How to do meditation at home to calm your anxious mind

Anxiety relief doesn’t have to be complicated.

Posted Sep 19, 2018

THE BASICS

  • What Is Anxiety?
  • Find a therapist to overcome anxiety

“You should sit in meditation for 20 minutes everyday —unless you’re too busy; then you should sit for an hour.” ― Dr. Sukhraj Dhillon

How to do meditation at home to calm your anxious mind

Recently I received an email from a college student who’s struggling with anxiety and wants to get unstuck.

A tall order for a non-therapy client, but he was nice and the millennials are struggling with stress and worries at alarming rates, so here goes.

I’m going to share a simple technique I’ve used with many counseling clients, and it’s a game changer.

How to Overcome Obstacles to Peace of Mind

But first, let’s talk about what trips up even the most well-intentioned person in the quest for a quiet mind and body.

  • Over-attention to the content of your worries. This is especially prevalent in people with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). I know how counterintuitive this may seem when it’s your mind obsessing over scary thoughts, but honestly, they are not that important. Your brain is stuck in overwhelm overdrive, but don’t let it take you along for the ride. Grab the steering wheel and park it below.
  • Underattention to problem-solving. Largely because of the first obstacle, your rational mind becomes dormant in the throes of runaway unhealthy thoughts and uncomfortable physical sensations such as rapid, shallow breathing, tightening in your chest, dizziness and nausea, etc. Next to “ER” (see below), problem-solving is your best asset for calming an anxious mind.
  • Feeling overwhelmed by…everything!
  • Giving in to impulsivity. According to research published by The Journal of Affective Disorders, a correlation exists between anxiety and impulsive behaviors. This is largely due to an inability to delay gratification and intolerance for uncertainty. Examples of giving in to impulsivity include: abusing substances or “self-medicating,” self-injury, avoidance of unpleasant situations, physical or verbal aggression, excessive social media or other media use to the extent that responsibilities are neglected, etc.
  • Allowing your emotions to get the best of you. “Emotional regulation” (a most unfortunate name for a must-have mental wellness tool) is where it’s at. At its core, ER (not the medical facility where up to 40 percent of the population ends up with complains of chest pain, when in fact, panic attack is the culprit) is the ability to withstand a wide variety of emotional situations and uncomfortable feelings. Examples of healthy emotional regulation include deep-breathing to slow you mind + body, pausing before you respond to an angry inquiry, taking a timeout when stressed, walking away instead of engaging in a psychological arm wrestle, etc.

Now the anxiety-relief tip, you’ve been waiting for.

Twenty Minute Calming Technique

1. Stay in the fray of your frazzled feeling state (3 minutes). While the tendency may be to “get calm,” your worries alert you about something which needs to change. Think of this as a mini-meditation for increasing self-awareness.

2. Sit in silence, close your eyes and pay attention to your body (2 minutes). Where do you feel stress? Is it your stomach, your head, your chest area? Where do you hold tension? Make a conscious effort to breathe into those areas of stress and replace the heaviness with relaxation.

3. Settle on one small action you can do which will bring you one step closer to solving your problem (10 minutes). Anxiety loves avoidance, so beat it at its own game and start acting. Set a timer for 10 minutes and completely immerse yourself in this step. Clear all distractions and focus on your goal (if you’re stuck, start with what you’ve been avoiding and what specifically bothers you about uncertainty: Is this an uncomfortable conversation with your spouse? Is it opening your VISA bill? A stagnant relationship? The time between text messages to a love interest? Needing to know the results of the lab test? The security of a good job upon graduation?).

4. Write down one task you will complete tomorrow to stay on the action track (5 minutes). Get specific and hold yourself accountable.

Repeat this process daily so you develop a nice habit. Challenges can be all-consuming or all-empowering. The goal is not necessarily to be calm, but to handle daily stress better and to find the right side of ‘in control’ quicker.

How to do meditation at home to calm your anxious mind

To calm your anxious mind, meditation can be beneficial. However, meditation is not always as pretty and picturesque as presented in social media. You do not have to meditate in the lap of nature, overlooking a beautiful valley at sunrise. You can do it whenever and wherever you find the time and the right place. If you do not have the right place to do meditation, you can create one for yourself by following some easy steps. Also, meditation has as much to do with the external environment as what a person is feeling inside.

Meditate At Home To Calm Your Anxious Mind

It is best if you can practice your meditation right at your home. There are only a few things you need to do to create a meditative space in your home.

  • A meditative space needs to be devoid of disruptions and noises. Everyone builds a nook or corner of the house to be calm and peaceful, and that corner is well suited for meditation. But keep in mind there is enough space for movement and ease.
  • Improving the Feng Shui of your home is very important. The concept of Feng Shui in Chinese culture shows how critical it is to have the right placements in your home. That means you have to take care that light, water, and air movement in your space is good. Also, living things like plants in your living or meditative space can improve the energy flow of your space.
  • It is essential to cut down disruptive sounds and noises. However, several noises are beyond your control. Therefore, when we meditate, we let the noises pass. In a way, we are learning to curb distractions by controlling our minds.
  • Sitting in the same position with closed eyes is what typically comes to mind when we think of meditation. However, when you have learned how to meditate, you can find the same peace that meditation brings, through doing routine household chores like cleaning, folding clothes, cooking.
  • To be able to meditate, you must first understand that you need to appreciate the art of doing nothing. That does not mean you are wasting time and energy. Meditation is the appreciation and awareness of just being. That is also called mindfulness.

Meditation Benefits

Meditation is a way to have a happier life, both mentally and physically. In our high-stress lifestyles, it is an essential practice. Therefore, we must incorporate it into our daily routines. It does not take much, and only a few hours of practicing it can make a huge difference. Meditation can be done everywhere and anywhere. Also, it is most convenient to do it in your home. A busy lifestyle needs a flexible meditation routine. So, it is best if you turn your home’s space into meditation space. It has excellent health benefits and also helps you focus better at your job. Apart from this, it also improves motivation and general productivity. Many successful professionals, athletes, and business personnel practice meditation to have an overall healthy and prosperous life.

Have you ever wondered why meditation helps with anxiety? If so, scientific research has discovered the answers that explain the link between anxiety and meditation.

In my guide to the best meditations for anxiety I shared all the best methods to use. But today I would like to explain why meditation helps with anxiety. So let’s take a look at the scientific research in order to understand things.

How to do meditation at home to calm your anxious mind

Why Does Meditation Help Anxiety?

You might wonder “How can meditation help anxiety?” For me, meditation cured my anxiety, but I wanted to look into the reasons why.

After considerable research into various scientific studies, I’ve learned that there are a few keys reasons why meditation helps with anxiety.

Firstly, meditation gives us the ability to recognise anxious thoughts and to handle them in a logical and objective manner.

The University of Massachusetts Medical School studied the effects of mindfulness meditation for anxiety relief. The study showed that mindfulness teaches us to recognise when we are experiencing troubling thoughts, and to then take steps to handle those thoughts in a healthy way. (4)

Essentially, when we are mindful of anxiety we are able to see it for it is: just an emotion. We can then tackle that emotion objectively. This explains why anxiety effects you less after you meditate.

It increases awareness of anxious thoughts.

We are often controlled by negative thoughts. And if we are not mindful these thoughts can greatly influence our emotions.

Mindfulness let’s us step back, identify anxious thoughts, and change them.

One scientific study looked at evidence from 39 difference studies to see the effect of mindfulness meditation for anxiety ( 5). This included people who had anxiety because they were living with cancer, people who suffered social anxiety, and people who had other forms of the condition. The study looked at 1140 participants in total. Researchers concluded that mindfulness meditation helps anxiety because it makes us more aware of thoughts.

Meditation reduces anxiety in the part of the brain that creates anxiety

Another reason why meditation helps anxiety is because it reduces activity in the amygdala.

A study at Stanford University showed the benefits of 8 weeks of mindfulness meditation for anxiety. 8 weeks mindfulness reduces activity in the amygdala (6). Anxiety is often caused by greater reactivity in the amygdala region of the brain, which is the region that triggers fear. By reducing activity in this area, mindfulness reduces the symptoms of the condition.

Meditation helps because it reduces stress hormones

Researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center conducted research on 89 patients to see the relationship between Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (a type of meditation) and anxiety. Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction decreases stress-related hormones and cell-signaling proteins. This, the study authors state, shows that meditation is a healthy and effective way of treating anxiety (7).

It gives us more control of anxious thoughts

Researchers at the University of Baltimore looked into nearly 19,000 studies on meditation and anxiety. They discovered that meditaiton helps anxiety-sufferrs to understand different types of thoughts.

“People who suffer from anxiety can’t tell the difference between nagging worry and problem-solving thought,” says Dr. Elizabeth Hoge, a psychiatrist at the Center for Anxiety and Traumatic Stress Disorders. People who suffer from unproductive worrying tend to think in terms of negative consequences, for example, “I’ll be late and lose my job,” instead of thinking, “How can make sure I get to work in time so I keep my job?”

Mindfulness based stress reduction (MBSR) helps patients with generalised anxiety disorder [GAD] to understand the different types of thoughts and to respond to them accordingly.

Anxious people tend to give negative thoughts too much attention. They believe their thoughts control reality. For instance, they believe that if they are thinking they’ll lose their job, they really will lose their job. Mindfulness meditation helps these individuals to distinguish thoughts from reality.

Meditation reduces anxiety because it changes the endocrine system

A recent study in March 2020 revealed that meditation helps anxiety because it changes the endocrine system.

Research conducted by Melbourne’s Victoria University and Belfast’s Queen’s University reveals shows that meditation improve our ability to self-manage anxiety, stress an depression because it positively influences the endocrine system.

The endocrine system is a “chemical messenger system comprising feedback loops of the hormones released by internal glands of an organism directly into the circulatory system, regulating distant target organs”. [Wikipedia]

In the peer-review study, researchers found a relationship between the endocrine system and meditation. The results of the study were published in the journal Cell Press.

Chantal Ski, one of the authors on the paper, told THE DAILY MEDITATION “Through the comprehensive literature review, we found that there is a clear link between meditation and stress reduction. We focused on studies that analysed how meditation affected the endocrine system and a number of interconnected systems that regulate stress.

Meditation changes the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis, a network of three glands located near our brains and kidneys. The hypothalamus regulates the growth of hormones via the pituitary gland, and the adrenal gland creates the “fight or flight” response.

Conclusion

Above we have discussed why meditation helps anxiety, and the scientific reasons to explain it.

Meditation helps anxiety sufferers in many ways. Not only does it help with relaxation, it also improves awareness of thoughts and feelings.

What differences have you noticed since you started meditating?

There are also many other healthy ways to treat anxiety. Find out more here.

Easy meditation techniques to assist induce a state of deep calm. Read to know more…

How to do meditation at home to calm your anxious mind

Do you have a restless mind that never allows you to focus on something for more than a minute or so? Then this article can give you some ideas to take care of your inner peace and help you calm your soul. It is a well-known fact that most people suffer from anxiety, restlessness, and sleep-related issues. In the last few months, as the pandemic raged on, people have been more anxious and stressed. The daily chores of handling work from home, taking care of personal responsibilities have taken a significant toll on many lives, also causing problems to physical and mental health. Also Read – Earthquake: Multiple organ failure to hypothermia, tremors can be detrimental to your health

Soothe your soul through meditation

Meditation has been around for several years. And while it was originally being used as a way to connect with the mystical forces of life, today it is mostly used primarily to help people find their inner calm. Anyone can practice meditation. There are no qualifications required to practice meditation. Also, you don’t need any special attire or a proper location to do it. You can practice meditation even when you are sitting on your balcony or about to sleep on your bed. Whenever you are anxious or feeling restless, be sure to meditate. This will make you feel composed and also increase your concentration power. To start with, try these 3 types of meditations. The only thing you need to keep in mind is that the end goal is much the same, no matter which path you choose and that is bringing a sense of calm to your mind and body. Also Read – Suffering from PTSD? Brain training may help treat this condition

Mindfulness Meditation

In this type of meditation, you allow your thoughts to come and go and try not to judge them as they flow into your mind. Mindfulness meditation helps you to read your thoughts and make a calculation on what you need to focus on right now in your life. Also Read – Depression, stress may reduce efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines, scientists say

Body Scan Meditation

As the name suggests, this type of meditation technique is centered on meditatively scanning your entire body, to identify sensations of pain, or discomfort. This helps increase awareness of your own body, allowing you to develop greater insight into the causes behind these uncomfortable and unwanted sensations.

Guided Meditation

This is one of the most ancient forms of meditation where you are guided by someone’s voice or directions. This voice helps you to visualize a place or a situation that in a way calms you down from inside.

Other than the above three types of meditations, you can also practice yoga. It will not only help you to calm your inner soul but also help you stay fit and happy. You can try Bhujangasana, Paryankasana, and Shavasana. These yoga asanas can help you cope with the stress and anxiety that you are suffering from.

Elisha Goldstein, psychologist and founder of the Mindful Living Collective, offers seven daily practices to help us feel calm and stay grounded in uncertain times.

  • By Elisha Goldstein
  • May 8, 2020
  • Daily Practices

How to do meditation at home to calm your anxious mindAndrii Zastrozhnov/Adobe Stock

[email protected] is a series of free guided meditations from some of our favorite mindfulness teachers. As they hunker down in their homes, they will be sending peace, calm, and love to you in your home. Tune in to our Facebook page every Monday, Wednesday, and Friday at 3 p.m. ET for live guided meditations.

In this video, Elisha Goldstein outlines seven simple things we can do in our everyday lives to cope with the stress and anxiety that arises in challenging times.

7 Ways to Ease Your Anxious Mind

1. Slow down

When you slow your physical movements, you are also allowing your mind to slow down. You can do this by taking your time with everyday tasks like walking, washing the dishes, or showering.

2. Take the news and social media with a grain of salt

It’s easy to get overwhelmed by anxious thoughts when reading the headlines of the day. We can limit the spread of unnecessary fear and panic by looking past the headline and reading the entire article. Once that’s done, pause and notice whether it’s worth sharing a sensational headline on social media.

3. Build certainty into your day

Often mindfulness practices teach us to be okay with uncertainty, but it’s also okay to build in elements of certainty that your mind can count on. Try creating a new routine that fits the reality of your life right now. Use exercise, sleep, or meditation to ground yourself with healthy habits.

4. Come to your senses throughout the day

To ease your worried mind, try the three-by-three practice. Notice three things that you can see, three things that you can hear, and three things that you can feel. Or, experiment with what works for you: Expand the practice to all five senses, or bring your attention to one sense at a time.

5. Release the critic

See if you can become aware of when you’re comparing yourself to other people. Gently remind yourself that you don’t need to compare how you’re handling the crisis to how others are coping. Instead, notice when thoughts of judgment arise and label the thoughts as “comparing.”

6. Do a reality check

Oftentimes anxiety confuses possibility with probability. Similar to Byron Katie’s four questions, ask yourself: “Is this thought true?” “How does this thought make me feel?” “What does it make me want to do?” and “What would I do if this thought wasn’t here?” With the answers to these questions in mind, you should be able to judge possibility and probability with a clearer distinction between the two.

7. Look up and listen

If you can, go outside, lie down, look up at the sky, and listen. Allow yourself to get comfortable and take in all of the sounds and visuals that surround you.

Explore and experiment with each of these seven practices and see what you notice. And know that whatever you’re experiencing right now, you’re not alone.

read more

How to do meditation at home to calm your anxious mind

One Year Into the Pandemic, Here’s How We’re Tapping Into Compassion

Wherever you are, whatever your circumstances, we’re sharing these practices to help you find ways to plug into connection, kindness, and care. Read More

  • Mindful Staff
  • March 11, 2021

How to do meditation at home to calm your anxious mind

What to Do When Thoughts Arise While Meditating

The mind often wanders in meditation—and it’s normal. Elisha Goldstein, psychologist and founder of the Mindful Living Collective, explores how to deal with both important and irrelevant ideas that come up. Read More

  • Elisha Goldstein
  • April 27, 2020

How to do meditation at home to calm your anxious mind

Free Mindfulness Resources to Find Calm and Nourish Resilience During the COVID Outbreak

Whether you’re looking for live guided meditations connecting you to others, a quick practice to help you find your ground, or a free course on how to meditate, here’s how the Mindful community is coming together to serve in the days and weeks ahead. Read More

  • Mindful Staff
  • March 19, 2020

Anxiety relief doesn’t have to be complicated.

Posted Sep 19, 2018

THE BASICS

  • What Is Anxiety?
  • Find a therapist to overcome anxiety

“You should sit in meditation for 20 minutes everyday —unless you’re too busy; then you should sit for an hour.” ― Dr. Sukhraj Dhillon

How to do meditation at home to calm your anxious mind

Recently I received an email from a college student who’s struggling with anxiety and wants to get unstuck.

A tall order for a non-therapy client, but he was nice and the millennials are struggling with stress and worries at alarming rates, so here goes.

I’m going to share a simple technique I’ve used with many counseling clients, and it’s a game changer.

How to Overcome Obstacles to Peace of Mind

But first, let’s talk about what trips up even the most well-intentioned person in the quest for a quiet mind and body.

  • Over-attention to the content of your worries. This is especially prevalent in people with Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). I know how counterintuitive this may seem when it’s your mind obsessing over scary thoughts, but honestly, they are not that important. Your brain is stuck in overwhelm overdrive, but don’t let it take you along for the ride. Grab the steering wheel and park it below.
  • Underattention to problem-solving. Largely because of the first obstacle, your rational mind becomes dormant in the throes of runaway unhealthy thoughts and uncomfortable physical sensations such as rapid, shallow breathing, tightening in your chest, dizziness and nausea, etc. Next to “ER” (see below), problem-solving is your best asset for calming an anxious mind.
  • Feeling overwhelmed by…everything!
  • Giving in to impulsivity. According to research published by The Journal of Affective Disorders, a correlation exists between anxiety and impulsive behaviors. This is largely due to an inability to delay gratification and intolerance for uncertainty. Examples of giving in to impulsivity include: abusing substances or “self-medicating,” self-injury, avoidance of unpleasant situations, physical or verbal aggression, excessive social media or other media use to the extent that responsibilities are neglected, etc.
  • Allowing your emotions to get the best of you. “Emotional regulation” (a most unfortunate name for a must-have mental wellness tool) is where it’s at. At its core, ER (not the medical facility where up to 40 percent of the population ends up with complains of chest pain, when in fact, panic attack is the culprit) is the ability to withstand a wide variety of emotional situations and uncomfortable feelings. Examples of healthy emotional regulation include deep-breathing to slow you mind + body, pausing before you respond to an angry inquiry, taking a timeout when stressed, walking away instead of engaging in a psychological arm wrestle, etc.

Now the anxiety-relief tip, you’ve been waiting for.

Twenty Minute Calming Technique

1. Stay in the fray of your frazzled feeling state (3 minutes). While the tendency may be to “get calm,” your worries alert you about something which needs to change. Think of this as a mini-meditation for increasing self-awareness.

2. Sit in silence, close your eyes and pay attention to your body (2 minutes). Where do you feel stress? Is it your stomach, your head, your chest area? Where do you hold tension? Make a conscious effort to breathe into those areas of stress and replace the heaviness with relaxation.

3. Settle on one small action you can do which will bring you one step closer to solving your problem (10 minutes). Anxiety loves avoidance, so beat it at its own game and start acting. Set a timer for 10 minutes and completely immerse yourself in this step. Clear all distractions and focus on your goal (if you’re stuck, start with what you’ve been avoiding and what specifically bothers you about uncertainty: Is this an uncomfortable conversation with your spouse? Is it opening your VISA bill? A stagnant relationship? The time between text messages to a love interest? Needing to know the results of the lab test? The security of a good job upon graduation?).

4. Write down one task you will complete tomorrow to stay on the action track (5 minutes). Get specific and hold yourself accountable.

Repeat this process daily so you develop a nice habit. Challenges can be all-consuming or all-empowering. The goal is not necessarily to be calm, but to handle daily stress better and to find the right side of ‘in control’ quicker.

Stress and anxiety are a part of life, especially during these times of uncertainty, but they don’t need to control your day.

  • By Elisha Goldstein
  • August 16, 2019
  • Mental Health

How to do meditation at home to calm your anxious mindVisual Generation/Adobe Stock

Stress and anxiety are a part of life, especially during these times of uncertainty. However, we don’t need to be enslaved by our anxiety and instead can strengthen our mindful skills to ease our anxious minds, come into our lives and grow in confidence.

1. Release the critic

Not only is anxiety painful enough, but we often get hit with a second round of self-critical thoughts. Ask yourself a simple question: Do the judgments make you more or less anxious? The answer is almost always, more. When you notice the self-critic, see if you can interrupt it by dropping into your heart and saying, “May I learn to be kinder to myself.”

2. Practice tuning into the senses

In moments of moderate to intense anxiety the 3×3 practice can come in handy. Drop into three of your senses and name three things that you notice about them. In other words, name three things you’re seeing, smelling, tasting, feeling, or hearing. This can help interrupt the automatic catastrophic thinking that’s fuelling the anxiety.

3. Channel your anxious energy

Not all anxiety is bad. Like most mental events, anxiety lies on a spectrum. When you’re feeling a lot of anxious energy, that could be stress or courage building up. Either way we need to release that. If your anxiety isn’t severe, you can actually channel that energy into something productive. If you’re nervously waiting to hear some news for example, get active—go for a brisk walk, clean, organize, or garden instead.

By Sejal Shah | Posted: June 02, 2020

Even though you may not have noticed consciously, the breath-mind connection is very powerful. Think about it: When you are feeling anxious and your heart is racing, what’s the first thing you do? Deep breathing. When you’re restless, sleepless, and nervous before a test or big interview, what’s the most common piece of advice you’re given? “Take a deep breath.” This is because breathing helps slow your heart rate, which can lower anxiety and calm your mind. Yes, you are reading right, to get rid of anxiety, your own breath can play the magic. Practicing some easy breathing techniques at the time when your mind is galloping, can be the most effective way to calm your mind.

Breathwork is a more recent term used for various breathing practices and techniques in which the conscious controlled way of breathing is said to influence a person’s mental, emotional or physical state.

Straw breathing or Pursed lip breathing technique can quickly reduce anxiety and panic, increase feelings of calm and relaxation and can help one think more clearly. This technique is quite simple and in 5 minutes you will start noticing the difference. If you have a straw with you, you can use it but this can be done even without an actual straw.

This is an easy to do technique for slowing down a person’s breathing and getting more air into their lungs and also releasing the trapped air from the lungs. According to Medical News Today , with regular practice, it can help strengthen the lungs and make them work more efficiently.

This is how you can do it:

Sit comfortably with your back straight, face, neck and shoulders relaxed.

If you have a straw (with a small diameter) with you, keep it ready in your hand.

Inhale fully through your nose and then put the straw in your mouth and exhale fully and slowly through the straw. Make sure you exhale fully, be gentle; do not force the breath out.

If you don’t have the straw with you, you can make the shape of your lips as if you are holding a straw in your mouth. Inhale slowly and fully, and exhale gently through the imaginary straw in your mouth.

Inhale through your nose again, then exhale through the actual/imaginary straw in your mouth.

Try to breathe down into your abdomen. Feel the rising movement of your abdomen as you inhale, and falling movement of the abdomen as you exhale.

Next you can include some counts – for example, inhale for the count of 4 and exhale a little longer, say for the count of 6-8. Continue with this practice for about 5 minutes.

Watch this video guide and do the straw breathing along with the video:

Some more tips:

Try to pause slightly after the exhalation to allow the inhalation to start naturally, do not force it or strain. Just wait for the feeling of the inhalation to come spontaneously.

You may start to become aware of the natural pause of stillness between the breath. Feel the sensation of calm and profound stillness in these pauses.

After about 5 minutes, make some observations. How much has your breathing slowed down? Do you still feel anxiety? Are you feeling calmer? What is your experience following this practice?

This breathing technique is also recommended by the American Lung Association to help with shortness of breath from COPD, asthma or other lung diseases.

How straw breathing helps anxiety

Straw breathing can help you regain a feeling of calm and can be a very useful tool for anxiety. It is like a quick healing balm. When you’re stressed, angry or panicked, you tend to take short , shallow breaths that can increase the activity of the sympathetic nervous system, which is responsible for the “fight or flight” response. Whereas the slow, gentle, deep breathing has the effect of stimulating the parasympathetic nervous system which is responsible for the “rest and digest response” or “relaxation response” – resting, calm state and balances the effects of the sympathetic nervous system, which triggers anxiety and adrenaline. Here are some more yoga practices like asana (yoga postures) and mudras (hand positions) that can help you with anxiety.

Change the behavioral patterns

If you observe that you have an easy tendency to get anxious at the drop of a hat—if every small thing triggers anxiety in you, it is better to address the issue at a deeper level. Here the breathing practice and meditation can help you a lot. Try this Beyond Breath A FREE Breath & Meditation Online Session With a Live Instructor. In this session, you will also learn more about the SKY Breath Meditation that has shown to address the roots of anxiety as per many scientific and experiential studies .

Sending you blessings for more calm and peace of your mind!

Sejal Shah, E-RYT 500 Sri Sri Yoga Teacher, YACEP, C-IAYT, Meditation Teacher, Happiness expert, NYU Post Graduate Medical School approved Yoga-CME retreat facilitator, Mind-Body Wellness Writer, Homeopath. She can be followed on YouTube, Instagram , Twitter , and Facebook .

Practicing simple techniques and exercises can help you improve mental clarity and curb anxiety.

How to do meditation at home to calm your anxious mind

How to do meditation at home to calm your anxious mind

When we are stressed-out, sad, anxious, irritated, or angry, we typically want those feelings to just disappear. This is natural. It can be difficult to sit with uncomfortable emotions, especially when we feel like there’s no way out. We might try to drown them out with Netflix, work, exercise, or Oreos. Or maybe we try to blast out the blues with positive affirmations or pep talks in the mirror.

And while some of these activities can be helpful in the moment, denying our feelings can actually make them more intense and negatively effect our physical and mental health. So how can we healthily face and release our emotions instead of sweeping them under the rug? One way is to practice mindfulness: the practice of becoming self-aware in the present moment.

“[Mindfulness] allows us to bring a healthy discernment into our everyday experience and identify the elements of our thought, speech, and behavior that lead to suffering and those that lead to freedom,” says NYC-based meditation instructor Kirat Randhawa. “Over time we can strengthen the causes for freedom and diminish the causes of suffering. Once we recognize the necessary conditions for happiness, mindfulness allows us to meet the experience with an embodied presence, thereby truly enjoying the unfolding of each moment.”

While happiness and joy may not be the immediate results of doing a mindfulness exercise, doing them consistently can help put an end to excessively ruminating on the past and worrying over the future. What’s more, it can help you develop more self-compassion, says therapist and yoga instructor Magdalene Martinez, LMSW.

“Mindfulness is the practice of being at ease with what is,” she adds. “The more you practice, the easier it gets to be more accepting of whatever feelings are present.”

The cool thing about mindfulness is that it can be practiced by anyone — even kids — in any place, at any time. So whether you want to learn to get in touch with your own emotions or teach mindfulness to your children, there’s something out there for you. We’ve asked experts to round up the best mindfulness activities you can incorporate into your daily routine, share with others, or use whenever you are feeling overwhelmed. Pick a couple, try them out every day for a week, and note what you’ve learned about your mental landscape.