that uses an Outlook feature, and they don’t run until you log into Outlook with the account that you used to create the rule. For example, this is a client-only rule:

From , flag message to

In this example, you ask the rule to play a sound when you receive a message, and this condition can be performed only by Outlook, which makes it a client-only rule.

Examples of common conditions specified in a rule that make it a client-only rule:

With specific words in the subject

Marked as importance

Marked as sensitivity

Flagged for action

With specific words in the body

With specific words in the message header

With specific words in the recipient’s address

With specific words in the sender’s address

Assigned to category

Examples of common actions specified in a rule that make it a client-only rule:

Using Exchange, I’ve created a rule and after I finished creating it I got a warning that the rule would be “client-only”. It also added the condition “on this machine only” by itself. I’ve disabled that condition but the rule still isn’t ran when Outlook is closed.

How do I turn it into a server rule?

Whether or not a rule will be a server-side or client-side rule depends on the actions, conditions and exceptions that are selected in the message.

When the rule contains an action or condition/exception that can only be performed by Outlook, then the rule turns into a client-side rule. If this action/condition/exception is also dependent on a specific configuration of Outlook then the rule will get the “on this machine only” condition as well.

This might sound confusing and is probably better explained with some examples;

  • Server-side
    From move it to the folder
    If the message is moved to a folder that is located within your Exchange mailbox and the sender’s name is either in the Global Address List (GAL) or in your Contact’s folder then the rule will be a server-side rule since all the information is contained on the Exchange server itself.
  • Client-side
    From flag message for
    This rule will be a client-side only rule since the action is an Outlook feature and Exchange therefore won’t be able to process this rule. When Outlook is running or started again, the rule will be executed when the message is delivered to Outlook.
  • “On this machine only”
    From move it to the folder
    The condition is similar to the first example, but if this time the specified folder is located within a pst-file, then the rule will be marked with “On this machine only”. This is not only because having a pst-file is an Outlook feature, but also because the pst-file may only exist on a specific computer only.
    To prevent any errors during executing the rules, this specific rule will only be fired when Outlook is running on that specific computer.

Warning message when creating a client-only rule.

Client-side conditions/exceptions

Common conditions and exceptions that make a rule a client-only rule are;

  • With specific words in the subject
  • Marked as importance
  • Marked as sensitivity
  • Flagged for action
  • With specific words in the body
  • With specific words in the subject or body
  • With specific words in the message header
  • With specific words in the recipient’s address
  • With specific words in the sender’s address
  • Assigned to category

Client side actions

Common actions that make a rule a client-only rule are;

  • Assign it to the category
  • Permanently delete it
  • Flag message for follow up at this time
  • Clear the Message Flag
  • Print it
  • Mark it as read
  • Display a specific message in the New Items Alert window
  • Display a Desktop Alert

On this machine only conditions/exceptions

Common conditions and exceptions that make a rule an “on this machine only” rule are;

  • From people or distribution list (if the address to be forwarded to is stored within your Contacts folder or the corporate GAL)
  • Sent to people or distribution list (if the address to be forwarded to is stored within your Contacts folder or the corporate GAL)
  • Through the specified account

On this machine only actions

Common actions that make a rule an “on this machine only” rule are;

  • Move it to the specified folder (if the folder is outside the user’s mailbox such as a pst-file, Public Folder or SharePoint List)
  • Forward it to people or distribution list (if the address to be forwarded to is stored within your Contacts folder or the corporate GAL)
  • Reply using a specific template
  • Play a sound
  • Start application
  • Run a script
  • Perform a custom action

Note: Rules for POP3 and IMAP accounts are always client-side rules and thus Outlook must be running in order to process the rules. If you want to run rules even when Outlook is closed for a POP3 or IMAP account, you’ll have to login to the web based client of your mailbox provided by your ISP and see if there is an option to configure rules there.

A user had mismatched rules in Outlook and his Exchange mailbox and wasn’t sure what to do.

How to create server-side rules in outlook

Outlook stores rules in the Exchange server mailbox (including Outlook.com accounts) and syncs a copy of the rules to Outlook on your desktop. This message comes up when Outlook detects the rules on the server are not identical to the rules stored in the Outlook data file and Outlook needs to know which ones you want to work with. If you know one set is correct, choose it, otherwise choose Server.

To eliminate the message, you can start Outlook with one of the cleanrules switches:

Switch Description
/cleanrules Removes rules from both Outlook data file and the server mailbox
/cleanclientrules Only removes the client side rules
/cleanserverrules Only removes the server side rules

If you clear only the client rules, the server rules will sync down to Outlook; clearing the server rules works the same way, with the rules stored in Outlook syncing up to the server.

You’ll first want to export the rules. This will allow you to restore the rules quickly and provides insurance, should something go wrong and you decide to delete all of the rules.

  1. Open the Rules & Alerts dialog, click Options and then Export rules.
    How to create server-side rules in outlook
  2. Close the Rules & Alerts dialog then close Outlook.
  3. Press Windows key + R on your keyboard to open the Run command.
  4. Type or paste outlook.exe /cleanrules in the Open field to clear all rules.
    Use outlook.exe /cleanserverrules if you know some client rules didn’t sync up to the server.
    Use outlook.exe /cleanclientrules to keep the server rules.
    How to create server-side rules in outlook
  5. Press Ok to restart Outlook.

If you used the /cleanrules switch, import the rules you backed up earlier. If you used either the client or server switch, open the Rules & Alerts dialog and choose which rules to keep one last time. The rules will sync so both client and server are identical.

Adding rules is a great way to manage the inflow of email. You can add rules on a shared mailbox you have access to the same way you add rules to your own account. However, not all methods of setting rules are compatible with each other so it’s best to use one method below for all rules on shared mailboxes.

You must first be a member of a shared mailbox before attempting the following. See Create a shared mailbox and Add or remove members from a shared mailbox for more information.

Outlook 2016

Add a shared mailbox account to Outlook 2016

Before you can set rules on shared mailboxes in Outlook 2016 you must first manually add the shared mailbox account using the following steps.

If you already see the shared mailbox folders in the folder list, it is possible that the mailbox is either Automapped or was added using Open these additional mailboxes. You must first remove the configuration that added the mailbox before proceeding with the numbered steps below.

To remove another person’s mailbox from Open these additional mailboxes, see Remove another person’s mailbox.

In Outlook 2016 access File > Account Settings > Account Settings…
How to create server-side rules in outlook

On the Email tab select New…

Your Name: Enter a descriptive name for the account

Email address: Enter the email address of the shared mailbox account

Password: Enter the password for your own email account. The shared mailbox account does not have its own password.

Select Next to proceed.

Change the email address to sign in with by selecting Sign in with another account.
How to create server-side rules in outlook

Sign in with your own account credentials and select Finish. You will need to restart Outlook for the changes to take effect

Set a rule in Outlook 2016 for a shared mailbox

In Outlook 2016 access File > Manage Rules & Alerts.

From the Email Rules tab change Apply changes to this folder: to the shared mailbox account.
How to create server-side rules in outlook

Access the New Rule… button and proceed with the appropriate rule criteria.

Outlook on the web

Open the shared mailbox in a separate browser window

Use this method if you want to view and manage the email rules for the shared mailbox in its own browser window.

Sign in to your account in Outlook on the web.

On the Outlook on the web navigation bar, select your name in the upper right corner.

Choose Open another mailbox

How to create server-side rules in outlook

Enter the email address of the shared mailbox that you want to access and select Open.

Another Outlook on the web session opens in a separate window, allowing access to the shared mailbox.

Set a rule in Outlook on the web for a shared mailbox

Select the Settings menu icon and choose Mail.

In the Mail > Automatic processing section choose Inbox and sweep rules.

How to create server-side rules in outlook

In the Inbox Rules section choose the + (plus) icon to add a new rule.

How to create server-side rules in outlook

Give the rule an appropriate name.

Add conditions, actions, and exceptions accordingly.

Select OK above the rule wizard to save the rule.

Tip: If you have multiple rules, use the move up and move down arrow buttons to set the rule evaluation order.

Outlook 2016 for Mac

Access a shared mailbox account

In Outlook 2016 for Mac select Tools > Accounts…

In the Accounts window choose the Advanced… button.

Select the Delegates tab. In the Open these additional mailboxes: section, select the + (plus) button.
How to create server-side rules in outlook

In the Choose a Person window, enter the name of the shared mailbox account in the text box, select the account, and choose Add.

Choose OK and close the Accounts window.

Once you’ve added the shared mailbox account, if you have access permissions, the shared mailbox will appear in the list of mailboxes on the left.

Set a rule in Outlook 2016 for Mac for a shared mailbox

Note: Rules for shared mailboxes in Outlook 2016 for Mac are client-side only and only evaluate while the Outlook application is running. The rules are not saved or processed on the server.

From the Tools menu choose Rules…

In the Client Rules section choose Exchange.

How to create server-side rules in outlook

Choose the + (plus) button to add a new rule.

In the When a new message arrives: section change the default From: popup menu to Account > Is > and choose the shared mailbox account name.
How to create server-side rules in outlook

Select the + (plus) icon to the right to add more criteria for the rule as you see fit.

Select the OK button to commit the changes.

Tip: If you have multiple rules, use the move up and move down arrow buttons to set the rule evaluation order.

Rule can be defined as an action which MS Outlook takes up automatically on arriving specified email or on sent message according to the conditions which you have set on the rule. When you create a rule it will be either server-side or client-side and it depends on the rule message you create with the selections of conditions, actions and exceptions. If the rule comprises of the actions, conditions, exceptions which can be performed by the Outlook then it is client-side rule. If it is also dependent on specific configuration of Outlook then it will add up the “on this machine only” condition.

Difference Between Server-side and Client-only Rules

What is Client-Side Rule?

These rules will run on your computer locally only. And will run only when Outlook in running. Let us take an example to elaborate it more;

From <> flag message for <> –

In this example is an Outlook feature and server i.e. Exchange will not be able to process this rule. This rule is therefore a client-side rule. And thus the rule will follow up when Outlook is started and messages are synched with Outlook.

What is Server-side Rule?

If Exchange server is being used by you then some rules will be created which will only apply to server, even when Outlook is not running. These rules have to be applied to messages when they are delivered to Inbox. And rule must run until they are completed on server. For e.g.;

From<> move it to <> folder –

If the folder to which message has to be moved is within the Exchange mailbox and belongs to the Exchange and the sender’s name is in GAL or in Contact’s folder then, the rule is server-side rule and information will be saved on the Exchange itself.

What is “On This Machine Only”?

From move it to the folder –

This condition is same as second example but if the folder which is specified is in PST file then rule will be marked as “On this machine only”. This has got an obvious reason that PST file will be part of a particular system configured in it. So this rule will execute only on that system.

How is Client-only or Server-side Rule Executed?

When you create a rule and provide certain specifications with this rule, the Rule Wizard stores these settings (conditions, actions, and exceptions) in an .rwz file. This file name has a same name as it is of the user’s profile to which account belongs. Rules applied for incoming messages, it will store that information in INBOX folder itself and the details of rule are available to the server also.

When any email arrives, server will first compare it with the list of rules and the server can execute the rule, it will do so. If it is not capable to run the rule, it places a deferred action message (DAM) in a hidden folder i.e. “Deferred Action folder” in the mailbox.

Now when user runs Outlook, client first checks the Deferred Action folder and examines each DAM. If rule belonged to current profile which is running on Outlook, it will carry out actions indicated in DAM. This is why sometimes rules get fired in unusual order.

List of Client-side Conditions/Exceptions

How to create server-side rules in outlook

List of Client-side Actions

How to create server-side rules in outlook

List of “On this machine only” Conditions/Exceptions

How to create server-side rules in outlook

List of “On this machine only” Actions

How to create server-side rules in outlook

Conclusion: The section above explains types of rules, their executions and list of actions, exceptions, and conditions of client-only rules. There are some rules like the rules which have been created for POP3 and IMAP accounts are always client-side rules. This means that MS Outlook must be always running so as to process the rules. If you want to execute the rules even when MS Outlook is closed for IMAP and POP3 account then you need to log-in to web-based client to configure rules there. It must be taken into consideration that if your mailbox is full, rules might not be executed well. So if your rules are not working or giving errors, you must check the mailbox size.