How to find the right career when you’re undecided

Whether you are just about to graduate or just entering your professional life, it’s all important to decide your career path first.

Choosing a career is one of those significant decisions which set the direction of your professional life. And with a number of options available, it’s not easy to decide which one is right for you. Not only you have to look at what you can do for the rest of your life, but also look at the gains that come with it.

If you are deciding what career to choose but don’t have any idea, you will find it as an insurmountable task. However, that shouldn’t be the case. Sufficient information regarding different careers and self-examination can help in increasing your chances of making a good decision.

Anyhow, to make things a bit easier for you, I’ve compiled a few tips that you should consider when choosing a career, especially when you are undecided.

Perform a Self-Assessment

Self-assessment is a valuable factor when it comes to finding the right career for oneself. Before choosing a career that you think is right for you, it’s important to learn about yourself first.

In this step, you need to know what your values are, where your interests lie, what soft skills you have and what your personality type is.

When trying to learn about yourself, you may also want to write notes. When kept it side-by-side with different career options, notes on your personality can help you to analyze a career option in an effective way. They can help you find appropriate occupations that match your traits and skills.

Fortunately, there are a number of self-assessment tools available that can help you generate a list of occupations based on your personality type. Generally, these self-assessments help you find key soft skills, technical skills, natural aptitude, and interests.

That’s why it’s important to perform self- assessment first before finding the right career type.

Write and Explore All Occupations in the List

Once you have self-assessed yourself, it’s time to make a list of occupations that match your personality type. At this point, you should list down all occupations generated by the self-assessment tools and leave a blank space between them.

Next, fill the space with some basic information about each occupation on our list. The list may include occupations that you already know a bit and others that you know nothing about.

Once you have a broad list of occupations with their detailed descriptions, go through each of them separately, and highlight those that appeal you must. This will help you narrow down to only 10 to 20 career options, from which you can pick the most suitable one yourself in the later stage.

Narrow Down Your List

Once you have a small list of preferred job occupations, start to narrow down the list even more. At this point consider only jobs that sound interesting or desirable to you.

Cut the occupations from the list that you don’t want to pursue, based on what you have learned about them already. And while doing so, make sure you are going through their roles and not just the title. As at times, the title doesn’t represent the actual job perfectly.

To help you in the process, you can use one or more of these following factors.

Salary

Check out the average compensation for a particular job role regardless you have salary specific requirement or not. It will help you determine the demands of professionals in a particular job role.

Job Requirements

Take a look at the type of academic credentials required for a job role. In the process, you may find different roles that don’t match your academic credentials. So it can help to narrow down your career options.

Growth Opportunities

It’s important to choose a career that offers growth opportunities. This means you will have a chance to progress ahead in your career, learn new things, and enjoy higher compensation benefits as your career advances.

Learn more about different career options so you can easily find about their different growth opportunities.

Job Outlook

With all other key factors t, it’s equally important to learn how a particular career option stands in the job market. Analyze whether a job role has steady hiring, career enhancement opportunities, and other benefits.

Get In-depth Information Regarding Roles

By now you probably would be left with only a few career options that are most relevant, suit your personality style, and perfectly matches your needs.

At this point arrange to meet people that already work in the profession you are interested to get into. Connecting with these professionals and obtaining firsthand knowledge about their roles will help you to finalize between 2 or 3 options to build a career in.

Make a Career Choice

Finally, after spending a long time researching about different career choice, it’s now time to decide which career path you want to pick for yourself. Be wise when making a decision. Keep all those factors in mind that are important to you.

Pick that option which you think will give you the most satisfactory professional career for life. Keep in mind you can’t switch careers often in your life. And It’s tough to change careers once you are in it for a few years.

Identify Short Term and Long Term Goals

Once you have picked up the right career for yourself, you need to identify for goals to work effectively in your chosen field. Let it be a digital marketer, a copywriter or a lawyer, these goals will help you reach a good position in your field.

Typically short-term goals are usually for six months to three years, while long-term goals are for three to five years. In case you find it tough to identify them, perform some research. In fact, the research you did for picking the ideal career path will help you identify these goals.

Anything from completing your education and training can be a long time goal. Meanwhile, internships and applying and improving a skill set can be a short term goal.

Put Down Your Career Action Plan

Successful careers always have action plans behind them. They act like a road map through which people can reach their career goals.

Write down a career action plan that will help you reach places in your professional life. And while doing so, don’t forget to anticipate different barriers that can come your way and ways you can overcome them to get your goals.

Choosing the right career is not an easy task for many. Some struggle and some find it impossible to find just the right career for them. However, these steps can help you find out and decide, which career is right for you to pursue.

Author Bio:

Anna Marsh is an academic writer and editor at a premium assignment help UK company. She is also an inspirational writer that contributes articles on different platforms from time to time. She likes to write on topics related to education, career planning, and entrepreneurship. When she is not writing, she reads and seeks a better understanding of the professional world.

8 Steps to Choosing a Career

How to find the right career when you're undecided

Image by Lisa Fasol © The Balance 2019

With thousands of options, how will you choose a career that’s right for you? If you don’t have any idea what you want to do, the task may seem insurmountable. Fortunately, it isn’t. Follow an organized process and you will increase your chances of making a good decision.

Assess Yourself

How to find the right career when you're undecided

Before you can choose the right career, you must learn about yourself. Your values, interests, soft skills, and aptitudes, in combination with your personality type, make some occupations a good fit for you and others completely inappropriate.

Use self-assessment tools, and career tests to gather information about your traits and, subsequently, generate a list of occupations that are a good fit based on them. Some people choose to work with a career counselor or other career development professionals who can help them navigate this process.

Make a List of Occupations to Explore

How to find the right career when you're undecided

You probably have multiple lists of occupations in front of you at this point—one generated by each of the self-assessment tools you used. To keep yourself organized, you should combine them into one master list.

First, look for careers that appear on multiple lists and copy them onto a blank page. Title it “Occupations to Explore.” Your self-assessments ​indicated they are a good fit for you based on several of your traits, so they’re definitely worth exploring.

Next, find any occupations on your lists that appeal to you. They may be careers you know a bit about and want to explore further. Also, include professions about which you don’t know much. You might learn something unexpected.

Explore the Occupations on Your List

How to find the right career when you're undecided

At this point, you’ll be thrilled you managed to narrow your list down to only 10 to 20 options. Now you can get some basic information about each of the occupations on your list.

Find job descriptions and educational, training, and licensing requirements in published sources. Learn about advancement opportunities. Use government-produced labor market information to get data about earnings and job outlook.

Create a “Short List”

How to find the right career when you're undecided

Now you have more information, start to narrow down your list even further. Based on what you learned from your research so far, begin eliminating the careers you don’t want to pursue any further. You should end up with two to five occupations on your “short list.”

If your reasons for finding a career unacceptable are non-negotiable, cross it off your list. Remove everything with duties that don’t appeal to you. Eliminate careers that have weak job outlooks. Get rid of any occupation if you are unable or unwilling to fulfill the educational or other requirements, or if you lack some of the soft skills necessary to succeed in it.

Conduct Informational Interviews

How to find the right career when you're undecided

When you have only a few occupations left on your list, start doing more in-depth research. Arrange to meet with people who work in the occupations in which you are interested. They can provide firsthand knowledge about the careers on your short list. Access your network, including LinkedIn, to find people with whom to have these informational interviews.

Make Your Career Choice

How to find the right career when you're undecided

Finally, after doing all your research, you are probably ready to make your choice. Pick the occupation that you think will bring you the most satisfaction based on all the information you have gathered. Realize that you are allowed do-overs if you change your mind about your choice at any point in your life. Many people change their careers at least a few times.

Identify Your Goals

How to find the right career when you're undecided

Once you make a decision, identify your long- and short-term goals. This helps to chart a course toward eventually landing work in your chosen field. Long-term goals typically take about three to five years to reach, while you can usually fulfill a short-term goal in six months to three years.

Let the research you did about required education and training be your guide. If you don’t have all the details, do some more research. Once you have all the information you need, set your goals. An example of a long-term goal would be completing your education and training. Short-term goals include applying to college, apprenticeships, other training programs, and internships.

Write a Career Action Plan

How to find the right career when you're undecided

Put together a career action plan, a written document that lays out all the steps you will have to take to reach your goals. Think of it as a road map that will take you from point A to B, then to C and D. Write down all your short- and long-term goals and the steps you will have to take to reach each one. Include any anticipated barriers that could get in the way of achieving your goals—and the ways you can overcome them.

This may sound like a lot of work—and it is. But it’s much easier to forge a career path when you know what you want. Taking these steps early will save you a lot of struggle and uncertainty in the long run.

How to find the right career when you're undecided

So, you can’t figure out what you want for a career. No big deal, it happens to the majority of students.

If you already know you don’t want to go to a college, and you’ve realized the trades route is for you, then you’ve made a quite a dent in the whole decision. The next part, though, is deciding which skilled trade is right for you.

Let’s explore the facts and fiction of skilled trades, and why undecided students going into one of the 6.7 million available trade skills jobs may be a good idea.

Shortage of Skilled Workers Can Work to Your Benefit

Currently, there are millions of jobs open within the skilled trades. Why is this major skilled tradesman shortage a big deal? Because we also have a crumbling infrastructure issue here in the United States.

Once the craze for college degrees took over, trades promotion fell to the side. However, our nation would come to a standstill without those who are skilled in the ways of the different trades.

It’s not reaching to say skilled tradespeople can act as heroes who save the world from the brink of potential disasters, and on a daily basis. We’ve seen it often in the medical community, the truck drivers and construction workers in and after hurricanes, and the firefighters, paramedics, and rescue teams fighting forest fires.

Employers are working to attract people to the skilled trades, now more than ever. Sign-on bonuses, higher pay, and better benefits are just a few items they are offering to potential employees.

Why Skilled Trades Are Important

Things break that need fixing. Buildings, bridges, and roads need to be built or rebuilt. Items need to be moved. Who’s going to take care of all that? The plumber. The electrician. The nurse. The truck driver. The IT person. That’s who.

Trades are important because everything in our lives, at some point in their cycle, was touched by a tradesman. Everything. From the clothes on your back to the device you’re reading this article or the building you’re in—it was all because someone in a skilled trade made it available to you in one way or another, from the creation all the way through the delivery. And THAT is why trades are important.

Popular Skilled Trades If You’re Undecided

If you’re interested in entering a trade for the fast training and high pay but don’t know which one is best for you, take a look at the following selection as a starting point.

These popular skilled trades and medical careers offer job security and good pay:

How to find the right career when you're undecided

Are you stuck in a career that you’re not passionate about?

If so, you’re not alone. Most of us choose a career based on interests that we develop during our teens or early twenties. And since our interests and priorities change over time, it’s not uncommon to find yourself in a profession that’s not a good match anymore. The good news is that it’s entirely possible to change career paths. The following seven tips will help you get started:

    Use a career test to perform a self-assessment. As Dawn Rosenberg McKay advises in her article “How to Make a Career Choice When You Are Undecided” for The Balance, career tests can help clarify your interests, skills, values, and personality type. Most career tests provide you with a list of occupations that could be a good match once you’ve completed them.

Research the occupations that appeal to you most. Use online and educational resources to learn more about each profession. Although a quick Google search will most likely give you some basic information, it can be helpful to visit professional organizations’ websites for further insights. In addition, you could find out who the thought leaders are in each field and look for articles, interviews and videos featuring them. Finally, narrow your list down to one occupation you want to pursue.

Determine if you need to retrain. Depending on your transferable skills and experience, you may have to get additional education. If so, work out a plan that will allow you to do so while you’re still working your current job.

Research industries and companies you’re interested in. No matter how much you like a job description, it’s important to be aware that the industry you’re in and the company you work at play a large role in your happiness. Spend some time finding out about various relevant industries, as well as which companies have the kind of projects and ethos you’re looking for.

Network. In her Inc.com article titled “Wrong Career Path (and 4 Steps to Get You Back on Track),” career coach J.T. O’Donnell points out that nowadays, almost all positions are filled as a result of referrals. That’s why you have to leverage your network by constantly making new contacts, cultivating existing contacts, and trying to get a connection to the company where you want to work.

Perform informational interviews. Jessica Abo offers some good advice about informational interviewing — speaking to a seasoned professional in a specific field or company to learn more. In her Entrepreneur article “Successfully Change Gears After Choosing the Wrong Career Path,” she recommends rehearsing your message so you know what you want to say, sending a thank you email, and following up with whatever you agreed to do — whether that’s contacting someone or scheduling an appointment for a more in-depth conversation.

  • Work with a recruiter. A recruiter can help you find jobs that are a good match for your skills and preferences while still taking your experience into account. Moreover, recruiters hear about jobs before they’re posted on job boards and can help get your résumé on the right desks.
  • It’s only logical to be a bit intimidated at the prospect of changing careers. But when you’re passionate about what you want to do for the rest of your working life, the time and energy you invest now are nothing short of an investment in your professional and personal happiness.

    November 21, 2020

    Choosing the right career isn’t easy, especially when you’re just starting out or making a career switch.

    Many people start their career, thinking it’s the best profession for them to follow. But after some time, they start feeling confused and disillusioned. This can demotivate them, lower their confidence, and hamper their overall personality and mental state.

    That’s why it’s important for you to choose the right career even if it means a career switch. But sometimes, when you try to choose between careers, you might find yourself in the midst of confusion and uncertainty. Yet, you have to make a choice.

    So how do you make the right decision when you’re undecided? Here are a few tips to help you choose the right career that offers job satisfaction and peace of mind.

    1. Assess Yourself

    The first step to choosing the right career when undecided is self-assessment. This helps you get clarity on your interests, skills, personality type, and values. In doing so, consider your life experiences too.

    Many people think that their resume should consist of the details of their formal education, job experiences, skills, and achievements that they have attained so far. But you fail to realize that apart from that, you also have other life experiences. These experiences might appear to be insignificant, but they have taught you many skills that you have forgotten about.

    For example, if you have lived in a different city, you probably must have learned a different language or something about its culture. Don’t ignore these experiences. The same is true for your hobbies too.

    Take some time and think of any such noteworthy experience in your life. This process will give you better insight into yourself, and you’ll discover a new you that you were totally unaware of. It’s a very good way of knowing what you’re capable of doing.

    2. List it Down

    Now that you know your skills start making a list of the career options you have. This list can be a long one. But that’s okay. Once you have the final list, pick the most relevant options, and make another list.

    In doing so, make sure you include only those career options that you’re truly interested in. Of course, you have to look at the financial benefits too. Consider both the aspects while making your list.

    Now do your research and find detailed information about each of these career options.

    You can easily find out details like job descriptions, average salary, skills, and qualifications required, etc., with a quick Google search. This can be tedious and time-consuming but don’t give up unless you have all the information in hand.

    Your next task is to narrow down this list to 3-4 career options that you want to explore.

    Now write down your expectations in terms of the job outlook, salary, position, etc. This will help you identify what you really want to achieve in your career and what jobs to look for.

    So your final list will contain 3-4 career options, and next to each of these options, you’ll write down your salary expectations, job outlook, and job position that you are willing to take up.

    3. Make a Choice

    Now that you have all the details in hand, it’s time for you to make a choice. Don’t be too quick in choosing your career. Consider different factors and see if the option you pick will offer job satisfaction.

    Don’t forget that switching careers too often isn’t possible. And you might have to stick to this career for a long time. You also need to consider your priorities in life.

    For example, if you like spending time with your family, you may not want a job that involves a lot of traveling. So take some time and see how your career can affect your priorities.

    It really matters if you’ll truly like your career. If you aren’t sure, you need to move on to the next option on your list. Go through all your options and pick the one that best meets your expectations.

    Not everyone is fortunate enough to pursue their dream career. But that doesn’t mean you’ll give up. All you need to do is stay positive and keep looking.

    Until then, try to make your current job more enjoyable. Try finding out the reasons why you dislike your current job. Once you identify the reason, you can make efforts to fix it.

    For example, you may not have the skills for your current position, which is making your job more difficult for you. In that case, you might want to take a course and improve your skills. Or you may want to shift to another department in the office that lets you work with things you like. That way, even if you’re stuck with a job you dislike, you won’t feel demoralized.

    Finding the perfect career can sometimes be difficult. But with the right plan of action and correct approach, you can easily find a job that you love.

    How to find the right career when you're undecided

    How to find the right career when you're undecided

    This identification—and then resulting action—is easier said than done. The mere thought of ditching a career you’ve spent years or even decades building in order to dive into uncharted territory can seem impossible at times, or even irresponsible. But it is possible, and it’s possible to do responsibly with the correct dose of courage, heap of passion, and willingness to take a leap of faith, all in the name of following your purpose and doing work that deeply fulfills you.

    For me, that looked like adding “manifestation coach” to my journalism-heavy résumé. And sure, that may constitute more of a pivot, or even the addition of a side hustle than a full-on career change, but the personal change still required me to engage an introspective audit of what fulfilling my goals would look like. Below, two career coaches share how to find the right career for you and what moves to make next for a seamless and successful transition.

    1. Get clear on why you want to change careers

    Ashley Marie, career-transition specialist and founder of Ashley Marie Coaching, suggests doing some serious self-reflection to get clear with yourself about why you want to make the shift. She says to ask yourself whether you feel a lack of fulfillment as a result of your specific job at your specific company or whether the issue is more macro in terms of skills you’re using. If it’s a matter of features about your current role not working for you, perhaps a new position at a different company within the same industry can suffice in terms making a healthy change.

    But if the issue is more macro, and you feel there’s another skill or passion that you want to explore that your current role doesn’t allow for? It could be time for a bigger change.

    2. Define your vision

    After you clarify your “why,” for the type of change you’re shooting for, whether that’s inter- or intra-industry, the next step in knowing how to find the right career is pinpointing your ideal next gig, and maybe even job title. “This is the time for unicorn brainstorming and suspending all your what-ifs, doubts, and excuses,” says Megan Accardo, career and business coach and host of the Power Your Purpose podcast. Allow yourself to dream big and tap into what you really want to do rather than what you think you should or what other people say you should.

    “This is the time for unicorn brainstorming and suspending all your what-ifs, doubts, and excuses.” —Megan Accardo, career coach

    No idea where to even start? Accardo recommends getting clear on any of the smaller details you know for sure, like the type of environment you like to work in, the things people often seek your help to complete, what you don’t like about your current job or industry, and what parts genuinely bring you joy. The more details you can note about what you do and don’t want in your new career, however small, the clearer you’ll be on your vision.

    3. Map out your action plan

    Next, Marie suggests getting clear on what your career-transition action plan will entail. What do you need to do in order to get from where you currently are to where you want to go? Maybe you need to polish your résumé, develop a certain skill set, take certain classes, network, or address the financial component that may come from taking a different job. (If you’re starting in a new industry, you may take a pay cut for coming in at an entry level, for instance.) Map it all out.

    4. Start taking baby steps

    While you may feel encouraged and inspired to get started on making your new vision a reality, know that carving out a new career path isn’t an overnight job, and getting ahead of yourself can open you up to gaps in your employment and, as such, potential financial stress. That’s why Accardo recommends starting with small steps.

    “It is important to start laying the foundation for your new career when you are not in ‘panic-mode’ and still able to provide for basic financial needs,” she says. “You may have to spend nights and weekends investing in your new endeavors. Remember this stage will not last forever.” So, that action plan you mapped out in step three? If possible, implement it in stages while you’re still working the job and career you want to leave.

    5. Take a leap of faith

    Once you’ve identified you why you want a career change (and to which intended career), laid out an action plan, and started implementing it, it’s time to go all in and fully take the leap. It’ll likely feel scary, but don’t let that hold you back. Especially given that you’ve done your due diligence to make the shift mindfully and responsibly, you should enjoy a feeling of confidence in your choice. “You will never feel completely ready, so trust the process and know that you can do hard things,” Accardo says. “Embracing change and being committed to moving toward a new career or new job that brings a sense of greater purpose is always worthwhile.”

    Now that you’re clearer on how to find the right career, here’s how your astrology chart can help you unlock secrets to success. And for more tips on finding the right path for you, here’s how your Myers-Briggs personality plays into your job choice.

    How to find the right career when you're undecided

    Are you stuck in a career that you’re not passionate about?

    If so, you’re not alone. Most of us choose a career based on interests that we develop during our teens or early twenties. And since our interests and priorities change over time, it’s not uncommon to find yourself in a profession that’s not a good match anymore. The good news is that it’s entirely possible to change career paths. The following seven tips will help you get started:

      Use a career test to perform a self-assessment. As Dawn Rosenberg McKay advises in her article “How to Make a Career Choice When You Are Undecided” for The Balance, career tests can help clarify your interests, skills, values, and personality type. Most career tests provide you with a list of occupations that could be a good match once you’ve completed them.

    Research the occupations that appeal to you most. Use online and educational resources to learn more about each profession. Although a quick Google search will most likely give you some basic information, it can be helpful to visit professional organizations’ websites for further insights. In addition, you could find out who the thought leaders are in each field and look for articles, interviews and videos featuring them. Finally, narrow your list down to one occupation you want to pursue.

    Determine if you need to retrain. Depending on your transferable skills and experience, you may have to get additional education. If so, work out a plan that will allow you to do so while you’re still working your current job.

    Research industries and companies you’re interested in. No matter how much you like a job description, it’s important to be aware that the industry you’re in and the company you work at play a large role in your happiness. Spend some time finding out about various relevant industries, as well as which companies have the kind of projects and ethos you’re looking for.

    Network. In her Inc.com article titled “Wrong Career Path (and 4 Steps to Get You Back on Track),” career coach J.T. O’Donnell points out that nowadays, almost all positions are filled as a result of referrals. That’s why you have to leverage your network by constantly making new contacts, cultivating existing contacts, and trying to get a connection to the company where you want to work.

    Perform informational interviews. Jessica Abo offers some good advice about informational interviewing — speaking to a seasoned professional in a specific field or company to learn more. In her Entrepreneur article “Successfully Change Gears After Choosing the Wrong Career Path,” she recommends rehearsing your message so you know what you want to say, sending a thank you email, and following up with whatever you agreed to do — whether that’s contacting someone or scheduling an appointment for a more in-depth conversation.

  • Work with a recruiter. A recruiter can help you find jobs that are a good match for your skills and preferences while still taking your experience into account. Moreover, recruiters hear about jobs before they’re posted on job boards and can help get your résumé on the right desks.
  • It’s only logical to be a bit intimidated at the prospect of changing careers. But when you’re passionate about what you want to do for the rest of your working life, the time and energy you invest now are nothing short of an investment in your professional and personal happiness.

    How to find the right career when you're undecided

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    Most of the choices we make every day are simple and straight-forward: what to wear to work, what to eat for lunch, whether to go to sleep at a reasonable hour or stay up watching Netflix. They don’t cause much stress or inner conflict.

    Career transition points, on the other hand, can leave you feeling significantly more stuck—especially when you’re facing a big, life-changing decisions.

    Should you take that promotion? Move to a different city? Transition to a new industry? Launch a business or take your side hustle full-time?

    Decision-making is tough, particularly when there may not be one “right” answer. Despite your best efforts, it’s not always clear what to do next. How do you know whether you’re heading in the right direction, or about to make a bad career move you’ll regret?

    1. You have a sense of foreboding.

    Just about everyone has experienced a feeling that something is “off” or a sense of dread they can’t shake. Does that sensation creep up when you think about the new opportunity?

    (Photo courtesy of Shutterstock)

    Maybe you didn’t feel much of a connection with the new team you’d potentially be working with when you met them. Or perhaps you’re starting to worry about relocation costs and not as willing to take a pay cut as you first thought.

    Although most of us come equipped with a sense of intuition when something doesn’t feel right, we also have plenty of ways to rationalize these feelings away and ultimately discount them. You certainly don’t want to turn down a great offer or miss out on a solid opportunity because you’re feeling nervous. A big career move is bound to cause some butterflies.

    But an ongoing feeling of discomfort could be a sign you’re not ready or that this career move isn’t the best option for you. Try out the 10/10/10 test to slow down your thinking and separate fact from fiction in your mind: will this concern matter 10 weeks from now? 10 months from now? 10 years? Your answers can help you put things in perspective.

    For instance, if you’re incompatible with your colleagues, that could absolutely matter 10 months or even 10 years down the line. Getting used to a longer commute, however, might be something you could become accustomed to in 10 weeks or less.

    2. You’re feeling desperate.

    Feelings of desperation may take root when you’re deeply unhappy with your current position, or when you and your family are in a difficult financial situation. You might have an anxious feeling of simply wanting to get the decision over with.

    When you feel panicky, it’s tough to maintain perspective, so consult someone who doesn’t share your emotional attachment to the situation. This may include a trusted friend, mentor or coach who can help you sort through options in an objective way. You may be amazed at how much easier it is to calm down and think rationally after getting out of your own head.

    3. Your motivations aren’t healthy.

    Be honest with yourself: are you considering this opportunity to spite someone else—to make your old co-workers jealous maybe? Taking a new job to sidestep criticism from family and friends or hiding the decision altogether are also bad signs you’re making an escape-based choice that you could regret in the future.

    Gallery: 10 Things To Do When You Hate Your Job

    If you find yourself venting to anyone who will listen ranging from your mom to a stranger on the bus or indiscriminately seeking advice, you’re likely being driven by fear. This type of “polling” behavior is done in an attempt to feel better. You seek external validation that you’re doing the right thing. But you essentially outsource your decision making to other people when you ask everyone for advice instead of becoming self-reliant. It’s important to learn to trust yourself.

    4. You have to talk yourself into it.

    You may find the pep talks you give yourself turning into last-resort trumpet songs. Your self-talk may include some version of the phrase, “Well, at least I…”

    • “Well, at least I have a job…”
    • “Well, at least I’ll be making more money…”
    • “Well, at least it will technically be a promotion…”
    • “Well, at least I won’t look stupid for passing off this opportunity…”

    This type of anxious internal dialogue, called intellectualization, is a common response to anxiety. Because strong emotions can be uncomfortable, we overly focus on facts and logic.

    While being rational and using reason can of course be a great thing, it can also signal denial. Deep down, you know your possible career choice might be a bad idea. This isn’t a productive frame of mind for making decisions about a career move because you’re talking yourself into something you don’t truly believe is right for you.

    5. You’re restless.

    The complicated nature of a significant career decision might make you feel completely preoccupied or keep you up at night tossing and turning. Any career transition can send you for a loop, but you should be able to see promise in what you’ll be able to learn through the process. Whether it’s taking on a promotion or starting a company, you might feel far outside your comfort zone, but you’ll also feel excited about everything you’ll learn.

    With big decisions come uncertainty. Learning to balance your head and heart is an ongoing process . Take the false pressure off of yourself to know all the right answers, right now. No matter what you choose, move forward with confidence, knowing that your career is always evolving.

    The next positive change might be right around the corner.

    Choose a career pathway from the range of options below to find your ideal career

    Looking for guidance?

    How to find the right career when you're undecided

    Biomedicine

    Become a world-class expert in diagnosis, prevention and treatment of complex diseases and life-threatening illness.

    How to find the right career when you're undecided

    Psychology

    Learn to help others, consult organisations or discover life-changing treatments by delving into the human psyche.

    How to find the right career when you're undecided

    Engineering

    Become the link between scientific discovery and innovative, real world solutions.

    How to find the right career when you're undecided

    Medicine

    Become a world-class expert in diagnosis, prevention and treatment of complex diseases and life-threatening illness.

    How to find the right career when you're undecided

    Finance

    Fund the future by trading currencies, predicting the marking and creating investment opportunities today.

    How to find the right career when you're undecided

    Information Technology

    Design, build and program the future. Become the creator of tomorrow’s world.

    How to find the right career when you're undecided

    Advise and assist clients ranging from multinational conglomerates to marginalized minorities.

    How to find the right career when you're undecided

    Business

    Jump into the world of sales, revenue and profit. Utilise your intellectual, financial and person-centred skills to establish yourself and live the high life.

    How to find the right career when you're undecided

    Science

    Draw upon your inquisitive nature to discover world-changing theories, solutions and technologies.

    How to find the right career when you're undecided

    Education

    Explore your knowledge and passions while shaping the minds of future generations.

    How to make a career decision

    Making a big career decision is always daunting, even for professionals. The best way to overcome career anxiety in choosing a new job or career is to research your options before making the decision.

    Luckily we’ve done the research for you!

    Start by identifying which career pathways below interest you, and click through to learn more about them. We’ll show you career options for each pathway as well as industry trends, interviews with professionals, and tips to land your dream job!

    We’re always working on adding more pathways and improving the Find My Pathway experience. If you can’t find the pathway you’re looking for, or have any suggestions, let us know!