How to experience the best of nyc for under $100

It’s no secret that New York City can be ridiculously expensive. Going out for drinks can make your wallet want to cringe, and the variety of trendy restaurants — although they’re delicious — can put a serious dent in your bank account. But when all is said and done, there is only one New York City. And luckily, there are still a ton of things you can do in The Big Apple that won’t break the bank. Here’s a little guide on how to explore NYC on $100 so that you can have the time of your life.

Whether you’re coming into the city for a day trip or are a resident who’s trying to find fun activities, you can definitely find things to do that’ll ensure a packed itinerary that won’t cost you too much money. You and your friends can split one of those rainbow cakes at Flour Shop (and take pics in front of the rainbow mural), walk across the Brooklyn Bridge, or see a cabaret concert at 54 Below.

I’m pretty sure it’s impossible to run out of things to do in NYC, even if you’re pinching pennies. Here are a few of my favorite spots to hit up when I’m on a budget but want to have some memorable NYC fun. Pick and choose to create the ultimate itinerary that’s $100 or under.

1. Take In The Views At Top Of The Rock

Rise up 70 floors to Top of the Rock, and take in the pristine views of New York City. Being up there is an incredible feeling that can’t really be described in words.

Tickets are $39.20, and you can even upgrade to a sunset viewing ticket for $10 more. And if you’re willing to drop a little more cash on this experience, the “Sun & Stars” ticket is $54. It allows you to visit the Top of the Rock deck twice in one day so you can experience it in two different ways.

2. Embrace Your Inner Carrie Bradshaw On The ‘Sex And The City’ Tour

If you’ve ever wondered what life was like for Carrie, Miranda, Samantha, and Charlotte from Sex and the City, you can get a taste of it on the Sex and the City tour. For $56, you’ll visit the bars they drank at, the stores they shopped at, and learn more about your favorite OG gossiping girls.

3. Stop At The Moxy Times Square For Drinks And Golf

If you’re longing to visit Times Square, don’t leave the area without stopping at Moxy Times Square for a bit. Their rooftop bar, Magic Hour, is a hotspot for locals and tourists alike. Browse the extensive drink menu, and play miniature putt-putt on the Insta-worthy course, if you’re game for some healthy competition.

4. Visit Any Of NYC’s Famous Museums

I’m a firm believer that everyone should visit The Met at least once in their life. Adult general admission is only $25, and if you’re a NYC resident, consider applying for a state ID so you can visit the museum for free.

Additionally, the famous museums in New York are actually pretty affordable to visit. The Guggenheim is $25 for adults and $18 for students with a valid ID. The MoMA is also $25 for adults, and $14 for full-time students with an ID. The MoMA even offers free admission on Friday nights from 4 p.m. to 8 p.m through their UNIQLO Free Fridays. Admission to the American Museum of Natural History is only $23 for adults and $18 for students.

5. Watch A Musical Theater Cabaret At 54 Below

If you’re really into musical theater and Broadway, 54 Below is the place for you. Broadway legends have all performed their own cabarets on the stage. Ticket prices vary per show, but are often less than $50. Also be sure to check out their late night series (shows that start at 11:30 p.m.), because tickets are often significantly cheaper for those shows.

6. Snap A Ton Of Pics For The ‘Gram In Freeman Alley

If you’re into graffiti and street art, Freeman Alley is a must-see. The alley features an ever-changing array of displays from Instagrammable NYC artists, from rainbow hearts to plastered posters. You can snap a pic in front of all of the murals to build up #content that will last for weeks after the trip is over. The best part is that looking at — and taking pictures of — the art is totally free.

If you want to stay in the area for a bite, head to Freemans for a yummy lunch and Morgenstern’s for dessert (both of which are moderately priced and will definitely fit within your $100 budget).

7. Enjoy A Sweet Treat At Flour Shop

Flour Shop is perfect for anyone who has a major sweet tooth. The spot has become famous for its multi-layer rainbow cake with candy literally pouring out of the center. (The smallest size of the Explosion Cake is $150, but if you’re splitting between a bunch of friends, then it’ll fit in your budget.)

Their other desserts, including their cookie cakes and cake balls, are also worth trying. While there, snap a pic in front of the storefront’s iconic rainbow mural or with their giant gummy bears.

8. Walk The Brooklyn Bridge

The beauty about visiting the Brooklyn Bridge is that it’s one of NYC’s most famous landmarks, and you can visit it for free. (Or rather, for the price of a subway swipe.)

If you’re staying in Manhattan, my advice is to take the subway to the Brooklyn side, and then walk across the bridge back to Manhattan. It’s as remarkable a view as they make it seem in the movies, and it’ll be an unforgettable trip that you should heavily document on the ‘Gram.

On a budget? Check out our insider’s guide to 100 things to do for under $100 in New York City.

New York consistently ranks as one of the most expensive cities in the world, but it doesn’t always have to be so tough on your wallet. That’s why we’ve rounded up 100 of the best things to do in NYC for under $100. Tour one of the most famous New York attractions, taste the local cuisine on a food tour or wander through one of the many fascinating museums in NYC. You can even score tickets to some of the best Broadway shows, concerts and sports games without breaking the bank. No matter how tight your budget is, there’s something for you on this list.

RECOMMENDED: Full guide to cheap things to do in NYC

100 things to do in NYC for less than $100

How to experience the best of nyc for under $100

1. Explore the American Museum of Natural History

Beyond the iconic, show-stopping displays–the grizzly bear in the Hall of North American Mammals, the 94-feet long blue whale, the prehistoric Barosaurus skeleton rearing up as if to scare the adjacent Allosaurus skeleton–is an expertly curated, 150 year old-plus museum that fills visitors of all ages with a curiosity about the universe. Whether you’re interested in the world below our feet, or the cultures of faraway lands or the stars light-years beyond our reach, your visit is bound to teach you a few things you never knew. $22.99 per person

How to experience the best of nyc for under $100

2. See a concert at Radio City Music Hall

One heralded as the “Showplace of the Nation,” this famed Rockefeller Center venue has razzle-dazzled patrons since the 1930s with its elaborate Art Deco details, massive stage and theatrics. Though best known as the home of the Christmas Spectacular, which stars the high-kicking Rockettes and a full cast of nativity animals, many musicians consider Radio City a dream stage to perform on, including a recent extended stay from Lady Gaga and Tony Bennett. No matter what you see, just sitting in those seats is awe-inspiring. Ticket prices vary

How to experience the best of nyc for under $100

3. Peep the collection at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

It would take multiple visits to fully appreciate this sprawling–as in 13 acres sprawling–collection of over 5,000 years of art from every corner of the world. As one of the biggest museums in the world, the gorgeous late 19th century neo-classical institution displays some of the finest examples of art spanning from mummified royalty of ancient times to avant garde fashion couture from last year’s runway. Visitors young and old are mesmerized by the Temple of Dendur, an Egyptian temple from 10 B.C. that was transposed from its Nile-side location to the bright, sun drenched Sackler Wing overlooking a reflective pool. $25

How to experience the best of nyc for under $100

4. Rent a bike in Central Park

There’s no way you could explore all 843 acres of Central Park on foot. Not in one day or even one weekend. To take in as much of the park as possible, rent a bike and cycle up and down the serene paths. You’ll see it all: waterfalls, castles, carousels, bridges and more. $8 per hour

How to experience the best of nyc for under $100

5. Take a food tour of Chinatown

Walk around the area south of Broome Street and east of Lafayette, and you’ll feel as though you’ve entered not just a different country but a different continent. Mott and Grand Streets are lined with stands selling exotic foodstuffs such as live eels, square watermelons and hairy rambutans. Plus, Chinatown offers some of the best restaurants in the city—although out-of-towners can rarely find them. To be sure you’re tasting the best, sign up for a guided food tour. It’s worth it for the samples alone. $89 per person

How to experience the best of nyc for under $100

6. Walk around Wall Street

While there is much debate on how Wall Street originally got its name–some claim it was because of a wall the Dutch erected to keep Native Americans away from their growing colony at the southern tip of Manhattan, while others believe it to be an Anglicization of a common Dutch surname–few people can argue what the street’s name is synonymous with today: wealth and capitalism. Since the late 19th century, Wall Street has been home to many of the city’s most important financial institutions and stock exchanges, including the New York Stock Exchange and NASDAQ. Lean about the markets, banking history, and the lavish Wolf of Wall Street lifestyle on a guided tour. $35 per person

How to experience the best of nyc for under $100

7. Peruse Chelsea’s art galleries

Formerly an industrial area, Chelsea has now become a hotspot for art galleries. Warehouses and garages now play host to museum-quality exhibitions. Navigating the endless options yourself could take ages, so why not let your tour guide do the hard work for you? $85 per person

How to experience the best of nyc for under $100

8. Get spooked on a ghost tour

Abandoned burial grounds, lingering spirits, creaking banisters—Gotham is home to plenty of ghostly apparitions, as your guide will be sure to point out on this two-hour tour. A flickering lantern lights your way as you wander through some of the creepiest locales in Greenwich Village. Fair warning: you may not ever be able to look at local landmarks the same way. $25 per person

How to experience the best of nyc for under $100

9. Look over NYC from the Top of the Rock

Let the world believe the Empire State Building has the best view of New York City–it keeps the crowds slightly more manageable at 30 Rockefeller Center’s spectacular open air observation deck. The bird’s eye view of Gotham from 70 stories up allows visitors to not only see other landmark skyscrapers around midtown–including the aforementioned Empire State building–but also to see the full sprawl of Central Park. If you’re willing to spend a little more, don’t forget to dress up and stop by the Rainbow Room–the historic lounge on the 65th floor–for exceptional cocktails, fine dining, live music and spectacular sightlines that rival the deck’s, albeit a few stories lower. $34 per person

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Last Updated 1 year ago

Manhattan is NOT CHEAP! Travelling the world has given me insight into hotels costs in different cities, and let me tell you, downtown NYC is one of the most expensive I’ve ever encountered!

If you want to stay in a hotel with a really good location, plus a decent guest rating (meaning no cockroaches and claustrophobic rooms) then you’ll have to open your wallet. However, I was determined to find a hotel in Manhattan that was not only a good price, but was still comfortable to stay in. You know, a place that doesn’t make you cringe when you go to lay down.

So, can you really get a GOOD hotel in NYC under $100?

First, let’s take a look at what you might encounter when searching for Manhattan hotels with a budget of $100 or less:

How to experience the best of nyc for under $100

Check out those ratings. OUCH! From personal experience, I won’t stay in ANYTHING under a 7.5/10. I know anything below that rating is going to have major cleanliness, safety or service issues. I can’t even imagine what a 3.6/10 gets you.

I looked up the New World Hotel in TripAdvisor and here is a recent review from a guest:

“WORST HOTEL EVER.
The room was so dirty (bedbugs, cockroaches, blood on the sheets, water in the bathroom ground). We also found some pills on the room ground … The bed was old and broken (making a lot of noise). Our nights were disturbed by strange people (a woman yelling ALL NIGHT LONG, people fighting, etc.). You cannot close the doors with the keys, so it’s not secure at all, thin walls between rooms so you can hear EVERYTHING. ”

There you have it. I guess THAT is what 3.6/10 gets you. Scary stuff, right?

Now, I consider myself the 007 of finding fantastic hotel deals, so I began my search to find something decent hotel in NYC under $100.

Here was my criteria:

  • A fantastic location. At least a 8/10 rating for location
  • A great overall rating. At least 8/10 rating overall (or a 4/5 on TripAdvisor)
  • A room with a view so I knew I was in NYC!

For anyone who has stayed in Manhattan before, you’ll know my criteria is pretty dang tight and perhaps a bit unrealistic, but that’s how I roll.

The Best Hotel in NYC Under $100

How to experience the best of nyc for under $100

Here it is! The hotel I was able to hunt down that matched or exceeded ALL of my criteria. The only hotel in Manhattan under $100 I could find that was actually nice:
The Best Western Premier Herald Square.

I will give you an HONEST review of this place, the good parts and the bad, so that you can decide if it’s right for your trip to NYC.

By the way – this post is not sponsored, the hotel didn’t know I was coming, which might explain the mishap I had when I first arrived.

The Good

The Price:

That is ALL I paid for a hotel in the centre of Manhattan. Such a good deal!

Now here is something you should know about the price of hotels: They will change a ton depending on the dates you are looking at. If there is a conference in the area, or if the hotel is almost sold out, prices will be high! They are all based on supply/demand. I did look into some dates for the rest of 2019 and into 2020 and I was able to find the SAME DEAL I got, so hopefully your dates will give you the same low price as well.

The Location:

The location is unbeatable! You can easily walk to the Rockefeller, Empire State Building, Times Square, or Central Park. Most of the top NYC attractions are within walking distance or a super short Uber or subway ride. You’re literally steps from 5 th Ave.

I had tickets to be in the audience of Seth Meyers Late Night Show at the Rockefeller Center and I walked there from the hotel instead of taking a taxi. It was super easy and allowed me to check out the area while I walked.

I get wanting to stay in an iconic and luxurious hotel, but the location of the Best Western Premier Herald Square is just as good as some of these $900/night hotels. You get the same ‘middle of the action’ experience for a fraction of the price.

Attractions Near The Best Western Premier Herald Square:

  • Herald Square – 170m
  • Empire State Building – 225m
  • Macy’s – 300m
  • Manhattan Shopping Mall – 350m
  • New York Public Library – 370m
  • Bryant Park – 400m
  • Madison Square – 600m
  • Grand Central Station – 950m

Saving money for students, mommies & daddies, brides, and Pittsburghers.

This post may contain affiliate links. For more details, please view our full disclosure.

How to experience the best of nyc for under $100

This past month I took a super frugal trip to New York. I was in town for a conference, and was initially a little worried about the budget. But it turns out, even in one of the most expensive cities on Earth, there are always affordable ways to travel.

I spent $181 on accommodations in NYC.

The first thing I looked at when I was deciding if this sojourn was even going to be possible was accommodations. The conference was happening at a hotel in Times Square, and even the discounted conference rate was oppressive.

I decided to turn to Airbnb. It’s an option I’ve been reluctant to use in the past. Sleeping in a stranger’s house seemed, well, scary. But when we went to Canada we tried it out for the first time and had a stellar experience. Stellar as in these were the views from the private apartment we rented:

How to experience the best of nyc for under $100

I’ve learned from personal experience and from watching others use the platform that reading reviews is critical. You want a place with lots of reviews to scroll through, and you want the vast majority of those reviews to be glowing. I applied this same method to NYC and found a place in the heart of Times Square for a grand total of $181– for three nights.

The place I stayed was set up similar to a hostel. Initially, I had planned to keep to myself and get a lot of work done. But as soon as I got there, I was bombarded with invitations to go grab some food, check out nightlife or just chat.

I took the offers I could within the conference schedule, and I’m so glad I did. I made new friends, learned amazing stories from new acquaintances, and saw far more of the area than I would have if left to my own devices. It felt like going away to summer camp, except your bunk mates were these amazing women from around the world.

I highly endorse Airbnb for budget travel. It’s saved me a ton of money over a hotel multiple times, and, after carefully reading the reviews, has felt incredibly safe and led to amazing experiences I wouldn’t have had if I hadn’t rented space from a local. If you want to try it out, too, you can get a $40 travel credit by signing up here.

I spent $81.00 getting to and around NYC from Appalachia.

I found a Megabus bus ticket from Pittsburgh to NYC for $72 roundtrip. That included reserving seats, which was an optional add-on.

Pro tip: My favorite was on the top in the front of the bus.

It was my first time using them. Wifi was spotty, which I expected. It was nonexistent on my way in, but on my way home I was able to knock a lot of work out. I had heard the buses were “dirty,” but I didn’t have that experience. Maybe I’m just too used to PAT buses, which can be pretty gross sometimes. Everything’s relative.

While in New York, I bought three subway tickets. I had a really easy time using it on the way in, and spent $3 on a one-time pass. But I got confused while heading to catch the Megabus out, so I ended up having to buy two one-time tickets for a total of $6.

I spent $84.00 on food in New York City.

I had some amazing eats while in the city. One day while I was in town, the conference provided free lunch and breakfast. Another day, my mom’s cousin was generous enough to treat me to lunch at Thalia. It was the first time each of us were trying the restaurant, and it was amazing.

With friends from the Airbnb, I tried some Indian, and old-school diner and an Irish pub. One night we grabbed a drink at Hard Rock, too.

Grand total: $84.00

The Conference: THINK17

My friends at CO-OP invited me to check out their annual conference: THINK17. I wasn’t able to stay for the entire thing because of prior obligations that week, but I’m so glad I made it for the two days I did. It was the most interesting and dynamic conference I’ve ever been to.

We listened to speakers who challenged the norm, spoke with credit union reps who were completely dedicated to making their members’ experiences beyond spectacular, and got to hear from some of the winners of their THINK17 prize, which invited innovation in the digital financial experience for those 50+.

How to experience the best of nyc for under $100

Aside from the awesome financial nerd discussions and inspirational speakers, we also were privy to some top notch entertainment, including a sampler of Hamilton during opening:

How to experience the best of nyc for under $100

And a Cirque-esque performance at our first night’s party:

I spent $0 on entertainment in NYC and remained thoroughly entertained.

I didn’t spend a lot going to shows or anything of the like while I was in NYC. Walking around in the evening brought enough free entertainment that I didn’t have to pay for it. Simply by going outside, my Airbnb friends and I were able to see some great performances, including a talented break dancing troupe.

I did learn, however, that if you want to go see a show, you can purchase any leftover tickets at the TKTS booth in the middle of Times Square. You have to be flexible in what you’re willing to see, but you’ll score a great deal.

Times Square 360 Video

The above video is in 360. Best viewed through your VR headset, but you can also look around by clicking and dragging to change your perspective with your mouse.

New York City on a Budget

If doing NYC for four days under $350 is possible, you can do anywhere on a budget of less than $100/day. I wouldn’t trade my frugal experiences for the world—whether we’re talking about the new friends I made or the new ideas and experiences I have in my tool belt for work.

What destinations have you done for cheap? Share your story in the comments!

Saving money for students, mommies & daddies, brides, and Pittsburghers.

This post may contain affiliate links. For more details, please view our full disclosure.

How to experience the best of nyc for under $100

This past month I took a super frugal trip to New York. I was in town for a conference, and was initially a little worried about the budget. But it turns out, even in one of the most expensive cities on Earth, there are always affordable ways to travel.

I spent $181 on accommodations in NYC.

The first thing I looked at when I was deciding if this sojourn was even going to be possible was accommodations. The conference was happening at a hotel in Times Square, and even the discounted conference rate was oppressive.

I decided to turn to Airbnb. It’s an option I’ve been reluctant to use in the past. Sleeping in a stranger’s house seemed, well, scary. But when we went to Canada we tried it out for the first time and had a stellar experience. Stellar as in these were the views from the private apartment we rented:

How to experience the best of nyc for under $100

I’ve learned from personal experience and from watching others use the platform that reading reviews is critical. You want a place with lots of reviews to scroll through, and you want the vast majority of those reviews to be glowing. I applied this same method to NYC and found a place in the heart of Times Square for a grand total of $181– for three nights.

The place I stayed was set up similar to a hostel. Initially, I had planned to keep to myself and get a lot of work done. But as soon as I got there, I was bombarded with invitations to go grab some food, check out nightlife or just chat.

I took the offers I could within the conference schedule, and I’m so glad I did. I made new friends, learned amazing stories from new acquaintances, and saw far more of the area than I would have if left to my own devices. It felt like going away to summer camp, except your bunk mates were these amazing women from around the world.

I highly endorse Airbnb for budget travel. It’s saved me a ton of money over a hotel multiple times, and, after carefully reading the reviews, has felt incredibly safe and led to amazing experiences I wouldn’t have had if I hadn’t rented space from a local. If you want to try it out, too, you can get a $40 travel credit by signing up here.

I spent $81.00 getting to and around NYC from Appalachia.

I found a Megabus bus ticket from Pittsburgh to NYC for $72 roundtrip. That included reserving seats, which was an optional add-on.

Pro tip: My favorite was on the top in the front of the bus.

It was my first time using them. Wifi was spotty, which I expected. It was nonexistent on my way in, but on my way home I was able to knock a lot of work out. I had heard the buses were “dirty,” but I didn’t have that experience. Maybe I’m just too used to PAT buses, which can be pretty gross sometimes. Everything’s relative.

While in New York, I bought three subway tickets. I had a really easy time using it on the way in, and spent $3 on a one-time pass. But I got confused while heading to catch the Megabus out, so I ended up having to buy two one-time tickets for a total of $6.

I spent $84.00 on food in New York City.

I had some amazing eats while in the city. One day while I was in town, the conference provided free lunch and breakfast. Another day, my mom’s cousin was generous enough to treat me to lunch at Thalia. It was the first time each of us were trying the restaurant, and it was amazing.

With friends from the Airbnb, I tried some Indian, and old-school diner and an Irish pub. One night we grabbed a drink at Hard Rock, too.

Grand total: $84.00

The Conference: THINK17

My friends at CO-OP invited me to check out their annual conference: THINK17. I wasn’t able to stay for the entire thing because of prior obligations that week, but I’m so glad I made it for the two days I did. It was the most interesting and dynamic conference I’ve ever been to.

We listened to speakers who challenged the norm, spoke with credit union reps who were completely dedicated to making their members’ experiences beyond spectacular, and got to hear from some of the winners of their THINK17 prize, which invited innovation in the digital financial experience for those 50+.

How to experience the best of nyc for under $100

Aside from the awesome financial nerd discussions and inspirational speakers, we also were privy to some top notch entertainment, including a sampler of Hamilton during opening:

How to experience the best of nyc for under $100

And a Cirque-esque performance at our first night’s party:

I spent $0 on entertainment in NYC and remained thoroughly entertained.

I didn’t spend a lot going to shows or anything of the like while I was in NYC. Walking around in the evening brought enough free entertainment that I didn’t have to pay for it. Simply by going outside, my Airbnb friends and I were able to see some great performances, including a talented break dancing troupe.

I did learn, however, that if you want to go see a show, you can purchase any leftover tickets at the TKTS booth in the middle of Times Square. You have to be flexible in what you’re willing to see, but you’ll score a great deal.

Times Square 360 Video

The above video is in 360. Best viewed through your VR headset, but you can also look around by clicking and dragging to change your perspective with your mouse.

New York City on a Budget

If doing NYC for four days under $350 is possible, you can do anywhere on a budget of less than $100/day. I wouldn’t trade my frugal experiences for the world—whether we’re talking about the new friends I made or the new ideas and experiences I have in my tool belt for work.

What destinations have you done for cheap? Share your story in the comments!

Whether it’s your first time to New York City or your millionth, the city’s famous sights truly never lose their splendor.

However, something that many visitors don’t consider when planning their trip to the Big Apple is the number of hidden costs to visit some of New York’s most popular attractions.

Certain beloved tourist destinations are completely free of charge — you can stroll through Central Park or take in the lights and billboards in Times Square without dropping a dime.

However, other tourist attractions may cost you.

Here’s exactly how much it costs to visit 10 of New York City’s most popular tourist attractions.

The Met Museum

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, fondly referred to as “The Met,” is perhaps New York City’s most well-known museum. Its grandiose steps and impressive art collection attracted more than 7 million visitors in 2017. Some of the most famous pieces of art you can see at The Met include “Washington Crossing the Delaware” (1851) by Emanuel Leutze, “Self-Portrait with a Straw Hat” (1887) by Vincent van Gogh, and “Bridge over a Pond of Water Lillies” (1889) by Claude Monet.

Cost to enter: For New York State residents as well as New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut students, admission is “pay as you wish” or suggested — meaning, you could technically pay one penny to enter the museum. General admission for visitors not from those states is $25 for adults, $17 for seniors, $12 for students, and is free for patrons and children under 12.

A membership to the museum is $100 per year for New York City residents and $80 for people who live outside a 200-mile radius of New York City. If you’re an out-of-stater who goes to the museum often enough, this membership could pay for itself in just over three visits!

The Empire State Building

The Empire State Building is undoubtedly one of New York’s most recognizable tourist attractions. On the 86th floor, you can find a wraparound viewing deck that offers 360-degree views of the city and beyond. Some sights you can see from the Observation Deck include Central Park, Times Square, The Statue of Liberty, and more.

Cost to enter: Tickets for the main viewing deck are $38.00 for adults, $32.00 for children, and $36.00 for seniors.

The Whitney Museum of American Art

The Whitney Museum of American Art was founded in 1930 by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney and focuses on 20th- and 21st-century American artworks. May famous people have supported the Whitney over the years, including Jackie Onassis and Bob Dylan.

Cost to enter: Tickets cost $25 for adults and $18 for seniors, students, and visitors with disabilities. Admission is free for those 18 and under and members of the museum, who pay $90 per year. P ay-what-you-wish tickets are also available on Fridays, 7–9:30 pm. These tickets cannot be purchased ahead of time and should be requested at the admissions desk.

Broadway

There are few things less iconic than New York City’s famed Broadway show district. Take in iconic shows like “Phantom of the Opera,” “Wicked,” “The Lion King,” or “Hamilton” in this famous part of the city, steps away from the heart of Times Square.

Cost to enter: The average price of a Broadway show ticket is $ 116.12 for a play and $122.73 for a musical.

I don’t know who needs to hear this, but transforming your home doesn’t have to cost you a small fortune. It’s so easy to scroll through jaw-dropping renovations on Instagram, Pinterest, and even this site, assuming they must cost thousands of dollars, which probably makes your dream of a gorgeous space feel just out of reach.

In reality though, it’s possible to revamp your home on the cheap. According to some designers, all you need is creativity and a $100 bill! If you’re looking for some affordable ideas, you’ve come to the right place. Below a few design pros are sharing their favorite game-changing decorating upgrades that all come in under $100.

Update your accents.

As the saying goes, the devil lies in the details. Not only can small finishing touches change the look and feel of your space, but they can also be incredibly affordable. “There are truly endless ways to spruce up your home without spending a pretty penny,” says designer Bria Hammel. “Focus on accessories. Pick a specific area and some fresh new accessories like nightstands, a bathroom vanity, or a dining centerpiece.”

Just remember that each room has a different set of accessorizing opportunities. While a lush plant or an assortment of throw pillows can be a game-changer for a living room, the bathroom might call for a new shower curtain or bath mat. For designer Beth Diana Smith, her secret to a game-changing transformation is embracing natural elements.

“My recent obsession is using sculptural or carved wood end tables as a simple yet impactful upgrade,” she shares. “I literally just found three from HomeGoods — each under $100! — that are great quality materials like cypress root and solid carved wood. They can be used in foyers, living rooms, and any unexpected nooks or corners to create artistic, beautiful design moment.”

Pack on the paint.

ICYMI, a fresh coat of paint can go a long way. Instead of coloring all four walls though, consider a paint job that highlights an architectural feature in your space — or use paint to “fake” one. “When you want to upgrade your home on a budget, painting a room can go a long way,” shares Lauren Lerner of Living with Lolo. “You can either paint an accent wall in a bold color or use wood moulding to give the wall some interest before painting.”

For an even trendier take, get creative with a painted mural. There are plenty of ways to use paint creatively, even if you’re not a pro, from painting arches and shapes to focusing on just your ceiling or doorways. Fortunately, this is one trend that can be a lot easier than it looks.

Whether it’s your first time to New York City or your millionth, the city’s famous sights truly never lose their splendor.

However, something that many visitors don’t consider when planning their trip to the Big Apple is the number of hidden costs to visit some of New York’s most popular attractions.

Certain beloved tourist destinations are completely free of charge — you can stroll through Central Park or take in the lights and billboards in Times Square without dropping a dime.

However, other tourist attractions may cost you.

Here’s exactly how much it costs to visit 10 of New York City’s most popular tourist attractions.

The Met Museum

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, fondly referred to as “The Met,” is perhaps New York City’s most well-known museum. Its grandiose steps and impressive art collection attracted more than 7 million visitors in 2017. Some of the most famous pieces of art you can see at The Met include “Washington Crossing the Delaware” (1851) by Emanuel Leutze, “Self-Portrait with a Straw Hat” (1887) by Vincent van Gogh, and “Bridge over a Pond of Water Lillies” (1889) by Claude Monet.

Cost to enter: For New York State residents as well as New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut students, admission is “pay as you wish” or suggested — meaning, you could technically pay one penny to enter the museum. General admission for visitors not from those states is $25 for adults, $17 for seniors, $12 for students, and is free for patrons and children under 12.

A membership to the museum is $100 per year for New York City residents and $80 for people who live outside a 200-mile radius of New York City. If you’re an out-of-stater who goes to the museum often enough, this membership could pay for itself in just over three visits!

The Empire State Building

The Empire State Building is undoubtedly one of New York’s most recognizable tourist attractions. On the 86th floor, you can find a wraparound viewing deck that offers 360-degree views of the city and beyond. Some sights you can see from the Observation Deck include Central Park, Times Square, The Statue of Liberty, and more.

Cost to enter: Tickets for the main viewing deck are $38.00 for adults, $32.00 for children, and $36.00 for seniors.

The Whitney Museum of American Art

The Whitney Museum of American Art was founded in 1930 by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney and focuses on 20th- and 21st-century American artworks. May famous people have supported the Whitney over the years, including Jackie Onassis and Bob Dylan.

Cost to enter: Tickets cost $25 for adults and $18 for seniors, students, and visitors with disabilities. Admission is free for those 18 and under and members of the museum, who pay $90 per year. P ay-what-you-wish tickets are also available on Fridays, 7–9:30 pm. These tickets cannot be purchased ahead of time and should be requested at the admissions desk.

Broadway

There are few things less iconic than New York City’s famed Broadway show district. Take in iconic shows like “Phantom of the Opera,” “Wicked,” “The Lion King,” or “Hamilton” in this famous part of the city, steps away from the heart of Times Square.

Cost to enter: The average price of a Broadway show ticket is $ 116.12 for a play and $122.73 for a musical.

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Las Vegas is open, and that means sun, fun, food and perhaps some responsible, socially distanced debauchery is never too far away.

Right now, there are quite a few ways to reach sunny Las Vegas, and enjoy the hotel prices, which are currently so ‘low’ for most of the year they raise eyebrows, in a good way, for around $200 round trip, or much less. Here’s some exciting flight deals worth taking a look at.

Cheap Flights To Las Vegas

Las Vegas, like many leisure favorites, has been forced to adapt quickly to covid-19 and find ways to make the experience both worthwhile and safe. Many hotels, resorts and casinos have done a fantastic job in that regard.

Major US carriers including American, Delta, United and JetBlue have some rock bottom fares to Vegas, which could be worth entertaining, both for near term travel and also travel later in the year.

Cities available for under $100 round trip include: New York, Dallas, Miami, Los Angeles, Cincinnati, Chicago, Seattle, Phoenix, San Francisco, Denver and more.

The Dates You Can Travel

The best deals are for travel between now and summer, and then fall onward. If you’re thinking March, April, or May – it’s wide open. Try to be as flexible as possible, since a day or two here or there can make all the difference with fares.

Should you travel? That’s up to you. If you’re taking every precaution to keep yourself and others safe, by wearing a mask, socially distancing and being respectful of laws and temporary measures, it’s not illegal to travel within the USA, and many are with great joy. If you’re planning on being part of the problem though, stay home.

How To Book These Flights

Google Flights remains one of the best ways to search and book flights, and we’ve made easy to use links for your enjoyment. Simply click, change dates to what you’re looking for and use the calendar to find the same low prices.

  • $77 Chicago to Las Vegas Round Trip
  • $83 Miami to Las Vegas Round Trip
  • $109 New York to Las Vegas Round Trip (Spirit under $100)
  • $99 Cincinnati to Las Vegas Round Trip
  • $59 Los Angeles to Las Vegas Round trip
  • $77 Seattle to Las Vegas Round Trip
  • $59 Phoenix to Las Vegas Round Trip
  • $74 Dallas to Las Vegas Round Trip
  • $99 Denver to Las Vegas Round Trip
  • $110 Atlanta to Las Vegas Round trip (Frontier under $100)

Most of these fares fall under the ‘Basic Economy’ category, which restricts advanced seat selection and other features. Even then, it’s a round trip to somewhere warm and fun for under $100 bucks.

If you’re a regular with a specific airline, it can absolutely be worth investigating their credit card offerings, since these typically offer perks which negate the issues with basic economy, like a free checked bag, and priority boarding. If not, just take the savings, expect a basic experience and enjoy Vegas!