How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

Saving your most visited websites can come in handy for many reasons. If you’ve ever cleared cache, or deleted cookies and autofill, that may have also stopped the internet browser from showing your most visited webpages on its home screen. If you come across a great article and want to be able to find it at a later time, just bookmark the webpage.

It doesn’t matter what browser you use, My Computer Works has provided instructions on how to bookmark webpages for them all!

TIP: Most internet browsers will allow you to use Ctrl+D (a keyboard shortcut), to quickly pull up the menu for creating a bookmark/favorite.

Safari

  1. Open Safari
  2. Head to the webpage you wish to save in bookmarks
  3. Click ‘Bookmarks’ on the toolbar (top of screen), then select ‘Add Bookmark’ (from the drop down menu)
  4. On the menu that appears: Name the bookmark and add it to a folder
  5. Click ‘Add’

If you want to have this webpage show up right under your address bar, just drag the web address and drop in there. It will then ask you to name the bookmark before adding it.

Mozilla Firefox

  1. On Firefox, navigate to the page you’d like bookmarked
  2. Use keyboard short cut: Ctrl+D
  3. A menu will appear labeled: Edit This Bookmark
  4. Name the bookmark, choose the folder you want it in, then select ‘done’

Google Chrome

  1. Open Google Chrome
  2. Go to the website you want to bookmark
  3. Then select the icon (far right side of the address bar)
  4. A menu will appear: name bookmark, select the folder, and click ‘Done’

Opera

  1. Navigate to the page you wish to bookmark on Opera
  2. Select the icon (far right side of the address bar)
  3. On the pop up menu: name the bookmark, save to a folder, and select ‘Done’

Microsoft Edge

  1. On Microsoft Edge, navigate to the webpage you want bookmarked
  2. Press Ctrl+D or select the icon (far right side of the address bar)
  3. A menu will appear, name the bookmark
  4. Choose a folder from the drop down menu titled ‘Save In’
  5. Select ‘Add’

Internet Explorer

  1. Open Internet Explorer on Microsoft
  2. Go to the website you wish to add to your favorites
  3. Select the icon (far right side of the web address bar) or press Ctrl+D
  4. The window that opens will ask you to name the favorite
  5. Select a destination for the favorite under the drop down menu labeled ‘Create in’
  6. Click ‘Add’

You can also right-click on any blank spot on the webpage and choose ‘Add to Favorites’ from the drop down menu. Then follow the same steps from here (4-6).

Has the bookmark stopped working?

This is not too common, but it can happen. For a bookmark to stop working after a certain point of time, there could be several reasons why. Webpages that require a login or have frequently changing information may cause your bookmark to expire after a few days or hours. If this keeps happening, we recommend saving the websites main page (home page) to bookmarks, rather than a sub-page.

For example, save http://mycomputerworks.com/ and not a specific sub-page like, http://mycomputerworks.com/alarm-clocks-that-will-force-you-out-of-bed/. It’s always possible that any webpage you choose to bookmark has changed locations, or has been deleted.

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Deleting large numbers of bookmarks can be tough. What if you need some obscure web page you bookmarked three years ago?

To avoid this stress, back up your bookmarks first. Your browser can export your bookmarks to an HTML file. If you ever need some bookmarks you deleted, you can view the HTML file in your browser—or even import it and get all your deleted bookmarks back.

It’s easy to start deleting large numbers of bookmarks if they’re backed up. You can always find them again if you need them—and there’s a good chance you won’t need them.

2. Here’s how to back up your bookmarks in all the big browsers:

  • Google Chrome: Click menu > Bookmarks > Bookmark Manager. Click the menu button at the top right corner of the Bookmark Manager page and select “Export Bookmarks.”
  • Mozilla Firefox: Click menu > Library > Bookmarks > Show All Bookmarks. In the Library window, click Import and Backup > Export Bookmarks to HTML.
  • Apple Safari: Click File > Export Bookmarks. Give your file a name and choose a save location.
  • Microsoft Edge: Click menu > Settings > General > Import or Export. Select “Favorites” and click the “Export to File” button.
  • Internet Explorer: Click the Favorites (star) icon on the toolbar, click the down arrow to the right of Add to Favorites, and select “Import and Export.” Select “Export to a File,” click “Next,” select “Favorites,” click “Next,” select the main “Favorites” folder, click “Next,” choose a location for the file, and click “Export.”

Save your bookmarks somewhere safe, such as a Dropbox, Google Drive, or Microsoft OneDrive folder.

After you’re done, you can double-click the .html file to view its contents. You can open the file and use Ctrl+F to search for bookmarks, or use your browser’s bookmark import function to restore the bookmarks into your browser

3. Now you can start deleting bookmarks. It’s probably easier to do this in your web browser’s bookmarks manager. For example, to open it in Chrome, click menu > Bookmarks > Bookmark Manager.

You can right-click a bookmark or folder and select “Delete” to delete it, or left-click a bookmark and press the Delete key on your keyboard. To select multiple bookmarks, hold the Ctrl key down as you left-click them. To select a range of bookmarks, click one, hold the Shift key down, and then click another. You can hold the Ctrl key and click selected bookmarks to deselect them. Press the Command key instead of the Ctrl key on a Mac.

Assuming you’re syncing your browser data, this will also clean up your messy bookmarks on your phone. You can, of course, manage bookmarks on your phone or tablet instead. Those changes will sync to the browser on your PC or Mac4. If even this is too much for you, you can get them out of your sight. Press Ctrl+A to select all the visible bookmarks. On a Mac, press Command+A instead. You can then drag them into another folder—for example, you could drag them into the “Other Bookmarks” folder on Chrome, or even create another folder for them. Then you can place the ones you do want to use in the top level, and all the clutter will be hidden behind that folder.

This is a good compromise between immediately erasing those bookmarks and having them in your face all day. Place those bookmarks in a hidden folder and, if you ever use a bookmark, move it out of the folder. When you’re comfortable that you don’t need the bookmarks in the folder, you can delete the entire folder. After all, you still have that bookmark backup file, anyway.

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How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

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Browser tabs are essential, everyday parts of modern web browsers, and odds are you probably have a bunch open right now. Too many, most likely. That’s usually OK, because they’re useful for comparing pages, keeping track of things you want to read later, or just organizing your work.

The problem is, they're so useful that they can quickly become overwhelming. You’ve only been at your computer for half an hour and you're already battling through 60 different tabs just to find the one you need. Or worse, your computer reboots and the built-in session save fails and you lose all those tabs.

We're here to tell you that there are solutions to your tab woes, ways of managing them so they can be a help rather than a hindrance. You can look to tools available both inside your browser of choice and third-party add-ons to stop the tabs from taking over.

Google recently introduced a new feature called Tab Groups that makes it easier to manage different bunches of tabs in Chrome. Try right-clicking on a tab and choose Add tab to new group—the tab will be assigned a colored dot, and you can give it a name and change its color by right-clicking on the dot. You might have different groups for different projects maybe, or one for personal stuff and one for work-related browsing. (If you don't have it yet, make sure you have the latest version of Chrome first, and then you may need to enable it in the "chrome://flags" experimental options.)

You can expand or collapse tab groups by clicking on their label. To add new tabs to a group, just drag them in, or right-click on a tab and choose Add tab to group (you can still create new groups too). Drag tabs out of the group, and they're released. To close a group or release tabs from it, right-click on its label—note that you can bring back closed groups the same way you can bring back closed tabs, via the History and Recently Closed options on the Chrome menu.

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

Digital clutter is different from physical clutter. Yes, it is important to remember that digital clutter actually isn’t as troublesome as physical clutter.

For example: Have you tried to carry a thousand books up a flight of stairs? How about a dozen photo albums? Or maybe a library of DVDs? If you have, then you know it’s much easier to move those possessions when they’re digital: thousands of books fit easily onto an e-reader, photo albums display beautifully in digital frames, and nearly every movie ever made streams effortlessly from the cloud.

That said, digital clutter can still be problematic: unlike the physical world, you’ll never eliminate digital clutter completely, so it’s best to organize our digital world to make it easier to navigate.

Take the Internet as an example: the World Wide Web is infinite, and thus impossible to “declutter.” It is, however, organized with precision through the use of URLs, IP addresses, etc. We can do something similar with our personal computers, smartphones, and other devices.

Here’s a tip: once a month, organize the folders on your computer, delete excess photos on your phones, clear unused bookmarks from your web browsers, and archive any files and emails you haven’t accessed in the past 90 days. With a backed-up archive, you’ll have searchable access to all your files should you need them, but they’ll be out of the way until you do.

Personally, The Minimalists save everything to Dropbox, and then once a month we move unused files and folders into an “Archive” folder. This monthly maintenance ensures our hard drives, desktops, devices, browsers, and inboxes are clear and easy to access.

This essay is an excerpt from of our 31-Days of Practical Minimalism Tips, which you can follow on Instagram, Facebook, or Twitter.

Purging and organizing inboxes, documents, photos, and other digital detritus can help reduce stress and improve productivity. Here's how to streamline and declutter your PCs, phones, and tablets.

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

A few times a year, I get an urge to purge. Whether it’s spring cleaning or taking a moment to archive last year’s emails, I find it incredibly gratifying to dump (or sometimes simply put away) stuff I don’t need. There’s a whole lot of hippie rhetoric about how clutter-free environments lead to clarity of mind, and I’m not necessarily saying it works for everyone, nor is it guaranteed to improve your productivity, but I sure do feel less stressed and more able to focus when the junk is gone.

As kids, most of us learn to clean our rooms, tidy our desks, donate or throw out items that we don’t need or want anymore, and put away our physical stuff. As adults, however, many of us never learned how to do the same thing with our digital material. It’s no surprise we never learned. Who would have taught us? There haven’t yet been enough generations to figure out how to do it and teach the next batch of youngsters.

If you enjoy a good purge and have a messy digital life, here are five places to start:

Files on your computer desktop

Messages in your email inbox

Photos on your phone

Apps on your phone

Your open browser tabs

Here’s some advice on how to do it.

1. Clean Up Your Desktop

Sometimes we place a file on the computer desktop so it’ll be in our line of sight and we’ll remember it. Then we repeat this action a few more times. Before you know it, the principle defeats itself. How can you see and remember a file among a messy heap of others?

View Desktop Files in List View

The easiest way to clean up the desktop is to start by viewing your files in a list rather than in a graphical representation of the desktop and file icons. In other words, open a Finder window in macOS or File Explorer in Windows. This view can make it easier to see which files you can delete or put away.

Make a Few Folders

You don’t have to trash all your files to clean up your desktop. Instead, make a few folders with names like IN PROGRESS and PHOTOS to help you sort what you have.

Don’t think too deeply about the correct classification for each file. Keep it simple. One folder each for PDFs, Photos, and Documents would do. Folders called Work, Personal, Fun, and Old are fine, too.

The method I use to sort files is by year. I have one folder for every year, and within those folders, I have whatever subfolders make sense. Why do I organize this way? Because I think about my work and personal files based on when they happened. So I have a 2020 folder and within it are subfolders called 2020 PHOTOS, 2020 TAXES, and so forth. Putting files into folders is similar to archiving them. They’re out of sight, but I can find them if I need them.

Sort Your Files

Now, using the list view to your advantage, sort your files into the folders that make sense. With the list view, you can see and sort by file type, date created or last edited, or by size. Turn on the preview option for images, PDFs, and other files if you need to glance at them before making a decision.

Don’t leave your folders on the desktop. They’ll only create more visual clutter. Tuck them out of view but somewhere you’ll remember, such as within the My Documents folder or maybe in a file-syncing folder, such as the main Dropbox folder.

2. Empty Your Email Inbox

Ready to trash everything in your email inbox? No? You’re not alone. A lot of us hesitate to throw away emails because we’re afraid of missing a million-dollar opportunity or an important message. OK, so don’t! You can clear your inbox without deleting any messages or tossing them into the Archive abyss.

Our method relies on the same concept we used to clear the desktop: Sweep those old emails out of sight by moving them into folders.

Create a Folder or Two

Start by creating a new folder…or two or three. It depends on how many messages you have to clear out. If it’s fewer than, say, 100, one folder will do. If you have many hundreds or thousands of emails, putting them into one folder will move them out of sight, and if that’s all you want to do, so be it. But in that case you might as well archive all the messages, as putting them into a folder won’t help you cope with the messages later. Sorting your mail into folders will.

Create a new folder (or in Gmail, a label) and name it for the current year. Or you could name it the year and the quarter (2021 Q1) or the year and the month. Make additional folders if you need them for other recent years, quarters, or months.

The reason I like time-based folders for email is that they remove the need to make additional decisions. Every email message or thread has a date, so you make fewer decisions about how to sort the messages. Fewer decisions means easier, faster, and more efficient cleanup. They practically sort themselves. Sure, if a thread spans several weeks or months, you may have to decide whether to file it by the first message date or the most recent date. Still, you’d only have to make that decision once and then apply it across other threads. Done and done.

Bulk-Move Messages

Now move messages en masse into the appropriate folder, based on the date of the message. Depending on what email program you have, you might be able to move them by creating a rule. Otherwise, just sort your inbox by date, select all the messages in a certain year, and drag them into the new folder. Easy.

You’re not deleting anything. But you’re restoring the Inbox as a place for new, incoming mail. You don’t have to deal with every unopened or unanswered message to get a fresh inbox. All you have to do is bulk-move old messages.

Develop New Inbox Habits

Now that your inbox is decluttered, it’s an excellent time to develop some new, positive email habits. If you take a little bit of time to set up some new rules for managing email and stick with them, you might find that email doesn’t have to be an unmanageable mess.

Remember, we’re not trying to be perfect in how we manage email. The goal in decluttering is to ease the stress associated with having an unmanageable inbox and perhaps feel a metaphorical weight lifted. We tidy up because it makes life easier going forward.

3. Transfer Photos From Your Phone

Nothing says purge like removing photos and videos from your phone. Nearly everyone hangs onto them, but clearing them out not only frees up space on your phone but also makes it easier to find the images you choose to keep there.

● Use a cloud storage service, such as iCloud, Dropbox, or OneDrive (this is usually the quickest method).

● Transfer photos directly to a computer (using a cable).

● Transfer photos wirelessly to a computer (using Wi-Fi or Bluetooth).

● Physically remove a memory card (not all phones have this option).

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

One of the reasons for Google Chrome’s popularity among web browsers is its ability to easily manage and organize tabs.

Here’s a comprehensive overview of all the ways you can open, customize, group, and arrange tabs in Google Chrome .

How to organize tabs in Chrome

How to open a new tab

You can have a virtually unlimited number of tabs open at once using Chrome, though if you have too many tabs open, your computer’s performance will suffer. Here are all the ways to open a new tab.

  • Open a tab in the current Chrome window: Click the New tab button (the plus sign) at the top of the browser window to the right of the existing tabs. Or use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl + t on a PC, or Command + t on a Mac.
  • Open a tab in a new window: You can click any tab and drag it out of the Chrome window; it’ll open in its own window instead. The keyboard shortcut is Ctrl + n on a PC and Command + n on a Mac.
  • Open a link in a new tab: If you click a link, it will open in the current tab, replacing the current content. If you want to open it in a new tab, press Ctrl + left-click on your mouse on a PC, or Command + left click on a Mac.

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

You can open tabs in the existing Chrome browser using the plus sign at the top of the window. Dave Johnson/Business Insider

How to close a tab

To close a tab, click the close button (the X) at the right side of the tab. You can also right-click and choose “Close” or press Ctrl + w on a PC, or Command + w on a Mac. You also have some other options at your disposal.

  • Close several tabs at once: If you want to close a bunch of tabs, right click the tab to the left of those tabs and choose “Close tabs to the right.” This works best if the tabs you want to close are already the right-most tabs.
  • Close all tabs except one: Right-click the one tab you want to keep open and choose “Close other tabs.”
  • Close all the open tabs in the Chrome window: Click the close button for the Chrome window or use the keyboard shortcut: Alt + F4 on a PC. On a Mac, it’s Command + Shift + w.

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

Right-click a tab to see several commands for closing one or more tabs at once. Dave Johnson/Business Insider

How to open a tab closed by accident

If you accidentally close a tab, press Ctrl + Shift + t on a PC to reopen it, or Command + Shift + t on a Mac.

You can also find recently closed tabs: Click the three-dot menu at the top right of the Chrome window and then click “History.” Find the link you want and click it.

This article will show you how to import and export your web browser bookmarks to and from Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, Microsoft Edge, and Safari to a portable HTML file. This enables you to back up your bookmarks and transfer them to another computer or even into a different web browser.

Google Chrome

Export to HTML

Click on the vertical dots in the top-right corner of Chrome, then select Bookmarks, followed by Bookmarks Manager from the menus. You can also use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl + Shift + O (the letter "oh").

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

Click on the vertical blue dots in the top-right region of the Bookmarks Manager. Be careful not to confuse them with the grey vertical dots right above them that we used in the previous step.

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

Select Export Bookmarks from the menu and then choose a destination for the HTML file, such as a flash drive or a network location.

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

Import from HTML

To import bookmarks from HTML into Chrome, follow the same instructions as when exporting except in the final step, select Import Bookmarks from the menu. Chrome will then prompt you for the HTML file that contains your bookmarks.

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

Mozilla Firefox

Export to HTML

Press Alt on your keyboard while within a Firefox window to reveal the hidden top menu, then select Bookmarks followed by Show All Bookmarks to bring up the Bookmarks Manager. You can also use the keyboard shortcut Ctrl + Shift + B.

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

Within the Bookmarks Manager, click the Import and Backup button, select Export Bookmarks to HTML from the menu, and then choose a destination for the HTML file, such as a flash drive or a network location.

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

Import from HTML

Follow the same instructions as with exporting to access the Bookmarks Manager, but in the final step, select Import Bookmarks from HTML and then provide Firefox with the HTML file containing your bookmarks.

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

How to declutter your web browser bookmarksMicrosoft Edge

Export to HTML

Bring up the Favorites sidebar by clicking on the three horizontal dots in the top-right region of the Edge window, then select Favorites from the menu.

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

Click on the gear icon in the Favorites sidebar to bring up the Favorites settings.

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

Under Favorites settings, click on the Import from another browser button. (Yes, this is how you get to the export feature.)

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

In the next section, click the Export to file button and then choose a destination for the HTML file, such as a flash drive or a network location.

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

Import from HTML

Follow the same instructions as with exporting, except in the final step click on the Import from file button and then provide Edge with the HTML file containing your bookmarks.

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

How to declutter your web browser bookmarksSafari

Export to HTML

With Safari open, click on the File menu in the top menu bar and then select Export Bookmarks and choose a destination for the HTML file, such as a flash drive or a network location.

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

Import from HTML

With Safari open, click on the File menu in the top menu bar, then select Import From, followed by Bookmarks HTML File, and provide Safari with the HTML file containing your bookmarks.

Following is a guide on how to export and import your bookmarks in each of the most popular browsers. The method used here is the HTML file export method, as it is the most universally compatible, and works well with the University systems. These guides will explain how to export the HTML file, and how to Import it back into your new browser. When exporting the HTML file, it is important to save it in a networked location, such as your filestore (fwa.soton.ac.uk).

Google Chrome

Export:

  1. On your computer, open Chrome.
  2. At the top-right, click More .
  3. Select BookmarksBookmark Manager.
  4. At the top, click More Export Bookmarks.

Import:

  1. On your computer, open Chrome.
  2. At the top-right, click More .
  3. Select BookmarksImport Bookmarks and Settings.
  4. Select the HTML file that contains the bookmarks that you’d like to import.
  5. Click Import.
  6. Click Finished.

Mozilla Firefox

Export:

Click the Library button on your toolbar. (If you don’t see it there, click the menu button then click Library.) Click Bookmarks and then click the Show All Bookmarks bar at the bottom.

Import:

Click the Library button on your toolbar. (If you don’t see it there, click the menu button then click Library.) Click Bookmarks and then click the Show All Bookmarks bar at the bottom.

Microsoft Edge

Export:

    Open Microsoft Edge and select Settings and more .

Import:

    Open Microsoft Edge and select Settings and more .

Internet Explorer

Export:

  1. In the Internet Explorer browser, select View favorites, feeds, and history, or press Alt + C to open Favorites.
  2. Under the Add to favorites menu, select Import and export. .
  3. Select Export to a file, and then select Next.
  4. On the checklist of options, select Favorites, and then select Next.
  5. Select the folder that you’d like to export your Favorites from, and then select Next.
  6. Type or browse to the location where you’d like your file exported.
  7. Select Export and then Finish.
  8. Your Favorites will now appear in an htm file in the location you’ve specified.
  9. You’ll need to be able to access this file on your Windows 10 PC, so send this file to yourself, either by emailing it, by saving it onto an external storage device, or by saving it to the cloud with a service like OneDrive. Learn more about how OneDrive can help you make the move at Move files off a Windows 7 PC with OneDrive.

Import:

  1. In Internet Explorer, click Favorites, click the down-arrow next to Add to Favorites, and then click Import and Export.
  2. Click Import from a file, and then click Next.
  3. Click to select the Favorites check box, and then click Next.
  4. By default, Internet Explorer creates a Bookmark.htm file in your Documents folder. However, you can import favorites that are saved under another name. To do this, click Browse, select a file or type a location and file name, and then click Next.
  5. Select the folder where you want to put the imported bookmarks, and then click Import.
  6. Click Finish.

Safari

Export:

In the Safari app on your Mac, choose File > Export Bookmarks.

The exported file is called “Safari Bookmarks.html”.

To use the exported bookmarks in another browser, import the file named “Safari Bookmarks.html”.

Import:

In the Safari app on your Mac, choose File > Import From > Bookmarks HTML File.

Select the file you want to import.

After you import bookmarks, they appear at the bottom of the sidebar in a new folder whose name begins with “Imported” and ends with the date.

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The Popular Bookmarks software may be attractive to computer users that like to keep their bookmarks in order, but you might want to know that it is perceived by security researchers as adware. The Popular Bookmarks software is created by adware developers to serve as their private ad network that can be used to present users with many ads, pop-ups and in-text hyperlinks to sponsored products. The Popular Bookmarks adware is deployed by bundling with free application installers that most computer users install via the ‘Express’ or ‘Typical’ option. The Popular Bookmarks adware may visualize its installation on your OS by adding a browser extension, an add-on, and a Browser Helper Object. The Popular Bookmarks adware may read the content of the web pages you are often visiting, and it may use this information to generate tailor-suited ads. The ads by Popular Bookmarks may clutter your web browser, and you might want to use a trusted anti-spyware tool to remove the Popular Bookmarks adware from your PC.

Site Disclaimer

Enigmasoftware.com is not associated, affiliated, sponsored or owned by the malware creators or distributors mentioned on this article. This article should NOT be mistaken or confused in being associated in any way with the promotion or endorsement of malware. Our intent is to provide information that will educate computer users on how to detect, and ultimately remove, malware from their computer with the help of SpyHunter and/or manual removal instructions provided on this article.

This article is provided “as is” and to be used for educational information purposes only. By following any instructions on this article, you agree to be bound by the disclaimer. We make no guarantees that this article will help you completely remove the malware threats on your computer. Spyware changes regularly; therefore, it is difficult to fully clean an infected machine through manual means.

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EnigmaSoft Threat Scorecard

The EnigmaSoft Threat Scorecard is an assessment report that is given to every malware threat that has been collected and analyzed through our Malware Research Center. The EnigmaSoft Threat Scorecard evaluates and ranks each threat by using several metrics such as trends, incidents and severity over time.

In addition to the effective scoring for each threat, we are able to interpret anonymous geographic data to list the top three countries infected with a particular threat. The data used for the EnigmaSoft Threat Scorecard is updated daily and displayed based on trends for a 30-day period. The EnigmaSoft Threat Scorecard is a useful tool for a wide array of computer users from end users seeking a solution to remove a particular threat or security experts pursuing analysis and research data on emerging threats.

Each of the fields listed on the EnigmaSoft Threat Scorecard, containing a specific value, are as follows:

Ranking: The current ranking of a particular threat among all the other threats found on our malware research database.

Threat Level: The level of threat a particular computer threat could have on an infected computer. The threat level is based on a particular threat’s behavior and other risk factors. We rate the threat level as low, medium or high. The different threat levels are discussed in the SpyHunter Risk Assessment Model.

Infected Computer: The number of confirmed and suspected cases of a particular threat detected on infected computers retrieved from diagnostic and scan log reports generated by SpyHunter’s Spyware Scanner.

Chris Hoffman
How to declutter your web browser bookmarksChris Hoffman
Editor-in-Chief

Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He’s written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami’s NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times—and that’s just here at How-To Geek. Read more.

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

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Articles on the web come with advertisements and other clutter. If you print them, you often get all that junk. But you can cut out the ads and other extraneous elements with a feature built into your web browser.

We recommend using “reading mode” in web browsers to eliminate this. In reading mode, your web browser creates a special view with just the text and important images. But this mode isn’t just for reading—you can also print from it and get a better, more streamlined hard copy. All you have to do is activate the web browser’s reading mode before printing the article. Here’s how:

  • Google Chrome: Chrome has a hidden reader mode you can enable. After you do, click menu > Distill Page. If you don’t want to mess with hidden flags, we recommend opening the web page in another browser and printing it from there.

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

  • Mozilla Firefox: Click the article-shaped “Toggle Reader View” button in the address bar or press F9.

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

  • Microsoft Edge: Click the book-shaped “Reading View” icon in the address bar or press Ctrl+Shift+R.

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

  • Apple Safari: Click the “Reader” icon on the left side of the address bar. It looks like a few lines of text. You can also press Cmd+Shift+R.

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

After enabling reading mode in your browser, open its menu and click “Print,” just like normal. This prints the streamlined, more minimal version of the web page. That cut-down version also appears in the print preview window.

How to declutter your web browser bookmarks

If you’re trying to print a web page that isn’t an article, the reader view icon either doesn’t appear or is grayed out. This is because reading mode only works with web articles, as your browser can automatically strip those down.

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How to declutter your web browser bookmarks Chris Hoffman
Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He’s written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami’s NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times—and that’s just here at How-To Geek.
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