How to cure depression (professional advice from a therapist)

Explore the latest findings on what helps and what doesn’t.

THE BASICS

  • What Is Depression?
  • Find a therapist to overcome depression

How to cure depression (professional advice from a therapist)

Major depression can be a devastating—even life-threatening—condition. Thousands of studies have examined what works in restoring hope and vitality.

I’ve compiled 27 important facts about depression treatment, based on the latest research. Whenever possible, I’ve relied on the most recent meta-analyses which combine results from all relevant studies to establish general trends.

Take care in interpreting these findings, as research in these areas is ongoing.

  1. Medication and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are equally effective in treating depression. Medication can help with severe depression even as much as CBT.
  2. There is a very strong placebo effect in depression treatment. The average person in a clinical trial does just about as well on placebo as on medication—a 40 versus 48 percent reduction in symptoms, respectively, based on a major review.
  3. Chronic and more severe depression responds better to a combination of medication and therapy. Medication plus CBT is more effective than meds alone, and medication adds additional benefit for those receiving CBT. For mild, non-chronic depression, a single treatment typically works as well as the combination—and avoids the additional time, effort, cost, and side effects.
  4. About 1 in 8 adults in the US are taking medications that are prescribed for depression. Two-thirds of these individuals are taking a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) like Prozac or Zoloft.
  5. CBT is not the only type of talk therapy that works well in treating depression. Psychodynamic therapy—which is based largely on a Freudian understanding of the mind—has gotten a bad rap in the era of evidence-based treatment. However, there’s growing evidence that short-term psychodynamic therapy is helpful, as is a more general type of treatment called “nondirective supportive therapy.” The Society of Clinical Psychology—a division of the American Psychological Association—keeps a list of treatments with the strongest research support.

How to cure depression (professional advice from a therapist)

Depression affects one’s cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and physical functions. One of the most insidious aspects of depression is that it tricks you into thinking that nothing will help, or that the relief will be temporary, and it will keep you in a cycle of maladaptive thinking, feeling, and doing (or non-doing). However, there are steps one can take to cope with depression.

Take care of your physical health

  • Get active! It is important to get 30 minutes of physical activity daily. This can be anything from yoga, walking, jogging, walking stairs, a stroll around the block, gardening. If this is too daunting, start with 10-15 minutes a day and add 5 minutes to each day.
  • Nourish your body–make sure you eat well-balanced meals.
  • Sleep…getting adequate sleep is important for our physical well being, mental acuity, and concentration

Take a closer look at your thoughts

  • Write down recurring thoughts…negative thoughts about oneself, one’s future, and the world are common; these thoughts are often distortions that feel real and often perpetuate unhelpful behaviors. By writing down these thoughts, one can begin to see the distortions a bit more clearly.
  • Challenge the distortions- is it accurate? Or does it just feel real? Are you taking into account the evidence? Does it help to think this way?
  • Limit rumination- rumination and depression go hand in hand; rumination is a type of thinking where you rehash a moment over and over again; you can learn to limit rumination by being more aware of it and redirecting yourself towards doing something more helpful. For example, when you are aware that you are ruminating, take notice of you are doing and what is around you. And ask yourself “what is one thing that I can do right now that is good for me?”

Identify unhelpful behaviors and replace them with healthy, helpful behaviors

  • Build a sense of mastery-this involves setting realistic, achievable goals daily; rather than tackling big ticket items, break them down into smaller, more manageable units. This sense of mastery will also help to chip away at the unhelpful distortions.
  • Reduce avoidance/procrastination—this will also promote a sense of accomplishment and self-efficacy
  • Avoid making big decisions or contemplating major life decisions during this time
  • Engage in healthy joyful activities—this can involve something as small as brewing a nice cup of tea, listening to a favorite song, sending an email/text to a friend, dancing in your own space
  • Stay connected to friends and family- it might help to let them know what you are experiencing and how they can help.

Practice self-compassion–being harsh or overly critical is not helpful, give yourself some grace and kindness.

Review micro-successes daily—when feeling depressed, it is easy to overlook successes and accomplishments. Hence, being intentional in reviewing these moments can help offset the feelings of failure and hopelessness.

If you are experiencing severe depressive symptoms, it may be time to seek out professional help. Signs of severe depression include:

  • Symptoms that are intense, paralyzing, and/or unrelenting (last months)
  • Inability to care for yourself (basic needs) or attend to daily responsibilities or relationships
  • Symptoms that are accompanied by substance abuse, self-harm, and/or thoughts of suicide

Content provided by ADAA member Kathariya Mokrue, PhD – 2020

The right therapist can make all the difference in getting the best treatment for depression, but do some homework before you choose one.

How to cure depression (professional advice from a therapist)

How to cure depression (professional advice from a therapist)

If you’re depressed, a therapist can teach you how to deal with your feelings, change the way you think, and change the way you behave to help ease your symptoms.

Finding a therapist you are comfortable with is essential. You will need to talk openly and honestly with your therapist about your thoughts and feelings, so it’s important to find the right specialist for you, says Ryan Howes, PhD, a clinical psychologist and a clinical professor at the Fuller School of Psychology in Pasadena, California.

The first step is to look at yourself and determine what it is you need, Dr. Howes says. “Ask yourself, Am I the sort of person who benefits from someone who tells me what to do? Or do I need someone with a good ability to listen and who will talk through things with me?” he advises. Your answer will tell you whether you need someone who will provide directive or non-directive therapy.

Also consider whom you might feel most comfortable with: a man or a woman; someone about your age, or someone younger or older; someone with lots of experience, or someone who is relatively new with fresh ideas. “Once you narrow it down, you can start looking for people who meet your criteria,” Howes says.

Different Types of Therapists and Their Credentials

Several types of mental health professionals can serve as a therapist for people with depression. Being aware of the training differences might help you narrow your search.

Psychiatrists are medical doctors (MD or DO degree) who have completed specialized training in mental and emotional disorders. They can diagnose, treat, and prescribe medications for depression. Psychiatrists may also provide individual or group therapy. Philip R. Muskin, MD, professor of psychiatry and chief of consultation-liaison psychiatry at the Columbia University Medical Center in New York City, advises starting with a physician if you’re severely depressed.

Psychologists have a doctoral degree (PhD or PsyD) in psychology. They are skilled in the diagnosis of emotional disorders and spend most of their time providing individual or group psychotherapy, but do not prescribe medication.

Social workers usually have a master’s degree in social work (MSW) and have training in providing individual or group therapy.

Licensed professional counselors have a master’s degree in psychology (or a related area) and are trained to diagnose and counsel individuals or groups.

Psychiatric nurses are registered nurses (RNs) with training in psychiatric nursing.

Sources of Referrals

How do you go about finding the right therapist for you?

You might want to start by talking with your family doctor. If your doctor feels you need a mental health specialist, he or she should be able to give you referrals, Dr. Muskin says. Or you might be the one to tell your regular doctor, “I need to see a psychiatrist, and this is why,” he adds.

You could also ask around to see if your friends or family members know of a good therapist who has experience in treating depression. “Personal references can be very good, particularly if they come from someone who knows you well and what you like,” Muskin says.

Here are other resources to help you find a therapist for depression treatment:

  • The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) runs a helpline that can help you locate support. Call 800-950-NAMI or email [email protected]
  • The American Psychological Association has a therapist locator on its website.
  • The Anxiety and Depression Association of America can also help you locate a therapist near where you live.
  • Your health insurance company likely has a dropdown menu item, such as “find a provider,” for names of professionals in its network.
  • Schools and universities often have counseling services that can offer referrals if they can’t help you directly. You may have access if you’re an alum or faculty.
  • The clergy Faith leaders often know of mental health professionals who can help. And if they know you, they can recommend someone who fits your personality and needs.
  • Employee Assistance Programs If offered by your employer, they’re part of your benefits package.

How to Interview Potential Therapists

Once you have a list of at least two or three potential therapists, it’s time to figure out which one is best for you. Call each therapist to get some key information before making an appointment.

Questions to ask include:

  • Are you taking new patients?
  • What experience do you have treating patients who have depression?
  • Where do the therapy sessions take place? Some psychiatrists have more than one office where they see patients, Muskin says. Their location and when they hold appointments can matter to you, he adds.
  • How much does the therapy cost? Do you take my insurance?
  • Can I meet with you before committing to a therapy session?

If you’re able to make a consultation appointment before a therapy session, ask the therapist more specific preliminary questions, such as:

  • What type of therapy would you recommend for my depression symptoms?
  • What will this type of therapy involve?
  • What are the benefits and the primary goals of my depression treatment?
  • Are you willing to work with other members of my medical team to coordinate my depression treatment? This is especially important if you have a non-MD therapist who will rely on your primary care doctor to prescribe medications.
  • How often would I need therapy sessions?

After meeting with a potential therapist, take some time to decide whether you are comfortable with them. If you aren’t, keep looking until you find one you like and trust.

Some people will improve with psychotherapy alone; others may need both psychotherapy and a prescription antidepressant. Once you start therapy for your depression, be patient. Psychotherapy (sometimes referred to as talk therapy) for depression can sometimes be painful, and you may find yourself doing most of the talking during the first few sessions. Your therapist will partner with you to ease your depression symptoms and improve your life.

How to cure depression (professional advice from a therapist)

Depression can drain you mentally and physically. The guide below will help you better understand and treat your depression.

Try to maintain your regular social activities.Depression may keep you to want to avoid these activities.Keep on doing the things you normally do.

Go outside for a little while every day to bask in some sun each day. Research has proved that depression is worse when there is lack of sunlight worsens depression.

Dealing with personal issues in your life can help you manage depression better. Take only gradual steps to prevent things on one step at a time. Breaking them into smaller goals and will probably fix many of the problems that are at the root cause of the depression.

Antidepressants are helpful with balancing out the chemicals in your brain’s neurochemicals. However, they will work much better if you combine them with regular exercise, therapy and other efforts of your own that will help you restore your life back to normal.

The foods you eat can have an effect on your mental state and depression. The foods that you consume which are high in sugar and carbs, impact serotonin levels and create other biological instabilities that can cause or exacerbate depression. Stay away from overly fatty foods and try to keep a diet that is healthy.

Find someone you care about that you can hang out with, or even play a video games with.Just getting in touch with people that love you can really improve your mood.

Try to decorate your home so that it feels upbeat and lively. This is a more up-lifting environment and you to naturally feel better just being in your own environment.

This is true for just about every type of art, because getting involved with them could be a good way for you to learn to deal with any hard times.

Take any prescriptions exactly as your doctor instructs. Don’t take any less or more than you are instructed, and never stop taking a medication without discussing it with your physician first, as it can be dangerous. You will find that some medications need to be weaned off of – if you mess around with your treatment.

Get yourself a new hobby if you struggle with depression. Scrapbooking, photography, and photography are great ways to engage.

Talk to your doctor to get the right choice for you. This is important due to the fact therapy and other coping skills is not enough to deal with depression. Medication is good for making things in your depression doesn’t come creeping in again.

Be sure to de-stress your depression. Stress makes depression in play and makes it stick around longer. Examine your life to find the things that are causing you stress and tension.Once you’ve figured out your primary stressors, develop a system to avoid those situations.

Negative thinking is always with someone that has depression. Depressed people usually minimize any good things in their life, while happy people minimize them and focus on the good. Staying positive can make people want to be around you so that you’re not lonely.

Eating overly processed and chemically treated foods can really make your body feel extremely unhealthy.

If you’re feeling down, venture outside for a refreshing change of pace. Going outdoors and seeking new helps you to differentiate between your perceptions of reality and what is real.

Sleep properly and for as much as is needed. Both physical and mental health suffer if you don’t get enough sleep. If you are having trouble sleeping, talk with your physician about using some kind of medication.

A good tip to deal with depression is to make sure you get enough rest each night. Depression can cause restlessness and insomnia and interfere with your ability to get adequate sleep, and vice versa so be sure to get your solid eight hours of restful sleep each and every night.If you stay busy all day, you will sleep better at night.

Start putting these tips to good use. It will really help you to get some insights as to how you can deal with your depression. There are many different choices available to help fight your depression, but it is up to you take a positive steps to help alleviate the situation and feel better.

Many people are interested in คาสิโนออนไลน์ ฝากถอนไม่มีขั้นต่ำ, but are unsure of how to learn more. This article contains all the information you need to gain a solid footing when it comes to คาสิโนออนไลน์ ฝากถอนไม่มีขั้นต่ำ. Now is the time to take the knowledge you have gained and apply it to your life!

How to cure depression (professional advice from a therapist)

Depression can drain you mentally and physically. The guide below will help you better understand and treat your depression.

Try to maintain your regular social activities.Depression may keep you to want to avoid these activities.Keep on doing the things you normally do.

Go outside for a little while every day to bask in some sun each day. Research has proved that depression is worse when there is lack of sunlight worsens depression.

Dealing with personal issues in your life can help you manage depression better. Take only gradual steps to prevent things on one step at a time. Breaking them into smaller goals and will probably fix many of the problems that are at the root cause of the depression.

Antidepressants are helpful with balancing out the chemicals in your brain’s neurochemicals. However, they will work much better if you combine them with regular exercise, therapy and other efforts of your own that will help you restore your life back to normal.

The foods you eat can have an effect on your mental state and depression. The foods that you consume which are high in sugar and carbs, impact serotonin levels and create other biological instabilities that can cause or exacerbate depression. Stay away from overly fatty foods and try to keep a diet that is healthy.

Find someone you care about that you can hang out with, or even play a video games with.Just getting in touch with people that love you can really improve your mood.

Try to decorate your home so that it feels upbeat and lively. This is a more up-lifting environment and you to naturally feel better just being in your own environment.

This is true for just about every type of art, because getting involved with them could be a good way for you to learn to deal with any hard times.

Take any prescriptions exactly as your doctor instructs. Don’t take any less or more than you are instructed, and never stop taking a medication without discussing it with your physician first, as it can be dangerous. You will find that some medications need to be weaned off of – if you mess around with your treatment.

Get yourself a new hobby if you struggle with depression. Scrapbooking, photography, and photography are great ways to engage.

Talk to your doctor to get the right choice for you. This is important due to the fact therapy and other coping skills is not enough to deal with depression. Medication is good for making things in your depression doesn’t come creeping in again.

Be sure to de-stress your depression. Stress makes depression in play and makes it stick around longer. Examine your life to find the things that are causing you stress and tension.Once you’ve figured out your primary stressors, develop a system to avoid those situations.

Negative thinking is always with someone that has depression. Depressed people usually minimize any good things in their life, while happy people minimize them and focus on the good. Staying positive can make people want to be around you so that you’re not lonely.

Eating overly processed and chemically treated foods can really make your body feel extremely unhealthy.

If you’re feeling down, venture outside for a refreshing change of pace. Going outdoors and seeking new helps you to differentiate between your perceptions of reality and what is real.

Sleep properly and for as much as is needed. Both physical and mental health suffer if you don’t get enough sleep. If you are having trouble sleeping, talk with your physician about using some kind of medication.

A good tip to deal with depression is to make sure you get enough rest each night. Depression can cause restlessness and insomnia and interfere with your ability to get adequate sleep, and vice versa so be sure to get your solid eight hours of restful sleep each and every night.If you stay busy all day, you will sleep better at night.

Start putting these tips to good use. It will really help you to get some insights as to how you can deal with your depression. There are many different choices available to help fight your depression, but it is up to you take a positive steps to help alleviate the situation and feel better.

Many people are interested in คาสิโนออนไลน์ ฝากถอนไม่มีขั้นต่ำ, but are unsure of how to learn more. This article contains all the information you need to gain a solid footing when it comes to คาสิโนออนไลน์ ฝากถอนไม่มีขั้นต่ำ. Now is the time to take the knowledge you have gained and apply it to your life!

Being depressed can make you feel helpless. You’re not. Along with therapy and sometimes medication, there’s a lot you can do on your own to fight back. Changing your behavior — your physical activity, lifestyle, and even your way of thinking — are all natural depression treatments.

These tips can help you feel better — starting right now.

1. Get in a routine. If you’re depressed, you need a routine, says Ian Cook, MD. He’s a psychiatrist and director of the Depression Research and Clinic Program at UCLA.

Depression can strip away the structure from your life. One day melts into the next. Setting a gentle daily schedule can help you get back on track.

2.Set goals. When you’re depressed, you may feel like you can’t accomplish anything. That makes you feel worse about yourself. To push back, set daily goals for yourself.

“Start very small,” Cook says. “Make your goal something that you can succeed at, like doing the dishes every other day.”

Continued

As you start to feel better, you can add more challenging daily goals.

3. Exercise. It temporarily boosts feel-good chemicals called endorphins. It may also have long-term benefits for people with depression. Regular exercise seems to encourage the brain to rewire itself in positive ways, Cook says.

How much exercise do you need? You don’t need to run marathons to get a benefit. Just walking a few times a week can help.

4. Eat healthy. There is no magic diet that fixes depression. It’s a good idea to watch what you eat, though. If depression tends to make you overeat, getting in control of your eating will help you feel better.

Although nothing is definitive, Cook says there’s evidence that foods with omega-3 fatty acids (such as salmon and tuna) and folic acid (such as spinach and avocado) could help ease depression.

5. Get enough sleep. Depression can make it hard to get enough shut-eye, and too little sleep can make depression worse.

What can you do? Start by making some changes to your lifestyle. Go to bed and get up at the same time every day. Try not to nap. Take all the distractions out of your bedroom — no computer and no TV. In time, you may find your sleep improves.

Continued

6. Take on responsibilities. When you’re depressed, you may want to pull back from life and give up your responsibilities at home and at work. Don’t. Staying involved and having daily responsibilities can help you maintain a lifestyle that can help counter depression. They ground you and give you a sense of accomplishment.

If you’re not up to full-time school or work, that’s fine. Think about part-time. If that seems like too much, consider volunteer work.

7. Challenge negative thoughts. In your fight against depression, a lot of the work is mental — changing how you think. When you’re depressed, you leap to the worst possible conclusions.

The next time you’re feeling terrible about yourself, use logic as a natural depression treatment. You might feel like no one likes you, but is there real evidence for that? You might feel like the most worthless person on the planet, but is that really likely? It takes practice, but in time you can beat back those negative thoughts before they get out of control.

Continued

8. Check with your doctor before using supplements. “There’s promising evidence for certain supplements for depression,” Cook says. Those include fish oil, folic acid, and SAMe. But more research needs to be done before we’ll know for sure. Always check with your doctor before starting any supplement, especially if you’re already taking medications.

9. Do something new. When you’re depressed, you’re in a rut. Push yourself to do something different. Go to a museum. Pick up a used book and read it on a park bench. Volunteer at a soup kitchen. Take a language class.

“When we challenge ourselves to do something different, there are chemical changes in the brain,” Cook says. “Trying something new alters the levels of [the brain chemical] dopamine, which is associated with pleasure, enjoyment, and learning.”

10. Try to have fun. If you’re depressed, make time for things you enjoy. What if nothing seems fun anymore? “That’s just a symptom of depression,” Cook says. You have to keep trying anyway.

Continued

As strange as it might sound, you have to work at having fun. Plan things you used to enjoy, even if they feel like a chore. Keep going to the movies. Keep going out with friends for dinner.

When you’re depressed, you can lose the knack for enjoying life, Cook says. You have to relearn how to do it. In time, fun things really will feel fun again.

Sources

Ian A. Cook, MD, Director of the Depression Research and Clinic Program, University of California Los Angeles.

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center: Can Folic Acid Help Ease Depression?

Liebenluft E, American Journal of Psychiatry, December, 2008.

National Sleep Foundation: “Sleep and Depression” and “Sleep Hygiene.”

How to cure depression (professional advice from a therapist)

Katie Edwards/Getty Images

The goal of therapy is to give you the tools and strategies for navigating whatever is going on in your life—from stress or relationship issues to managing a mental health diagnosis. But a therapist isn’t going to just hand over some life-changing advice and call it a day.

“Most of the work of therapy happens outside the consultation room,” licensed clinical psychologist Alicia H. Clark, Psy.D., tells SELF. “The best progress happens when you apply what you’ve learned outside that setting, in your real life.”

“There are 168 hours in a week,” licensed clinical psychologist John Mayer, Ph.D., author of Family Fit: Find Your Balance in Life, tells SELF. “It would be terribly arrogant on the part of a therapist to believe that your one-hour intervention will suffice to keep your clients mentally healthy for the rest of the 167 hours.”

But, we get it, therapy isn’t always accessible to everyone. So, while this isn’t meant to be a substitute for professional help, we asked mental health professionals to share the most impactful and least intimidating strategies that they typically give to their patients. If you’re looking for mental health advice that you can start acting on immediately, try some of these tactics:

Venting is awesome for a reason—it helps you get out your frustrations. That’s one of the reasons why it can be helpful to keep a mental health journal, David Klow, licensed marriage and family therapist, founder of Chicago’s Skylight Counseling Center and author of the upcoming book You Are Not Crazy: Love Letters from Your Therapist, tells SELF.

You don’t need to do anything in-depth or lengthy—just take five minutes or so a day to write down your thoughts, feelings, or ideas. This can be especially helpful if you want to keep track of changes in your moods or behavior over time (maybe to discuss with a therapist later). But it can also just be a place to work through something in a private, non-judgey space—something that you may not feel comfortable talking about just yet.

Stress happens, and it always sucks on some level—whether you’re overworked or overbooked or both.

Still, Dr. Clark says you can take those moments when you’re totally overwhelmed and try to look for the good in them. For example, if you’re stressed because you’re up against an intense work deadline, think about how that stress is actually helping to push you to get it done. “The sensation of pressure doesn’t have to be negative—it can be a positive challenge and motivating,” Dr. Clark says. Or, if you don’t have a free weekend to yourself in the next two months, consider how it’s pretty great that you’ve got such a rich social life these days. In many cases, it’s all about how you view it.

And, of course, if you’re chronically stressed and there really isn’t an upside, consider viewing that as a welcome warning sign that you need to find ways to scale back before you burn out.

Sometimes you just need to step away from what you’re doing or dealing with and get some air. Sure, getting regular exercise is important for mental health, but even just taking regular, relaxing walks can be soothing for your mind. Plus, it may literally force you to take a breather when you need one.

“Getting out into the world and connecting with life is usually healing, as is the rhythmic nature of walking,” Klow says. “It can help get you out of your head and into the world.” Try taking a walk when you first get up or after dinner, or try scheduling 20 minutes into your work calendar to remind you to just step out for a bit.

Negative thoughts are just a part of life, but they don’t have to consume you. Instead of trying to ignore those thoughts altogether, try countering them with positive statements, suggests Dr. Mayer. For example, if you’re feeling anxious and regretful about staying in bed til noon one day, follow that with a reminder that you really needed some extra rest and alone time this week. You can get back out there tomorrow.

You know the ones—these are the people you know you can always call, text, or email when you need to feel a connection, Klow says.

“By building a list of people that you trust, with whom you can talk to in times of need, you allow yourself a strong sense of not being alone,” he says. The next time you’re struggling, check out your list and reach out to someone on it. Then, work your way down if someone you love isn’t free to talk.

It’s hard to think of anything else when you’re really upset or frazzled, so this exercise is mostly about hitting pause and broadening your focus.

Just think of two or three positive things in your life in this moment—something that brings you joy, something you’re proud of, someone who loves you. This can help ease your feelings of angst and frustration, Dr. Clark says. “Gratitude is something I work with people to cultivate especially when life feels overwhelming and negative,” she adds. Even being thankful for a hot shower can help you reset.

Everyone has certain things or coping mechanisms that give them a boost when they’re feeling crappy, and you might not even realize what yours are, Klow says. Maybe it’s taking a bath, watching that one YouTube clip, putting on the sweatpants with three different holes in them, whatever. Just make sure whatever it is, it’s accessible when you really need it.

Everyone has an inner voice, i.e. the way you talk to yourself in your head or out loud. But sometimes that voice can be cruel—even though it’s ultimately dictated by you. It can tell you that you’re a failure or convince you to stress about something that you have absolutely no control over. “Most people have a loud inner critic which makes their life more stressful,” Klow says. “Learning to have a reassuring and soothing inner voice can make a big difference in improving your mental health.”

Obviously that’s easier said than done, but here’s a good place to start: When your inner voice is giving you really crappy freedback and advice, stop and consider how you would talk to your best friend in this situation. Then try to adjust your inner voice to talk like that. Chances are you wouldn’t tell your friend she’s doing everything wrong and everyone hates her. You’d probably tell her she’s overreacting, that she has no reason to think these things, and that she should focus on what she can actually control in the situation.

Ruminating over something that’s making you anxious isn’t going to achieve anything. But you can help push your thought process forward by forcing yourself to think ahead, Dr. Clark says. “This helps elucidate thoughts that are reasonable, probable, or sometimes even rational,” she says.

How to cure depression (professional advice from a therapist)

A few months ago, I told you how a quarter-life crisis catapulted me into a severe depression, and my story of recovering. The response I received from that piece since tells me that I’m not alone in this plight, and that many of us have experienced a similar personal crisis. And a recent article on Forbes confirmed that more millennials are suffering from depression, anxiety, or some other form of mood disorder than ever before.

One of the hardest parts of my ordeal was that, in the midst of it all, I still had to be a functional adult and stay on top of my job responsibilities. And while there are many great books online about how to deal with depression or anxiety at work, I also want to share some suggestions based on my own experience for making it through—and even thriving.

1. Get Help

If you’ve recognized that you’re depressed, then hopefully, you’ve already begun treatment for depression—working with a therapist or support group is the best way to help you cope with your symptoms, which in turn will help you better manage your professional life.

If not, keep in mind that most employer- and school-based insurance plans offer some type of mental health coverage. Many companies offer additional mental health services through the Employee Assistance Programs at little or no cost. If you’re unsure about the coverage you have, reach out to HR and inquire about the specifics of your plan. Also read your company’s policies and procedures regarding medical leave and sick days in case you need to take time off for medical appointments.

If you’re self-employed, check out your insurance policy and see what kind of mental health benefits it includes. (This is when you hope you read the fine print!) And if you’re uninsured, look into community mental health centers, which often offer services on a sliding fee scale.

2. Find Support

It’s key to find a trusted friend, ideally at work, who can support you through this difficult time. There will be tough days—some that seem nearly impossible—on the road to recovery, and I can’t stress how important it is to have someone to lean on and talk to. In my case, I found several friends at work that had been through similar experiences, but if you don’t want to share what’s going on with anyone at the office, make sure you have supportive friends and family to talk to. Group therapy is another great way to see that you’re not alone in your struggle. One of the best things I did was participate in a depression and anxiety therapy group, where I learned coping strategies for the workplace from other participants.

3. Set Clear Goals

One of the difficult things about my depression was that it made it nearly impossible for me to focus. I had to set very clear goals for myself and be realistic about what I would be able to accomplish—and I had to do it on a daily basis.

I would create lists for the day and highlight my top priorities, which would ensure that I was meeting the needs of my most important audience—my boss. I would also double check any important memos, give myself extra time to prepare assignments, and have a colleague give my work a second look if I was having a rough week. During staff meetings, I would take copious notes because I knew that my memory retention was failing me.

Do whatever helps you, and don’t be too hard on yourself when you have a difficult day. The road to recovery is a marathon, not a sprint.

4. Speak Up

If things are incredibly difficult, or if you need to take more time off than your mental health days allow, you may need to say something to your employer. During a particularly difficult week, I finally told my boss that I was dealing with depression. I was so worried that she would figure out something was wrong, and I decided I would rather her know that it was depression and not a lack of interest in my work.

Obviously, not everyone has that kind of relationship with her supervisor, so don’t feel obligated to disclose details. If you’re taking a lot of time off or you’re worried others will wonder what’s going on, you can tell them that you’ve been “dealing with some health issues” and leave it at that. Or, consult with HR to determine the best approach.

If don’t want to discuss specifics with your colleagues at all, request a few days off and do whatever helps you cope with your symptoms and re-group. Really. It may mean the difference between maintaining your professional reputation and having a breakdown at the office.

5. Take Care of Yourself

A valuable lesson I took away from my experience is that it’s okay to take time to take care of yourself—in fact, it’s actually a very important factor in your professional success. I ignored my symptoms for a long time and was so busy with work that it seemed ludicrous to take time for myself. But after my mini-meltdown, I realized that my therapist, my psychiatrist, my yoga instructor, and my group therapist (or as I called it, “The Keeping Betsy Functioning Dream Team”) made me a better, happier employee—and what company doesn’t benefit from that?

Finally, remember that you won’t only get through this, you may even be a better employee and discover new things about yourself because of it. In the meantime, find your village of support and don’t ever feel the need to suffer in silence. You are definitely not alone.

How to cure depression (professional advice from a therapist)

Depression can drain you mentally and physically. The guide below will help you better understand and treat your depression.

Try to maintain your regular social activities.Depression may keep you to want to avoid these activities.Keep on doing the things you normally do.

Go outside for a little while every day to bask in some sun each day. Research has proved that depression is worse when there is lack of sunlight worsens depression.

Dealing with personal issues in your life can help you manage depression better. Take only gradual steps to prevent things on one step at a time. Breaking them into smaller goals and will probably fix many of the problems that are at the root cause of the depression.

Antidepressants are helpful with balancing out the chemicals in your brain’s neurochemicals. However, they will work much better if you combine them with regular exercise, therapy and other efforts of your own that will help you restore your life back to normal.

The foods you eat can have an effect on your mental state and depression. The foods that you consume which are high in sugar and carbs, impact serotonin levels and create other biological instabilities that can cause or exacerbate depression. Stay away from overly fatty foods and try to keep a diet that is healthy.

Find someone you care about that you can hang out with, or even play a video games with.Just getting in touch with people that love you can really improve your mood.

Try to decorate your home so that it feels upbeat and lively. This is a more up-lifting environment and you to naturally feel better just being in your own environment.

This is true for just about every type of art, because getting involved with them could be a good way for you to learn to deal with any hard times.

Take any prescriptions exactly as your doctor instructs. Don’t take any less or more than you are instructed, and never stop taking a medication without discussing it with your physician first, as it can be dangerous. You will find that some medications need to be weaned off of – if you mess around with your treatment.

Get yourself a new hobby if you struggle with depression. Scrapbooking, photography, and photography are great ways to engage.

Talk to your doctor to get the right choice for you. This is important due to the fact therapy and other coping skills is not enough to deal with depression. Medication is good for making things in your depression doesn’t come creeping in again.

Be sure to de-stress your depression. Stress makes depression in play and makes it stick around longer. Examine your life to find the things that are causing you stress and tension.Once you’ve figured out your primary stressors, develop a system to avoid those situations.

Negative thinking is always with someone that has depression. Depressed people usually minimize any good things in their life, while happy people minimize them and focus on the good. Staying positive can make people want to be around you so that you’re not lonely.

Eating overly processed and chemically treated foods can really make your body feel extremely unhealthy.

If you’re feeling down, venture outside for a refreshing change of pace. Going outdoors and seeking new helps you to differentiate between your perceptions of reality and what is real.

Sleep properly and for as much as is needed. Both physical and mental health suffer if you don’t get enough sleep. If you are having trouble sleeping, talk with your physician about using some kind of medication.

A good tip to deal with depression is to make sure you get enough rest each night. Depression can cause restlessness and insomnia and interfere with your ability to get adequate sleep, and vice versa so be sure to get your solid eight hours of restful sleep each and every night.If you stay busy all day, you will sleep better at night.

Start putting these tips to good use. It will really help you to get some insights as to how you can deal with your depression. There are many different choices available to help fight your depression, but it is up to you take a positive steps to help alleviate the situation and feel better.

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