How to get deep sleep in 5 steps naturally

As night falls, some of us are really excited to crawl into bed to have a good quality sleep and wake up feeling refreshed. Unfortunately, for a lot of people it’s not often the case. Bedtime can be a frustrating time for some, tossing and turning with the inability to sleep. With sleep being so valuable and so many of us lacking it, here’s how to get more deep sleep in just five simple steps.

How to get deep sleep in 5 steps naturally

#1 – Stick To A Sleep Schedule

Choose a bedtime and awake time that works best for your lifestyle and stick to it! Even on weekends and holidays. A sleep schedule will help regulate your bodies clock and keep you on a routine.

#2 – Honor Your Circadian Rhythm

When you honor your bodies clock, you also honor your body’s hormonal regulation system. The hormone melatonin is released from your brain when you are in darkness. Melatonin is a hormone that tells our body to slow down and sleep. Melatonin is not released as readily when we’re out in the sunlight or around bright lights. Honoring your circadian rhythm means creating a dark space to sleep and staying away from screens for at least one hour before bed. It’s time to turn off the TV, computer and phone. Create a dark space for yourself before bed.

When you wake up in the morning, spend time in a bright or well-lit area. Open your blinds and let the sunshine in! Start to eat breakfast by a window or out on the deck if weather permits. Begin your day with a morning walk or outdoor time. The exposure to sunlight and well-lit areas will signal your brain to decrease melatonin release and help increase your energy throughout the day.

How to get deep sleep in 5 steps naturally

#3 – Create A Bedtime Ritual

Creating a routine that divides your day may be helpful in falling asleep and staying asleep. There are times during the day that we may experience anxiety, stress or excitement. For some us it’s when we are at the gym, at work or playing with the kids. Creating a bedtime ritual separates the high excitement state from the low energy and relaxed state you want to be in before bed. The ritual allows you to shift to a state of calm and relaxation.

For some people the ritual may be an epson salt bath before bed, meditation listening to relaxing music in a calm quiet area of your house, sitting and chatting with your partner or reading an easy book. Creating that bedtime ritual is also going to help you fall asleep and get you in that relaxed state. Want to put a little Namaste in your life? Click here to learn more!

#4 – Evaluate Your Room

Look around your room and determine if there are any factors that can affect your sleep. Sources of light like alarm clocks, night lights and windows can be contributing to your poor quality or lack of sleep. Assess your room and evaluate if it is dark. If you have a clock and it’s shining or flashing, turn it away from you or even remove it from your room. Move electronics away from your bed and out of your bedroom. Put the nightlight in the hallway and close your door. You can even use a mask to help keep things dark. Make sure that your sleep space is a quiet area. If you find that there are noises that are waking you up
try to move them or use earplugs at night. Avoid any sleep disturbances.

How To Find The Right Pillow

#5 – Get Good Quality Pillows & Mattress

The average good quality bed typically has a life span of 10 years. If your mattress is old and expired, than switch it out or invest in a new one. I say invest because it truly is a solid investment. The average person spends eight hours a day in their bed (sleeping or trying to sleep). You use your bed every single day for years. Therefore, a quality mattress is key to quality sleep!

If you’re sleeping on your side use one good quality pillow rather than a stack of pillows. If you are sleeping on your back, use a small thin pillow. Click here to take the pillow test.

Also, avoid sleeping on your stomach! Need help picking the perfect pillow for you? Click here to learn about all things pillows from the pillow doctor himself!

I hope you now know how to get more deep sleep and that these simple tips help you improve your quality of sleep. Of course, there’s many more things that you can do to help improve your quality of but this is a perfect place to start.

Also, something to consider if you have symptoms of exhaustion, anxiety and sleep disturbances is adrenal fatigue. Click here to find out if you have adrenal fatigue and ways you can fight back naturally!

Have a wonderful night sleep tonight and sweet dreams!

Does it feel like your body is dragging, despite getting 7 to 8 hours of sleep at night? It might mean yo u ’ re missing out on precious deep sleep. Deep sleep is the sleep stage responsible for healing and repairing your body, replenishing cells, and revitalizing your immune system . Therefore, it ’ s important that we get enough of it to feel our best each day.

You can try some of these ideas to see if they help improve your deep sleep for a more energized tomorrow!

1 . Get the Right Amount of Exercise at the R ight T ime

Experts recommend about thirty minutes of exercise per day, 5 days per week. Try for the 30-minute average per day of whatever you enjoy doing most. Even moderate physical activities like walking the dog, light jogging, or yoga should do the trick . E xercise can help expend your energy and extend your deep sleep, but keep in mind that strenuous exercise too close to bedtime can interfere with getting the sleep you need. Physical activity in the morning can help you feel awake and energized, and you can spend your day feeling good that you already got some exercise. A nother time for exercise that works for many people is the late afternoon , to burn off the stress of the day. Do this at least 3 hours before bedtime to wear yourself out while not encroaching on your time to wind down and relax before bed. W hen you get enough sleep, you have more energy! Feeling energized means you can get more done , including more physical activity , which will help you get more deep sleep.

2 . A Pre-bed Warmup

Taking some time before bed to warm your body can help prepare you for a healthy night ’ s sleep and actually can help you fall asleep faster and improve deep sleep! You want to f eel cozy and warm — but not hot – at night. Try s pending time in a warm bath, hot tub, or sauna at night. For the best results, we recommend taking a long bath with a temperature of 95 ⁰F (35⁰ C) or higher, ending at least 45 minutes before your regular bedtime.

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3 . Careful with Caffeine

It comes as no surprise that caffeine consumption can have negative consequences for your sleep ; however , the time of day you need to stop caffeine intake may surprise you. Caffeine can linger in our system for up to 6 hours , possibly increasing the amount of time you’re spending in lighter stages of sleep and decreasing the amount of time you spend in deep sleep. Therefore, you should halt any caffeine consumption at least 6 hours before bedtime to give yourself the best chances at a healthy night of sleep.

4 . Try Pink Noise

R esearchers at Northwestern Medicine found that sleeping with pink noise as a constant sound in the background boosted objectively-measured deep sleep in patients with mild cognitive impa i rment , which led to improvement in their me mories the following day . There are some great sound machines that feature many different varieties of sounds, including pink noise. You may also consider a fan or an air purifier for their background noise along with the added bonuses of temperature control and clean air.

5. Hypnosis Before Bed

A study out of the University of Fribourg in Switzerland found that research participants who listened to sleep-promoting audio recordings containing hypnotic suggestion spent more time in deep sleep compared to those who did not listen to the recordings. If you’re interested in trying this technique , there are free and paid audio resources available. Find one that appeals to you, and t ry using it before you sleep . T urn it off before you drift off to sleep or use a timer to shut it off. That way the sounds won’t disrupt your sl umber after you’ve fallen asleep.

You may find that one or all of these suggestions help you . T ry them out to see what works for you, keeping in mind that everyone’s sleep is a little different.

How to get deep sleep in 5 steps naturally

Does it feel like your body is dragging, despite getting 7 to 8 hours of sleep at night? It might mean yo u ’ re missing out on precious deep sleep. Deep sleep is the sleep stage responsible for healing and repairing your body, replenishing cells, and revitalizing your immune system . Therefore, it ’ s important that we get enough of it to feel our best each day.

You can try some of these ideas to see if they help improve your deep sleep for a more energized tomorrow!

1 . Get the Right Amount of Exercise at the R ight T ime

Experts recommend about thirty minutes of exercise per day, 5 days per week. Try for the 30-minute average per day of whatever you enjoy doing most. Even moderate physical activities like walking the dog, light jogging, or yoga should do the trick . E xercise can help expend your energy and extend your deep sleep, but keep in mind that strenuous exercise too close to bedtime can interfere with getting the sleep you need. Physical activity in the morning can help you feel awake and energized, and you can spend your day feeling good that you already got some exercise. A nother time for exercise that works for many people is the late afternoon , to burn off the stress of the day. Do this at least 3 hours before bedtime to wear yourself out while not encroaching on your time to wind down and relax before bed. W hen you get enough sleep, you have more energy! Feeling energized means you can get more done , including more physical activity , which will help you get more deep sleep.

2 . A Pre-bed Warmup

Taking some time before bed to warm your body can help prepare you for a healthy night ’ s sleep and actually can help you fall asleep faster and improve deep sleep! You want to f eel cozy and warm — but not hot – at night. Try s pending time in a warm bath, hot tub, or sauna at night. For the best results, we recommend taking a long bath with a temperature of 95 ⁰F (35⁰ C) or higher, ending at least 45 minutes before your regular bedtime.

SleepScore Store

Explore top rated sleep products

right from your own home

3 . Careful with Caffeine

It comes as no surprise that caffeine consumption can have negative consequences for your sleep ; however , the time of day you need to stop caffeine intake may surprise you. Caffeine can linger in our system for up to 6 hours , possibly increasing the amount of time you’re spending in lighter stages of sleep and decreasing the amount of time you spend in deep sleep. Therefore, you should halt any caffeine consumption at least 6 hours before bedtime to give yourself the best chances at a healthy night of sleep.

4 . Try Pink Noise

R esearchers at Northwestern Medicine found that sleeping with pink noise as a constant sound in the background boosted objectively-measured deep sleep in patients with mild cognitive impa i rment , which led to improvement in their me mories the following day . There are some great sound machines that feature many different varieties of sounds, including pink noise. You may also consider a fan or an air purifier for their background noise along with the added bonuses of temperature control and clean air.

5. Hypnosis Before Bed

A study out of the University of Fribourg in Switzerland found that research participants who listened to sleep-promoting audio recordings containing hypnotic suggestion spent more time in deep sleep compared to those who did not listen to the recordings. If you’re interested in trying this technique , there are free and paid audio resources available. Find one that appeals to you, and t ry using it before you sleep . T urn it off before you drift off to sleep or use a timer to shut it off. That way the sounds won’t disrupt your sl umber after you’ve fallen asleep.

You may find that one or all of these suggestions help you . T ry them out to see what works for you, keeping in mind that everyone’s sleep is a little different.

How to get deep sleep in 5 steps naturally

Slow wave sleep, also called deep sleep, is an important stage in the sleep cycle that enables proper brain function and memory. While most adults are aware that they should aim for between 7 and 9 hours of sleep each night, the science of sleep is quite complex.

The two main categories of sleep are called rapid eye movement (REM) sleep and non-REM sleep, and each has important stages. Humans cycle through these stages in a somewhat regular pattern as they sleep, and a full night’s rest means cycling through these stages a few times before waking up.

There may be some ways to get both better sleep and more deep sleep each night, allowing a person to wake up feeling more rested and refreshed.

The body first cycles through the three non-REM stages of sleep:

How to get deep sleep in 5 steps naturally

Share on Pinterest Stage one of the sleep cycle is relatively short.

The first stage of the sleep cycle is a transition period during which the body and brain shift from a state of wakefulness to one of sleep. This period is relatively short, lasting only a few minutes, and the sleep is fairly light. People may wake up from this stage of sleep more easily than from other stages.

During stage one, the body starts to slow its rhythms down. The heart rate and breathing rate slow down, and the eyes begin to relax. The muscles also relax but may occasionally twitch.

The brain unwinds along with the body. The brain waves start slowing down as brain activity and sensory stimulation decrease.

The second stage of non-REM sleep is another lighter stage of sleep that occurs as the body starts transitioning to deeper sleep. As the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke note, humans spend most of their time during the sleep cycle in this stage of sleep.

In the body, the heart rate and breathing rate slow down even more. The muscles relax further, and eye movements stop. The body temperature also goes down.

Although the brain waves slow down further, this stage also includes small bursts of electrical signals in the brain.

Deep sleep or slow wave sleep is the third stage of non-REM sleep. Although the body completes a few cycles throughout the night, the third stage occurs in longer periods during the first part of the night.

In the body, the heart rate and breathing rate are at their lowest during this part of the sleep cycle. The muscles and eyes are also very relaxed, and the brain waves become even slower.

It may be very difficult to wake someone from this stage of sleep, which is when sleep disorders, such as sleepwalking, occur.

If you’re curious to learn more evidence-based information about the fascinating world of sleep, visit our dedicated hub.

REM sleep is the fourth and final stage of the sleep cycle. The body first goes into REM sleep about 90 minutes after falling asleep.

During this stage of sleep, the eyes dart back and forth behind the closed eyelids. This state is closer to the wakeful state than the other stages of sleep.

In REM sleep, the brain waves start to resemble the brain waves of the wakeful state. The heartbeat and breathing rate speed up.

The REM stage is also when most dreaming occurs. The brain temporarily paralyzes the arms and legs to prevent the body from acting out these dreams.

While a person needs all the stages of sleep, deep sleep is especially important for brain health and function. Deep sleep helps the brain create and store new memories and improves its ability to collect and recall information.

This stage of sleep also helps the brain rest and recover from a day of thinking, allowing it to replenish energy in the form of glucose for the next day.

Deep sleep also plays a role in keeping the hormones balanced. The pituitary gland secretes human growth hormone during this stage, which helps tissues in the body grow and regenerate cells.

Importantly, a person has to get enough deep sleep for these functions to take place. The amount of deep sleep that a person has will relate to how much overall sleep they get. Sleeping 7 to 9 hours is the recommendation for most adults, which will usually give the body plenty of time in the deeper states of sleep.

If the body does not get enough deep sleep one day, it will compensate the next time it can get sleep by quickly moving through the cycles to reach the deepest levels of sleep faster and stay there longer.

However, if the person regularly does not get enough deep sleep, this may start to affect the brain.

As deep sleep plays a role in memory, the body may have difficulty making new memories or retaining information if it does not get enough sleep.

Long-term issues with deep sleep may have an association with other conditions, such as heart disease or Alzheimer’s disease.

There may be a few ways to increase the amount of deep sleep that a person gets each night.

As the American Sleep Association note, the most important thing that a person can do to increase the amount of deep sleep that they get each night is to set aside more time for sleep. Doing so allows the body to go through more sleep cycles, which makes it possible to have more deep sleep.

Other practices may help promote deep sleep and good sleep in general, such as:

  • doing vigorous exercise, such as swimming, jogging, or running, early in the day rather than before bedtime
  • making diet changes that include eating fewer carbohydrates and more healthful fats
  • warming up the body in a spa or hot sauna

Additionally, some antidepressants may help people get deeper sleep, although this is not the case for everyone.

Pink noise may also increase the effectiveness of a person’s deep sleep. Pink noise is random noise with more low-frequency components than white noise. A study in the journal Frontiers in Human Neuroscience looked into the effects of using sound stimulation, such as pink noise, on deep sleep. The findings indicated that listening to these sounds might enhance a person’s deep sleep state, leading to better memory function when they wake up.

Some general healthful sleep habits may also help promote better sleep overall, including:

  • avoiding blue lights, such as smartphones or computers near bedtime
  • keeping the room as dark as possible by shutting windows and turning off lights from alarm clocks
  • avoiding caffeine later in the day
  • avoiding big meals before bedtime
  • reducing stress
  • setting a sleep schedule and trying to fall asleep at the same time each night

Deep sleep is an important part of the overall sleep process, but it is just one aspect of a good night’s sleep. There may be some ways to promote deeper sleep, such as tiring the body through exercise or listening to pink noise while falling asleep.

The best way to get more deep sleep may be as simple as setting aside more time to sleep each night.

If you’re longing to wake up energized after a night of deep, refreshing sleep, you’re in good company. One in three adults gets by on six hours or less of nightly slumber, when most of us really need seven to nine hours.

“Humans are essentially the only mammals that willingly deprive themselves of sleep,” says Johns Hopkins sleep expert Rachel Salas, M.D.

And plenty more people wake up feeling tired, thanks to insomnia or more subtle sleep disturbances caused by problems like nighttime reflux and sleep apnea.

“But our need for sleep is still there,” Salas says. In fact, missing out on your fair share of high-quality sleep can boost your risk for depression, becoming overweight or obese, type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, and memory and concentration problems—and can even make you look older.

Yet research suggests that many of us are still taking wrong turns that keep us from getting the sleep we need and deserve. Here are proven solutions that can put you on the right path to better sleep.

Know when to watch the clock.

It’s normal to take 10 to 20 minutes to fall asleep after lights-out. If you’re dropping off within five minutes or find yourself falling asleep during the day, you’re likely not getting enough sleep. But if you’re still tossing and turning after 20 to 30 minutes, get up. Go read a book or listen to relaxing music until you feel sleepy, then return to your bed. It’s one way to train your mind to associate your bed with sleeping instead of struggling, research has shown.

Don’t underestimate caffeine.

It takes nearly six hours for half of the caffeine from your favorite coffee, tea or cola to exit the body. Caffeine too late in the day can cause lighter, more disturbed sleep—or keep you from sleeping at all, researchers have found. In a 2013 study, researchers learned that consuming 400 mg of caffeine (the amount in two to three cups of coffee or one 20-ounce coffee drink) six hours before bed cut total sleeping time by more than an hour.

Have Trouble Falling Asleep?

Skip the nightcap.

An estimated 10 percent of older adults use alcohol to overcome insomnia. It seems to help . but is actually harmful. A recent review confirms that an alcoholic drink before bed can help you fall asleep faster. But it reduces the amount of time you spend in deeper sleep stages that affect memory, concentration and even physical coordination.

Trade sleep aids for sleep hygiene.

One in five older adults turn to drugstore sleep remedies, which often contain antihistamines that can cause dangerous daytime drowsiness (and can mask a fixable sleep problem). Instead, try upgrading your sleep habits. Salas suggests these steps for natural, high-quality sleep:

  • A bedtime ritual: Put on your pajamas. Relax. Avoid stressful activities, like working or having tense discussions.
  • A peaceful bedroom: “Some people have a desk in their bedroom with bills on it and constant reminders of all the things they need to do,” Salas says. Instead, keep this room free of distracting clutter.
  • No electronics at least 30 minutes before bed: Darkness in the evening helps our brains prepare for sleep. Staring at the light from your phone, computer or television throws off your brain’s internal clock.

Rule out health problems.

Conditions like gastroesophageal reflux disease and obstructive sleep apnea can rob you of quality sleep. If you have heartburn, talk with your doctor about reflux treatments that can ease nighttime reflux. You may have sleep apnea if you snore loudly and gasp or seem to choke at night as tissue in your throat blocks your airways, causing you to momentarily stop breathing. If you share a bedroom, ask, “Do I snore loudly or gasp for breath at night?” Treatments, including weight loss and wearing a pressurized mask for better breathing, can reverse apnea.

Still tossing and turning?

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for insomnia retrains your body and mind for deep sleep. In one study, CBT was more effective than prescription sleeping pills at helping people with insomnia fall asleep faster and stay asleep with fewer interruptions. A year later, they were still sleeping well—without drugs. Ask your health care provider how to give it a try.

Consult with a sleep expert.

If you’re struggling with lack of sleep, talk to your health care provider. However, Salas’s research as a Johns Hopkins sleep expert has found that doctors often get little training on sleep problems during medical school. If you can’t resolve your problems with your health care provider’s help, consider visiting a sleep specialist. This expert can help figure out if such problems as restless legs syndrome or chronic pain are keeping you from sleeping well.

Definitions

Sleep apnea (ap-ne-ah): A disorder in which your breathing repeatedly stops or becomes very shallow as you sleep. Your breathing may pause anywhere from a few seconds to a few minutes. This ongoing condition disrupts your sleep, making you tired during the day and increasing your risk for heart problems, diabetes, obesity and driving or work-related accidents.

Restless legs syndrome (RLS): A disorder that creates a strong urge to move your legs often because you notice strange or unpleasant sensations: creeping, crawling, pulling, itching, tingling, burning, aching and even electric shocks. When you move your legs, it relieves the strange sensations. The unpleasant feelings are strongest when you are resting or inactive, and they can make it difficult to fall or stay asleep.

Gastroesophageal (gas-tro-e-soph-a-ge-al) reflux disease (GERD): A condition in which some of the contents from your stomach flow backward, up into your esophagus, causing heartburn. (Usually, food and beverages travel in one direction: down the esophagus and into the stomach.) Because some of the stomach’s digestive juices contain acid, this condition is also sometimes called acid reflux or acid indigestion.

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT): Two different psychotherapies—cognitive therapy and behavioral therapy— in one. Cognitive therapy can help you improve your mood by changing unhelpful thinking patterns. Behavioral therapy helps you identify and solve unhealthy habits. When used in conjunction with each another, these therapies have been shown to improve problems such as depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, insomnia and eating disorders.

How to get deep sleep in 5 steps naturally

Last week we spoke about why sleep is so important and all the health issues that may come about from chronic sleep deprivation (read about it here). Now, You may be longingly looking out the window trying to find some sleep. Don’t worry! Help is here 🤗 This week we will touch upon some simple measures we can take to get more deep sleep naturally.

Obviously, there are plenty of prescription medications that can help you find sleep, but my goal is for you to find sleep without having to use these. All of these medications are not without side effects and some have the potential to create addiction.

I am a creature of habit when it comes to my evenings. I like to take a warm shower before bed to relax and put on my light and comfy cotton PJ’s. Also, I make sure the temperature is cool in my bedroom and I dim the lights. I put my lavender hand cream on and avoid electronics at least for 20-30 minutes before bedtime. Once in bed, I read a few pages of the book “du jour” before turning in.

So first, let’s talk about sleep hygiene. This refers to those evening routines we perform before going to bed. Hopefully, these set us up to slip into a peaceful slumber and get more deep sleep naturally.

Sleep hygiene and easy steps to promote sleep

How to get deep sleep in 5 steps naturally

  1. Try to keep your same bedtime every night within 30 minutes, it doesn’t have to be exact. However, big fluctuations will mess up your internal clock and make it harder to fall asleep.
  2. Start diming lights and putting away your electronics at least 30 minutes before bedtime – Artificial light from electronics (cell phones, TV, etc) disrupts our circadian rhythm (our natural sleep-wake cycle) and it disrupts the production of a sleep inducing hormone called melatonin.
  3. Have dinner at least two hours before bedtime – Lying down and going to sleep soon after eating a big meal will make you less comfortable for sleep and it predisposes you to have reflux and heartburn.
  4. Avoid eating junk food – Make sure your dinner has a good combination of healthy carbs and protein. Your body will digest it faster and you will sleep better.
  5. Make sure your bedroom temperature is ideal– Studies suggest that the ideal temperature to sleep in and get the best quality sleep is 65-72ºF (17-24ºC). Too cold or too hot temperatures will disrupt your sleep.
  6. Avoid caffeine later in the day – Some people are more sensitive to this, but as a general rule, avoid stimulants like caffeine from 2pm onwards.
  7. Do not exercise too late at night – Again, this affects some more than others, but try to finish your exercise at least two hours before bedtime.
  8. Avoid drinking excessive alcohol – We know alcohol disrupts your sleep stages. Although it may make you feel sleepy initially, it will not lead to restorative sleep.

The above steps are something simple enough that we can all do to promote our sleep. What if you follow all these steps and you still can’t find sleep? Is there anything you could take without having to resort to prescription medications?

Let’s take a look at the top most commonly seen options and what the data suggests on their effectiveness.

Natural sleep promoting alternatives

How to get deep sleep in 5 steps naturally

  1. Melatonin: This is a hormone released by our brain to help regulate sleep. Light inhibits it’s production and darkness stimulates it. There are many studies on melatonin supplementation out there. For the most part, most studies agree that it is helpful in dealing with jet lag, insomnia and sleep issues in night shift workers. Consider starting with 1 mg at night and work up to 3 mg per night until desired effect. Try not to exceed 5 mg as side effects, such as headache, dizziness, drowsiness or nausea are associated with higher doses. Also, do not use if pregnant or nursing. There are many supplements available out there, but they aren’t all great quality, so please make sure you obtain a high quality supplement such as Pure Encapsulations brand. Click here for more information on melatonin.
  2. Chamomile: This is a plant derived compound used in teas and extracts. It has been used for ages to help manage anxiety and sleep disorders. Unfortunately, there aren’t any great studies to define how effective chamomile is. There are some small studies suggesting it may be helpful with anxiety, but nothing definitive for sleep. Either way, it has a very good safety profile, with the main side effect being allergic reactions. So, if you want to drink something warm in the evening, this may be worth a try. Read more about it here.
  3. Valerian Root: Since the early days of medicine, people used this ancient plant to treat insomnia and anxiety. There are several studies that suggest it helps with insomnia and people’s scoring in a sleep quality scale. Doses varied from 60 to 900 mg, with the majority in the 450 mg range. The safety profile is pretty benign as well, with the biggest problems being headache, dizziness, itching, and digestive upset. You can read the data here.
  4. Kava Kava: We find this plant in the western pacific. It is best known for it’s anti-anxiety properties, but in several studies it shows sedative properties which may help with sleep difficulties. Unfortunately, depending on it’s preparation, it can have serious side effects for your liver, including liver failure. Many member countries of the European Union restrict its use. Therefore, until we have more studies on the safety and dosing of this supplement, I would steer clear from it.

So, there you have it! There are several other supplements out there, but I picked the ones that people ask me about most frequently. I hope these help you catch those 😴 pronto! In the meantime, tells us about the techniques that help you reconcile sleep!

All-natural, sound-sleep secrets tailored to your nightly needs

How to get deep sleep in 5 steps naturally

Sound slumber results in increased energy and productivity, improved heart and immune system health, a better mood, even a longer life. And hey, you just feel so much better after a satisfying 8 hours of rest. But chances are, you’re not getting it. “Sleep issues are epidemic among women today,” says Michael Breus, PhD, clinical psychologist and author of The Sleep Doctor’s Diet Plan.

Not surprisingly, women tend to get less sleep than men do overall, says Marianne Legato, MD, FACP, director of the Partnership for Gender-Specific Medicine at Columbia University. Even if you don’t have children, levels of sleep-promoting estrogen sink regularly during menstruation and then permanently in menopause. And symptoms related to both—cramps, headaches, hot flashes, and night sweats—also disrupt slumber.

But experts agree that these biological facts don’t mean that sleep deprivation has to be your destiny. “Feeling tired should never be considered normal,” says Dr. Breus. Yet there are no stock sleep solutions, either: Finding out what works for you takes some trial and error, but it’s well worth it, says Lawrence Epstein, MD, chief medical officer of Sleep HealthCenters. “Sleep is a basic biological necessity—just like eating—and it has an impact on every aspect of your health and your life,” he notes.

Try these 20 ideas to find the sleep formula that works best for you.

By Yasmin Anwar, Media Relations | April 5, 2017 April 11, 2017

As we grow old, our nights are frequently plagued by bouts of wakefulness, bathroom trips and other nuisances as we lose our ability to generate the deep, restorative slumber we enjoyed in youth.

But does that mean older people just need less sleep?

How to get deep sleep in 5 steps naturally

The nuisances that keep us up at night as we age leave us more vulnerable to mental and physical ailments.

Not according to UC Berkeley researchers, who argue in an article published April 5 in the journal Neuron that the unmet sleep needs of the elderly elevate their risk of memory loss and a wide range of mental and physical disorders.

“Nearly every disease killing us in later life has a causal link to lack of sleep,” said the article’s senior author, Matthew Walker, a UC Berkeley professor of psychology and neuroscience. “We’ve done a good job of extending life span, but a poor job of extending our health span. We now see sleep, and improving sleep, as a new pathway for helping remedy that.”

Unlike more cosmetic markers of aging, such as wrinkles and gray hair, sleep deterioration has been linked to such conditions as Alzheimer’s disease, heart disease, obesity, diabetes and stroke, he said.

Though older people are less likely than younger cohorts to notice and/or report mental fogginess and other symptoms of sleep deprivation, numerous brain studies reveal how poor sleep leaves them cognitively worse off.

No magic pill

Moreover, the shift from deep, consolidated sleep in youth to fitful, dissatisfying sleep can start as early as one’s 30s, paving the way for sleep-related cognitive and physical ailments in middle age.

And, while the pharmaceutical industry is raking in billions by catering to insomniacs, Walker warns that the pills designed to help us doze off are a poor substitute for the natural sleep cycles that the brain needs in order to function well.

“Don’t be fooled into thinking sedation is real sleep. It’s not,” he said.

For their review of sleep research, Walker and fellow researchers Bryce Mander and Joseph Winer cite studies, including some of their own, that show the aging brain has trouble generating the kind of slow brain waves that promote deep curative sleep, as well as the neurochemicals that help us switch stably from sleep to wakefulness.

“The parts of the brain deteriorating earliest are the same regions that give us deep sleep,” said article lead author Mander, a postdoctoral researcher in Walker’s Sleep and Neuroimaging Laboratory at UC Berkeley.

Aging typically brings on a decline in deep non-rapid eye movement (NREM) or “slow wave sleep,” and the characteristic brain waves associated with it, including both slow waves and faster bursts of brain waves known as “sleep spindles.”

Youthful, healthy slow waves and spindles help transfer memories and information from the hippocampus, which provides the brain’s short-term storage, to the prefrontal cortex, which consolidates the information, acting as the brain’s long-term storage.

“Sadly, both these types of sleep brain waves diminish markedly as we grow old, and we are now discovering that this sleep decline is related to memory decline in later life,” said Winer, a doctoral student in Walker’s lab.

Another deficiency in later life is the inability to regulate neurochemicals that stabilize our sleep and help us transition from sleep to waking states. These neurochemicals include galanin, which promotes sleep, and orexin, which promotes wakefulness. A disruption to the sleep-wake rhythm commonly leaves older adults fatigued during the day but frustratingly restless at night, Mander said.

How to get deep sleep in 5 steps naturallyOf course, not everyone is vulnerable to sleep changes in later life: “Just as some people age more successfully than others, some people sleep better than others as they get older, and that’s another line of research we’ll be exploring,” Mander said.

The hunt for new treatments

Meanwhile, non-pharmaceutical interventions are being explored to boost the quality of sleep, such as electrical stimulation to amplify brain waves during sleep and acoustic tones that act like a metronome to slow brain rhythms.

However, promoting alternatives to prescription and over-the-counter sleep aids is sure to be challenging.

“The American College of Physicians has acknowledged that sleeping pills should not be the first-line kneejerk response to sleep problems,” Walker said. “Sleeping pills sedate the brain, rather than help it sleep naturally. We must find better treatments for restoring healthy sleep in older adults, and that is now one of our dedicated research missions.”

Also important to consider in changing the culture of sleep is the question of quantity versus quality.

“Previously, the conversation has focused on how many hours you need to sleep,” Mander said. “However, you can sleep for a sufficient number of hours, but not obtain the right quality of sleep. We also need to appreciate the importance of sleep quality.

“Indeed, we need both quantity and quality,” Walker said.

Try incorporating these five steps into your routine to prepare your body for deep sleep. By experimenting with each of these steps, you’ll find what does and doesn’t work for you and your consciousness.

1. Shower at the End of the Day
This is a good way to calm down mentally and to feel comfortable and clean in your skin. If you have no possibility to take a shower, than wash your face and teeth properly. Enjoy this step and start slowly retreating from the day. Make this one of your last physical activities for the day.

Express gratitude that you’re able to retreat peacefully, wherever you are and whoever you’re with. Stop talking, verbally as well as mentally.

2. Shut Down the Mental Chatter
Decide not to think about anything that concerns tomorrow, yesterday or today. Your highest priority is sleep.

Your smartphone and the rest of the gadgets should be switched off, your kids should be tucked in, and everything should be set to hibernation mode. In case something happens and takes you out of this step, step 3 below is the technique to be applied.

3. Soothing Exercises
There are several relaxation techniques you can do to sooth your body before sleep. Stretch your spine by pulling up your arms above your head. Let your breathing lead the body movement in order to relieve tension in your muscles. Gently rotate your pelvis, making circles to the left then to the right. Do this for at least 3-5 minutes.

For another 3-5 minutes, stretch your mandibular muscles by gently opening and closing the jaw. Massage your head, neck, and jaw muscles, gently circulating with your hands. This will relieve this whole area of tension and prepare your body to fall asleep easier and quicker. Again, let your breathing lead the movement of your hands.

4. Deep Breathing
If you try nothing else before going to sleep, at least give this a go. Slow, controlled breathing can reduce your heart rate, lower stress hormones[3], and relax your muscles, all of which are essential in preparing your body for deep sleep.

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Simply pay attention to your breath and breath gently, slowly and deeply. Following the flow of your breath will break down the process of thinking.

This conscious, deep breathing technique is the only natural way to stabilize your heart rate, your body temperature, and calmcease your mental fluctuations. As a result, the nervous system soothes and stabilizes the production of hormones.

All these factors take you more effectively and more efficiently to the so called N3 stage of NREM sleep deep sleep.

5. Meditation
Continuous, conscious deep breathing leads you automatically to a meditative state of mind in which all bodily functions are balanced and prepared to regenerate in sleep. Do the following meditation practice

Consciously generate thoughts about how your breathing pattern will take you from this wakeful state of consciousness to deep sleep in a peaceful way. Meditate on yourself as a pure being that has no form or name. This is quite abstract, but so is deep sleep. In the state of deep sleep, there is no body, no mind, and no experience. So, let your “self” be carried into deep sleep by not analyzing how it’s done.

When the state of deep sleep has transgressed to the state of wakefulness, the concept of the social identity acknowledges the experience of nothingness.

Once you’ve gained expertise in this step, you will never have problems falling asleep, given that your circadian rhythm and environmental factors remain intact.

Final Thoughts
Many people have their own specific sleep-ritual approach that involves physiological, psycho-social and spiritual aspects. The bottom line is that, if you want to know how to get deep sleep, you must find a way to silence your mind to the extent where no concepts, ideas, or beliefs can influence your wakeful state of consciousness.

Take this sleep-ritual approach and allow yourself to put everything aside in order to effortlessly and carelessly transgress into deep sleep.

Pay respect to the power of your intelligence that keeps your body healthy every single day, enabling you to enjoy the wonders of life, of which the biggest one is you.

Let go of your dilemmas and look deep inside yourself, where the infinite silence of deep sleep resides.

BDST:1350 HRS, NOV 10, 2020
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