How to get a book contract in 6 months (with a blog)

How to get a book contract in 6 months (with a blog)

Franchise Your Business

How to get a book contract in 6 months (with a blog)

You know that publishing a book could exponentially grow your business. It can bring you more sales, more fame and launch you into a new industry as a speaker or consultant. In essence, it can give you the brand name needed to make your dreams come true.

That said, you probably also know that there are many publishing options out there. Self-publishing works for plenty of entrepreneurs, but it’s certainly not perfect: It costs you money, there’s no publisher to support your book with marketing or distribution, and the media will generally not pay attention to self-published books. Legitimate, traditional publishers are very different. They will actually pay you for your work, and help your book reach its audience. (To be clear, I’m talking about nonfiction books. I know nothing about novels!)

But if you want to sell your book to a traditional publisher, you’re going to need two things: an excellent proposal and a strong marketing plan.

A nonfiction book proposal is to the publishing industry what a business plan is to venture capitalists, and for the same reason: You’re trying to get a complete stranger to invest their money in your dream. Along with two sample chapters, it should cover these five basic parts:

1. The Overview

Where you outline your credentials, your ability to sell this book and a little about its content.

2. Your Bio

Who you are why you are the right person to write this book.

3. Competitive Analysis

Proof that similar books exist and are selling well, but that yours is still vitally important to publish.

4. Chapter Summaries

A loose outline of what you intend to include and the order in which you might present it.

5. Marketing Plan

How you will ally with your publisher to sell a gazillion books in record time.

That last bit, the marketing plan, is what trips up most would-be authors who think their idea is so brilliant that it will magically rise to the surface. But there are millions of books in print, with a million-plus more self-published every year. Getting in a position where your book actually fulfills your business goals is called “building a platform,” as outlined in my most recent book with Entrepreneur Media, The Ultimate Guide to Platform Building. While I think you should immediately buy yourself a copy and read it six times until you can recite it (and, please, also give one to everyone you know), I’ll share some select tips right here.

1. Your marketing plan, or platform, should be aligned with your specific goal, be it selling more stuff, growing a speaking career, etc.

2. You should do the things you’re naturally good at, which is likely not everything. Focus on your strengths.

3. You will benefit most by being logical in your marketing efforts. Spreading yourself too thin financially or time-wise will cause you to burn out and ultimately defeat the purpose of being a published author.

4. A legitimate publisher will help you to supersize your marketing/platform building, but they will not create it for you. They can help you make it grow, but you need to have things in process already.

5. A book is the single greatest imaginable tool, but like all tools, you have to use it to create a result.

Your journey to a contract with distinguished publishers like Penguin Random House, HaperCollins, McGraw Hill, Entrepreneur or Simon & Schuster depends on taking the right steps in the right order. The system works if you work it, and disappoints if you don’t. Write a proposal, get an agent, execute your marketing plan and watch the results flow in fast.

How to get a book contract in 6 months (with a blog)

An employment ban may be imposed even if the termination is by mutual agreement between the employer and the employee.

I am employed on a limited duration employment contract by a limited liability company, which is established in the Ras Al Khaimah Economic Zone (RAKEZ). The probation period of my job contract is ongoing, and an employment-residence visa has been issued to me on my employer’s sponsorship. However, I intend to resign from my employment as I am not comfortable with the working atmosphere in the company and the fellow employees. Am I liable to bear the visa costs? Will an employment ban be imposed on me?

While you have confirmed that your employer is subject to the provisions of Federal Law No. (8) of 1980 regulating employment relations in the UAE (the ‘Employment Law’), it may be presumed that the several ministerial decrees, issued in furtherance of the Employment Law may also be applicable, in addition to the Employment Law, in respect of your job matters.

And therefore, it may be noted that the relevant provisions of the Ministerial Resolution No. (52) of 1989 on the rules and procedures to be adopted at the labour permits sections with respect to the recruitment of non-national labours for the employment in UAE (the ‘Ministerial Resolution No. 52 of 1989’) and the� Ministerial Decree (766) of 2015 on rules and conditions for granting a permit to a worker for employment by a new employer (the ‘Ministerial Decree No. 766 of 2015’) may also be applicable in your case.

Pursuant to the first part of your query, it may be noted that as per the provisions of the Ministerial Resolution No. 52 of 1989, an employer is required to undertake at the time of making an application for recruitment of an employee that he shall sponsor and be responsible for the person being recruited. It may, therefore, be inferred that an employer may not collect or deduct employment visa costs from the employee in the UAE. This is in accordance with Article 6(a) of the Ministerial Resolution No. 52 of 1989, which reads as follows:

“The employer or its legal representative shall sign the recruitment application form prepared by the ministry for this purpose. Such form shall include the following undertakings:
an undertaking from the employer to the effect that he shall sponsor and be responsible for the recruited employee, the bearing of his recruitment expenses and his employment in accordance with the employment contract in a way not prejudicing the provision of the Federal Law No. 8 of 1980 referred to herein.”

Pursuant to the above, it may be noted that you shall not be required to pay to your employer, the cost for your employment visa, should you decide to resign from your employment.

In response to the second part of your query, it may be noted that an employment ban may be imposed on an expatriate employee, if he resigns from his limited duration employment prior to the completion of the employment contract. This is in accordance with the provisions of Article 128 of the Employment Law, which reads as follows:

“Where a non-national employee leaves his work without a valid reason before the expiry of a contract for a limited period, he may not, even with the employer’s consent, take up other employment for one year from the date on which he left his work. It shall not be lawful for any other employer who is aware of the fact to recruit such employee or keep him in his service before the expiry of such period.”

Further, if the termination of an employment contract takes place before the completion of six months, an employment ban may be imposed on the employee to work even if such termination is by mutual agreement between the employer and the employee, except where the employee qualifies for the Skill Level 1, 2 or 3 as classified by the Ministry of Human Resources and Emiratisation. This is in accordance with the provisions of Article 1 (I) (2) of Ministerial Decree No. 766 of 2015, which states:

“A new work permit may be granted to an employee upon the termination of the said employee’s employment relation in the following instances: The two parties (employee and employer) mutually consent to terminating the contract provided the employee has completed a period of no less than six months with the employer; the latter provision is waived for employees that qualify for skill levels 1, 2 and 3, as per the ministry’s classification.”

Based on the aforementioned provisions of law, the competent authority at RAKEZ, governing your employment, may at its discretion impose an employment ban on you, should you wish to resign from your employment, now.

Labour bans essentially mean that you cannot work in the UAE for a stipulated time, or permanently

How to get a book contract in 6 months (with a blog)

Image Credit: Pixabay

Dubai: Labour bans are among the most discussed and asked about topics for expatriates working in the UAE.

If your employer is threatening you with a ban, this handy guide could help you find out if he/she is right or if the firm is trying to coerce you into staying.

UAE Labour Law is quite clear when it comes to employee rights and responsibilities. The Ministry of Human Resources and Emiratisation (MOHRE) usually initiates labour or residency bans at the request of the concerned employer — which could be in any of these situations.

If you break a limited contract

A limited contract is an employment agreement stipulated by time, and requires renewal on expiry. An employee who signs a limited contract cannot resign or quit, with or without notice before this term finishes.

The employer, in this case, can request for a labour ban of up to one year, regardless of whether the employee’s residency is sponsored by the employer or not.

He or she could also initiate processes to claim compensation (not exceeding 45 days’ salary) if loss or damage resulting from the resignation can be proven.

After a 2016 resolution, you can now terminate a limited term contract if it has been mutually agreed upon in writing with your employer, and a notice period is also agreed upon (not exceeding 3 months).

If you abscond

Absconding essentially refers to situations where employees don’t turn up for work for seven or more consecutive days, or more than twenty non-consecutive days (in one year) without informing the employer (Article 120).

Article 128 also states that in limited contract cases, if absconding has been reported by an employer, the employee cannot work in the country for a year from the time of reporting.

No employer is allowed to hire or retain this person legally during this period either.

Employers are given three months’ time to report absconding cases and if proven to be true MOHRE could impose a one-year labour and/or immigration ban on the employee.

The employee also has a chance to prove he/she wasn’t absconding in such cases — this is crucial because once filed, the absconding report cannot be withdrawn even by the employer.

Also read

  • UAE Labour Law: 7 things to know about your annual leave
  • UAE Labour Law: Wrongful absconding report filed by employer
  • UAE labour law: When can an employee be suspended?

If you fail to serve notice

If you resign and don’t serve notice, the employer could request the MOHRE for a labour ban.

There are only two situations wherein an employee can resign without notice as per Section 14 of the UAE Labour Law — if the employer has failed to hold up his/her end of the contract or if the employee was assaulted by the employer or his legal representatives.

In limited contracts, resignation before the end of the contract is considered a breach, while for unlimited contracts the employer stipulates the notice period within the agreement. The notice period stipulated cannot exceed three months.

If you’re an unskilled worker

Breaking any employment contract before completing six months with the firm used to be considered a risky move and one that could almost certainly get you a labour ban – but this has changed. Before 2016, a 6-month ban could be applied to employees who left companies earlier than the contract-stipulated two years.

However, as per a resolution passed in 2016, you can now break the contract before six months, after completing your requisite notice period or other terms (mutually agreed upon with the employer), without a labour ban. It is based on mutual agreement with the employer only. This facility depends on your skill level as defined by the labour law.

Skill levels 1 (under-graduate degree or higher), 2 (diplomas in any field) and 3 (higher-secondary or high-school) can make use of this clause to avoid a ban.

Skill levels 4 and 5 (with no education qualifications on record) will get a ban if they break an employment contract before completing at least six months and then serving notice as agreed upon.

Do remember that if you fail to serve notice, or break any other terms in the contract, you’re still at risk of a ban regardless of your qualifications.

In this article

Get access to BritBox through EE. You’ll get the first six months on us – we’ll even cover the cost of data you use to watch it. Offer is available if you’re on a pay monthly, 12-month SIM Only, tablet or data SIM plan (excluding business plan customers).

About BritBox

About BritBox

BritBox is an on-demand streaming service for Britsh television boxsets.

Get shows from BBC, ITV, Channel 4 and Channel 5 all in one place and ad free.

Use the BritBox app to stream on your EE device, or on a television if you have a Chromecast.

BritBox is also available on the BritBox website, some Smart TVs and Amazon Firestick. Find out more about BritBox and other ways to stream on the BritBox website.

How do I subscribe?

How do I subscribe?

Either add the BritBox Add-on in My EE/the My EE app, or text BRITBOX to 150 – the six months on us starts as soon you add the Add-on or send the text

We’ll send you a text with a link to create a BritBox account

Sign in to your BritBox account – you won’t pay to stream (or for the data you use) for six months.

If you already have a BritBox subscription

You can still take up the offer with EE. You’ll have to replace your current subscription as part of the sign up process. However, if your subsription is with iTunes you’ll need to cancel your subscription directly with iTunes.

If you’re already using BritBox with a free trial or discount, we suggest waiting until that ends before signing up with EE.

Don’t agree to working hours you will regret, and negotiate terms from the outset, says employment lawyer Philip Landau

  • Looking for a job? Explore the range of vacancies on Guardian Jobs and find the perfect role for you

Make sure you read the contract thoroughly before signing. Photograph: Juniors Bildarchiv GmbH/Alamy

Make sure you read the contract thoroughly before signing. Photograph: Juniors Bildarchiv GmbH/Alamy

Last modified on Tue 30 Oct 2018 10.38 GMT

You may be feeling elated because you’ve been offered a new job, or perhaps it is your first foray into full-time employment. If the salary stacks up and it’s what you want to do, shouldn’t you just skim the more detailed aspects of your employment contract and simply sign up? Well, no. It’s always best to read and understand what you are signing.

So what are the top things to focus on before you sign a contract of employment?

Job title and responsibilities

This is important because it defines the scope of what your exact role is, and what duties your employer can or cannot require you to do. The wider the job description, the more flexibility your employer will have to require you to take on more work, changing the goalposts. You should check that the job description adequately reflects the role you are applying for, and does not look to impose added responsibilities that you can’t or don’t want to do. Also check that the job title is correct. If the role is for a managerial position, for example, you won’t want the job title to simply state “executive”.

Place of work

If you have agreed to work in a wide geographical area, for example other offices, locations in the UK or even abroad, your employer will be in a strong position if you object to a move at a later stage. If working remotely at home is a possibility and something you have discussed, then the contract should reflect this. Also, your rights to a redundancy payment could be adversely affected if you refuse to work in a new location, having previously agreed in your contract to do so.

Salary, benefits and bonuses

Make sure your employment contract reflects what was in your offer letter. You need to check there is provision for payment of other benefits that have been agreed, such as an enhanced pension, car, private health cover, equity or share options, bonuses and commission payments. Check if bonuses are guaranteed or discretionary. If based on performance, there should be set targets and an understanding of who decides whether the objectives have been met.

Hours of work

Don’t agree a working pattern that you will later regret. It’s best to negotiate a variation at the outset if necessary, including the possibility of flexible working if this is the only way you can get the job done. As well as hours of work, check whether there are any shift patterns, including whether you are required to work weekends or evenings, and if so, for what days and for how long? Also check if you are being asked to “work all the necessary hours that the job entails”, and if so what is expected. Also check if you’re required to do overtime, and if you will be paid for this.

Welcome! We’re glad you’re here and want to make sure YOU find the financial success you deserve.

However, as of December 2020, this website contains nearly 2,200 blog posts and pages, over 82,000 comments, 188 podcasts, and hundreds of thousands of posts on the WCI Forum. It’ll only get “worse” in the future. The readership continues to grow and thousands of new readers visit each month thanks to word of mouth, other websites, and the ever popular Google. I completely understand that it can be overwhelming to arrive here and not have any idea where to start.

  • The archives page can be very helpful. It lists posts both by date and by category.
  • If you’re looking for posts on a particular topic, type that topic into the search bar at the top right of every page (near the bottom on the mobile version).

On your first few visits, however, I suggest you start with some of the posts below. They will give the new reader a starting point to get up to speed with other readers. I’ll list both popular posts and those that will help you do something today to improve your financial situation! Other great ways to get up to speed quickly (and give yourself a frame work to hang all this new information on include:

  1. Reading The White Coat Investor: A Doctor’s Guide to Personal Finance and Investing and/or
  2. Reading The White Coat Investor’s Financial Boot Camp: A 12-Step, High-Yield Guide to Bring Your Finances Up To Speed and/or
  3. Taking the comprehensive Fire Your Financial Advisor online course, which will take you from knowing nothing to having a written financial plan you can follow from now to financial independence and/or
  4. Signing up for the FREE WCI newsletter which comes with an abbreviated version of Boot Camp as a 12 email course

Reading through some or all of these posts will get you up to speed quickly and accustom you to the tone and subject matter of the blog, podcast, videocast, WCI Forum, private WCI Facebook Group, and the WCI Subreddit, all of which is 100% free to you.

How to get a book contract in 6 months (with a blog)

Buy Our Book!

The White Coat Investor: A Doctor’s Guide To Personal Finance And Investing not only summarizes the most important information on the blog, but also contains material not found on the site at all.
Read on »

WCI Online Course

FIRE YOUR FINANCIAL ADVISOR

A step-by-step process to creating and implementing your own financial plan.

Select your level:

  • Beginners
  • Intermediates
  • Advanced
  • Experts

Beginners – “I’m pretty sure I should learn something about taxes or retirement or something.”

Intermediates – “I read a book on investing once and I’ve even got a retirement account.

Advanced – “I want to add another low-correlation asset class to my portfolio.”

Experts – “I’ve always wanted to maximize my tax-protected space by converting the SEP-IRA from my professional corporation into a Roth IRA I can stretch to avoid estate taxes.”

There is no easy answer to this question. One book might take a year to produce while another is designed and printed in three weeks. It is sensible to allow at least three months for the process – six months is even better. And before all that, you need to write the book!

These are some of the steps involved in producing a book, which will give you an idea of how long the process is likely to take from start to finish.

Writing

  • Most novelists reckon to complete the first draft within a year. After that, there is rewriting to take into account. Non-fiction can take even longer, especially when it is based on research or investigation.

Editorial – Part 1

  • Writers need criticism as well as encouragement. This can be tough but most writers agree that impartial feedback really helps to improve a novel.
  • WritersServices offers a simple Reader’s report or an Editor’s report. There is no need to wait until the book is fully polished before getting a report.
  • Every piece of work needs some reworking. It takes courage to do a rewrite but without it a book can seem uneven to a reader.
  • Most writers suggest that this is best done as one big project if at all possible rather than piecemeal in evenings and at weekends.

Editorial – Part 2

  • Once a manuscript is complete it needs polishing. Copy editing will make sure that spelling, grammar and proper names are correct and ensure that the novel is consistent in other ways.
  • To tackle this task yourself, put the manuscript away for some weeks so that you will come to it with fresh eyes. Reading aloud helps to spot errors and can also highlight places where the style is clumsy. WritersServices has a copy editing service if you need professional help.
  • Think about preparing a style sheet and check your text against it.
  • It’s also worth thinking about the preliminaries at this stage. Does the manuscript need a contents page or a foreword? What about an index?

Allow 4-8 weeks for this, depending on who is undertaking the work, and allow extra time to check the changes.

  • If you are going to look for a publisher you want to make sure the package you send does your hard work justice. WritersServices offers a submission critique service where an editor comments on the letter and material you plan to send.
  • If it is non-fiction you might be talking to a publisher already and they will be setting the pace.
  • Fiction is hard to sell direct to publishers so think about finding an agent who will present it for you.

    Agents and publishers can take several months to respond. Be prepared to contact several, though you normally have to do this only when one has turned you down. It will save time if you check that the agent or publisher you have contacted is looking for your sort of work. Study the market carefully. In the meantime, don’t stop writing. Many ‘first novels’ are not actually the first thing someone wrote.

    Publishing yourself

    • There are many reasons for publishing yourself. Is self-publishing for you?
    • WritersServices Self-publishing offers a flexible alternative which can deliver copies to you in any quantity or make them available through the normal bookshops and online retailers.
  • The text needs to be prepared for the designer.
    • It will help if you produce a design brief.
    • We need a clean script to work with. Making sure you have the correct version of the manuscript, properly set out, saves time and money. Increasingly, writers ask for their work to be copy-edited before it is typeset. Giving the designer messy text will dramatically slow the project and cost more money.
    • It can take a month or more to get the text checked and in the right form for the designer if the layout is complex.
  • You need to inspect and approve the page look. This could go through several cycles but we have some excellent designers so we normally get it right first time.
  • If you need an index then you need to book an indexer. If you do it yourself, allow at least a month.
  • The cover has to be prepared, and approved by you.
    • It is important that you prepare a cover design brief. It can take a few attempts to get the cover exactly right.
  • Along with the main text other details are required, including a dedication, acknowledgments and much else There is often a hold-up at this stage while we wait for the material.

    Bear in mind that other books are also flowing through the system so it may take a few days before the studio can work on your book.

    • Once we have the designs we can draw up a contract.
      • We need the book’s format and page count to calculate the production cost.
      • Each contract is different and depends on the marketing support planned.
    • While the contract is being signed, the design is finalised. If the writer requested a lot of changes this means another set of proofs to check. This typically takes 3-6 weeks. SO .
    • It is very important to check page-proofs carefully. In spite of all your efforts so far, and the work of any copy-editor, there will still be errors.
    • Once the material is ready, it is converted into files for submission to the printer. This can take a week or two but depends on the workload at the printer.
      • The printer has to check the files which are submitted electronically.
      • The printer then has to make up their digital ‘printing plates’.
    • We then ask for a printed proof to check that everything looks right. This copy goes through 3 stages of inspection before it goes to the writer.
      • If the printed proof has to be corrected and the changes are significant, the pages might have to be remade. You will probably be charged for any changes you make at this stage.
      • In the build-up to some holidays, printers can be very busy so there are few gaps to run off a set of proofs. It is impossible to fit in proof printing in November or December.
    • Most first-time proofs are approved without changes. The book can be ‘published’ as soon as the writer gives approval.
      • It takes 2 to 8 weeks for the retail chain to hear about a new book through the Nielsen system, which provides book information to the book trade.
      • We have known books to be available through our partner Amazon within 24 hours but it can take up to 3 weeks. With some books we make it available before it is actually approved.
      • With ‘Print on Demand’, for a modest cost changes can be made to produce an updated or corrected edition for guide books and similar.

    How to get a book contract in 6 months (with a blog)

    Once you have had an offer on a property accepted, there are a series of steps the buyer and the seller must complete before the new home is yours.

    There are no guarantees until the contracts have been exchanged and even then you may have to wait a few weeks before the seller will be able to hand the keys over. Exactly how long the process takes from beginning to end can vary but if the standard two weeks between exchange of contracts and completion is not long enough to arrange the move you can always ask for more time. Here is our step-by-step guide to what happens next after your offer is accepted.

    1. Pay your deposit

    The buyer pays a deposit to their solicitor or conveyancer. It is usually about 5% of the total agreed price of the house but it can be up to 10%. If the buyer pulls out after this stage they will lose this deposit and may face legal action from the seller. This is also the point where the buyer will also pay any other costs due to their solicitor, such as Stamp Duty. Make sure you check the details of your solicitor’s bank carefully before making any payments.

    2. Sign and then exchange contracts

    The buyer’s solicitor will provide a series of legal documents to sign, including identical contracts which will be signed by both the buyer and the solicitor. These will then be sent by recorded delivery to each other’s solicitor or conveyancer. At this point, the deal is legally binding and no one can back out.

    3. Make sure you are covered

    At this stage, protect yourself with buildings insurance cover and consider life insurance too. There are big sums of money involved in buying a house and it is essential to prepare for any unexpected events.

    4. A date for completion is set

    Completion is when the money changes hands and you are able to finally get hold of the keys to your new place. A time of two weeks is usually allocated between exchanging contracts and completion, although it can be even quicker than this. The buyer’s solicitor can be sued if they fail to meet the deadline. Use this time to plan your move, pack your belongings and book a removals company if necessary. Make a list of all the people who need to know about your change of address, including utilities companies. If you think you need longer to prepare you can ask your solicitor to arrange this.

    5. The lender releases the money

    When the lender has received a Certificate of Title from the buyer’s solicitor, they will release the money to them. The Certificate of Title contains detailed information of the history of ownership of the property, and a complete legal description of it.

    6. Final checks are made

    Right before the lender releases the money, they’ll do a final check to make sure your circumstances haven’t changed. It’s a good idea not to do anything which might affect your credit rating around this time, such as maxing out any credit cards or making any large purchases.

    7. The seller receives the money

    Once the buyer’s solicitor receives money from the lender, they will forward it on to the seller’s solicitor. The sale is complete once the seller has received the money.

    8. Time to pick up the keys

    With the sale complete, there is now only one thing left to do – pick up the keys to your new home and move in.

    Welcome! We’re glad you’re here and want to make sure YOU find the financial success you deserve.

    However, as of December 2020, this website contains nearly 2,200 blog posts and pages, over 82,000 comments, 188 podcasts, and hundreds of thousands of posts on the WCI Forum. It’ll only get “worse” in the future. The readership continues to grow and thousands of new readers visit each month thanks to word of mouth, other websites, and the ever popular Google. I completely understand that it can be overwhelming to arrive here and not have any idea where to start.

    • The archives page can be very helpful. It lists posts both by date and by category.
    • If you’re looking for posts on a particular topic, type that topic into the search bar at the top right of every page (near the bottom on the mobile version).

    On your first few visits, however, I suggest you start with some of the posts below. They will give the new reader a starting point to get up to speed with other readers. I’ll list both popular posts and those that will help you do something today to improve your financial situation! Other great ways to get up to speed quickly (and give yourself a frame work to hang all this new information on include:

    1. Reading The White Coat Investor: A Doctor’s Guide to Personal Finance and Investing and/or
    2. Reading The White Coat Investor’s Financial Boot Camp: A 12-Step, High-Yield Guide to Bring Your Finances Up To Speed and/or
    3. Taking the comprehensive Fire Your Financial Advisor online course, which will take you from knowing nothing to having a written financial plan you can follow from now to financial independence and/or
    4. Signing up for the FREE WCI newsletter which comes with an abbreviated version of Boot Camp as a 12 email course

    Reading through some or all of these posts will get you up to speed quickly and accustom you to the tone and subject matter of the blog, podcast, videocast, WCI Forum, private WCI Facebook Group, and the WCI Subreddit, all of which is 100% free to you.

    How to get a book contract in 6 months (with a blog)

    Buy Our Book!

    The White Coat Investor: A Doctor’s Guide To Personal Finance And Investing not only summarizes the most important information on the blog, but also contains material not found on the site at all.
    Read on »

    WCI Online Course

    FIRE YOUR FINANCIAL ADVISOR

    A step-by-step process to creating and implementing your own financial plan.

    Select your level:

    • Beginners
    • Intermediates
    • Advanced
    • Experts

    Beginners – “I’m pretty sure I should learn something about taxes or retirement or something.”

    Intermediates – “I read a book on investing once and I’ve even got a retirement account.

    Advanced – “I want to add another low-correlation asset class to my portfolio.”

    Experts – “I’ve always wanted to maximize my tax-protected space by converting the SEP-IRA from my professional corporation into a Roth IRA I can stretch to avoid estate taxes.”