How to find an accountability partner to help you reach your goal

Career and Success

How to find an accountability partner to help you reach your goal

How to find an accountability partner to help you reach your goal

Plenty of people set goals, but far fewer are actually willing to declare their goals in a way that sets them up for success. Simply thinking about goals won’t yield results. There is one critical component of bringing a desired goal to fruition: accountability.

Consider this scenario: Your alarm goes off at 5:30 a.m. It is your intention to go to the gym, but it’s raining outside, and your bed is extremely cozy. In which of the following situations are you more likely to actually make it to your workout?

  1. You have an exercise buddy who will be meeting you at the gym at 6:00.
  2. You didn’t tell anyone you were planning on exercising this morning, and no one but you will know if you hit snooze button three more times.

It’s a no-brainer. Obviously, you chose scenario #1 because someone is holding you accountable to your actions.

Studies have shown that when you share your goals with others, you are twice as likely to achieve them than if you keep the goals to yourself. For the same reason exercise buddies and personal trainers can help you to follow through on your workout goals, accountability when goal setting is one of the most crucial elements in your success.

What Is Accountability?

When it comes to goal setting, accountability means being held responsible for the achievement of your goals. The word sometimes has a negative connotation, as if accountability implies blame or judgment. However, when seen as a way of tracking success, accountability can create a sense of ownership and pride that often leads to great triumph, enhancing your ability to achieve your desired outcomes.

Why Accountability Works

When you hold yourself accountable to your goals, you are communicating to the universe (and to yourself) that the goal is a priority—it’s not just something that may or may not get done. If you don’t share your goals in some way, you aren’t truly committing to them. It’s too easy to give up because it’s like they never really existed.

Another reason accountability works is because it can motivate you to save face. It’s human nature to care about your reputation and to fulfill your loved ones’ expectations of you (Do they see you as a person with integrity or as someone who is flaky?). You also feel motivated to avoid being called out when you mess up. In the first scenario, the friend waiting in the parking lot of the gym is going to be pretty mad if you stand her up. On the other hand, if you pick the right type of accountability partner, they will actually encourage you when the going gets tough. Everyone needs a cheerleader sometimes to remind you of your potential for greatness.

5 Types of Accountability

There are many types of accountability, and depending on the type of goal you have and your unique personality, some will work better than others. Try out some or all of the following strategies:

1. Tell a Friend

Share your goals with someone who loves you, who will ask you about your goals, support you in achieving them, and celebrate with you when you do. Picking the right person is crucial though, because anyone who could potentially judge you or become overly competitive with your progress could actually sabotage your success. The ideal accountability partner is one who supports you and your goals completely and whole-heartedly.

2. Join an Accountability Group

Joining or creating an accountability group can help you accomplish what you often can’t do on your own. If you’ve ever participated in a book club, you know that gathering with others to discuss the latest novel makes it far more likely that you’ll find the time to read it. If you want to write more, for example, join a writing group that expects you to write 2,000 words a week.

Are you an amateur chef? Join a cooking group and support each other in trying seven new recipes a month. As a social creature, you can help others accomplish just about anything and vice versa. Look to your church community, workplace, or yoga studio for people who might be interested in joining forces, or on sites like Meet Up to find like-minded people who want to get together for motivation.

3. Use Your Technology

There are plenty of apps and websites that have been created specifically to help with accountability, by either offering reminders and tracking systems or by connecting you with other people who are also trying to complete similar goals. Sites like Mint (for money management) and apps like the Health App (to track nutrition, exercise, and mindfulness) are great tools for keeping track of your productivity. If you’d rather interact with other people, iDoneThis and the Whole Life Challenge bring people together virtually from all over the world in a network of support for goals of every size.

Self-love starts with self-care. Download the Chopra App for personalized self-care guidance you can access anywhere.

4. Hire a Coach

The coaching business has increased in popularity lately, and for good reason. Coaches get paid to assist you in clarifying your goals, to hold you to a reasonable timeline, and to help develop strategies for overcoming obstacles that get in the way of achieving the final outcome (plus, you’re more likely to try to get your money’s worth if you’ve invested in someone to help you). One of the defining characteristics of coaching is that it creates a measuring tool for action and a means for reporting on self-learning. Good coaches never judge, scold, or blame; they simply help you realize what works and what doesn’t when it comes to the commitments you make to yourself.

5. Write It Down

For some people, simply writing their goals down on paper is enough to move the dream into reality. Written promises to yourself can strengthen the internal fortitude needed to complete a challenging task. Posting reminders and checklists in a visible location (like a daily planner, a wall calendar, or a note on the desktop of your computer) can be an effective motivator for follow-through.

So find a support system, hold yourself accountable, and see what happens. It could be just the thing you need to create positive change in your life.

Research indicates 50% of Americans commit to changing their habits at the start of every year. It also reveals 25% will give up within a week of setting their goal!

Those facts aren’t meant to discourage you from trying, if you are reading this, you’re probably in the 25% who won’t give up!

One proven way to ensure you reach your goals is to hold yourself accountable with an accountability partner. According to one study, people with accountability partners are 65% more likely than others to achieve their goals.

What is an Accountability Partner?

An accountability partner is simply someone who knows you have a goal you want to achieve and provides honest feedback to let you know whether you’re taking the necessary steps to do so. However, your accountability partner is also someone to whom you provide similar feedback.

That’s why it often helps when accountability partners have the same (or at least very similar) goals. Consider the following examples.

  • Getting in shape: You and your accountability partner could work out together, ensuring there’s someone else in both of your lives willing to hold you both accountable when either of you might otherwise skip a workout.
  • Losing weight: It’s helpful when an accountability partner is a spouse, family member, or someone else you live with if you’re both trying to lose weight. You can each pay attention to what the other is eating, prep nutritious meals together, etc.
  • Reading every day: Joining a book club or meeting with a reading buddy on a monthly or a weekly basis to discuss the content. If one of you clearly hasn’t done the reading, it will be obvious, and the other partner can point this out during your meetings.

Along with also having a goal like yours, it’s helpful if your accountability partner has certain key traits. They include:

  • Honesty: An accountability partner who merely tells you what you want to hear won’t help you change your habits.
  • Availability: Your accountability partner doesn’t necessarily need to be someone you can meet in-person regularly. However, they should be someone you can stay in touch with consistently.
  • Challenging (but not too challenging): An accountability partner needs to be willing to push you when your own discipline is lacking. That said, they also need to be compassionate enough to give you a break when you truly need it. They have to strike a balance between challenging you and supporting you.
  • Clarity: Even if an accountability partner is honest, their feedback may not do you much good if it’s hard to understand their exact points. You need an accountability partner who offers actionable advice.

How to Find an Accountability Partner

There are plenty of ways to find an accountability partner you can rely on. The following are just a few ideas to keep in mind:

  • Apps: Odds are good there is an app for people trying to achieve the same goal you’re striving towards. Apps like Strava for running or Rithm for building habits are good examples.
  • Online groups or services: Facebook groups, services like Coach.me or Clarity.fm are good examples of helping people find an accountability partner.
  • Relevant in-person groups/activities: Trying to work out more? You can probably find an accountability partner during a class at your local fitness center. Want to quit smoking? There are probably local support groups that meet regularly near you. Trying to meditate every day? Find an accountability partner at a group meditation session in your area.
  • Friends and family: Don’t overlook the basics! While you need to make sure your accountability partner is someone with the right traits, and not merely someone you chose because you already knew them, it’s entirely possible your ideal accountability partner is a friend or family member.

All that said, research shows that working with an accountability partner will help you achieve your goals. Ideally, it’s a two-way mutual relationship where you are both trying to achieve similar goals.

Looking for an accountability partner?
Try Rithm, the habit tracking, goal tracking accountability app! It’s Free.

How to find an accountability partner to help you reach your goal

There is certainly no shortage of goal setting when looking forward in your career.

Often times, the goals we set are large, hearty and ambitious. And something about our assessment of our abilities suggests that, though large, these goals are attainable. That’s just the easy part—the goal setting.

Things tend to get tricky, however, after the goals are set and we are then charged with attaining said set goals. Our intention is always there. We want to do precisely what we set out to do, but that want is simply not enough. Attaining goals takes action–it takes strategy, a plan, a vision, precise steps, and in many cases, it takes sound, unwavering  accountability.

If you take a poll of successful goal attainers many will tell you that often times their reasons for reaching new heights exceeding themselves—they had someone or something to answer to. Who or what do you have?

Find accountability and hold steadfast as you embark on your goal attaining journey. Some of the best and most effective accountability may come from a friend, colleague or mentor. Here are a few tips for selecting an accountability partner that may be best for you.

  1. Find someone more disciplined than you are. It would behoove you to select a partner that doesn’t take it easy on themselves, thus, are less likely to take it easy on you. If you know someone who tends to put their money where their mouth is, that’s your guy…or gal.
  2. Choose a partner you’d be remiss to disappoint. You may be willing to let yourself down, but have someone in your corner that you wouldn’t let down if your life depended on it. That’s an ideal accountability partner candidate. Find someone who you’d hate to say, ‘I haven’t done it yet’ to, especially if you’d assured them the deed would be done.
  3. Find a partner who has the time to invest in your goals. We’re all pretty busy doing what we can for ourselves. If you happen to know someone who is just as invested in seeing you do well as they are in themselves, you might want to hold on tight. Create a set time/date periodically to check in with your partner to ensure milestones are reached. If your partner is consistently unavailable for check-in, you may want to reconsider your choice.
  4. The more the merrier. No need to put all your eggs in one basket. The more partners you have to answer to, the less likely you are to want to answer ‘no.’ Find a select few that won’t take it easy on you.
  5. Hold your accountability partners accountable. Let your partners know that you are counting on them to keep you on track. If they slip, you may just as likely. There’s certainly no need for that. Let your partner(s) know ahead of time what you’re expecting from them and hold them to that expectation. You’ll be glad you did.

Learn the value of surrounding yourself with the best people to help you reach your career heights at the 2016 Black Enterprise Women of Power Summit, March 9-12, at the Hilton Diplomat Resort & Spa, Hollywood, Florida, for the Women of Power Summit. Register now. For information on the 2016 Women of Power Summit, including sessions, speakers and performers click here.

How to find an accountability partner to help you reach your goal

May 5, 2019 12:00 AM EST | 6 min read

Let’s face it: January is over and you still haven’t made a dent in your new-year goals.

Complete that cardio circuit at the gym? Nah, you’re too busy at work. Contribute to your savings account or retirement fund? That seems impossible, too, because all your friends have winter birthdays — and you know they’ll love you for gifting them the latest hot gadgets.

Maybe you even had plans to launch your own business, but you haven’t yet followed through.

No matter how small or lofty your goals, sometimes it seems like you just can’t turn your dreams into reality.

It’s not because you’re incompetent — you just can’t keep yourself accountable all the time.

You could probably benefit from an accountability partner.

What’s an Accountability Partner?

Simply put, an accountability partner refers to someone who knows your goals and helps keep you on track — and also calls you out when you’re just making excuses.

Having an accountability partner doesn’t make you weak. Many successful business people have an accountability partner — a person with whom they check in regularly to track progress and work through specific obstacles.

An accountability partner isn’t just a mentor, because the relationship should be mutually beneficial. That is, it’s your job to make sure your partner stays committed to her own goals, too.

After all, that’s the beauty of a partnership. It’s symbiotic.

What Are the Benefits of an Accountability Partner?

Here are a few ways how having an accountability partner can enhance your life:

  • You increase your chance of success. Studies have shown that people are more likely to achieve their goals if they work toward them with a partner. For example, if your goal is to lose weight or increase your physical fitness, you have up to a 95% success rate if you exercise with a partner — compared to a 43% success rate if you exercise alone. That’s because you motivate each other. However, keep in mind while having a partner to help you achieve specific goals such as losing a certain amount of weight, the results you see will be because of your own efforts, not someone else’s. Lean on them, use them to motivate you, and allow that support to push you even higher individually, but remember that you can only change yourself by your own efforts, not someone else’s.
  • You learn responsibility. When you’ve found someone who has agreed to push you toward your goals on a daily basis, it consistently reminds you that you’re responsible for your own progress — in any endeavor. And this can be an important lesson in self-awareness, carrying over to other aspects of your life, whether personal or professional. Your partner will learn some lessons in responsibility, too.
  • You figure out your flaws. As successful as you are, you may be blind to your own weaknesses — those little things you can easily improve with a bit of effort. An accountability partner can point out your excuses and make you aware of those areas you need to work on to become better at what you’re trying to achieve. You’ll also contribute to your partner’s self-improvement.

How Do I Choose an Accountability Partner?

There’s no need to advertise on Craigslist — your best chances at an accountability partner are within someone you already know and trust.

Consider, for example, a significant other, best friend or parent.

Just make sure you choose someone you know can be reliable and honest with you on regular basis.

Here are a few tips:

  • Seek confidentiality. Sure, you’re close with your aunt, and she’s always honest — but maybe a little too honest on social media. If you want to be truthful about your goals, you don’t necessarily want the entire world to know what they are — so pick someone who won’t share everything you say about your personal life on Facebook. Confidentiality is key, even if you do break your commitment and eat that high-calorie Krispy Kreme doughnut (much to your aunt’s chagrin).
  • Seek a challenge. The whole point of an accountability partner is to keep you accountable for your actions, not to make you feel like royalty when you don’t measure up. So don’t choose someone you know will be an eternal pushover and, well, make excuses for your excuses. For example, if your mom is eternally doting and you can never do wrong in her eyes, she may not be the best at this partnership — especially when you lapse in judgment. Really, there are no good excuses.
  • Seek consistency. A good accountability partner needs to be there for you on a regular basis — and remain easily accessible. Otherwise, you’ll slip on your daily goals — and your partner will, too. Choose someone who has the ability to communicate early and often, whether it’s via phone, email or in person. Consistent and reliable motivation can be crucial to your progress, no matter what you’ve chosen as your end goal.
  • Seek consequences. You don’t need a Skinner box, but you should still come up with a few consequences of not meeting your daily goals — and find an accountability partner who will enforce them. The circle of consequence can be a very effective learning tool and train you to achieve what you want (or else).

I Chose an Accountability Partner: Now What?

Now that you’ve selected your accountability partner, here are a few quick tips on how to make the most of the relationship:

  • Write down your goals. This will make it easiest for you to monitor each other’s progress — and record your honest feedback.
  • Establish a regular check-in time. Set an alarm and take 10 minutes to check in with your partner on a frequent basis, whether it’s via phone, email or text.
  • Meet face-to-face. There’s no bond quite like a face-to-face connection. Use your new accountability partnership to strengthen your personal relationship — in person.

Grab the right accountability partner and you’ll never fail at your new year’s resolution again.

And, if you’re a good enough motivator, neither will that close person in your life.

How to find an accountability partner to help you reach your goal

There is certainly no shortage of goal setting when looking forward in your career.

Often times, the goals we set are large, hearty and ambitious. And something about our assessment of our abilities suggests that, though large, these goals are attainable. That’s just the easy part—the goal setting.

Things tend to get tricky, however, after the goals are set and we are then charged with attaining said set goals. Our intention is always there. We want to do precisely what we set out to do, but that want is simply not enough. Attaining goals takes action–it takes strategy, a plan, a vision, precise steps, and in many cases, it takes sound, unwavering  accountability.

If you take a poll of successful goal attainers many will tell you that often times their reasons for reaching new heights exceeding themselves—they had someone or something to answer to. Who or what do you have?

Find accountability and hold steadfast as you embark on your goal attaining journey. Some of the best and most effective accountability may come from a friend, colleague or mentor. Here are a few tips for selecting an accountability partner that may be best for you.

  1. Find someone more disciplined than you are. It would behoove you to select a partner that doesn’t take it easy on themselves, thus, are less likely to take it easy on you. If you know someone who tends to put their money where their mouth is, that’s your guy…or gal.
  2. Choose a partner you’d be remiss to disappoint. You may be willing to let yourself down, but have someone in your corner that you wouldn’t let down if your life depended on it. That’s an ideal accountability partner candidate. Find someone who you’d hate to say, ‘I haven’t done it yet’ to, especially if you’d assured them the deed would be done.
  3. Find a partner who has the time to invest in your goals. We’re all pretty busy doing what we can for ourselves. If you happen to know someone who is just as invested in seeing you do well as they are in themselves, you might want to hold on tight. Create a set time/date periodically to check in with your partner to ensure milestones are reached. If your partner is consistently unavailable for check-in, you may want to reconsider your choice.
  4. The more the merrier. No need to put all your eggs in one basket. The more partners you have to answer to, the less likely you are to want to answer ‘no.’ Find a select few that won’t take it easy on you.
  5. Hold your accountability partners accountable. Let your partners know that you are counting on them to keep you on track. If they slip, you may just as likely. There’s certainly no need for that. Let your partner(s) know ahead of time what you’re expecting from them and hold them to that expectation. You’ll be glad you did.

Learn the value of surrounding yourself with the best people to help you reach your career heights at the 2016 Black Enterprise Women of Power Summit, March 9-12, at the Hilton Diplomat Resort & Spa, Hollywood, Florida, for the Women of Power Summit. Register now. For information on the 2016 Women of Power Summit, including sessions, speakers and performers click here.

How to find an accountability partner to help you reach your goal

Goal achievement is NOT an individual sport. While you may be the one who sets the goals and you may be the one who benefits from achieving your goals, you can’t do it alone, no matter what your goal is. It takes a team to help you reach your goals.

The first members of your team should be the individuals who will help you to learn the necessary skills to reach your goals. If you want to get healthy and fit, you might need a personal trainer or nutritionist to help you know exactly what YOU need to do to reach your goal. If you want to get out of debt, you may want to hire a debt counselor to walk you through some of the steps.

The next team members should be your cheerleaders. These are the individuals with whom you share your goals and know that they will be there to support you and lift you up while cheering you on. Cheerleaders may join you on your journey and support you through being a partner as well. You might find cheerleaders in your friends and family or you may need to look to others such as networking groups or uplines.

And finally, you have accountability partners. These individuals are a unique breed and require careful selection. Here are some of the things to consider when looking for a good accountability partner.

  1. Spouses and/or significant others DO NOT make good accountability partners. There’s just too close of a relationship there to make this work. I have an amazing relationship with my husband and I would NEVER consider ruining that through working with him as my accountability partner. Even if you work with your spouse, it isn’t a good idea. See Business Partners.
  2. Business Partners do not make good accountability partners. They are too involved in the end goals to be objective.
  3. Friends and family do not make good accountability partners. They are likely to be either too soft on you or too critical. Accountability partners need to be able to walk a fine line between being understanding and not letting you get away with your BS.
  4. Colleagues do not make good accountability partners. They are usually great for a week, maybe three if you are lucky. After that, they get distracted with their own objectives and goals and don’t stay in touch with you or follow up when you don’t check in.
  5. An effective accountability partner should have an ability to determine your motivational style so they can help yo develop a plan that will keep you engaged in your goals long after the initial excitement has worn off.
  6. An effective accountability partner should be willing to follow up with you when you fail to check in on your goals.
  7. An effective accountability partner will hold you to your commitments even when you have a “really good reason” for not doing what you committed to.
  8. An effective accountability partner will be there to help you brainstorm solutions to challenges that are getting in your way.
  9. An effective accountability partner will help you to see just how far you’ve come when doubt and fatigue are setting in.

It isn’t always easy to find a partner that will truly be committed to helping you achieve your goals. Most people have a lot going on and would love to help but just can’t spare that much of a mental commitment let alone a time commitment to check in with you regularly. If you are able to find someone who is willing to make this kind of a commitment to you and your goals, be sure to write out a clear description of what the expectations are from both parties. This will help to remind you each of what your responsibilities are to be. Also be sure to include a clear end date that may or may not be renewed as agreed upon by both parties.

The one thing that can help you reach your health and fitness goals.

How to find an accountability partner to help you reach your goal

“Accountability” is when you take responsibility for your actions. When you “own” them.

And it’s key to improving your health and wellness.

Have you ever bought a book or program with the absolute best intentions of following it to a “T?” Have you ever not followed it completely? Life gets in the way. We get too tired or busy and let a day or two slide. Then, sometimes, we completely fall off the bandwagon.

This happens to the best of us – Yes, even to me! You can have all the right information, but the implementation is the hard part.

Accountability is more of the “doing” than the “knowing.” It’s when you already know what you should be doing; but, doing it doesn’t always happen. And accountability, when you know someone is measuring or checking your actions, makes you more likely to do them.

How to find an accountability partner to help you reach your goal

What are some options for accountability?

  1. Start an activity journal– Just writing down the amount of exercise you do each day can increase your accountability. You can use a calendar or a blank notebook. For each day record:
  • Time/duration;
  • Which exercise is done;
  • Distance or repetitions;
  • Intensity (easy/moderate/vigorous);
  • Notes or comments (what improvements you can make for next time); and,
  • How you feel afterwards – Use this last item to motivate yourself to capture that feeling again.

Bonus points for logging what and how much you eat every day. That will help keep you accountable on the nutrition side too.

  1. Use a fitness tracker – Would you believe that a Harvard study of fitness habits in postmenopausal women showed that a fitness tracker increased the amount of exercise they did? Two groups of women were advised to walk 10,000 steps each day and get 150 minutes of moderate/vigorous physical activity each week. One group was given a pedometer. The other was given a pedometer plus a fitness tracker. Guess how much more activity the fitness tracker group increased each week? Thirty eight minutes! Yes, just having a fitness tracker increased activity, while the pedometer-only group had no change.

The conclusion? Having the tracker increased their accountability, measurement of the activities, and motivation to do them.

I like using a Fitbit, but there are now a ton of options out there, so find one that fits your needs and budget.

  1. Get an “accountability buddy” – Find a workout buddy. Someone who you can go for walks or to the gym with. If not, ask someone you trust to follow up with you every few days on your tracked activities. Make sure they know your “why” and can remind you of it when you need it. Have them spend a few minutes reviewing your journal/tracker and give you some “tough love” from time to time.
  2. Make a plan that sustainable and fits your lifestyle – Avoid plans that are nearly impossible to follow long term. Think in terms of lifestyle changes.
  3. Hire a health coach (like me). I love supporting people who are on a path to better health and finding the way to do so with busy lives.

How to find an accountability partner to help you reach your goal

WHERE TO START

You don’t need to exercise like crazy to improve your health and lose weight. You just need to do it regularly. Here are my recommended steps:

  • Talk to your doctor before beginning any exercise program.
  • Start from where you are and do a bit more every day.
  • Always remember your “why.”
  • If you need accountability, decide whether you’d prefer an activity journal or a fitness tracker. And use it daily. Track your exercise and what you eat and drink too.
  • If you need an accountability buddy, ask a trusted friend or family member; or contact me (your health coach) and we can have a free strategy session to see how I can support your health goals.

Why you need an accountability partner + how to find yours today

Accountability is key when applying for scholarships, jobs, and college. It is easy to become overwhelmed with deadlines, the seemingly unending amount of tasks, and other outside responsibilities awaiting you. This is why it is so important to find an accountability partner to keep you motivated and on track to reach your goals.

What is an accountability partner?

Accountability Partner [noun]. This is someone who has your back and will be by your side throughout the application process. Your accountability partner helps you stay committed to your goals and motivated to reach them.

This person can be someone going through the same process or experience as you. When you are in it together, helping each other, it makes you both much stronger because you are supporting one another.

But this person can also be someone who just wants the best for you. It could be a parent, a teacher, a college counselor, or even a good friend.

Our Marketing Intern, Heather, found her accountability partner in her mother.

“Throughout high school, I would occasionally become overwhelmed with exams, sports, or work and momentarily forget deadlines to scholarships. Thankfully she would remind me just in time, never doing the work for me, simply reminding me that if I did not turn in that scholarship I had completed, but never submitted, I would not have a chance of winning. Having this constant support and love from my accountability partner was essential to managing everything on my plate.”

How do you find an accountability partner?

Finding an accountability partner is actually easier than you think.

  1. First, write down the goals you are trying to achieve. This step will ensure you pick the right person to hold you accountable.
  2. Next, make a list of everyone in your life who wants the best for you, is going through something similar OR has knowledge and expertise about what it’s like to be where you are. This could be your best friend, a family member, a fellow classmate, a parent, or someone else.
  3. Now, ask yourself who of these people who be the best fit to hold you accountable to your goals. Make sure this is someone you trust and respect. This should also be someone who will understand and support the goals you have set, whether that is applying for scholarships or finding a summer job.

How do I get started with my accountability partner?

Once you pick your accountability partner, you’ll need to ask them if they would be willing to support you on this journey.

To get started, chat with them about your goals, why you are trying to achieve them and how you plan to succeed. You will also need to let them know HOW they can best support you.

  • Do you need a daily, weekly, or monthly check-in?
  • Do you want them to call you, text you, or check-in with you in person?

Make a plan for how they can help you stay accountable.

BONUS TIP: Sometimes it is helpful to come up with a reward for yourself once you meet your goal. Make sure you share this with your accountability partner so that they can help you celebrate and remind you of what’s at stake.

Accountability is key when it comes to winning scholarships, finding job or internship opportunities, and submitting college applications. In order to be successful, you have to stay organized and motivated. It is too easy to become sidetracked and overwhelmed with school, work, and family life. Making sure you have that balance, organization, and your partner by your side is essential.

Are you looking for an accountability partner who has been there before and walked this same path of applying to college and working to win as many scholarships as possible? We offer support and accountability to students and parents on this college bound journey.

Accountability leads you to success

No matter how bad you want to accomplish something, sometimes it’s just difficult to stay motivated. That’s why accountability is such an important part of reaching your goals. Many people struggle when they’re only accountable to themselves.

If you have struggled with this in the past, an accountability partner can be just the thing you need to help you reach your goal.

I know good accountability is hard to find because I spent years trying to find a mentor or accountability partner. I contacted resources that I found online, talked to other professionals like business coaches, and joined membership groups. This process helped me get crystal clear on what I was looking for in someone to help me reach my goals.

I realized if I had struggled for years to find the right fit that other women might be going through the same struggle. I hate to see people not reaching their potential and being stuck in a place in their life. That is why I am now offering online accountability coaching services.

Here’s what you can expect:

  • Help setting clear goals
  • Assistance in breaking your goals up into a workable plan
  • Access to a tracking system to help measure your progress
  • Support and encouragement
  • Someone to celebrate your wins with you
  • Progress in finding success while learning how to be accountable to yourself

You should not feel guilty, ashamed, or fearful when you are working with an accountability partner. You should feel motivated to do the work that you are committing to do. While I can’t do the work for you, I can help you step by step so you can start making the progress you desire.

A Quick Kick in the Pants! – $99 (one-time fee)

This is a great package for you if you know you have what it takes, but just need a little help getting started. Maybe you have a goal but aren’t sure what steps to take to help you get there. Or you just need a push to help you get started. This package is to help you turn that desire you have into action.

Here’s how it works:

  • You’ll complete a questionnaire so I can get to know you and what you’re after.
  • We’ll have a 60-minute call to hammer out goals and a plan.
  • I’ll set you up with an accountability system to help you track your progress towards reaching your goals.
  • You’ll have 30 days to use the system to work towards your goal. The whole time knowing that someone (me!) is watching your progress.
  • Then, we’ll have a quick 20-minute follow-up call at the end of the month to discuss your progress and your next steps.

You’ll also receive:

  • Access to the how-to videos showing you exactly how to use the accountability system to help you stay on track
  • Emails with accountability tips and encouragement

I Can’t Do This Alone! – $300/month

If you’ve struggled in the past with staying accountable to yourself, this is the plan for you! We will work together throughout the month to help you make progress towards reaching your goal. This plan is for women that are serious about seeing changes in their life. If you know you want changes, but aren’t sure exactly what needs to change, that’s OK. We will talk about it and figure out the steps together.

Here’s how it works:

  • You’ll complete a questionnaire so I can get to know you and what you’re after.
  • We’ll have a 60-minute call to hammer out goals and a plan.
  • I’ll set you up with an accountability system to help you track your progress towards reaching your goals.
  • You’ll track your actions each week and I’ll be watching to see how things are going.
  • We’ll have 30-minute calls (phone or Zoom video calls) once a week to review your progress and talk through any obstacles or challenges you’re running into.
  • We’ll decide together on tasks for you to complete throughout the upcoming week to help you stay on track.

You’ll also have:

  • Access to unlimited email communication throughout the month. This allows us to make real-time adjustments to the plan as needed.
  • Access to a journal to document your experiences and progress within the system.
  • Emails personalized with accountability tips and encouragement just for you
  • Someone that will celebrate your success with you and help you realign your plan after setbacks

**These packages are only a month-to-month commitment. You don’t have to lock in for a set number of months and you can change from one package to the next at the start of each month. **