How to enable local menus in ubuntu

Lori Kaufman
How to enable local menus in ubuntuLori Kaufman
Writer

Lori Kaufman is a technology expert with 25 years of experience. She’s been a senior technical writer, worked as a programmer, and has even run her own multi-location business. Read more.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

If you work a lot in the command line, you probably keep more than one Terminal window open at once. However, instead of having separate windows, you can condense all your Terminal sessions onto one window using tabs.

We’ll show you how to open multiple Terminal sessions as tabs in Ubuntu.

To begin, open a Terminal window and select “Preferences” from the “Terminal” menu. The menu bar may either be on the title bar of the Terminal window or on the top panel on the desktop, depending on whether global menus are enabled in Ubuntu.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

On the Preferences dialog box, make sure the General tab is active. Then, select “Tab” from the “Open new terminals in” drop-down list.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

Click “Close” to accept the change and close the Preferences dialog box.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

To open a new Terminal session on a new tab, select “New Terminal” from the “Terminal” menu.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

A second Terminal session is opened on a new tab and the original session is also available on a tab. The name on the tab includes the current directory you’re in on that tab.

NOTE: Even when the Open new terminals in option is set to Tab, pressing Ctrl+Alt+T opens a new Terminal session in a new window, not a new tab.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

Once you have two sessions open, you can open additional sessions using plus button to the right of the tabs.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

When you add a new tab, whether it be through the Terminal menu or using the plus button, the new session is open to the same directory you were in on the tab that was currently active at that time.

There are several ways to switch among tabs. You can click on a tab to activate it, of course. You can also use the down arrow button on the far right to select the session you want or press Alt+1, Alt+2, etc. on your keyboard to jump to a specific tab. The tabs are numbered from the left, starting at 1.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

If you want change the order of the tabs, you can click on a tab and drag it to another location on the tab bar. When you move tabs, they’re renumbered, so using the Alt+1, Alt+2 keyboard shortcuts to switch among the tabs will account for the new tab order. For example, if you move the third tab to the second position, Alt+2 would then activate what used to be the third tab.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

To close a tab, click the “X” button on the right side of the tab.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

You can also move and close tabs by right-clicking on a tab and selecting an option from the popup menu.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

To close the Terminal window, and all the tabs, click the “X” button in the upper-left corner of the window.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

The tabs are not saved when you close the Terminal window. However, the Open new terminals in setting is preserved and you can open multiple sessions on tabs the next time you open a Terminal window.

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How to enable local menus in ubuntu Lori Kaufman
Lori Kaufman is a technology expert with 25 years of experience. She’s been a senior technical writer, worked as a programmer, and has even run her own multi-location business.
Read Full Bio »
Lori Kaufman
How to enable local menus in ubuntuLori Kaufman
Writer

Lori Kaufman is a technology expert with 25 years of experience. She’s been a senior technical writer, worked as a programmer, and has even run her own multi-location business. Read more.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

The Global menu is a feature in Ubuntu that places the menu bar for each application on the bar at the top of the screen. If you don’t like the Global menu, you can move the menu bars back to the program title bars.

Disabling the Global menu in Ubuntu 13.10 involved removing a specific package that provided the Global menu. As of Ubuntu 14.04, there is now a setting that allows you to easily disable the Global menu, if you don’t like it, and enable the local menus on the program title bars. We’ll show you how to change this setting.

To enable the local menus, click the System Settings icon on the Unity bar.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

On the System Settings dialog box, click the “Appearance” icon in the Personal section.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

On the Appearance screen, click the “Behavior” tab. Under Show the menus for a window, click the “In the window’s title bar” option.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

Click the “X” button in the upper-left corner to close the Settings dialog box.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

The change is effective immediately. You do not need to log out or restart. The menu bar for each program is moved to the title bar of the respective program.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

If you decide you want the Global menu back, simply change the setting to the “In the menu bar” option.

Note that, because the menu bar is on the title bar of each program, the menus disappear when the mouse is not on the title bar. Simply move the mouse over the title bar to access the menus.

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How to enable local menus in ubuntu Lori Kaufman
Lori Kaufman is a technology expert with 25 years of experience. She’s been a senior technical writer, worked as a programmer, and has even run her own multi-location business.
Read Full Bio »

Do you want to enable local menus in Ubuntu 14.04 ?. Yes, you can easily manage your local menus, and this new feature helps you to configure your local menus within the program menu rather than the top bar of your screen. Basically, it helps you to access all the functionality of toolbars like edit, view, search, etc. within the program.

You just need to follow some simple steps to do this procedure, just have a glance at this article to find out how to enable local menus in Ubuntu 14.04.

Steps to enable local menus:

Step 1: First go to your Unity dash and then click on “System Settings”.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

Step 2: Under ‘system settings’ go to “Appearance”, as shown in the image below.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

Step 3: Under ‘appearance’, go to “Behavior” tab.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

Step 4: Now, inside the ‘Behavior’ tab, you’ll have to select “In the window’s title bar”, under “Show the menus for a window”.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

Step 5: Finally, you can see the local menus as marked in the image below.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

Though it’s not perfect, Global menu is still possible in Ubuntu 20.04, Ubuntu 21.04 with the default Gnome Desktop.

It used to have a Gnome Global Menu extension to enable focused app menus (e.g., File, Edit, View, Help, etc.) in the top panel. It is however discontinued because GTK+ development is blocking the uniform support for the global menu to the Gtk+ applications.

Users can still use Fildem global menu to get the function in Ubuntu 20.04, Ubuntu 20.10, and Ubuntu 21.04, though it does not work with most Gnome Apps.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

1.) Install Fildem global menu extension.

Firstly, open terminal by pressing Ctrl+Alt+T on keyboard. When terminal opens, run commands to install the packages for installing and toggling Gnome Extension:

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

Next, go to extension web page and turn on the slider icon to install it.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

If you don’t see the toggle icon, click the top ‘Click here to install browser extension’ link to install browser extension and refresh the web page.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

2.) Install and Configure the External App

To make the function work, you have to install the external app.

a.) Download and double-click to install the “fildem_x.x.x_all.deb” package from the link below:

Or install the package via sudo apt install

b.) Open terminal (Ctrl+Alt+T) and run command to edit the .gtkrc-2.0 file.

When the file opens, add gtk-modules=”appmenu-gtk-module” to the end.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

c.) Next edit the .config/gtk-3.0/settings.ini file via command:

And also add gtk-modules=”appmenu-gtk-module” line to the end. Also, add [Settings] line before it if not exist.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

3.) Start Global Menu:

Finally in a terminal window, run command fildem &.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

Search for and open Extensions utility. When it opens, click on the gear button to configure the Gnome Extension:

  • Toggle off ‘Show menu only when the mouse is over the panel’ option.
  • Change the Button padding as you prefer.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

Now global menu should work for apps, e.g., Google Chrome, Chromium, GIMP, Audacious, Shutter, LibreOffice, etc.

Sadly, most Gnome Apps as well as Firefox does not work with global menu. If you intend to get it work with Firefox, install the one from Ubuntu 18.04 repository (all current Ubuntu releases has the latest Firefox packages).

4.) Auto-start Fildem global menu:

To make the function work on startup, search for and open ‘Startup Applications‘ utility. Then click on Add button to add:

  • Type fildem in command box.
  • Type Name and Comment as you prefer.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

How to Remove Fildem global menu:

To remove fildem package, open terminal and run command:

And remove the extension via Extensions utility.

To remove the auto-start service, just remove which you created in step 4.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

This quick tutorial is going to show you how to enable hibernate option in the top-right corner power menu in Ubuntu 18.04. So you’ll get a similar menu as the picture shows:

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

Test if hibernate works

First of first, you have to make sure hibernate works in command line.

1. Open terminal via Ctrl+Alt+T or by searching for ‘terminal’ from app launcher. When it opens, run command:

Please SAVE all of your work before hitting enter, in case something goes wrong and your open applications and documents cannot be recovered.

2. After you computer turns off, switch it back on. Did your open applications re-open?

If hibernate doesn’t work, take a look at this question on askubuntu.

UPDATE: Hibernate does not work out-of-the-box since Ubuntu 20.04, at least in my case, you have to enable it by adding Kernel parameter in boot menu. See this tutorial for Ubuntu 20.04 & higher.

Enable Hibernate in Menus

If hibernate works in command line, continue enable it in the menus via following steps.

1. Open terminal (Ctrl+Alt+T) and run command to create a configuration file:

When the file opens, paste following content and save it.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

2. Restart your computer and click the link to install the gnome extension: Hibernate Status Button.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

For those who never installed a gnome extension, see this how to tutorial for details.

I’m fairly excited for Unity, as it looks like a promising new direction for Ubuntu. However, I do have a concern – will it be possible to use Unity without the global menu?

I have my window manager set to focus-follows-mouse/sloppy focus, and find the productivity gains to be immense. Sloppy focus is incompatible, however, with global menus, as it is possible for the focus to change while you move from window to menu.

Will Unity support an option to use window menus while still using Unity?

8 Answers 8

11.04 – 13.10

Yes, the Desktop version of Unity will use the global menu by default.

  • To disable the global menu remove the indicator-appmenu package, then log out and back in.

Unity will continue to run without it and your menus will appear inside the application windows as normal. You can also tell the appmenu to ignore specific applications if you’re having a problematic app.

The command line way to remove the package is:

Removing the appmenu will break the HUD feature

The Global Menu can be optionally switched in favour of Local Integrated Menus (LIM) – aka – more traditional window based menus.

The reason for this additional ability is ostensibly due to the increasing prevalence of high-resolution displays and as such the perceived mouse-travel from application to the global-menu would be relatively large.

To toggle the global menu off or on can be achieved via the appearance control-panel applet:

Once clicked, the application menus appear within the window decoration as shown here:

The above can be achieved using the terminal command:

Integrated menus can be disabled (i.e. switch global menu back on)

If you dont like Locally Integrated Menus then the old trick of removing indicator-appmenu still works although this will break the HUD

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

A third-party Cinnamon extension called Global AppMenu, currently in beta, provides a similar panel-based application menu system to that found in Unity.

The GitHub project page has full install details and caveats but we’ll cover it in just a second.

The most important thing to know about this applet is that it’s not stable, and not bug free.

Understandably not all apps have been tested with the applet, so there’s no guarantee that all apps will work. Applications with particularly expansive menus may take longer to load too. Applications that use their own GUI toolkit will not work with app (e.g., Blender, Java apps).

Install Global Menu on Cinnamon

If you use Cinnamon on a recent version of Ubuntu you won’t need to install the unity-gtk-module packages. If you’re running Linux Mint or an alternative Ubuntu-based distribution you will need to install these before you do anything else.

To install them on a support system:

Next step is to grab the latest version of the Global AppMenu applet from GitHub:

Unzip the downloaded file and copy the folder named ‘ [email protected] ‘ to

/.local/share/cinnamon/applets/ using the Nemo file manager or equivalent.

Finally, enable the applet through Cinnamon Settings, making sure to add it to the panel you want menus to appear on (and keeping in mind that applications with lots of menus will need room to display them). Logout and then login and, et voila, global app menus.

Home » How To » How To Enable Global Menu on Linux Mint/Cinnamon

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

You can do the job easily via Grub-Customizer (available in Ubuntu Software) under General Settings tab. However, you need to also disable “look for other operating systems” option.

Any time you want to show the Grub menu, press ESC while booting up will NO longer show dual-boot (multi-boot) systems other than Ubuntu.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

NOT OK with Grub-Customizer settings? Re-enable “show menu” and “look for other operating systems” options, save changes, and do following steps one by one.

Hide boot menu by manually editing the config file:

In most Linux including Ubuntu, you can edit the /etc/default/grub file along with scripts under /etc/grub.d to control how the Grub boot menu works.

1.) Firstly, open terminal from system app launcher. Run command to edit the configuration file:

For Ubuntu flavors / Linux Mint, replace gedit with your favorite text editor.

When the file opens, you need to set following lines:

  • GRUB_TIMEOUT_STYLE=hidden – Hide the boot menu. Though it still wait a few seconds you set by GRUB_TIMEOUT.
  • GRUB_TIMEOUT_STYLE=countdown – Hide boot menu and show countdown. Even set GRUB_TIMEOUT=0. It counts 3,2,1.
  • GRUB_TIMEOUT = 0 – It will boot the default OS immediately. However, you may set it to 3 or 5 so you can press ESC (F4 or hold Shift) during the time to show the boot menu if need.
  • GRUB_DISABLE_OS_PROBER=true – Disable “/etc/grub.d/30_os-prober” because it overwrite the value of GRUB_TIMEOUT_STYLE. However, it will no longer find other OSes other than Ubuntu.
  • GRUB_RECORDFAIL_TIMEOUT=0 – Set timeout if last boot failed. Without the key, it will show and stop at boot menu waiting user action.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

2.) Step 1. will do the job after applying changes. However, it will no longer display other operating systems if any in your machine.

In case you want to boot other OS once in a while. Modify 30_os-prober file instead of disable it via “GRUB_DISABLE_OS_PROBER=true”.

To do so, run command:

And set quick_boot=”0″. So it will no longer overwrite “GRUB_TIMEOUT_STYLE” value you set in step 1, while also find other OSes on your machine.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

3.) Finally apply changes via command:

How to restore:

Just undo what you did in step 1 and / or 2 and apply change by running command sudo update-grub .

I’ve downloaded and uncompressed Eclipse Kepler for Java EE Developers.

The software menus are messed up. I didn’t notice similar problems in other software.

When I click any menu in Eclipse, the drop-down seems to be “cut”. Sometimes the drop-down shows, but the options are invisible.

I tried Eclipse Indigo, but the same problem occurs.

6 Answers 6

(Stable way, until someone fixes the bug)

This method takes for granted that you already have your eclipse.desktop file (or that you can alternatively create a new one from scratch). Otherwise, you can momentarily take a look at the “fast way” below.

Open your eclipse.desktop file:

(If you can’t find it in this path, try in

/.local/share/applications/eclipse.desktop . Otherwise, you could have to find yours using locate command).

Replace the Exec= line with this:

Where “eclipse” is the path to your eclipse executable. In this case it’s just “eclipse” since there’s a symlink in /usr/bin folder.

NOTE: If you can’t find your eclipse.desktop file, you can simply create one from scratch in the above path, and fill it with these lines:

Now you can run Eclipse from its icon as usual.

(Fast but repetitive way)

If you haven’t got any eclipse.desktop file and you don’t want to create it at the moment, you can simply run Eclipse with this command:

where “eclipse” is the path to your eclipse executable. Note that this is just the fast way to run Eclipse once. If you don’t want to remember this command and use it every time you have to run Eclipse, follow the “stable way” above.

How to enable local menus in ubuntu

When you need to access a computer from outside your home or office, you’ll want to use the best remote desktop software. Having a remote desktop can enable you to access files on your work or home computer from anywhere. Or, you can access a client’s computer to offer technical support.

Whatever your goal, it’s relatively easy to learn how to set up a remote desktop connection. In this guide, we’ll show you how to enable and use a remote desktop on the Ubuntu operating system.

How to enable and use Ubuntu remote desktop: Preparation

Preparing your Ubuntu computer for use as a remote desktop is simple. Screen sharing is baked into the operating system if you’re using the latest version of Ubuntu (18.04), so you just need to download and install remote desktop software on the computer you want to use for remote access.

For this tutorial, we’ll use Remmina. This is free, open-source remote desktop software designed for Linux systems. To install Remmina on your control computer, open a command line terminal and enter the following:

sudo apt-add-repository ppa:remmina-ppa-team/remmina-next

sudo apt update

sudo apt install remmina remmina-plugin-rdp remmina-plugin-secret

Remmina will install all required packages for you to use the remote desktop software.

Note that you’ll also need the IP address of the computer you want to connect to remotely. You can find the IP address by right-clicking on the network icon in the upper right corner of the desktop and selecting Connection Information.

You will need to be on the same local area network as the remote computer when connecting to a remote desktop using this IP address. If you’re on a different network, you’ll need to set up port forwarding. That is beyond the scope of this guide, as it requires modifying the remote desktop network’s firewall settings.

Step 1: Enable remote desktop sharing

The first thing you need to do is to enable remote desktop sharing on Ubuntu. Open the system settings window by clicking on the tools icon in the top right corner of the screen. Then navigate to the Sharing tab in the left-hand menu in the system settings.

By default, screen sharing is turned off on Ubuntu. You can turn it on by clicking the On/Off toggle at the top of the window. Then click on the Screen Sharing button that appears below to configure the screen sharing options.

In this pop-up, turn screen sharing on by clicking the On/Off toggle and make sure the screen control option is checked. Then you must choose whether to require a password or permission when someone attempts to connect to this computer as a remote desktop. If someone will be at the computer every time you connect, then choose the ask for access option. If no one will be present or you’re not sure, choose the password option. Make sure you use a strong password to prevent unauthorized access to your remote desktop.

You can also decide whether to enable or disable any networks for remote connections. Make sure the toggle is set to On for at least one network. (You will only see multiple network toggles if the computer has both wired and wireless networks set up.)

Note that if you are planning to connect to a remote Ubuntu desktop from a Windows computer, you must disable encryption for remote connections. Open a command line on the remote computer and enter

gsettings set org.gnome.Vino require-encryption false

This will prevent any issues with incompatible encryption between Linux and Windows systems.

Step 2: Connect to the remote desktop

Now, you can connect to the remote desktop using Remmina. Search your control computer’s system for Remmina and open the program. In the drop-down menu, select VNC and then enter the IP address of the remote desktop. Hit Enter to make the connection.

At this point, you’ll either be prompted for a password on your control computer or with a notification on the remote desktop, depending on how you configured the screen sharing settings. Once you enter the password or approve the connection, you can begin working on the remote desktop. It’s always a good idea to test the remote desktop connection while you still have access to the remote computer to make sure there are no unexpected hitches.

Summary

By following these steps, you’ll be able to remotely control one Ubuntu computer from another or from a Windows desktop. You can take control of a remote computer even without having someone present at the computer. It just needs to be turned on in order to make the connection.

If you use Remmina as your remote desktop client, you can transfer files and modify the quality of your connection to handle low-bandwidth networks. If Remmina doesn’t quite suit your purposes, you can also try another top Linux remote desktop client. Note that the process for connecting may be slightly different, but you’ll still need to enable screen sharing on the remote Ubuntu desktop by following Step 1.

Need to set up a remote desktop on another computer? You can learn how to enable and use remote desktop on a Mac or on Windows 10.

  • We’ve featured the best Linux remote desktop clients.

Michael Graw is a freelance journalist and photographer based in Bellingham, Washington. His interests span a wide range from business technology to finance to creative media, with a focus on new technology and emerging trends. Michael’s work has been published in TechRadar, Tom’s Guide, Business Insider, Fast Company, Salon, and Harvard Business Review.