How to drink more water easily when it seems like a major chore

How to drink more water easily when it seems like a major chore

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Something crazy happens when you start to get older. You start to get out of bed and think, “Wow, I should actually accomplish something interesting and fulfilling today.”

Now, maybe you already feel like this or are frustrated at how you can’t seem to shake yourself out of those ugly moods you’ve been having periodically since you embarked on the journey of adult life. With all of the responsibilities and stresses life throws our way, we could all use some new habits and methods that promote ways to make us feel good instantly. Here are just a few:

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Last Updated on March 24, 2021

How to drink more water easily when it seems like a major chore

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We’ve all done it. We’ve gone out and bought useless gadgets that we don’t really need, just because they seemed really cool at the time. Then, we are stuck with a bunch of junk, and end up tossing it or trying to sell it on Ebay.

On the other hand, there are some pretty awesome tech inventions that are actually useful. For instance, many of the latest home gadgets do some of your work for you, from adjusting the home thermostat to locking your front door. And, if used as designed, these tools should really help to make your life a lot easier—and that’s not just a claim from some infomercial trying to sell you yet another useless gadget.

Take a look at some of the most popular “smart gadgets” on the market:

1. Smart Door Locks

A smart lock lets you lock and unlock your doors by using your smartphone, a special key fob, or biometrics. These locks are keyless, and much more difficult for intruders to break into, making your home a lot safer. You can even use a special app to let people into your home if you are not there to greet them.

2. Smart Kitchen Tools

Wouldn’t you just love to have a pot of coffee waiting for you when you get home from work? What about a “smart pan” that tells you exactly when you need to flip that omelet? From meat thermometers to kitchen scales, you’ll find a variety of “smart” gadgets designed to make culinary geeks salivate.

3. Mini Home Speaker Play:1

If you love big sound, but hate how much space big speakers take up, and if you want a stereo system that is no bigger than your fist, check out the Play:1 mini speaker. All you have to do is plug it in, connect, and then you can stream without worrying about any interruptions or interface. You can even add onto it, and have different music playing in different rooms.

4. Wi-Fi Security Cameras

These are the latest in home security, and they connect to the Wi-Fi in your home. You can use your mobile devices to monitor what is going on in your home at all times, no matter where you are. Options include motion sensors, two-way audio, and different recording options.

5. Nest Thermostat

This is a thermostat that lives with you. It can sense seasonal changes, temperature changes, etc., and it will adjust itself automatically. You will never have to fiddle with a thermostat dial or keypad again, because this one basically does all of the work for you. It can also help you to save as much as 12% on heating bills, and 15% on cooling bills.

6. Smart Lighting

Control your home lighting from your remote device. This is great if you are out and want to make sure that there are some lights on. It is designed to be energy efficient, so it will pay for itself over time because you won’t have to spend so much on your monthly energy bills.

7. Google Chromecast Ultra

Whether you love movies, television shows, music, etc., you can stream it all using Google Chromecast Ultra. Stream all of the entertainment you love in up to 4K UHD and HDR, for just $69 monthly.

8. Canary

This home security system will automatically contact emergency services when they are needed. This system offers both video and audio surveillance, so there will be evidence if there are any break-ins on your property. You can also use it to check up on what’s happening at home when you are not there, including to make sure the kids are doing their homework.

How to drink more water easily when it seems like a major chore

Despite how important it is to stay hydrated, there are many things that keep us from drinking enough water ― busy schedules, things we’d rather be drinking (especially coffee and cocktails), and the belief that drinking more water will lead to spending half the day in a bathroom stall.

We feel you. But it’s also necessary to drink up. Fortunately for all of us, there are more ways than ever to score enough H2O, and you don’t have to turn your life upside down to make them happen. Ahead, experts share their super-easy strategies for drinking more water:

1. Bookend each day with water

How to drink more water easily when it seems like a major chore

If your days are so hectic that stopping to drink water barely crosses your mind, try bookending each day with some H2O to take the pressure off, said North Carolina-based registered dietitian Autumn Ehsaei . Drinking a few cups in the morning and a few more once you’re off the clock guarantees that your body is getting a decent amount of water, and it brings you another step closer to reaching your ultimate hydration goals.

2. For every cup of coffee, drink one glass of water

“While coffee is a fluid, it’s not as hydrating or thirst-quenching as water for most of us,” Ehsaei said. If you’re already in the habit of drinking a few cups of coffee each day, following them up with a glass of water can easily improve your hydration status.

3. Add lots of ice to your drinks and smoothies

If you find water to be a yawn on its own, adding lots of ice to your go-to drinks and smoothies is an easy way to sneak in some hydration, said Maryann Walsh , a registered dietitian in Florida. Popping just four ice cubes into your glass adds roughly a half of a cup of water to your drink ― and your taste buds will barely notice.

4. Add more spice to your foods

How to drink more water easily when it seems like a major chore

Kicking things up a notch in the spice department ― say, by adding extra hot sauce or peppers to your meal ― is a really easy (and tasty) way to bump up your water intake. Most people drink (OK, chug) water to cool down their mouth after bites of spicy food and this can help fulfill your hydration goals in the process, said Kristen Smith , a registered dietitian based in Georgia.

5. Drink a full glass of water with every med or supplement

If you take medications or supplements, set a goal to wash them down with a full glass of water, Walsh said. Many meds and supplements are supposed to be taken a few hours apart for maximum efficacy, so this small change may increase your water intake quite a bit.

6. Invest in a smart water bottle

Tracking your water intake tends to get lost among all your other daily to-dos ― hence the popularity of smart water bottles, which do all of the tracking for you. A bottle like HydraCoach , DrinKup or Ozmo Active can help you calculate the approximate amount of water you should drink daily, send you reminders to drink up and track your data so that you can improve your hydration habits over time.

7. Drink from a straw

You’re more likely to swallow more at a time when you drink from a straw compared to when you sip directly from the bottle. Plus, drinking water from a straw makes it more accessible, said Kristen Kizer, a registered clinical dietitian at Houston Methodist Hospital in Texas. You’ll be more likely to sip on your water during a meeting if you have a straw, for example, and don’t have to reopen your bottle every time.

8. Use an app

How to drink more water easily when it seems like a major chore

There are tons of apps, such as Gulps , that can help you strengthen your water intake by sending reminders to your phone and providing a visual of how much you’ve had to drink so far, said Amanda Montalvo, a registered dietitian and functional nutrition practitioner from Kettlebell Kitchen . If gaming’s more your thing, Plant Nanny links your daily water consumption to keeping an adorable plant alive.

9. Measure ahead of time

If you’d rather go old-school with tracking your intake, start by estimating how much water you should be drinking every day (Montalvo recommends “a minimum of half your body weight in ounces”). Then fill a large bottle with that amount and make sure to finish it by the end of the day. If a large bottle is overwhelming or annoying to cart around with you, you can break up your intake into smaller water bottles to make it more manageable, Kizer said. Before bed, refill your bottles for the next day.

10. Drink in unconventional ways

If you find drinking water, well, boring, research suggests that switching up how you drink it can make it feel new again ― and thus, more enjoyable. Researchers from the University of Chicago and Ohio State University observed 300 study participants as they consumed water. They asked participants to come up with their own unconventional ways to consume water, and their answers ranged from drinking it out of a martini glass to drinking it from a spoon. The result? They ultimately enjoyed drinking water more than participants who drank it the “normal” way. So the next time you cringe at the thought of drinking water from a ho-hum cup, consider busting out a martini glass instead.

11. Get a refill as soon as it’s empty

How to drink more water easily when it seems like a major chore

Get up and refill your water bottle as soon as you empty it, Kizer said. This will ensure that you’re well-stocked once it’s time for your next sip session and eliminates any excuses you might make to not drink up again later.

12. Incorporate it into health goals that are important to you

If drinking water for the sake of staying hydrated isn’t enough of a health incentive for you, try attaching the habit to other goals that are legit important to you. For example, drinking an 8-ounce glass of water before a meal may help aid digestion , while drinking water an hour after you consume your meal may help the body absorb the micronutrients, said Jacqueline Schaffer, M.D., author of Irresistible You. ( Staying hydrated can also help enhance skin and joint health, and can even help to relieve headaches.)

13. Keep tabs on your bathroom habits

Figure out how long it takes before you have to use the bathroom after you drink water or other fluids. “For people with long commutes or worries about disrupting sleep at night, this data can be very helpful,” Kizer said. Instead of avoiding fluids all afternoon and evening just in case, you can hydrate with ease, both at the office and at home, by learning the cut-off times that work best for your body.

Enhanced waters promise a better sex life, better memory, better health.

March 6, 2009— — Chances are you’ve seen the bright bottles and flashy displays at your supermarket: Vitamin Water … Sobe Life … Oxygen Water … waters with protein and fiber … even waters that offer to cure your hangover or pump up your sexual vitality.

Water may be the oldest drink there is, but enhanced bottled waters are the newest, hottest thing in beverages.

The enhanced water category has become a $1.5 billion industry, with more than 150 products available, says Barry Nathanson, editor of the trade publication Beverage Spectrum. The question: Are there any benefits?

Nutritionist Dr. Pamela Peeke believes that you should think before you drink.

While a little more water can’t be bad, some of the purported pluses these enhanced waters tout might not entirely live up to the hype, she says.

For example, what health benefits come from adding more oxygen to water — as in Active O2? Peeke said you can easily have 10 times more oxygen just by breathing in and out than you’d get by consuming one of these oxygenated waters.

“The bottom line is if you wanted more oxygen, open your mouth and breathe,” she said.

Vitamin Water is the country’s best-selling enhanced water — it’s even endorsed by such celebrities as Shaquille O’Neal and Carrie Underwood. But along with the water’s vitamins, Peeke says it packs another punch too: calories. In fact, an entire 20 oz. bottle of Vitamin Water has 32.5 grams of sugar, just 6½ grams less than the sugars in a 12 oz. can of Coke.

So, are these healthy beverages?

“Define healthy for me,” Peeke said. “There’s no peer-reviewed research that we’re aware of that says in those kinds of combinations and percentages of vitamins and refined sugar, that you’re going to suddenly become healthy.”

Coca-Cola, the maker of Vitamin Water, told ABC News in a statement that “we don’t make health claims beyond nutrient content claims for our products. We state very clearly on our label what’s in our product and consumers can be sure they are receiving the nutrients listed in each bottle of Vitamin Water.”

‘Boost Memory, Mental Sharpness’ With Water?

Other enhanced waters also add ingredients that sound like they’re good for you, such as protein and fiber, to help curb your appetite. Kellogg’s created a drink called K20 Protein Water that has 5 grams of protein, 5 grams of fiber and 50 calories.

The company’s ad says the product “helps you take the edge off your hunger and still lose weight.”

But Peeke said, “Five grams of protein probably is not going to do that. You’re going to feel fuller just having drunk the entire bottle of water. Drinking this will not stop you from eating that large slice of cake in front of you.”

Kellogg’s said, “There are numerous published studies and articles on how protein and fiber work to promote satiety, and we relied on this data to support our K20 claims.”

What about a water that says on its cap that it was “created by physicians”? That is a big selling point for the waters from Function, founded by 32-year-old orthopedic surgeon Dr. Alex Hughes.

“We spend so much time and effort either developing devices or pharmaceuticals to help sick people,” Hughes said, “but very little time necessarily spent trying to enhance the lives of healthy, hard-charging adults.”

Hughes said he and his friends decided to develop drinks for weekend warriors like themselves. Along with a drink designed to abate hangovers and another drink touted to boost sexual vitality, Function offers a beverage called Brainiac, which claims to “boost your memory and mental sharpness,” thanks to ingredients like soy PS, zinc and ginkgo biloba.

“You’re just going to assume, ‘wow, that sounds sort of medical and I got to trust him,” she said. “He’s got an M.D., for crying out loud. Be careful here. . Look for the research that goes with it.”

Function cites a host of supportive studies to bolster its claims, but the studies are of the ingredients and not the drinks.

“We test that that ingredient is still in its functional form on the other side,” Hughes said, “and then that’s our criteria for how we know that that functional ingredients is still in effect in the product.”

Brainiac Water vs. Hawaiian Punch

No one has ever officially tested Brainiac, so “20/20” decided to.

Dr. Thomas Crook has run hundreds of studies on memory during the last 37 years. He and his colleagues at the Cognitive Research Corporation in St. Petersburg, Fla., agreed to construct a small test for “20/20” with 12 people to see whether drinking one bottle of Brainiac really would improve memory.

A group of people were given a few computerized tests, like recalling names with faces, to establish their basic memory levels. Then, in unmarked glasses, some were given Function’s Brainiac and others were given a placebo. After drinking the beverages, each took the memory tests again.

The results of the unofficial test? Not only was there no sign that Brainiac boosts memory, the group that drank the placebo — a Hawaiian Punch mixture — did slightly better than those who drank Brainiac.

In a response, Function says that because Crook’s experiment “comprised only 12 test subjects” it had generated “no statistically significant findings.”

Crook agrees, but said from his experience the results “didn’t surprise me . because I read the papers that were sent and I looked at the amount that they were adding — the amount of PS, the amount of ginkgo they’re adding to the product. They’re so small that no one has ever shown any effect.”

Seems like when it comes to enhanced water, it is up to the consumers to make healthy choices — and to read the labels carefully.

Besides, Peeke believes, there’s another choice you might want to consider, too. “You know something? At the end of the day, it’s all about having just plain old water. “

Dr. Mark Hyman shares the truth about seltzer

How to drink more water easily when it seems like a major chore

How to drink more water easily when it seems like a major chore

It’s no secret that we all need water to survive. But many of us have been swapping out our regular H2O for something a bit fizzier — carbonated water known as seltzer or sparkling water. (Not to be confused with sparkling mineral water or club soda, which you can read about here.) So… is this okay? Are we being good to our bodies by sipping bubbly water? Or should we cut back and opt for plain ol’ water instead?

We checked in with our favorite health expert Dr. Mark Hyman, author of the new cookbook Food: What the Heck Should I Cook?, to find out.

Katie Couric: It seems like everyone’s drinking sparkling water (or seltzer) nowadays — you even find seltzer machines in offices. So let’s break it down. How is seltzer different from regular ol’ water?

Dr. Mark Hyman: Seltzer is just carbonated water. It’s water with pressurized carbon dioxide gas added and that’s what gives it the bubbles that people enjoy so much. But it is important to note that this is the recipe for seltzer; club soda is similar but often has minerals salts like sodium bicarbonate, sodium citrate, disodium phosphate, and sodium chloride added. Sparkling mineral water is also slightly different, it has naturally occurring minerals and the bubbles could be natural or artificially added. Then there’s always the possibility of flavors and sweeteners added to any of these so I always suggest reading the label to really know what you’re getting.

Why do you think there’s been such a sudden surge of popularity for seltzer? Even beverages like La Croix are gaining popularity on sodas…

I think the seltzer trend is a good sign that people are wising up when it comes to the dangers of soda — which is linked to increased rates of obesity, type 2 diabetes, cancer, learning disabilities, and more. Seltzer can provide the same fizzy feeling in your mouth and belly without the insane amounts of sugar or neurotoxic artificial sweeteners found in soda. Since it can satisfy a craving for something bubbly with zero calories (when you choose the right ones) it’s become a go-to staple for many people who are wanting to be conscious of beverages like soda that only supply empty calories.

So… is seltzer actually good for us? Is it as hydrating as water?

Nothing is as good for us as clean filtered water. It’s something every single cell in the body needs and it’s how we get nutrients throughout the body, eliminate toxins, maintain protective mucous membranes, digest food, and it is part of so many other essential functions for our health. If you’re drinking plain seltzer, it is technically as hydrating as water (and it’s not as bad as soda). It’s not as good as filtered water, though, because you don’t know what the original water quality was like.

Seltzers with added flavors are another story — even flavorings labeled as “natural” aren’t chemically different than those labeled “artificial.” It just means they were derived from edible substances but they are still very highly processed and offer no nutritional value. And any added sweeteners or artificial sweeteners should always be avoided.

It’s also super important to just pay attention to how you feel. People with sensitive digestive systems, like those with IBS, might be prone to bloating and gas from the bubbles in seltzer. There was also one small study that showed seltzer increased the hunger hormone ghrelin which can lead to weight gain. While we need more info to really look at that component, clean flat water is always going to be the safest bet for your health.

Is it true that seltzer is damaging for our teeth enamel? I think we’ve all heard those rumors…

Nope! As long as it’s plain carbonated water. This was a big concern for seltzer lovers and has been debunked in several studies now. Any seltzer with citric acid or sugar added, though, can contribute to the erosion of enamel and should be avoided.

If someone has a major seltzer habit and drinks it more often than water, is that okay? Or would you recommend setting aside the bubbles for a bit and focusing on regular H2O?

Flat, filtered H2O is always going to be the best, because it’s what our bodies are designed to use. With that being said, if you struggle to drink enough water every day and plain seltzer helps you up your intake, that could be helpful. Overall, I say focus on real water as much as possible and enjoy plain seltzer as a bonus beverage here and there to replace the more harmful offenders like soda and fruit juice, or swap it into your routine to reduce your alcohol consumption.

Follow Dr. Mark Hyman on Instagram , Twitter , and Facebook , and check out his books on Amazon or your local books retailer.

This originally appeared in Katie Couric’s Wake-Up Call newsletter. Subscribe here.

How to drink more water easily when it seems like a major chore

You’re bloated and blocked. You strain on the toilet, but … nothing. You’re constipated.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Constipation is common. For some people, it’s a chronic condition. For others, it’s a brief occurrence caused by stress, medications, a poor diet, lifestyle choices or a medical condition or surgery, says colorectal surgeon Massarat Zutshi, MD.

But no matter the cause, you can find relief — it’s just a matter of how.

Sometimes, the solution is simple

Most cases of acute constipation happen because you are not eating enough of the right foods (or in the right quantities), drinking enough water or getting enough exercise. So the fixes are simple: Move more, drink more water and add fiber to your diet (or take it as a supplement) to add bulk to your stool.

Some people have success taking probiotics, too, which can change the composition of the bacteria in the gut.

Make time to move your bowels

Try waking up earlier to eat breakfast and then move your bowels. Food can stimulate the need to go, and you probably feel most relaxed in your home bathroom.

But don’t get too relaxed in there — the more time you spend on the toilet, the more likely you are to strain for bowel movements. “Do not take your cell phone into the bathroom with you, or work on your computer or read a book,” Dr. Zutshi advises.

And if you feel the urge to go when you’re out an about, don’t avoid using a public restroom. Delaying a bowel movement can actually make constipation worse.

What’s on your plate?

Have you changed your diet recently? Sometimes drastic changes to what you eat can cause constipation.

For example, if you suddenly cut all fat from your diet, it’s easy to get blocked up. You don’t want to overdo fat, but you need a little to move things through your bowel.

Fiber is not always the answer

If adding fiber to your diet in the form of food or supplements makes you more bloated and blocked than before, there are a number of potential reasons. For example, in “slow transit constipation,” a condition where the bowel does not move things quickly through, fiber sits in your gut and can make you feel worse.

Long story short: If fiber makes you worse, don’t just add more. See your doctor.

Know when to see a doctor

Sometimes simple changes are not enough. If your constipation doesn’t respond to treatments or changes in your diet, and if it lasts for weeks or months, Dr. Zutshi recommends getting yourself checked out to exclude more serious medical causes.

It’s especially important to see a professional if you have other symptoms such as dizziness, fatigue, cramping or spasms.

Chronic constipation can be a sign of conditions such as:

  • Hyperthyroidism
  • Hypercalcemia
  • Celiac disease
  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS)

Opioid-induced constipation is its own entity and should also be treated by a physician, Dr. Zutshi says.

For serious constipation, there are options

If your constipation is severe and does not improve with changes to your diet and lifestyle, there may be other options that you can discuss with your doctor. Surgery is the very last option.

A wide range of laxatives are available, plus there are pro-motility drugs that a doctor can prescribe. Sometimes at-home remedies can bring relief, too, like dietary vegetable or mineral oil to lubricate the bowels.

Here’s the bottom line: Try simple fixes first, but if they fail, don’t suffer needlessly. If you think your bowel movements are not what you would consider normal, discuss it first with your primary care physician, who can talk with you about treatments or refer you to a specialist who can help get your bowels moving again.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

How to drink more water easily when it seems like a major chore

In This Article

Do you ever feel that even despite drinking what seems like a substantial amount of water, you still feel thirsty and dehydrated? This is fairly common occurrence and can happen for a few reasons: there’s a chance you aren’t actually drinking enough water to meet your body’s needs, you might have an electrolyte imbalance, or maybe something else is happening internally.

To help you understand more about why you may be feeling this way, we spoke with some physicians and dietitians about hydration. Here’s everything you need to know.

How much water should I drink each day?

Before you’re able to address dehydration, you need to understand the basics of staying hydrated. Although everyone has slightly different needs, according to our experts, the simplest rule of thumb when determining how much water to drink each day is to divide your weight in half and drink that amount in ounces. In other words, if you weigh 140 pounds, you’ll want to drink around 70 ounces of water each day. That’s about nine glasses, or a few refills of your Hydro Flask.

But that rule isn’t set in stone—you may need more or less water depending on your diet, medications, the environment you live in, toxic exposures, activity levels, and other factors. Foods that contain a lot of water can be hydrating as well, so you may not need to drink as much to stay hydrated if you’re eating a lot of produce like cucumbers, strawberries, watermelon, celery, and other hydrating fruits and vegetables:

“If you eat the recommended five to seven servings of vegetables daily, you can probably consume more like 75 percent of the recommended water for your weight, and be well hydrated,” says Caitlin Self, a licensed dietitian/nutritionist. “So if a 150-pound person has a veggie-packed salad every day, carrots and cucumbers for a snack, and two servings of vegetables with dinner, he or she might only need 50 to 60 ounces of water daily.”

The importance of staying hydrated

It’s no secret that hydration is important—we hear about this a lot. But there’s less information floating around on the why behind it all. “Good hydration is critical for the functioning of our bodies,” explains Linda Anegawa, a physician at the virtual health platform PlushCare. “Water in our bodies ensures that our blood circulates adequately, wastes are removed efficiently, body temperature is regulated through sweating, and hormones and signaling molecules needed by the nervous system are produced.”

Dana Cohen, an internal and integrative medicine physician and author of the book Quench, says staying hydrated is the single most important thing one can do to treat and prevent chronic illness. “It is the baseline of all homeostasis in the body,” she says. “It regulates body temperature, it is an energy source, and it keeps our cells, fascia, joints, skin, and brain lubricated and in motion.”

Is it possible to drink too much water?

While water consumption is a critical part of keeping our bodies healthy, it is possible to over hydrate. “Drinking too much water can actually lead to a condition called water intoxication, in which excess water dilutes out important blood electrolytes such as sodium, potassium, magnesium and calcium,” Anegawa says.

This can lead to complications like muscle cramping, weakness, heart arrhythmias and fatal brain swelling, but the more severe complications are rare and would require drinking in excess of a gallon or two of water each day, according to Anegawa.

Signs of dehydration

If you’ve ever been dehydrated, you’re no stranger to some of the common signs and symptoms—headaches, fatigue, dry skin, constipation, stiffness, brittle hair, urine thats dark in color, and muscle cramps.   “If you’re not urinating frequently, that’s another sign that you’re not getting enough fluid throughout the day,” Self says.

How to drink more water easily when it seems like a major chore

What if I’m drinking enough water and still feel dehydrated?

There are a few reasons you may feel dehydrated even after drinking the recommended amount of water. Here’s what our experts shared:

Water is the single largest component of the human body, making up 50 to 80 per cent, and it plays a vital role in most bodily functions. Proper hydration is essential for your heart.

Your heart is constantly pumping blood through your body. Beating on average 72 times a minute, it pumps around 7,600 litres every day. Staying well hydrated helps your heart do its job and more easily pump blood through the blood vessels to your muscles. This in turn helps your muscles work more effectively.

If you are dehydrated, the amount of blood circulating through your body decreases. Your heart will try to compensate by beating faster, increasing your heart rate. This places strain on your heart as it needs to work harder than normal.

How much water should you drink each day?

It seems like an easy question, but there isn’t a simple answer.

Several factors have a bearing on this, such as your body composition, your metabolism, diet, climate you live and work in, and even your clothing. We can’t survive very long without water, and even mild dehydration can lead to fatigue, headache and a bad mood.

While all fluids can count towards your daily total (even those from food, tea and coffee), experts suggest drinking plenty of water and limiting beverages with added sugars and alcohol.

The recommended intake of fluid is between 2.1 to 2.6 litres for adults and between 1 to 1.6 litres for children every day. The recommended total intake per day, which includes fluid from food, is between 2.8 and 3.4 litres for adults and 1.4 to 2.2 litres for children. 1

Should you drink more water when you’re more active or exercising?

Put simply, you should be guided by your own thirst. Prolonged physical activity and exposure to heat can increase your fluid or water needs. It is all a case of balance. The more water you use, or lose, then in theory the more you should replace to be in water balance.

Aim to drink one and a half times the fluid you lost while exercising, spread out over the following several hours. This is because you continue to lose fluid through sweating and urination for some time afterwards.

Should you drink sports drinks when you exercise?

There is little evidence that we ‘need’ anything in sports drinks if we maintain a varied, healthy and adequate diet. While there has been some evidence that sports drinks may improve performance and speed up the recovery process between exercise sessions, for most everyday people, they’re not necessary.

Most importantly, don’t get too caught up in the numbers. Hydration is a dynamic process, so a snapshot view of it wouldn’t be accurate. Some days we drink more, some days less. Some days we’re active, and other days we’re not.

After even a day of not having enough water, people usually catch up by drinking more in the evening or the following day. Over a period of time, this balances out as we have enough water reserve and flexibility within our body to cope with short-term challenges.

Tips for increasing your water intake

  • Carry a water bottle with you or leave one at your desk/workspace.
  • Use an app to track your water intake.
  • Add freshly cut fruit to your water jug or bottle for some flavour.
  • Set reminders on your phone to have a glass of water.
  • Keep an easily accessible jug of water in your fridge.
  • Switch one of your tea/coffee breaks to water instead.

Adapted from original article provided by Kate Mayhew.

Water is the single largest component of the human body, making up 50 to 80 per cent, and it plays a vital role in most bodily functions. Proper hydration is essential for your heart.

Your heart is constantly pumping blood through your body. Beating on average 72 times a minute, it pumps around 7,600 litres every day. Staying well hydrated helps your heart do its job and more easily pump blood through the blood vessels to your muscles. This in turn helps your muscles work more effectively.

If you are dehydrated, the amount of blood circulating through your body decreases. Your heart will try to compensate by beating faster, increasing your heart rate. This places strain on your heart as it needs to work harder than normal.

How much water should you drink each day?

It seems like an easy question, but there isn’t a simple answer.

Several factors have a bearing on this, such as your body composition, your metabolism, diet, climate you live and work in, and even your clothing. We can’t survive very long without water, and even mild dehydration can lead to fatigue, headache and a bad mood.

While all fluids can count towards your daily total (even those from food, tea and coffee), experts suggest drinking plenty of water and limiting beverages with added sugars and alcohol.

The recommended intake of fluid is between 2.1 to 2.6 litres for adults and between 1 to 1.6 litres for children every day. The recommended total intake per day, which includes fluid from food, is between 2.8 and 3.4 litres for adults and 1.4 to 2.2 litres for children. 1

Should you drink more water when you’re more active or exercising?

Put simply, you should be guided by your own thirst. Prolonged physical activity and exposure to heat can increase your fluid or water needs. It is all a case of balance. The more water you use, or lose, then in theory the more you should replace to be in water balance.

Aim to drink one and a half times the fluid you lost while exercising, spread out over the following several hours. This is because you continue to lose fluid through sweating and urination for some time afterwards.

Should you drink sports drinks when you exercise?

There is little evidence that we ‘need’ anything in sports drinks if we maintain a varied, healthy and adequate diet. While there has been some evidence that sports drinks may improve performance and speed up the recovery process between exercise sessions, for most everyday people, they’re not necessary.

Most importantly, don’t get too caught up in the numbers. Hydration is a dynamic process, so a snapshot view of it wouldn’t be accurate. Some days we drink more, some days less. Some days we’re active, and other days we’re not.

After even a day of not having enough water, people usually catch up by drinking more in the evening or the following day. Over a period of time, this balances out as we have enough water reserve and flexibility within our body to cope with short-term challenges.

Tips for increasing your water intake

  • Carry a water bottle with you or leave one at your desk/workspace.
  • Use an app to track your water intake.
  • Add freshly cut fruit to your water jug or bottle for some flavour.
  • Set reminders on your phone to have a glass of water.
  • Keep an easily accessible jug of water in your fridge.
  • Switch one of your tea/coffee breaks to water instead.

Adapted from original article provided by Kate Mayhew.

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For Bacterial Infection: “I started Bactrim DS 3 days ago for an infection in my jaw. Everything seemed to be ok but I began feeling extremely weak and achy. By the second dose on day 3 I began running a fever of 101.7. I thought maybe it was the infection. My glands in my neck were swelling and my eyes were burning. My head felt like my brain was literally swelling. I read all of these could be a potentially serious side affect of Bactrim, so I didn’t take the second dose like I was supposed to. After a couple of hours my fever started to break without me taking anything for it. My head started feeling better. I began to drink even more water than before to flush it out and the dangerous side effects began to go away. I know it was the Bactrim because had it been the infection, the fever wouldn’t have gone down on its own without medication.”