How to endure and overcome the worst of life’s hardships

Life is simple if you live simply

Maybe you’re having trouble with your spouse, May be with the demise of your loved ones. Maybe your job doesn’t bring in the kind of money you need to do anything more than survive, May be your boss toss you each day, May be you are facing issues with your neighbour, May be you have disputes within your family. Hardship can range from emotional to financial and what not. But there are way to overcome those.

Circumstances- You can’t change the external environment but what you can change is your circumstances. You can change your circumstances to get out of your unwanted situation. It can be difficult to do this, especially when nothing but negativity surrounds you, but if you decide willingly to change your circumstances, you can. It’s just a matter of knowing how.

Forced Change-It’s human nature to need to be constantly growing, evolving, and changing. If you are stagnant and stick in a routine for too long, what happens? Well, most of the time, you get a feeling of boredom; a desire for change, or despair that comes from being in a stalled state of progression. That’s just you telling yourself that you need to change something.

So what’s the process for being able to endure and overcome, you might ask? Well, as you probably already know, no one process will work for everyone, just as there is (usually) no quick-fix solution for the various hardships that come into your life. There are, however, certain ways you can choose to perceive the realities you’re hit with.

Perception-Perception is in the eye of the beholder, so if I perceive my life in a negative way, I’m more than likely going to be dealing with all of the emotions and thoughts that come from that perception. In other words, thinking negative thoughts—in any situation—is going to bring out negative emotions. This can get you stuck in a tailspin, and you’ll find it very difficult to get past emotions such as anger, sadness, and low self-esteem, which go along with negative perceptions.

This doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t want to feel those negative emotions—they are a valuable part of progressing and moving forward in your life. The negative emotions are there so you can overcome them. Let’s look at just how you can change your feelings of suffering when hardships hit into a new perspective on your life, which will allow you to endure when there is suffering, and overcome when it’s time.

Persistent-When hit with any kind of hardship it’s difficult to know which types of emotions will surface. Of course you will be experiencing suffering, so the bad emotions that follow are going to be entering your world. One of the worst things you can do, (other than hurting yourself or another, of course) is to try to hide or not acknowledge your feelings.

Overwhelming-After you’ve taken the time to sit back, reflect, and gain clarity on your current circumstances, it’s time to start moving forward. After all, how can you expect to overcome a challenging situation in your life if you don’t move? It does require a little inspirational push, but if you want to get over a hardship, you need to let it in. Here are some ways to overcome any difficult situation when you just can’t escape your own thoughts and feelings.

  • Find inspiration in your life.
  • Put a Strategy in place
  • Take Action

If you really want to overcome hardships, not just endure, you need to start changing your status quo. Discover and pursue a life that brings progress and positive changes to your world. Surround yourself with people who care about you, want the best for you, and believe in you. The most important factor is to remember that you’re not alone. Sometimes, it may seem easier to just cope and put on a happy face, but it’s not.

The very greatest things – great thoughts, discoveries, inventions – have usually been nurtured in hardship, often pondered over in sorrow, and at length established with difficulty.

The true change happens, when you fully cuddle the associations and connections around you.

How to endure and overcome the worst of life's hardships

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Life throws many curve balls our way—it could be said that when one person goes to bed heartbroken, another could wake up finding true love. It’s a never-ending cycle of disappointments and achievements, but although we might presume that each of us are capable of getting back up every time life kicks us to the ground, that is far from reality. Sometimes it really hurts being in a situation you have no control of, and making decisions that seem completely unfair to you will definitely find their way into your life. Regardless of the tough issues you may face, it’s getting back up and moving forward that counts the most when you need to deal with hardship. This is a list of 5 things I’ve tried in my own life just to help me believe in a brighter future and get past a tough situation.

1. Reflect On the Bad Times in Your Life

This may sound like a bad idea, but it does serve a purpose: you may feel depressed when thinking about past sorrows, but the idea behind reflecting on past hardship isn’t to run you down; it’s to prove to yourself that you have gotten past them. Usually we’re afraid that a tough time will break us, but when you think about the countless times you’ve actually gotten past what you thought was the worst experience in your life only proves that you’ve gotten stronger. Allow those victories to be an opportunity for you to see beyond the baggage in front of you.

2. Write or Talk About How You Feel

I’ll be honest: keeping my feelings to myself used to plague me and made me feel alone, but when I found someone who actually genuinely cared about me, it became natural to share how I felt with her and that contributed immensely to my ability to overcome troublesome situations. Not only did I speak to her about how I felt, I also decided to blog about it, and though talking to strangers about your issues may seem crazy, it actually isn’t. In fact, it’s what therapists regard as their bread-winning strategy; the ability to be neutral and use their lack of a personal relationship with you as a means of helping you. It doesn’t matter if you want to talk, sing, or write about how you feel, just get it off your chest and the weight on your shoulders won’t seem so crippling.

3. Detach Yourself From the Situation

It can be overwhelming when you’re in the middle of a heated argument or office politics, and there’s no way you’ll be able to make a rational decision when caught in the midst of a fire. They say that running away from your problems will never help, and though that’s partially true, it doesn’t mean that you need to submerge yourself so deeply into a situation that you run out of air to breathe and lose the ability to weigh the pros and cons of your choices. That happens more than we like to admit, which is why its important to detach yourself from a situation long enough to think clearly without having people hanging over your shoulders. This helps because you finally have a break to think things through and in cases like this, a lot of thought is needed.

4. Remind Yourself That You’re Not Alone

It’s easy to curl up into a ball and feel like your world is closing in from loneliness, and it’s so hard to remember that there is definitely someone out there who loves you. I know for a fact that we Lifehack readers are tough folks, and the fact that you’re here means that you have the strength to realize that help is but a URL away. Regardless of who or what you depend on, you need to remind yourself that you are not alone; you have people who do care. Even if it’s just one person, that’s enough to give you reason to remind yourself that you will never truly be alone. Sometimes it’s strangers who may share the same feelings as you do. Think about it—you may not know any of these readers personally but they could be in the exact same situation as you, so in fact, no one is truly alone.

5. Accept the Results and Get Back Up Again, Only Stronger

Finally, it’s time to come to terms with what has happened. Regardless of whether the results of your choices proved to be helpful or not, it’s time for you to accept them and get back up. This time you have a new experience to add to your book of life so the next time something tries to knock you down, it won’t be easy because you will be strong and determined to push forward. Life will go on, time will never stand still, and it rests upon you to make the right decision of moving forward. Don’t dwell on “what could be” or “what if” circumstances; things are done, and it’s time for you to see that you may have a new battle scar, but you will certainly have gained a whole lot more character.

How to endure and overcome the worst of life's hardships

No one enjoys suffering, but suffering is a necessary, normal part of the Christian life. In fact, the Scripture says we can expect hardships and suffering to increase (2 Tim. 2:3; 3:1-4, 13), so we must be prepared.

We learn from the book of 2 Timothy that we may experience suffering as a result of our testimony, our godly living, or our stand for truth (2 Tim. 1:8; 2:8-9, 17-18; 3:6-8, 12). We may also experience suffering when we are rejected or left alone (2 Tim. 1:15; 4:9-11; 4:16), or as a natural consequence to our fleshly, worldly desires (2 Tim. 2:22).

Suffering will indeed come, but God can give us grace and power to overcome every trial and to fulfill our purpose and mission in His kingdom. In his second epistle to Timothy, the Apostle Paul shares some important truths about how we can endure suffering.

Ten Principles for Enduring Suffering

1. Don’t forget why you are suffering. Remember your purpose and Whom you serve! The Apostle Paul said he was willing to suffer for the proclamation of the Gospel, for the sake of the elect, and for the glory of God. Our suffering, big or little, can be used to bring about the same purposes. ( 2 Tim. 2:8–9)

2. Remember that you are a prisoner of Christ, not of your circumstances or other people. (2 Tim. 1:8)

3. Keep going back to the things you know to be true from God’s Word. Don’t doubt in the dark what you have seen in the light. Remember what you received as a result of your salvation in Christ (2 Tim. 1:5). Remember your calling and the grace of God (2 Tim. 1:1, 9-13).

4. Keep doing whatever God has called you to do. Persevere, stay the course, and be faithful, regardless of any opposition or hardship. (2 Tim. 4:1-5)

5. Trust God to deal with those who oppose the truth. Don’t take matters into your own hands or become bitter and argumentative. ( 2 Tim. 2:23–26)

6. Remember times in the past when the Lord delivered or rescued you. Be quick to praise Him and testify to others (2 Tim. 3:11; 4:16-17).

7. Rely on the resources God has given you:

  • The grace of God (2 Tim. 1:2, 9; 2:1; 4:22).
  • The gift of God—your God-given ability to serve Him (2 Tim. 1:6-7).
  • The power of God (rather than your own strength) (2 Tim. 1:8; Phil. 2:13; Eph. 6:10).
  • The indwelling Holy Spirit (2 Tim. 1:14).
  • The Word of God, which will keep you grounded and give you perspective (2 Tim. 2:7, 9; 3:12-17; 4:1-2).

8. Remember that you are not alone in your suffering.

You already have:

  • The presence of Christ (Matt. 28:20)
  • The prayers of other believers (2 Tim. 1:3)
  • The “fellowship of suffering”—other believers who are facing hardships for the sake of Christ (2 Tim. 1:8; Heb. 13:3; Col. 1:24).

Cultivate these to help you endure:

  • Godly helpers – Find and cultivate a group of like-minded believers whose faithfulness and prayers can inspire and strengthen you (2 Tim. 1:2, 4-5; 4:9-13, 19-21).
  • Godly heroes – Read the biographies of missionaries and other faithful believers so God can cultivate faith and wisdom in your heart (Heb. 13:7; 2 Tim. 3:10, 14).
  • Godly heritage – As you learn about those who’ve gone before, you will be able to instill faith and courage in the next generation. Pass the baton to others. (2 Tim. 2:2)

9. No matter how difficult things are today, you can face the future with hope. Trust the truth of Scripture.

  • All wrongs will one day be righted (2 Tim. 3:8-9; 4:14).
  • The Lord will deliver you from all evil—in His time and way (2 Tim. 4:17-18). In the meantime, counsel your heart according to the truth and promises of God (Psalm 27).
  • All your suffering, efforts, labors, and faithfulness will be rewarded in “that Day” when believers stand before the Lord (2 Tim. 1:12, 18; 2:12; 4:8; Phil. 1:6, 10; 2:16; James 1:12).
  • You will give an account, so guard the “deposit” entrusted to you (2 Tim. 1:12, 14; 1 Tim. 6:20).

10. In all your suffering, remember Jesus Christ.

  • His life and His suffering and sacrifice for you (2 Tim. 2:3)
  • His triumph over Satan, sin, and death (2 Tim. 2:8)
  • His power, promises, and presence (Matt. 28:18-20)
  • What He is doing for you in heaven (John 14:2-3; Rom. 8:34).

Expect suffering—it is inevitable—but don’t forget the powerful resource that you have in Christ. Entrust your life to His ever-present care and control. He loves you, and He will help you endure.

Related Video: You’re Going to be Okay: Encouragement for Your Hardest Days

How to endure and overcome the worst of life's hardships

Many people will tell you that the hard times will pass but the people who will endure will be rewarder with immense strength and good fortune. Others will say that it’s easier said than done, but the bottom line is that we all know what it feels like to go through a tough patch. We’ve all been down and we’ve all managed to get ourselves up again. After every hardship we feel stronger, happier and grateful we’ve managed to win yet another battle.

But those of us who’re still struggling in life need some help and reassurance that they too will be able to persevere and overcome their challenges as well. Sometimes hearing from people who’ve been there can help a lot, can give us motivation and faith that we can do it. Here are some quotes about strength that will guide you through your hard times and help you endure to see the light at the end of the tunnel.

“Play with your strengths, don’t push your weaknesses.” – Jenifer Lopez

Remember that your strengths are always bigger than your weaknesses, use them and you’ll always win.

“A hero is nothing more than an ordinary person who simply finds it in himself to endure the hardships and overcome his obstacles in life.” – Christopher Reeve

This is coming from a man who’s been through a lot and knows that not all heroes wear capes. Sometimes they’re just ordinary people, like you and me, who’ve been gifted with enormous strength and wisdom. You too can be a hero only if you put your mind to it.

The hard times are supposed to motivate you to be stronger, not to discourage you.” William Ellery Channing

Instead of bowing down to a challenge, lift up your spirit and spur into action. The hard times are there to show you what you’re made of and not break you. Learn from them and become stronger.

“People never know how strong they really are until there’s no other choice but being strong.” – Bob Marley

Don’t be surprised if you turn up to be stronger than you expected. You have no idea what hides deep inside you until you’ve faced your worst nightmares.

“Our strength comes from our struggles, not from winning them. When we face an obstacle and decide not to give up, that’s what makes us strong, not the outcome.” – Arnold Schwarzenegger

Strength has nothing to do with winning, but everything to do with never giving up. It doesn’t matter if you’ve won or not, it matters that you’ve tried your best and you’re still standing.

“Life doesn’t get easier, we’re the ones that get stronger.” – Steve Maraboli

We may think that as we get older, life gets a bit easier but we’re wrong. We learn how to fight better and our experiences have made us stronger.

“We do not conquer the mountain we’re climbing, but ourselves.” Sir Edmund Hillary

The first man who climbed Mt. Everest understood that it’s much easier to conquer a physical mountain than it is to conquer our mental one.

“There’s an opportunity in the middle of every difficulty, we just need to find it.” – Albert Einstein

When we face a difficulty in life there are two ways to go about it. We can quit or we can see it as an opportunity to grow and become better. You can always choose the second and become stronger with every obstacle you overcome.

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I read something today which makes me feel really uncomfortable, partly because the poor guy lost his entire life savings and also because with the rise of gambling apps like Robinhood and Cryptocurrencies, there will be many more of such stories to come. Source: https://web.archive.org/web/20210302171421/https://www.reddit.com/r/PersonalFinanceCanada/comments/lvuhw9/lost_my_life_savings/

But first, let me share a little bit about my experience back in 2008-2009. That period was extremely challenging for me. Long story short, I trusted the wrong people and lost more than $100k of my money with them. That time was also the Global Financial Crisis and my business went from making $20000 profits every month to losses every month. I couldn’t even pay the office rent at the end!

During that time, I was also studying for my masters degree. What should have been a student loan easily paid off ended up as a bad debt and imagine I constantly had to deal with harassments from debt collectors. During the worst period of my life, I had to endure disparaging comments from my mom and I just left home with less than $100 in my wallet and bank account combined. I rather be homeless and endure hardships than having to suffer indignity. On that very day, my networth was negative so I believe most people would be in a better financial shape than I was back then.

While I did lost pretty much everything back then, my money my business my family, I didn’t lose my positive attitude and mindset about life. In fact, that period was the time I grew the most as a person. And that’s really what I wanted to share because I was hoping it would be helpful if ever you find yourself dealing with hardships in your life.

The most important thing when all hopes seem lost is to focus on what you have instead of what you had lost. For example, I lost everything but I was young and healthy and I look more handsome than Brad Pitt and of course I have a great sense of humor. Focus on what you have helps you to put your situation into perspective and gives you the necessary tools to get back up.

Another useful way to deal with hard times in your life is to have a growth mindset. Instead of beating yourself up, which is totally not helpful, try to see it from another angle, what can I learn from this lesson? Try not to see mistakes as failures or stupidity, but rather as a positive learning moment to grow as a person. Babies learnt to walk by constantly falling down and getting back up every single time because they don’t understand the meaning of failure. And I am glad babies are like that because if babies knew what society thinks of their failures, babies might give up walking after a few tries!

I find that it is easy for people to feel miserable when they have high expectations, sometimes these expectations came from comparing themselves to others or society pressures. The moment you liberate yourself from these expectations, you will find life much happier and easy going. I would recommend you guys to watch this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CvCB5HT7eRs

I think society has done a really poor job with regards to human happiness. Society tells you that you need to have X or Y in order to be successful or happy and I am here to tell you that’s not true. Success and happiness meant different things to different people. And you know what? You can decide and change what success and happiness mean to you. Don’t let society decide that for you.

How to endure and overcome the worst of life's hardships

No one enjoys suffering, but suffering is a necessary, normal part of the Christian life. In fact, the Scripture says we can expect hardships and suffering to increase (2 Tim. 2:3; 3:1-4, 13), so we must be prepared.

We learn from the book of 2 Timothy that we may experience suffering as a result of our testimony, our godly living, or our stand for truth (2 Tim. 1:8; 2:8-9, 17-18; 3:6-8, 12). We may also experience suffering when we are rejected or left alone (2 Tim. 1:15; 4:9-11; 4:16), or as a natural consequence to our fleshly, worldly desires (2 Tim. 2:22).

Suffering will indeed come, but God can give us grace and power to overcome every trial and to fulfill our purpose and mission in His kingdom. In his second epistle to Timothy, the Apostle Paul shares some important truths about how we can endure suffering.

Ten Principles for Enduring Suffering

1. Don’t forget why you are suffering. Remember your purpose and Whom you serve! The Apostle Paul said he was willing to suffer for the proclamation of the Gospel, for the sake of the elect, and for the glory of God. Our suffering, big or little, can be used to bring about the same purposes. ( 2 Tim. 2:8–9)

2. Remember that you are a prisoner of Christ, not of your circumstances or other people. (2 Tim. 1:8)

3. Keep going back to the things you know to be true from God’s Word. Don’t doubt in the dark what you have seen in the light. Remember what you received as a result of your salvation in Christ (2 Tim. 1:5). Remember your calling and the grace of God (2 Tim. 1:1, 9-13).

4. Keep doing whatever God has called you to do. Persevere, stay the course, and be faithful, regardless of any opposition or hardship. (2 Tim. 4:1-5)

5. Trust God to deal with those who oppose the truth. Don’t take matters into your own hands or become bitter and argumentative. ( 2 Tim. 2:23–26)

6. Remember times in the past when the Lord delivered or rescued you. Be quick to praise Him and testify to others (2 Tim. 3:11; 4:16-17).

7. Rely on the resources God has given you:

  • The grace of God (2 Tim. 1:2, 9; 2:1; 4:22).
  • The gift of God—your God-given ability to serve Him (2 Tim. 1:6-7).
  • The power of God (rather than your own strength) (2 Tim. 1:8; Phil. 2:13; Eph. 6:10).
  • The indwelling Holy Spirit (2 Tim. 1:14).
  • The Word of God, which will keep you grounded and give you perspective (2 Tim. 2:7, 9; 3:12-17; 4:1-2).

8. Remember that you are not alone in your suffering.

You already have:

  • The presence of Christ (Matt. 28:20)
  • The prayers of other believers (2 Tim. 1:3)
  • The “fellowship of suffering”—other believers who are facing hardships for the sake of Christ (2 Tim. 1:8; Heb. 13:3; Col. 1:24).

Cultivate these to help you endure:

  • Godly helpers – Find and cultivate a group of like-minded believers whose faithfulness and prayers can inspire and strengthen you (2 Tim. 1:2, 4-5; 4:9-13, 19-21).
  • Godly heroes – Read the biographies of missionaries and other faithful believers so God can cultivate faith and wisdom in your heart (Heb. 13:7; 2 Tim. 3:10, 14).
  • Godly heritage – As you learn about those who’ve gone before, you will be able to instill faith and courage in the next generation. Pass the baton to others. (2 Tim. 2:2)

9. No matter how difficult things are today, you can face the future with hope. Trust the truth of Scripture.

  • All wrongs will one day be righted (2 Tim. 3:8-9; 4:14).
  • The Lord will deliver you from all evil—in His time and way (2 Tim. 4:17-18). In the meantime, counsel your heart according to the truth and promises of God (Psalm 27).
  • All your suffering, efforts, labors, and faithfulness will be rewarded in “that Day” when believers stand before the Lord (2 Tim. 1:12, 18; 2:12; 4:8; Phil. 1:6, 10; 2:16; James 1:12).
  • You will give an account, so guard the “deposit” entrusted to you (2 Tim. 1:12, 14; 1 Tim. 6:20).

10. In all your suffering, remember Jesus Christ.

  • His life and His suffering and sacrifice for you (2 Tim. 2:3)
  • His triumph over Satan, sin, and death (2 Tim. 2:8)
  • His power, promises, and presence (Matt. 28:18-20)
  • What He is doing for you in heaven (John 14:2-3; Rom. 8:34).

Expect suffering—it is inevitable—but don’t forget the powerful resource that you have in Christ. Entrust your life to His ever-present care and control. He loves you, and He will help you endure.

Related Video: You’re Going to be Okay: Encouragement for Your Hardest Days

What defines those who thrive despite adversity?

“When life gets tough, the tough get going.” This timeless proverb may be true for some, but for others, hardship can be too much to overcome. When the going gets tough, their life simply falls apart.

What is it exactly that separates those who thrive regardless of adversity and those who don’t? Is it genetics, luck, or pure willpower?

Consider that Nelson Mandela spent 27 years in prison before he became the first democratically elected president in South Africa. Abraham Lincoln failed in business, had a nervous breakdown, and was defeated eight times in elections before becoming president. A boy born to a teenage alcoholic prostitute and an absentee father found himself in trouble throughout his childhood, eventually growing up to be Charles Manson.

These examples are extreme, but they demonstrate the different routes people may choose when facing major obstacles. Some people turn to alcohol and drugs, stealing, or physical violence. Nearly 16,000 people drank themselves to death in 2010. Every year, more than 3 million children will witness domestic violence in their home. Conversely, many people have gone through hell and back and are moral, happy, and successful. As a youth violence and family trauma psychologist, it’s my job to find the turning point between the right path and the wrong one.

In my own life, I dealt with hardship and failure. My family was poor. I had to cope with suicides, mental illness, and domestic violence; two of my family members died of alcoholism.

My grandmother was a teacher and I thought I would follow in her footsteps. After attempting to go to school for teaching, I realized that I was not cut out for it. I felt like I had failed. When I was young, I tried to be a writer and was not successful. My first marriage was a failure, as was my first business. I was challenged significantly when I enrolled in my Ph.D. program at the age of 42 and my classmates were all 20 years younger.

And the story would not be complete without telling you that someone attempted to rape me when I was a young woman. I only told a few people. I cried and cried. I wanted to scrub the skin right off my body. Yet today, I can face my fears and am a big fan of Law and Order: Special Victim’s Unit.

Despite all these trials, life marched on and turned out positive. I earned my Ph.D. I am a successful non-fiction writer and the author of two books that have sold well. I own my own practice, Eastern Shore Psychological Services, which has grown considerably and won numerous awards. And I am happily remarried to a loving husband, although I once told myself that I’d never marry again.

Why was I able to overcome the negative parts of my life when others from similar backgrounds have ended up addicted to substances or in jail? The simple answer is that I had enough protective factors in my life to outweigh my risk factors. For instance:

  • The neighborhood I grew up in was safe.
  • I was always supported by people who loved me.
  • I did well in school and had opportunities to succeed.
  • I had pro-social role models.
  • I received treatment for depression and PTSD.
  • There were many happy events in my life.
  • I kept going, one foot after the other, no matter what.

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention found that children who have more than five risk factors (learning problems, maltreatment, chaotic neighborhoods, etc.) and less than six protective factors (adult support, life skills, clear standards set by caregivers, etc.) have an 80 percent chance of committing future violent acts. This means that, while we all face varying levels of hardship, there must be a counterbalance of positives in our lives so that we may continue to grow and succeed.

Looking back at my family members who struggled, I realize that they did not have the level of support and education about depression and alcoholism that I was fortunate to have. At two points in my life, I had problems controlling my anger, just like my father. But I gained support through education and friends, and I learned to deal with it effectively. Without these support systems, statistical research says that I would most likely have failed.

It’s true that some of our ability to deal with hardships and failure has to do with biological traits and genetics. Some of it may have to do with luck. But mostly it has to do with the environment and people around us. Our parents, siblings, peers, educators, and community all play a vital role in shaping who we become.

Life is tough and we all have our own challenges to face. But we don’t have to face them alone. With a caring heart and encouraging hand, we can all play a role in supporting others through their greatest hardships.

For more information, please visit my website.

How to endure and overcome the worst of life's hardships

Many people will tell you that the hard times will pass but the people who will endure will be rewarder with immense strength and good fortune. Others will say that it’s easier said than done, but the bottom line is that we all know what it feels like to go through a tough patch. We’ve all been down and we’ve all managed to get ourselves up again. After every hardship we feel stronger, happier and grateful we’ve managed to win yet another battle.

But those of us who’re still struggling in life need some help and reassurance that they too will be able to persevere and overcome their challenges as well. Sometimes hearing from people who’ve been there can help a lot, can give us motivation and faith that we can do it. Here are some quotes about strength that will guide you through your hard times and help you endure to see the light at the end of the tunnel.

“Play with your strengths, don’t push your weaknesses.” – Jenifer Lopez

Remember that your strengths are always bigger than your weaknesses, use them and you’ll always win.

“A hero is nothing more than an ordinary person who simply finds it in himself to endure the hardships and overcome his obstacles in life.” – Christopher Reeve

This is coming from a man who’s been through a lot and knows that not all heroes wear capes. Sometimes they’re just ordinary people, like you and me, who’ve been gifted with enormous strength and wisdom. You too can be a hero only if you put your mind to it.

The hard times are supposed to motivate you to be stronger, not to discourage you.” William Ellery Channing

Instead of bowing down to a challenge, lift up your spirit and spur into action. The hard times are there to show you what you’re made of and not break you. Learn from them and become stronger.

“People never know how strong they really are until there’s no other choice but being strong.” – Bob Marley

Don’t be surprised if you turn up to be stronger than you expected. You have no idea what hides deep inside you until you’ve faced your worst nightmares.

“Our strength comes from our struggles, not from winning them. When we face an obstacle and decide not to give up, that’s what makes us strong, not the outcome.” – Arnold Schwarzenegger

Strength has nothing to do with winning, but everything to do with never giving up. It doesn’t matter if you’ve won or not, it matters that you’ve tried your best and you’re still standing.

“Life doesn’t get easier, we’re the ones that get stronger.” – Steve Maraboli

We may think that as we get older, life gets a bit easier but we’re wrong. We learn how to fight better and our experiences have made us stronger.

“We do not conquer the mountain we’re climbing, but ourselves.” Sir Edmund Hillary

The first man who climbed Mt. Everest understood that it’s much easier to conquer a physical mountain than it is to conquer our mental one.

“There’s an opportunity in the middle of every difficulty, we just need to find it.” – Albert Einstein

When we face a difficulty in life there are two ways to go about it. We can quit or we can see it as an opportunity to grow and become better. You can always choose the second and become stronger with every obstacle you overcome.

How to endure and overcome the worst of life's hardships

One of the best qualities you can have in your relationship is resiliency. Every couple goes through their share of ups and downs. But truly resilient couples who come out the other side when going through hard times in a relationship can be stronger than before. So, what are these couples doing that everyone else isn’t?

“A couple is resilient when each hold the other at such high value,” relationship coach Jenna Ponaman, CPC, ELI-MP, tells Bustle. “They’re willing to do what it takes to keep the relationship alive.”

That means, they fight for what they want, even if that means sometimes fighting each other. They communicate in healthy ways and are open about their feelings with one another. Most importantly, they are both crystal-clear about what it is they want out of the relationship.

“If they are ever in a misalignment, they know how to set the agreement to which both feel satisfied in the relationship,” Ponaman says.

Being able to overcome the challenges in your relationship requires a bit of preparation. Couples who are resilient know that it’s important to consistently work at their relationship each and every day. According to experts, it’s the things they do on a daily basis when everything is all good that really sets them apart.

So if you and your partner can do these things, your relationship may survive tough times.

Work On Your Friendship

If you want your relationship to survive hardship, work on having a solid foundation of friendship with your significant other. “All relationships have ups and downs and there will be times when you don’t feel in love with your partner,” therapist Alisha Powell, PhD, LCSW, tells Bustle. “Having a friendship with them ensures that there is a cushion for hard times when you both don’t feel like being romantic with each other.” It’s not that hard to do. Like any friendship, it requires spending time together, talking, and being there for each other when it’s needed.