How to get out of a funk and take control of life

How to get out of a funk and take control of life

It’s not easy to either feel or take control but it’s very easy to feel anxious and worried about where your life is headed. If you’ve ever felt like things aren’t going your way, or too many external incidents are affecting the way you think, live and work then you might need some friendly tips on how to relax and take control of your life. Being independent and autonomous is extremely important to your mental wellbeing and self-confidence. Perhaps you’ve lost sight on what you really want to do with yourself; if you have then here are 10 Top Ways to Take Control of Your Life so you can have a little ‘me’ time.

1 Establish Priorities

First thing in the morning, decide what needs to be done on that day and list them down in order of importance. Another good tip is to question the list – will you get too stressed if this doesn’t get done? Try to arrange your to-do-list on your terms so that you become the person who makes the decisions. By doing what only you’ve set yourself to do, you can take control of your life.

2 Know Your Limits

Setting yourself unreachable goals will only stress you out and make you feel like you’re losing control of things. Be realistic as well as ambitious. If you are altruistic and try to help others as much as you can you need to be careful and ensure you aren’t damaging yourself in the process.

3 Be More Decisive

You can take control easier and quicker if you make a decision and stick with it.

Don’t be flaky or fickle, because having a clear set goal helps when trying to control your surroundings and activities. This relates to knowing what you want. E.g. if a great opportunity appears, take it. Make your own decisions and try to do things you’re comfortable doing.

4 A Tidy House is a Tidy Mind

Having a clean and ordered environment helps your brain categorize, organize and feel more in control. Tidy your workplace and home and get rid of any unnecessary clutter. Also, designate certain areas of your workplace for important items so you’ll always know where to find them. Once this is done, you can focus your mind better and teach it to take control of your life through simple organization.

5 Plan and save Your Meals Ahead

If you are constantly busy and feel like there aren’t enough hours in the day, save yourself some time and cook your meals in advance. Don’t rely on expensive and greasy take-aways. Cook a big batch of food at the beginning of the week and freeze it so you’ll always have a prepared home-cooked meal. It saves you time so you can focus on other issues at hand.

6 Reflect

Think about your typical week and calculate how many hours you work, play and rest. If you’re shocked by any of the results try adjusting your lifestyle to one you feel comfortable with. For example if you spend more hours in the office than you want or need to, try cutting back. Realize that recharging your batteries is just as important as using them. Otherwise you’ll just burn out.

7 Minimize and Maximize the Use of Your Commuting Time

If you commute to work, take that long slog of a journey to do some reading, listen to podcasts, do brain training or take up a relaxing hobby such as knitting. Or to be even more organized, you can use that time to write down your to-do lists for the day. If you designate your own tasks whilst on the train or bus, then you can take control of how your time is being used.

8 Share the Load

Family, friends and colleagues could all be tugging you in different directions, getting you to do this that and the other. When things get too much, establish firmer rules with how much you are really willing to take on. Discuss with your family a fairer way of doing household chores. Take control of how you use your time. Get others to share the load for a change.

9 Working from Home

Of course this is dependent on what type of job you have. But with fast-speed internet and conference calling technology, nowadays it is possible to work effectively from home. It cuts down commuting time, the stress of rush hour and also travels expenses. By working from home you would be ensuring you are spending time on you and your ability to be productive, not wasting time on a packed train.

10 Consider Setting up Your Own Business

If you find your current job is unfulfilling and doesn’t give you the necessary job satisfaction, try being your own boss. Enterprising and entrepreneurial work sets you up to be independent, organized and tons more skills to boot. Of course it is brave work to set up your own business, but it could all pay off because at least you are the one who controls your life.

Feeling settled and in control of your life is difficult and what many people struggle with. It’s just a natural part of life. But you can do things to take control and feel more at ease with where you are and what you’re doing, to help you manage your time significantly better. With these Top 10 Ways to Take Control of Your Life, you could make decisions that lead you to happiness! If you have any, please share your personal ways on how you control the strains of life!

How to get out of a funk and take control of life

When I was a kid, I was ice skating and remember going really fast. Next thing I recall I was being tended to in the changing room by my sister and employees of the skating center. Apparently I had been going so fast that I lost control, hit my head, and knocked myself unconscious. That incident rendered me fearful of the ice. Fast forward to 2012 when I was discussing this incident with 1994 Olympic speed skating Gold medalist Dan Jansen. He told me, “throw a helmet on and get back out on that ice.” His advice was spot on. In the face of fear one must face it rather than avoid it. To ignore that which we’re afraid of only gives the fear more power, while facing it will diminish it. This ice skating incident is perhaps a metaphor for other things in life.

What do you do when you feel like you have no control over a situation? Maybe you’ve had your own ice skating incident or perhaps you’ve been a passenger in a car with an inexperienced driver. If so, then you know just how out of control it feels when a driver doesn’t brake quickly enough as a red light or an obstacle approaches.

Some people live their lives as if they are passengers in an out-of-control car. Rather than doing something to control the situation — by getting into the driver’s seat — they operate the car as passengers. They attempt to control what is out of their control, rather than what actually is within it.

Here’s how you can gain control when you feel like you have none:

  • Shift the locus of control. Sometimes it’s as simple as recognizing that there are things that you can change and control. What can you actually change? Be realistic. One person can’t single handedly change the economy, but, perhaps there are things you can do to ensure you stay financially sound. Such as being a smart consumer, saving, and investing wisely.

Put the dynamite out before it explodes. People often find themselves in tough situations and dread facing someone, whether a loved one, friend, or colleague. Maybe a huge mistake was made at work that cost the company money. Perhaps poor judgment was used and it hurt a friend. Naturally you avoid them. This tactic will keep you free of conflict; however, at an unconscious level it will eat away at you and lead to chronic stress and anxiety. The solution: face it. Rather than passively dealing with the situation, take control and initiate the conversation, and do it with confidence. Know that you have control over what you say, how you tell the person, and reactions you might have.

Next time you face a situation where you feel that you have no control; take some time to change your thinking. Below are some examples of how to take control. Use them as a guide when you look at your own life.

  • Will she agree to have dinner with you? You control: What you wear, what you say to her, how you say it when you make the request, and how you present yourself to her.

Will you get a promotion? You control: How well you perform your job so that your supervisors see you as promotion worthy. Things to separate you from your colleagues such as taking on special projects and specialized training.

Will you die of a heart attack? You control: The foods you consume, how much and how often you exercise, and how much stress is in your life.

So next time you’re stuck or feeling like you have no control, ask yourself: What do I actually have control over?

For more tips on improving your life check out my book BE FEARLESS: Change Your Life in 28 Days.

How to get out of a funk and take control of life

When you’re in a funk, it’s hard to find the desire and motivation to reach your goals. It often feels like you’re just going through the motions in life. There isn’t always an answer as to why these feelings ignite. Maybe it’s from burnout, or maybe life just hasn’t been going as you had hoped. Regardless, it’s important to take control of your emotions and your life.

1. Talk About Emotions

When you’re in a funk, you may not even know what you’re feeling. You may be feeling sad, alone, unmotivated, and you don’t even know why you’re feeling this way. A good way to get a better grasp of how you’re feeling and to spark inspiration is to talk it out. Connect with someone you trust and who you are comfortable having an open conversation. Talk about all the ups and downs of life, and what you can do to move past this. An open conversation might remind you you’re not alone, and even give you new ideas on how you can get closer to your goals. Talking out what’s going on in your head might help you get to the root of the problem and might even spark inspiration on ways to turn a new leaf and get you excited to get yourself back on track.

2. Journal

Sometimes when in a funk, it’s hard to even put into words the emotions we’re feeling. Maybe you’re not quite comfortable talking about what you’re feeling because you don’t even know yourself. Journaling could be a good solution to connect with your emotions a bit more. Grab a pen and paper and let out a massive brain dump. Anything that’s on your mind – Now’s your time to let it out. Reflect on how life has been going for you the past few months. Try to analyze where things may have gone wrong. It’s okay to feel what you’re feeling, and it’s okay to vent. Letting everything out may be just what you need to move on from the rut you’re in.

3. Exercise

Physical activity is a great way to distract yourself from the rut you’re in and to get your blood pumping. Even if you’re feeling down and you’re letting your emotions stop you from getting your work done and reaching your goals, you can feel proud to know you got a good workout in and that you accomplished something great today. Plus, it’ll make you feel happier which could increase your motivation to go home and get your work done. So even if it’s hard to push yourself to get a workout in, remember by doing so that you’re giving both your mind and body some much needed love. It might not be enough to fully remove you from the funk you’re in, but it’s a start.

4. Rise and Shine

Even though it might be tempting to sleep your days away – Don’t. Go to bed early, and wake up early. Focus on getting a good nights sleep. Turn the lights off, get comfortable, and count sheep until you fall asleep. Sometimes it’s poor rest that is the route to all our problems. If you’re tired, how can it be possible to get anything done when all you can think about is sleep? At the same time, sleeping too much can be just as bad as not sleeping at all. Be sure to get 8-9 hours of sleep each night. Your mind will be much more alert and you’ll feel much more motivated if you’re well-rested.

Remember to take it one day at a time. You’ll get through this.

“Somedays you just have to create your own sunshine.” — Unknown

“Pain hurts. Sometimes important things come from sitting with [our] own pain.” — Lynne Namka

Have you ever found yourself in a funk for no apparent reason? You wake up one morning and the light simply appears dimmer and your motivation and inspiration is buried so deeply within that you cannot muster even the slightest bit of energy? Yet you cannot connect any clear or apparent reason why you’re feeling this way? There might be a number of reasons why we experience a “funk,” the most important key to remember is that our “funk” is a normal process and is a part of our journey. Sometimes life just doesn’t feel like a bowl of cherries. So, a “funk” is as much a part of our path as “fun,” and pain is as powerful and expected in our lives, as peace and pleasure. Keep in mind though, a “funk” is not to be confused with depression, which is a complicated and painful disease. Therefore, if someone is clinically depressed, medical supervision and psychotherapies are available to provide comfort and support.

However, in this blog, I’m referring to the often mundane pendulum of joy and pain that we may experience inexplicably in our everyday lives. The emotional ebbs and flows that we don’t have to ignore but can recognize as parts of ourselves that are calling out for our awareness and attention, and a normal process through life’s journey. If we take the time to closely examine our “funk,” we might discover some powerful messages and transformations that are happening within us. A “funk” can serve as our teacher. It may appear only to reveal parts of us that we have kept hidden.

So the next time you find yourself in a “funk,” here are some powerful tips to help you explore the etiologies of your “funk,” to help you move through the “funk,” and to discover new things about yourself, your path, and your own growth and transformation.

Before considering the following list, be sure to first address any changes to your health, diet, or lifestyle. Are your biorhythms imbalanced due to changes in your sleep patterns, or are there new responsibilities at home or at work causing you to feel a “funk”? New stress invited into your life? Any changes to your health? Hormonal imbalances?

1. The first step to understanding anything about ourselves is AWARENESS. Simply take a moment and notice your mood and ask pertinent questions. What’s bothering me? Did anything new or sudden change in my life that I’m not aware of consciously? Am I going through a major transition in my life? Is this an anniversary period of a difficult or impactful past life experience? Then explore whichever thoughts or answers come up. Don’t allow the “funk” to own you. You can take control over your own “funk.”

2. MEDITATE. Sit with your thoughts and feelings in stillness and investigate the dominant thoughts you’re keeping. Don’t attempt to run or escape. Sometimes you have to sit awhile longer and allow your thoughts and feelings to arise from your unconscious mind, because the source could be deeply buried from within. It is the repeated telling of our positive and negative thoughts to our conscious and unconscious minds that create our feelings. So, a “funk” may arise because you’re unconsciously choosing a repetition of painful and negative thoughts. Meditation and sitting still with our thoughts and emotions will help us uncover what might be bothering us on an unconscious level.

3. JOURNAL YOUR THOUGHTS AND FEELINGS. There is so much healing power in writing. When we allow ourselves to simply write, without fear and judgment, but in a free flowing style, we have the power to discover new qualities, beauties, and sufferings that are within us.

4. CRY! Yes, let out a good cry. Don’t hold onto any heavy emotions. Sometimes a “funk” just appears so we can experience a cathartic cry and let go of any old emotional baggage we’re still storing. Release it! Let it go. We are able to go deeper in our own healing when we release the darkness from within. Spirit desires for us to constantly grow and evolve. So, sometimes pain must show up in order for us to transition to the next level in our spiritual path.

5. PRACTICE GRATITUDE. It’s easy when we’re in a “funk” to bemoan about all the things that are going wrong in our lives. Yet a subtle and powerful practice of gratitude, focusing on the good in our lives rather than the bad, can quickly shift our mindset to more positive feelings. Write down what you’re grateful for on those dark and gloomy days. And consider cultivating an ongoing gratitude practice. It’s simply remarkable the shifts gratitude can create in our minds and in our lives.

6. LISTEN TO MUSIC. Music is simply powerful. It connects to us on a soulful level. Our mood can immediately alter upon hearing the rhythmic sounds and beats of inspirational music. Music that touches and moves us at our core can serve as a conduit for us to explore and release emotions. And also elevate our vibration to higher thoughts and emotions. Music can bring us to euphoria.

7. TURN YOUR “FUNK” INTO FUN! That’s right. shake it up! Sitting in our emotions can be heavy so we can balance between sitting still in our emotions with seeking fun and pleasure. Whatever delights your soul, do more of that.

8. RIDE IT OUT! Eventually a typical “funk” will pass and we’ll finding ourselves feeling like our old selves again or even better. Give time for your “funk” to pass. Let it be and refrain from ignoring it or pushing too hard through it.

Remember that being in a “funk” from time to time is a completely normal passage through life. If however, you find that you’re not moving through it after several weeks consider contacting your doctor.

I wish you much luck on your journey. May we all learn to embrace the “funk” just as much as we embrace the “fun.”

How to get out of a funk and take control of life

When I was a kid, I was ice skating and remember going really fast. Next thing I recall I was being tended to in the changing room by my sister and employees of the skating center. Apparently I had been going so fast that I lost control, hit my head, and knocked myself unconscious. That incident rendered me fearful of the ice. Fast forward to 2012 when I was discussing this incident with 1994 Olympic speed skating Gold medalist Dan Jansen. He told me, “throw a helmet on and get back out on that ice.” His advice was spot on. In the face of fear one must face it rather than avoid it. To ignore that which we’re afraid of only gives the fear more power, while facing it will diminish it. This ice skating incident is perhaps a metaphor for other things in life.

What do you do when you feel like you have no control over a situation? Maybe you’ve had your own ice skating incident or perhaps you’ve been a passenger in a car with an inexperienced driver. If so, then you know just how out of control it feels when a driver doesn’t brake quickly enough as a red light or an obstacle approaches.

Some people live their lives as if they are passengers in an out-of-control car. Rather than doing something to control the situation — by getting into the driver’s seat — they operate the car as passengers. They attempt to control what is out of their control, rather than what actually is within it.

Here’s how you can gain control when you feel like you have none:

  • Shift the locus of control. Sometimes it’s as simple as recognizing that there are things that you can change and control. What can you actually change? Be realistic. One person can’t single handedly change the economy, but, perhaps there are things you can do to ensure you stay financially sound. Such as being a smart consumer, saving, and investing wisely.

Put the dynamite out before it explodes. People often find themselves in tough situations and dread facing someone, whether a loved one, friend, or colleague. Maybe a huge mistake was made at work that cost the company money. Perhaps poor judgment was used and it hurt a friend. Naturally you avoid them. This tactic will keep you free of conflict; however, at an unconscious level it will eat away at you and lead to chronic stress and anxiety. The solution: face it. Rather than passively dealing with the situation, take control and initiate the conversation, and do it with confidence. Know that you have control over what you say, how you tell the person, and reactions you might have.

Next time you face a situation where you feel that you have no control; take some time to change your thinking. Below are some examples of how to take control. Use them as a guide when you look at your own life.

  • Will she agree to have dinner with you? You control: What you wear, what you say to her, how you say it when you make the request, and how you present yourself to her.

Will you get a promotion? You control: How well you perform your job so that your supervisors see you as promotion worthy. Things to separate you from your colleagues such as taking on special projects and specialized training.

Will you die of a heart attack? You control: The foods you consume, how much and how often you exercise, and how much stress is in your life.

So next time you’re stuck or feeling like you have no control, ask yourself: What do I actually have control over?

For more tips on improving your life check out my book BE FEARLESS: Change Your Life in 28 Days.

How to get out of a funk and take control of life

“If you correct your mind, the rest of your life will fall into place.” -Lao Tzu

We’ve all been there. Even the things that normally make you happy begin to bring you down. Worst of all, you can’t seem to understand why.

So you give it time, let it take its course, and just when you think you’ve escaped the funk, something drags you back in. You know it’s happening but you can’t stop from slipping back under.

What’s happening here is simple. Something—be it your job, peers, or general lifestyle—is contaminating your mind. You’ve lost track of the calmness you know you possess and it’s like your mind’s been tricked.

You’re stuck in a painful and decisive delusion that causes everything to be toxic.

It’s time to wake up. Seriously, the snooze button is off-limits.

You only come to find yourself in these types of negative situations because you’ve let your mind take control. It may seem like other people and circumstances are to blame, but everyone is responsible for their own mental state.

Life will never stop throwing you curve balls. The only solution is to change how you internalize and deal with them.

Since completely escaping your mind may seem a bit radical, at the very least, you must correct your thinking.

Our minds are like oceans. Like the tides, thoughts come in and then retreat back. When your mind is stuck, the ebb and flow of your thoughts are all negative. Each new thought process makes the negativity even stronger, creating a snowball effect.

Luckily there is a solution, and you innately have it.

Patanjali’s Yoga Sutras suggests that there is a jewel of pure consciousness within each of us that is waiting to shine through the clouded mind. By intentionally concentrating away from negativity, and instead focusing the flow of thought on something pure, that jewel will become apparent.

Even if you have to fake it at first, you can teach your mind to ignore negative thoughts. The mind works both ways; the flow of thought can be a snowball of positive energy too.

This being said, I invite you to give meditation a try, even if you think it’s not for you. Stretch a little first to loosen your muscles and connect with your body. Sit in a position that’s comfortable for you and take a few deep breaths—or as I like to say, reboot your mind.

When you reboot your mind, you are clear of the past, empty of regrets, and focused on something positive. You’re simply present, connected, and peaceful in the moment.

Don’t stress if your mind starts to wander while you’re meditating. Just notice it and pull yourself back to a place of awareness.

It helps to focus on a specific point or place so that your meditation practice is an active experience. This place, or the inner-jewel, varies between us all, so it is up to you to find your own. By focusing upon this inner-treasure, your mind will feel less inclined to go down a negative path.

If you find yourself struggling to find this place, meditate on the sun, moon, or water. Pretty soon this type of meditation will teach you your own unique meditative dance. You’ll feel less easily pulled into a funk when things go wrong outside you, and positive energy will seem more natural.

By learning to live in absorption of this meditative place, you’ll help your problems slowly dissipate. Your funk will fade into a sense of peace that you can nurture every day by connecting with body and your breath.

How to get out of a funk and take control of life

Sometimes, you get stuck in a funk and can’t figure out why. Maybe it is something tangible and specific. Maybe it is nothing in particular.

How to get out of a funk and take control of life

For example, a month ago, we had two gorgeous weeks of spring. The temperatures were in the 70s, the birds were singing, the daffodils began to bloom. I caught myself whistling as I was leaving for work.

But, as usual in Tennessee, cold weather has returned. Right now it feels just like winter. The temperatures are in the 40s. It’s overcast and raining. Last night, for no apparent reason, I caught myself in a funk.

Well, if you’re a blogger, you see an opportunity (or at least a post!) in every problem. I decided to make a list of twenty-four “hacks” (or quick fixes) for getting out of my funk:

  1. Write a list of 10 things you are thankful for. Be specific.
  2. Put on some upbeat, happy music. I like Keith Urban.
  3. Go for a walk—or a run.
  4. Plan a vacation or, better yet, go on one!
  5. Schedule an appointment with a counselor.
  6. Talk to a good friend who knows how to listen.
  7. Have a good cry. It’s okay. It will cleanse your emotional system.
  8. Take control of that little voice in your head. “Change channels.”
  9. Turn off the TV and the radio.
  10. Read the Psalms.
  11. Do volunteer work with a local charity.
  12. Organize your desk and/or your office.
  13. Take one “baby step action” for each of your top three projects.
  14. Take the afternoon off and take a nap.
  15. Get a massage or sit in a hot jacuzzi or tub.
  16. Change positions. If you are sitting, stand. If you are standing, sit.
  17. Pray. Pour out your heart to God.
  18. Smile. Your emotions will usually follow your body’s lead.
  19. Do that one thing you fear the most.
  20. Write a love note to your spouse and mail it.
  21. Excuse yourself from negative conversations.
  22. Resist the temptation to complain—about anything!
  23. Forget the past. Ignore the future. Be fully present NOW.
  24. Stop worrying about things you have no control over.

How to get out of a funk and take control of life

Getting Out Of A Funk

Some days are easy. You’re on fire. Focused. Productive. Energetic and Happy.

And some days, are, well, not. And right now, a lot of people I talk to are feeling this way, and for good reason: the shorter days, unrest in the world, uncertainty and isolation with COVID.

You probably already know what I mean when I say ‘feeling blah’ or ‘in a funk’. If you’re unfamiliar with ‘blah’, then lucky you. Here’s how I describe it: you feel down, a bit ‘off’, unmotivated, uninspired, generally dissatisfied. And there’s no glaring reason why. Your dog didn’t die. You didn’t just have a massive fight with your spouse. In fact, intellectually you know there’s much to be grateful for. Despite knowing all this, you simply feel, well ‘blah’, and you can’t quite shake it off.

I spent the better part of today feeling just that way. On the bright side, it inspired me to write this for you.

I have learned, through personal and professional experience, however, how to create a shift. I did it this afternoon, and I’d like to share it with you.

Before I share my ‘5 steps to get out of a funk’, please note that I’m talking about ‘blah days’. If you do experience these feelings for more than a few days, please, please, please reach out to someone who can support you, and talk to a health professional. It’s time that we open the conversation and get real about the ups and downs with people we trust.

Let’s start with what DOESN’T WORK.

  1. “Shoulding” yourself. “I should be feeling happy”; “I should be grateful for everything that I have”. The ‘should’s’ creates a discrepancy between where you are and some false expectation of where you ‘should’ be. The word ‘should’ is a red flag. There is no ‘should’. There is just what is.
  2. Overanalyzing the situation. Awareness can be really helpful, but sometimes we get stuck in the ‘why’… and we keep searching for the answer without moving forward.
  3. Blaming others or things you can’t control. Again, being aware of situations or circumstances is fine. But the only way to move forward is to take responsibility for what you can control. I get that this is easier said than done, and depending on the circumstance can take time.

So, what does work to create a shift from ‘blah’?

While there’s something to be said about ‘feeling the feelings’ and not necessarily trying to ‘fix’ moods that you’re uncomfortable with, I prefer to work my way through it. Here’s five ways to create a shift:

  1. Accept that it is part of the process. Going back to the ‘shoulds’; the discrepancy between what we think things should be like and the actual reality creates unnecessary tension. Stop arguing with reality; you won’t win. Feeling in a funk isn’t good or bad, it just is. And while I prefer not to stay in that state, accepting that it’s part of the process and part of normal life removes any unnecessary stress or the additional feelings when you think ‘what’s wrong with me?’. What we resist persists.
  1. Accept control. Now that you have accepted that feeling flat, empty or unfocused, is part of the journey and part of the human experience, it’s time to take control. Recognize that you have the power to change. You can decide to change your thoughts. Focus on what you can control. You can decide to take action, or not- but you do have the choice. And while continuing to blame others or circumstances may help you feel better about feeling in a funk, it won’t help you move past it.
  1. Get out of your head… and into your body. Literally. Move your body. I know we like to associate fitness and physical activity with weight loss and heart health, but the most immediate and impactful benefits of exercise are on your mental health and your mood. Go for a walk or run. Put music on and dance. I just went for a short hike while listening to an energizing playlist. For me right now, “Miss Atomic Bomb” by the Killers is on repeat. And “Low” by Flo Rida (yes… and I love it). If you’re at work and feeling stagnant, take a walk break or at least step outside for some fresh air. It’s transformational and it’s instantaneous. Movement changes your state.
  1. Connect with others. When you’re feeling down, you may feel inclined to hide under a rock. DON’T. Connect with people who love you and are worthy of hearing your story.
  1. Take action on SOMETHING that will help just a little bit. Hopefully your ‘something’ was moving your body. Other things you can do:

⭐️ Celebrate what’s going RIGHT. We can get down on ourselves when we’re not where we think we ‘should be’ (again… the word ‘should’) but taking a moment to celebrate your wins can shift your perspective.

⭐️ Take action on ANYTHING. If you’re feeling blah, it can be really hard to have the motivation to do anything. Start small so that you can create momentum with a quick win. Maybe it’s cleaning the kitchen or writing an email that you were putting off. Then celebrate your win; it could be as simple as checking that task off your list, or saying ‘good job’ to yourself. Sure it sounds silly, but it works.

⭐️ Get out of your head and into the world. In other words, serve others. Serving others will give you a refreshed perspective on your own issues. “We rise by lifting others” –Robert Ingersoll.

I wrote this with love, maybe a bit of tough love, and a whole lot of compassion. If you’re going through a tough time, my heart goes out to you. But if you’re in a funk and ready to get out, you can slowly, lovingly work through it. Take action. Your thoughts create your feelings. And you can gently shift your thoughts. And that’s a beautiful thing.

Last week I shared 10 ideas to help you get out of a funk in your life in general. The tips included several ways to change the environment in your personal life to lift your spirits. But what if your home life is fine, and your work life is leaving you with the blues?

Today’s tips are all about ways you can change things up at the office to help you get out of a funk at work. If your work days are filled with feelings of annoyance, drudgery, boredom, or a lack of fulfillment it could be an indication that it’s time to look for a new job. However, most of the time, it’s simply a sign that you need to change things up to re-spark your energy for your current job.

How to get out of a funk and take control of life

Remember your “Why”

Why do you work in the first place? Why did you choose the job you are currently doing? What is the best part about your current job? How does it make you feel to be successful in your current position? What are you hoping to achieve with your current job?

Think through and journal your responses to these questions to help you reconnect with your why behind your current career. Sometimes we get stuck in the day to day monotony and lose sight of the big picture of why we are doing what we’re doing. Take several minutes to take a step back and see the big picture to refocus your thoughts on the positives of your current career.

Need further help with figuring out your why? Check out this post of 30 questions to develop more clarity in life and this one on how to find your purpose in life.

Get a change of scenery.

Most of the time we don’t have the luxury of completely changing the location of our office, but you can make small changes to your current work space to freshen things up. First things first, clean up your work space, get rid of the coffee mugs, the papers and clutter, take out the trash, and put everything in it’s place.

You might also want to do a little reorganizing and redecorating. Not necessarily a complete overhaul of your space, but could you shift some of your supplies around to be more efficient? Could you bring in a new family picture to inspire you during the day? Maybe grab a small bouquet of flowers to brighten up the corner of your desk this week.

How to get out of a funk and take control of life

If you have the flexibility in your position, you might want to talk with your supervisor about working in a completely different space once in a while. Ask if you can work from home one day a week, spend a few hours at a coffee shop, or maybe hold your next meeting outside or at a local restaurant just to change things up a bit. Often by working in a different space we can refresh our creativity, re-energize our focus, and avoid some typical office distractions which can all have a big impact on both the way we feel about our jobs and our productivity.

Clean up your digital space.

In our modern world our digital environment can be just as overwhelming, if not more, than our physical environment. Take a few minutes to take control of your email inbox. Delete every unimportant piece of junk email you have hanging around and breeze through a few of the emails that only require a quick response. It won’t get you to inbox zero, but it should shrink things down to be a little more manageable.

While you’re at it, organize the desktop and folders on your computer. If you randomly save things all over the place, take a few minutes to drag and drop your files into organized folders. Remove the visual chaos on your computer and cut down on the amount of searching through files you need to do throughout your day.

Create a schedule for your day.

There are only so many hours in your workday. And you only have so much energy and focus. When you start feeling “blah” it’s easy to float around from one task to another, working on whatever feels good for the moment, but completely ignoring the important items. This just sets you further and further behind and builds on your blah. Take a moment to create a schedule for the things you need to do for the day and then stick to your schedule whether you feel like it or not. If you’re feeling in a funk, you probably won’t want to do a lot of the things that need to get done. Make sure you have a plan to get them done anyways, and try to build in a little margin to reward yourself for sticking with your plan.

How to get out of a funk and take control of life

Take a break.

Depending on the level of your “funk” this break could range from a five minute walk around the building to clear your head to a week long vacation. Working hard and focusing is important, but we all need time to rest and rejuvenate. If you’re feeling overwhelmed, annoyed, and frustrated by every little thing, it might be time to step away from your work for a while. Take some time to do things you enjoy, get a little exercise, soak up some fresh air and sunshine, and then get back to work refreshed and ready to tackle your assignments. (This post on 101 ways to practice self-care can give you some ideas for what to do on your break.)

No matter how much we love our jobs, there will always be days when things aren’t as enjoyable as we would like. It’s easy to get stuck in these moments and worry that it will last forever. Usually with a few small changes these feelings will pass and we can get back to business as usual. The sooner you can reset and refresh tings, the easier and faster it will be to get out of a funk at work.