How to find work motivation when you’re unfulfilled at work

They were very unfulfilled at work and they needed to make a change so that they could position themselves towards a career path they were passionate about.

For some, it was more than possible to quit their jobs immediately and make the switch towards building their business or finding a job that worked better for them. However, not everyone has the financial stability that is required to do that and you may still need to work in your current job in order to be able to pay for your living expenses while you continue or start your education, build a side hustle, or work your way up in a different industry.

Regardless of what your future career goals may be, it can be difficult to stay motivated and present in your current job when you know that it is not what you want to be doing.

Are you having trouble gritting your teeth and getting the job that you have at the moment? If you are, here are some tips that will help you to find work motivation when you are unfulfilled:

1. Keep Your Mind on Your Purpose

The best way to stay motivated at work is to be super clear about why you do what you do — your purpose.

If you aren’t sure your true purpose to work, you’re not alone. This article can help you figure this out:

Even if you think making money is the reason why you’re doing the job, you should think deeper and ask yourself why.

Why is making more money so important to you? Is it because of the family that you’re supporting? Or is it because you’re trying to make more money to build up your own business?

Find out the root of what you truly want and this purpose will become your drive to work.

2. Find the Positives in Your Role

No matter what your profession is, there are always positives to the job that you have. Whether it’s being to help others by building value in their business or simply being able to interact with intelligent people, you are guaranteed to find something that you like about your job.

I would like for you to sit down and write down 3 things that you enjoy about your job right now. If you can think of more, amazing! If you can only think about three or even have trouble getting to that number, that’s perfectly fine.

Once you’ve finished creating your list, I want you to take that list with you when you go to work and put it in a place where you will be able to look at it frequently. When you feel unmotivated or unsatisfied, look back at this list of things that you enjoy about your role and focus on those things while you are working.

When you can highlight the positives of what you are doing, you can better focus on providing value in your position, even if you are not completely happy doing it.((Balance Career: 9 Reasons to Love the Job You Have))

3. Focus on Your Goals and How Your Work Is Helping You to Reach Them

If you’re feeling unfulfilled at your job, you have hopefully found your next position and created a road map of how you are going to get there. Besides helping you to make your next move, these goals and plans serve another purpose: to keep you motivated at your current job by reminding you that it is serving your overall goal.

Ultimately, your current position is simply a placeholder and a way for you to maintain steady income while you plan your exit. If need be, keep a list of these goals or a reminder of your current job’s purpose nearby so that you are always reminded that, while it is not wanted at the moment, this job is more than necessary.

You could also provide further motivation with this tactic by keeping a calendar that counts the days until you plan to leave so that you are reminded to continue working hard until you are ready to leave this current role behind.

Have trouble setting or achieving goals? This guide can help you:

4. Build Momentum by Achieving Success With Small Tasks

Think back to the last time you achieved something in your current position. It felt good, right?

No matter how out of love you are with your job, achieving success is still something that provides excitement when you are performing work-related tasks and being recognized and commended for them.

When one feels unfulfilled at their role, it is very unlikely that they are focused on being successful and achieving a lot at work. Unfortunately, this desire to do your work well can wane if you lose sight of providing value.

To get back into the swing of things, build your momentum by achieving small, simple tasks. When you see that you are more than capable of being successful in your workplace, that hunger for achievement will grow and you will be able to accomplish more difficult tasks with ease and with the desire to do so.

Success breeds the desire for more success and if you are finding that you are having trouble motivating yourself in a job that isn’t your favorite, this is a great way to get back on track for the time being.

You can find out more about how to build momentum here:

5. Keep Your Overall Emotional Quality High

Even if you were working a job that you enjoyed, you can’t perform well if your emotional quality isn’t in good shape. Whether you are too tired, not having enough fun in your personal life, or dealing with hardships inside or outside of the workplace, it negatively impacts all aspects of your job.

Before going to work and even during the course of your day, try your best to keep your emotional quality high. Whether it is putting yourself around co-workers that you love or helping them out, taking micro-breaks to recover from hard work and recharge, or by talking to a friend, a little bit of self-care goes a long way. If you’re happy, you’ll perform well. It’s as simple as that!((Happier.com: 5 Scientifically Proven Ways to Be Happier at Work))

The Bottom Line

While you won’t always be in love with your job, you can always find the motivation necessary to power through the tasks associated with your role.

If you have felt unfulfilled in your current position and are having trouble finding that motivation, use the five tips above to help you cultivate this work motivation in order to achieve more and push through poor performance.

More Resources About Motivation

  • How to Find Motivation When You’re Totally Burnt Out
  • How to Get Motivated and Be Happy Every Day When You Wake Up
  • 8 Steps to Continuous Self Motivation Even During the Difficult Times
  • How to Crush Your Lack of Motivation and Always Stay Motivated

CamTrader brings you human interest articles from around the web to spice up your day. We hope you like it.

How to find work motivation when you're unfulfilled at work

Sep 24, 2020 · 5 min read

How to find work motivation when you're unfulfilled at work

Work. You know, it’s that thing you spend anywhere from 8–10 hours a day on. Considering that it could take up almost a quarter of your life, it would make sense to find ways to make your work life a source of happiness and fulfillment, rather than a drain on it.

Unfortunately, that’s not the case for most people. Instead, work is often seen as a chore, and can be a major source of stress, burnout, and mental fatigue.

In this article I’ll d escribe 9 signs that you might be feeling unfulfilled at work, and 2 concrete things you can focus on to bring more satisfaction to work, and to your life overall.

  1. You find yourself frequently unengaged, checking social media and the news instead of working on your projects.
  2. You often wonder “ what’s the point of this work anyway? Does the world really need this?”
  3. You dream about weekends and vacations where you can finally get away from it all.
  4. You don’t feel motivated to learn new skills relevant to your job or profession.
  5. You look at your superiors and the leaders in your space, and you don’t want to be where they are.
  6. You catch yourself rationalizing, “ Well, at least I’m making good money”.
  7. You worry about the ethical and/or moral implications of the work that you do, “Am I causing harm with this?”
  8. You don’t feel that you can have honest, vulnerable conversations with your coworkers.
  9. You couldn’t be bothered to explain to a stranger or a new acquaintance what you do for work.

If any of these describe you, don’t worry! There’s hope for you yet. And no, you don’t have to quit your job and travel to India to go “find yourself”. There are concrete steps you can take right now to bring more happiness and fulfillment to your work.

So, what do you do if you want to find more fulfillment in your work? We can look the PERMA model of psychological well-being, developed by Dr. Martin Seligman, for some insight. This model describes 5 keys to cultivating a deeply fulfilling life:

  1. Positive Emotions
  2. Engagement
  3. Relationships
  4. Meaning
  5. Accomplishments

When it comes to workplace satisfaction, two of the easiest places to begin are with Engagement and Meaning. Below I’ll describe what are they, and how to cultivate them.

Engagement

Studies have shown that to find work that feels fulfilling it helps to be engaged. What does it mean to be engaged? Do you know that feeling called Flow, or Being in the Zone? Those are deep states of engagement. It’s that quality of being fully immersed in your work or your tasks. Rather than overthinking what you’re doing, second-guessing, and stressing out, you are fully present. When you’re in a state of flow, it can feel like time is flying. Some common examples of flow states are programming, doing mathematics, and playing sports. While these are some obvious examples, it’s possible to find flow in almost any task that has a degree of complexity.

If you’re not feeling engaged, two things might be happening. First, if the work is too easy compared with your skills and abilities, it can lead to boredom. Second, if the work is too difficult, it can lead to anxiety (and eventually burnout). To find more engagement with your work, it will take some mindful self-awareness. Try to find work where the challenge matches well with your skill level. It might involve asking your superior for more challenging work, or conversely for more resources to meet the demand of tasks that are too difficult. Finally, ask yourself which kind of activities you naturally feel engaged in. It might be possible to bring more of your natural inclinations and skills to the work you do.

Meaning

How would you like to never work again a day in your life, and still get paid? The key to making this happen is to find work that is deeply meaningful to you. When the work you do is a cause you believe in, it’s easier to feel fulfilled, and feel like it’s not work at all! Just a few days ago, after teaching a 2-day emotional intelligence workshop at a large company, and being on my feet all day, my colleague asked me how I was feeling. “Physically exhausted,” I said, “But my heart feels full.” Even though my brain was fried and my feet were killing me, I was happy to be doing what I was doing, because I find the work so meaningful.

A helpful way to tap into this is to take some time journal about questions like “ Who am I fighting for?” or “ What idea do I believe in that most people think is crazy?” or “ What social issues light me up?” Finding work that touches on what you naturally care about will make finding meaningful work easier.

Now you might be thinking, “ But Jeremy, my company sells socks, how can I find meaning there?”. Well Mr. Sock Salesman, don’t fret. There are ways you can bring meaning into every moment of your life. To do this, it’s important to connect with your values. Identifying your key values will allow you to practice living in a meaningful way. For example, if one of your values is being a good listener, find ways where you can do that more in your day to day work life. Care about the environment? Start recycling initiatives within your office. There are unlimited ways to start living a more meaningful life right now.

It’s important to also realize that you might be on a career path that’s fundamentally taking you in the wrong direction. If you’re on the wrong ladder, it doesn’t matter how high you climb, you still won’t end up where you want to go. Sometimes it’s helpful to actually get yourself on a different ladder altogether. It’s never too late to make a change.

Have you been struggling with something else at work or in life? I’d love to hear about it! Drop a note in the comments below and let me know what I can help you out with!

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How to Find Motivation When You Feel Unfulfilled At Work

How to find work motivation when you're unfulfilled at work

You are slowly walking away from enough finances, a boss that ignores you or a team that doesn’t love you anymore, and you’re losing any opportunity to rise. This unfulfilling working condition might be slowly killing you!

Your work is draining you completely. You’d want to break up with your unfulfilling work, but, this is not the solution. You feel difficult to concentrate, find yourself getting sick, struggle to focus and to start difficult projects. But you don’t have to stay stuck in this rut.

Here’s how you can stay motivated and not take a step back.

1. Find Positives in your Role

No matter what your role is, you love it or not, there are always positives to the job. You’ll find something positive in your profession that you’ll be happy about. Whether it’s bringing value to the business or generating ideas.

Do this activity. Write down any 3 things that you are happy about in your job, put it on your desk, and whenever you feel you are being unvalued at work, get the motivation back by looking back the list of things that you enjoy at work. When you are keenly observing the positives of your position, you can focus on growing and staying happy, despite not being happy (at times).

2. Break Overwhelming Tasks up into Smaller Pieces

What’s keeping you from being unfulfilled? Find the problem. This is a great approach if you feel unfulfilled when actually you are not doing well. This approach works with many daunting tasks. The sooner you start breaking the large project into smaller discrete pieces that you and your team can handle, you can start crossing items off. And that’s motivating to grow. You can add your tasks to ProofHub’s task list, where you can create sub-tasks, add custom labels to organize tasks, and set time estimates to complete a task.

To manage tasks and achieve goals, try ProofHub for free.

3. Visualize your Success

Visualization is about creating detailed pictures in your mind. The famous quote, ‘see it to believe it’ tells exactly what visualization is about. It helps you move in a positive direction whenever you feel unfulfilled at work and achieve your goal quicker.

Just focus and bring all your energies on the little details that will take you to where you want to be – you’ll either quit the goal or you’ll be able to figure out how to make it happen.

4. Exude Good Vibes

It can be frustrating to see no lasting results and no big wins. Sometimes the hard work of your team won’t pay off, it will never feel like enough. Bringing good energy to the office and adopting a let’s-make-this-happen attitude will energize the people around you—and perhaps you’ll be energized.

What else do you do that keeps you genuinely motivated at the workplace? Leave a comment and let us know.

We’ve all faced days at the office where we’re just not feeling motivated. Off days happen to everyone and it’s tough—if not unrealistic—to constantly do your best work. There are bound to be times when you procrastinate too much, lack focus, or struggle to start important projects.

You may react by getting down on yourself, wondering where your determination has gone. It can be disappointing to feel like you’re not living up to your aspirations, especially when there’s important work to be done—which there almost always is. Speed, efficiency, and productivity are what drive results, and when our energy doesn’t match our ambition, it can be frustrating.

When you lack enthusiasm, a single day at the office can feel like an uphill battle. A long-lasting motivational slump can leave you stressed out, feeling guilty that you’re not doing enough to advance in your career.

The effects on your well-being can be numerous: You may have difficulty sleeping, find yourself getting sick, or notice a decrease in your ability to concentrate. Your mental health takes a beating from emotional exhaustion, with anxiety and pessimism overshadowing your mood.

But you don’t have to stay stuck in this rut. With some exploration and reflection, you can get to the bottom of what’s sapping your energy and dig yourself out of it.

Here are three reasons you’re unmotivated along with solutions to getting back on track fast.

1. You’re Caught in the “Busy Trap”

Today being busy is a status symbol, a sign that you’re sought-after and in-demand. While your ego may enjoy the validation, existing perpetually in “work mode” and being available round-the-clock can lead to burnout.

Operating under the illusion that staying constantly busy is helping you advance professionally can backfire, earning you the title of office pushover—or leading you to resent your job, boss, and co-workers.

To disentangle yourself from the busy trap, you’ve got to ruthlessly prioritize and eliminate non-urgent tasks, which will allow you to invest in work that’s truly important.

To get over your chronic busy-worshipping, begin to unhook yourself from responsibilities that are actually someone else’s work. Practice saying “no” more often. When you do agree to take something on, do so with a clear intention. Try saying, “I choose to…” rather than “I have to…” It may sound simple, but your words create your reality, and this subtle verbal shift invokes autonomy and personal choice, which stokes motivation. It feels very different to say “I choose go to tonight’s networking event” instead of “I have to to go to tonight’s networking event.”

2. You’re Relying on Willpower

Convincing yourself to accomplish a task out of sheer will is difficult. When willpower fails you, focus on creating habits that make your success inevitable. Often, getting started on a big goal or complicated project is the hardest part. Once you actually get going, the whole project feels a lot less daunting.

The trick to staying motivated is to create small habits that help with productivity and make you feel good about what you’re accomplishing.

Conquer willpower dips by lowering barriers that get in the way of your beginning a task. If you have a hard writing assignment to tackle, for example, focus on getting just the the first sentence down (even if it’s a stream of consciousness). But, once you write that first line, you’ll likely feel your anxiety melt away.

You can also try developing a warm-up routine that sets off a positive chain of events to help you generate momentum. For instance, maybe you have a cue like brewing your morning coffee or checking your email that serves as a transition into work mode. Many entrepreneurs I work with like to start their day with 10 minutes of meditation. This can be an excellent way to prepare for your day and cue your mind to get in the mood for work. Instead of conjuring willpower, you’ll organically move into the professional state of mind.

3. You’re Emotionally Exhausted

If you feel like you’re sleepwalking through your workday, it’s likely you’re among the 70% of people who feel emotionally disconnected at the office.

Don’t underestimate your social needs when trying to pinpoint your motivational barrier. Maslow’s pyramid ranks belonging as the third most important aspect of our mental health, coming only after physical needs and safety. Feeling accepted and useful at work is essential to sustaining the drive to stick with your duties day after day.

In fact, “psychological safety” has been found to be the most important trait successful teams share. Groups characterized by interpersonal trust and mutual respect are not only happier, they’re also more productive. When employees have a sense of confidence that their co-workers will not embarrass, reject, or punish them for speaking up they accomplish more and thrive in their careers.

To repair your emotional exhaustion, begin deliberately structuring social opportunities into your workflow. An easy way to start is by showing up five minutes early to meetings. Use the unstructured time for light conversation. This informal small talk is not just meaningless chitchat, and it goes a long way to building stronger relationships with colleagues.

If you’re a manager, try reigniting your team’s motivation by giving day-to-day tasks more meaning and circling back to shared goals. Empathic leadership has everything to do with lifting up other people, which can be accomplished by reinforcing how your direct report’s efforts tie into to big-picture goals and the company’s mission.

No one among us is motivated and productive 100% of the time, but if you’re feeling lethargic and blasé about your work more often than not, then you’ve got to find a way to climb out of the slump. Reading inspiring tips and career advice is one thing, but taking action is another. Doing something to alleviate the lethargy is the real antidote to getting unstuck and out of a work rut.

How to find work motivation when you're unfulfilled at work

How to find work motivation when you're unfulfilled at work

The movie Office Space is a cult classic because so many workers can sympathize with these . [+] demotivators. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Can you say that you truly love your job? Not very likely, according to the research. Among other things, recent studies reveal that 48% of employees worldwide don’t even like their jobs, more than 80% of US workers feel stressed at the office, and only 30% feel “engaged and inspired” by their careers. Especially troubling for leaders and business owners, 18% are actively disengaged – that is, present at work but hating every minute of it.

The facts are sobering and expensive. Beyond the frustration of having checked-out paper pushers or haters in our organizations, this lack of satisfaction and motivation costs us billions in lost productivity.

But what actually causes the disengagement? If you’re trying to understand your own job dissatisfaction, or root out a morale problem at your company, consider these common reasons people hate their jobs.

1. Micromanagement

Micromanagers may have good intentions – trying to get work done well – but they drive us crazy. Micromanagement saps the life out of us, causing apathy at work.

In an eye-opening article on the dangers of micromanagement, HBR blog contributor Christina Bielaszka-DuVernay writes , “ because a consistent pattern of micromanagement tells an employee you don’t trust his work or his judgment, it is a major factor in triggering disengagement.”

Those disengaged employees might stay at their company and muddle through, or decide to leave for more autonomy. Recruiter.com’s Shala Marks warns , “people don’t quit jobs, they quit managers.”

2. Lack of progress

As it turns out, money for nothing doesn’t feel so great. While it might seem that we work for our salary, studies like this one show we want to feel that our work matters.

When a company can’t get its act together, or when any change or new idea a worker tries to implement has to go through endless layers of red tape, employees lose any motivation or passion that they might have had. People like enough process to be effective, but not to create busy work.

Organizations should also be mindful of unnecessary rules that don’t actually benefit the company. (i.e. restrictive office hours, Internet usage, or vacation policies) When they start to feel controlling rather than efficient, employees bristle.

3. Job insecurity

When we’re on a sinking ship, we start preparing for the jump. Employees who work for unstable companies or in jobs deemed expendable will only invest enough to keep getting their paycheck while they look elsewhere. The rest of their energy will be spent sharing rumors with co-workers, updating their resumes and planning their next move.

As a leader, it’s extremely difficult to keep your best talent in place during uncertain times. The best you can do is to communicate frequently, and give your team a sense of loyalty and trust. You can’t make people stay, but you can encourage transparency on both sides so you’re not surprised.

4. No confidence in company leadership

We don’t have to love our leaders to be happy, but we can’t believe they’re incompetent. Once we lose faith in where our company is heading, then our loyalties fray and we cease to wholeheartedly follow. We can even get subversive.

Fellow Forbes contributor George Anders cites a recent study that confirms the importance of excellent workplace leadership, saying, “bosses who inspire confidence, who show faith in their employees, and who communicate an inspiring vision…are rewarded with a workforce that is ready to get things done.”

5. Lack of recourse for poor performance

When we go to work, we like to be rewarded and recognized for our contributions. If this isn’t happening, or worse, people doing mediocre work are getting the same treatment as strong performers, it’s natural to just turn off and do your job on autopilot. Companies that don’t deal with performance issues bring down the average for everyone.

6. Poor communication

A seasoned journalist I worked with years ago said this about workplace dynamics: “Never attribute to conspiracy what incompetence can explain.” In the absence of information, rumors thrive. Employees end up guessing, confused, and frustrated. If there’s not an avenue to communicate back to leadership for clarification, it gets even worse. Having to spend large amounts of time getting the information we need to do our jobs is exhausting.

Not only does clear communications throughout the organization make for an efficient workplace, as this article points out, it has a major impact on employee morale and confidence.

7. Unpleasant coworkers

In my 20s, I had a job that didn’t pay much nor provide exciting work, but I loved going to work every day because of my co-workers. We were a tight-knit team that worked together all day then went to happy hour after work. The importance of working with people we like can’t be overstated. Friendships make up for a lot of ills, and the reverse is also true. A well-paying, career-enhancing job with a group of back-stabbers is a recipe for stress and misery.

As Gallup research has shown for years, and professor Christine M. Riordan reports , “ close work friendships boost employee satisfaction by 50% and people with a best friend at work are seven times more likely to engage fully in their work.”

You don’t have to have best friends at work, but you do need to be able to relax around your colleagues and enjoy their company.

Gen Y workers are known for seeking jobs that are personally satisfying and inspiring to them, but they’re not alone. As this statistics-packed Huffington Post article reveals , 55% of Gen X and Gen Y workers believe that finding a job that’s personally fulfilling is worth sacrifices in salary. A recent LinkedIn poll also shows this increasing desire for fulfillment among various age groups and geographies. The research found that those over 65 were the most excited about their work, showing that we all want to be inspired no matter where we are in our careers.

Have you been demotivated at work? Why? Comment here or @kristihedges.

by How to find work motivation when you're unfulfilled at workTheCarousel 25/06/2020, 2:40 pm

How to find work motivation when you're unfulfilled at work

This leads people to question why they are still not satisfied, further enhancing feelings of guilt and even depression.

Nicole T Harcourt, best-selling author, life stylist and founder of Evolved Life Visions, has experienced this feeling of dread and actively made changes to her life to overcome these negative feelings.

She has shared the five main reasons people feel unfulfilled and from her experience, what they can do to fix it.

1. Living in your comfort zone

Are you feeling a lack of enthusiasm, excitement or interest in what lies ahead? Well you’re not alone. Many of my clients over the years have felt like this. The reason people feel this way is because they are stuck in their own comfort zone and are seeking fulfilment in all the wrong places. Their vision of success is based on superficial needs. They haven’t based this on how they will feel or how they will grow as a person from attaining the goal. For example, a new car could be a goal however what is the motivation behind this? Is it need or greed? How will you feel when you reach this goal? Is it going to make your life better? Happier? Or is it only feeding your ego? Or pleasing those who have certain expectations of you? Asking these questions adds substance to each goal. By weighing all of your goals against growth and emotional development it will satisfy your internal goals, and lead to a sense of fulfilment. Life begins at the end of your comfort zone.

2. Too much negativity

Do you constantly compare yourself to others with feelings of envy and feel a sense of failure? If so, you are seeking outside approval in all you do because your inner voice is negative and therefore not listening to your true goals and desires. All of these things combined can lead to stress and anxiety. In a day and age of social media in which everyone is encouraged to compare themselves to others, it can be hard to accept ourselves as we are and feel content. By finding what makes you feel good and learning the latest Evolved Guided Visualisation Techniques (EGVT) you will be able to learn what your true potential is. Accept that failure is a part of life and that it helps people to discover a new path and opens up new opportunities. When you finally realise that you’re not in a place you want to be in your life, you will fall in line with your true life purpose and your attitude and reality will begin to transform.

3. Not having a purpose

Sometimes when people are so used to feeling unfulfilled and have felt that way for a long time they don’t know how to change. I always advise my clients that they need to envisage their goals and then learn how to take baby steps towards those goals. As we often hear, Rome wasn’t built in a day and neither were our dreams but we can live a full life by always following our true life goals and making sure we are continuously making pathways to those goals. Using techniques such as guided questions will open up self-awareness and allow you to find your life path. We need to open up our minds and listen to our inner voice and follow our heart.

4. Fear of taking risks

When people are stuck in a rut or are unhappy, they have the ability to change but change can be associated with taking risks which many people are afraid of. It is this fear that holds people in their comfort zone. However, when people are able to visualise their dreams and goals they can build the courage to overcome the associated risks. Many of my clients over the years have lived ‘fairy-tale’ lives but were still unhappy. In order for them to find their true life path they had to risk this lifestyle they worked so hard to obtain. However, what I have found is when they tune into what their heart, mind and soul really want and chase it, their lives are so much richer and happier.

5. Not asking for help or seeking help

86% of all people never find fulfilment as they can’t reach their goals because they haven’t programmed their brain accordingly. In neuroscience the ego – the same part of the brain which controls the fight or flight mode – resists change. It resists change as it thinks your current status is the safest way to operate and is only tuned to move on a flight or fight reaction. Which is why it is so hard to change and the brain will resist forming new neural pathways as 1. the brain doesn’t want to upset the status quo and 2. the brain, unless directed towards a goal, doesn’t understand what it needs to do to get there. The brain actually needs to be rewired with new patterns which is the key to success and lasting transformation.”

  • Evolved life Visions is holding workshops Australia wide. Tour dates, locations and tickets available here.

We’ve all faced days at the office where we’re just not feeling motivated. Off days happen to everyone and it’s tough—if not unrealistic—to constantly do your best work. There are bound to be times when you procrastinate too much, lack focus, or struggle to start important projects.

You may react by getting down on yourself, wondering where your determination has gone. It can be disappointing to feel like you’re not living up to your aspirations, especially when there’s important work to be done—which there almost always is. Speed, efficiency, and productivity are what drive results, and when our energy doesn’t match our ambition, it can be frustrating.

When you lack enthusiasm, a single day at the office can feel like an uphill battle. A long-lasting motivational slump can leave you stressed out, feeling guilty that you’re not doing enough to advance in your career.

The effects on your well-being can be numerous: You may have difficulty sleeping, find yourself getting sick, or notice a decrease in your ability to concentrate. Your mental health takes a beating from emotional exhaustion, with anxiety and pessimism overshadowing your mood.

But you don’t have to stay stuck in this rut. With some exploration and reflection, you can get to the bottom of what’s sapping your energy and dig yourself out of it.

Here are three reasons you’re unmotivated along with solutions to getting back on track fast.

1. You’re Caught in the “Busy Trap”

Today being busy is a status symbol, a sign that you’re sought-after and in-demand. While your ego may enjoy the validation, existing perpetually in “work mode” and being available round-the-clock can lead to burnout.

Operating under the illusion that staying constantly busy is helping you advance professionally can backfire, earning you the title of office pushover—or leading you to resent your job, boss, and co-workers.

To disentangle yourself from the busy trap, you’ve got to ruthlessly prioritize and eliminate non-urgent tasks, which will allow you to invest in work that’s truly important.

To get over your chronic busy-worshipping, begin to unhook yourself from responsibilities that are actually someone else’s work. Practice saying “no” more often. When you do agree to take something on, do so with a clear intention. Try saying, “I choose to…” rather than “I have to…” It may sound simple, but your words create your reality, and this subtle verbal shift invokes autonomy and personal choice, which stokes motivation. It feels very different to say “I choose go to tonight’s networking event” instead of “I have to to go to tonight’s networking event.”

2. You’re Relying on Willpower

Convincing yourself to accomplish a task out of sheer will is difficult. When willpower fails you, focus on creating habits that make your success inevitable. Often, getting started on a big goal or complicated project is the hardest part. Once you actually get going, the whole project feels a lot less daunting.

The trick to staying motivated is to create small habits that help with productivity and make you feel good about what you’re accomplishing.

Conquer willpower dips by lowering barriers that get in the way of your beginning a task. If you have a hard writing assignment to tackle, for example, focus on getting just the the first sentence down (even if it’s a stream of consciousness). But, once you write that first line, you’ll likely feel your anxiety melt away.

You can also try developing a warm-up routine that sets off a positive chain of events to help you generate momentum. For instance, maybe you have a cue like brewing your morning coffee or checking your email that serves as a transition into work mode. Many entrepreneurs I work with like to start their day with 10 minutes of meditation. This can be an excellent way to prepare for your day and cue your mind to get in the mood for work. Instead of conjuring willpower, you’ll organically move into the professional state of mind.

3. You’re Emotionally Exhausted

If you feel like you’re sleepwalking through your workday, it’s likely you’re among the 70% of people who feel emotionally disconnected at the office.

Don’t underestimate your social needs when trying to pinpoint your motivational barrier. Maslow’s pyramid ranks belonging as the third most important aspect of our mental health, coming only after physical needs and safety. Feeling accepted and useful at work is essential to sustaining the drive to stick with your duties day after day.

In fact, “psychological safety” has been found to be the most important trait successful teams share. Groups characterized by interpersonal trust and mutual respect are not only happier, they’re also more productive. When employees have a sense of confidence that their co-workers will not embarrass, reject, or punish them for speaking up they accomplish more and thrive in their careers.

To repair your emotional exhaustion, begin deliberately structuring social opportunities into your workflow. An easy way to start is by showing up five minutes early to meetings. Use the unstructured time for light conversation. This informal small talk is not just meaningless chitchat, and it goes a long way to building stronger relationships with colleagues.

If you’re a manager, try reigniting your team’s motivation by giving day-to-day tasks more meaning and circling back to shared goals. Empathic leadership has everything to do with lifting up other people, which can be accomplished by reinforcing how your direct report’s efforts tie into to big-picture goals and the company’s mission.

No one among us is motivated and productive 100% of the time, but if you’re feeling lethargic and blasé about your work more often than not, then you’ve got to find a way to climb out of the slump. Reading inspiring tips and career advice is one thing, but taking action is another. Doing something to alleviate the lethargy is the real antidote to getting unstuck and out of a work rut.

Motivation is rather elusive, isn’t it? Some days you feel it, and other days you can’t grab a measly corner of it no matter how hard you try. You stare at the computer screen, willing yourself to type, create, develop, and instead you find yourself simply going through the motions, barely caring about the work you’re producing. Needless to say, you’re totally uninspired, and you don’t know how to make yourself feel otherwise.

Quora users have been there, and they have real and practical solutions for digging up that lost motivation and getting a job not just done—but completed with a sense of passion. Read on for seven tips and tricks that’ll get you motivated in no time.

1. Don’t Think About it as Hard Work

There is only one way for me to motivate myself to work hard: I don’t think about it as hard work. I think about it as part of making myself into who I want to be. Once I’ve made the choice to do something, I try not to think so much about how difficult or frustrating or impossible that might be; I just think about how good it must feel to be that, or how proud I might be to have done that. Make hard look easy.

Think about it: If the project you’re faced with isn’t viewed as drudgery, but rather as a piece of the puzzle that’s helping you along your career path, then perhaps the energy required to do it will be easier to come by.

2. Create Small, Bite-Sized Goals

There’s a reason donut holes are so lovable. They’re easy to eat. Before you know it, you’ve eaten a dozen of them. This is how goals should be too. Of course you should have a really big, audacious goal. But make sure you break down that goal into bite-sized, consumable goals. This way you’ll feel like you’re making progress in your journey and you’ll also feel a sense of accomplishment when you complete the smaller goals. A feeling of progress and achievement is a beautiful combination.

You’ve no doubt heard this advice before, but have you applied it to motivation? Completing a large project is daunting when you don’t know where to begin. How can you finish if you don’t even know where you’re starting? So, rather than focusing on a large, scary goal, take one thing at a time, and break the big goal into ideas you can digest one at a time.

3. Read Daily

Make sure you carve out time in your day to read. (I recommend the early mornings before everyone is awake.) Read for at least one hour a day. If that’s too much, start with 20 minutes [a day] and do it for one month (habit). Develop a belief that reading is the quickest way to success. It will make reading a breeze, and extremely fun/rewarding (if you’re driven by success). The most successful people in the world attribute their success to reading a lot of books (Warren Buffet, Bill Gates, Elon Musk).

Although it may sound counter-productive to set aside reading time when really what you’re looking for is motivation to work hard, sometimes it’s necessary to do something seemingly unrelated to tackle the task at hand. Developing a daily reading habit is one thing that’s likely to have a long-lasting impact on your thought processes, ultimately inspiring you in all areas of your life.

4. Stop Caring About the Things That Don’t Matter

Doing things that don’t mean anything costs [us] a ton of mental energy. Look at your aggregated to-do list, find things you know that you don’t care about, and get rid of as many of these activities as possible. You will stay more consistently motivated if you’re working on activities that are inherently meaningful or are part of a larger mission.

Look very carefully and closely at your list, and shave off anything that’s both truly demotivating and unnecessary for you to do. It’s not always best to finish what you started if, down the line, you can’t even remember the reason you started something in the first place.

5. Set a Quit Time

Entrepreneurs tend to stray from the typical 8 to 5 workday, and global accessibility through emails and Skype makes it more than easy to have a 24-hour workday. But it’s important to recognize when enough is enough. Set a realistic quitting time for yourself, and stick to it most days of the week. Stop answering emails after 8 PM, or take Sundays off. You’ll feel more refreshed and more productive when you allow yourself some down time.

Raise your hand if you’re motivated 24/7! I didn’t think I’d see any hands. It’s unrealistic to feel energized all the time, to want to plow through tasks all the time. You need to give yourself a rest, and if that means giving yourself a specified set time to unplug or turn away from the demands of your job, then do it. It’s likely to help you perform harder and smarter in the hours that you do allot for work.

6. Just Do It

To get motivated to start doing something, from my own experience, the most effective trick for me is to just do it (sounds trite, but it works). As soon as you think something needs to be done, jump into it, doing it immediately (of course, provided the conditions are feasible). You must not think about anything else, suppressing all other thoughts, keeping your mind blank, acting like a robot. Yes, it sounds weird, but it does work! Otherwise, you will debate whether you should do it now or there were too many issues with doing it, or there are other more pleasurable and exciting things to do over this boring task.

Now here’s some worthwhile advice: Instead of waiting around, willing yourself to feel motivated, what if you just went ahead and started doing the work you know you need to do? Dive into the project and trust that the focus will be what you need.

7. Celebrate Wins

Start acknowledging all the good you are doing. Don’t discount the little things. I mean, how many times do you scold yourself for doing something small that wasn’t perfect? How often do you think the good things such as being on time, or signing a new client is simply how it’s meant to be? They need celebrating. You need more wins in your life. This will motivate you, encourage you, and help you see how brilliant you truly are.

If you’re constantly waiting for a long-term payoff, you forget how crucial all the little wins are. And it can be challenging to stay motivated and on top of things if there’s no reward in sight. Treat yourself with small things and don’t underestimate how gratifying it can feel to recognize tiny advancements.

What other motivation tips work for you? Let me know on Twitter!

by How to find work motivation when you're unfulfilled at workTheCarousel 25/06/2020, 2:40 pm

How to find work motivation when you're unfulfilled at work

This leads people to question why they are still not satisfied, further enhancing feelings of guilt and even depression.

Nicole T Harcourt, best-selling author, life stylist and founder of Evolved Life Visions, has experienced this feeling of dread and actively made changes to her life to overcome these negative feelings.

She has shared the five main reasons people feel unfulfilled and from her experience, what they can do to fix it.

1. Living in your comfort zone

Are you feeling a lack of enthusiasm, excitement or interest in what lies ahead? Well you’re not alone. Many of my clients over the years have felt like this. The reason people feel this way is because they are stuck in their own comfort zone and are seeking fulfilment in all the wrong places. Their vision of success is based on superficial needs. They haven’t based this on how they will feel or how they will grow as a person from attaining the goal. For example, a new car could be a goal however what is the motivation behind this? Is it need or greed? How will you feel when you reach this goal? Is it going to make your life better? Happier? Or is it only feeding your ego? Or pleasing those who have certain expectations of you? Asking these questions adds substance to each goal. By weighing all of your goals against growth and emotional development it will satisfy your internal goals, and lead to a sense of fulfilment. Life begins at the end of your comfort zone.

2. Too much negativity

Do you constantly compare yourself to others with feelings of envy and feel a sense of failure? If so, you are seeking outside approval in all you do because your inner voice is negative and therefore not listening to your true goals and desires. All of these things combined can lead to stress and anxiety. In a day and age of social media in which everyone is encouraged to compare themselves to others, it can be hard to accept ourselves as we are and feel content. By finding what makes you feel good and learning the latest Evolved Guided Visualisation Techniques (EGVT) you will be able to learn what your true potential is. Accept that failure is a part of life and that it helps people to discover a new path and opens up new opportunities. When you finally realise that you’re not in a place you want to be in your life, you will fall in line with your true life purpose and your attitude and reality will begin to transform.

3. Not having a purpose

Sometimes when people are so used to feeling unfulfilled and have felt that way for a long time they don’t know how to change. I always advise my clients that they need to envisage their goals and then learn how to take baby steps towards those goals. As we often hear, Rome wasn’t built in a day and neither were our dreams but we can live a full life by always following our true life goals and making sure we are continuously making pathways to those goals. Using techniques such as guided questions will open up self-awareness and allow you to find your life path. We need to open up our minds and listen to our inner voice and follow our heart.

4. Fear of taking risks

When people are stuck in a rut or are unhappy, they have the ability to change but change can be associated with taking risks which many people are afraid of. It is this fear that holds people in their comfort zone. However, when people are able to visualise their dreams and goals they can build the courage to overcome the associated risks. Many of my clients over the years have lived ‘fairy-tale’ lives but were still unhappy. In order for them to find their true life path they had to risk this lifestyle they worked so hard to obtain. However, what I have found is when they tune into what their heart, mind and soul really want and chase it, their lives are so much richer and happier.

5. Not asking for help or seeking help

86% of all people never find fulfilment as they can’t reach their goals because they haven’t programmed their brain accordingly. In neuroscience the ego – the same part of the brain which controls the fight or flight mode – resists change. It resists change as it thinks your current status is the safest way to operate and is only tuned to move on a flight or fight reaction. Which is why it is so hard to change and the brain will resist forming new neural pathways as 1. the brain doesn’t want to upset the status quo and 2. the brain, unless directed towards a goal, doesn’t understand what it needs to do to get there. The brain actually needs to be rewired with new patterns which is the key to success and lasting transformation.”

  • Evolved life Visions is holding workshops Australia wide. Tour dates, locations and tickets available here.