How to handle rejection and overcome the fear of being rejected

It’s pretty OK to become fearful of someone or something at some point in your life, but it’s absolutely not OK to let that fear creep up in your head for longer as it puts no one else but you on the line. Here a question arises: Does fear really exist? If yes, what causes fear to evolve? It could be any fear-either micro or macro- such as fear of failure, fear of the unknown, fear of darkness, etc.

Here, we need to bring it to your attention that our monstrous fear is the fear of rejection that gets on our nerves and leads us astray.

Now the question is how to overcome rejection to bounce back? How to not let any shade of fear cause destruction in life? Do Not Let Fear Of Rejection Knock You Down

It’s not an odd thing to say that each one of us is hit hard by rejections in our lives one or the other way. No doubt, rejections, in any case, hurt. But it totally rests on the way you opt for responding to the fear of being turned down.

7 Useful Tips on How to Overcome Rejection

The more you allow negative emotions to dig in, the more attention you give to rejection. Here are some tips that will help you win the battle against rejection.

1. Face and process your fear boldly

Being in severe pain, you pretend to be happy, wear a fake smile on your face, force optimism but most of the time this strategy doesn’t run well. You ought to be true to your feelings and emotions.

To get back on track, you need to address your fear head-on. The first and foremost tip on how to overcome rejection is, to be honest to your own self. Faking for this world wouldn’t get you anything other than pain.

The inner critic is the tiny voice that plays off in the back of your mind with the purpose to sabotage you. It is a sort of ‘anti-self’ which refers to the side of you that is hostile to your own self. It hinders you from burying your fears because it attacks when a person is weak from the inside and is emotionally and mentally unstable. As the inner critic injects the seed of self-destruction, you have to take the hard challenge and beat your inner voice. Otherwise, you’ll fall in pieces.

If you can win over your inner critic, you’re a real star who well understands how to overcome rejection.

3. Come out of the box

When bleeding at heart because of rejection, try to be your own good friend. Do not blame yourself for anything that’s not your fault. You have to step out of the box to cope up with this fear. Indulge yourself in activities that keep you from all the bad thoughts. Be Your Own Saviour

To get rid of this fear, you have to be your own savior. You have to drive the car yourself, rather than being driven by someone else. You have to convince yourself for a “no big deal” strategy by stepping out of your own shadow.

This is, though hard, but a quite useful tip on how to overcome rejection.

Surround yourself with optimistic people

People with a positive mindset can surely help you beat your fear by broadening your horizon. Their positive thoughts, stories, and experiences will not only overpower your negative approach but will also urge you to pick yourself up. Get Into The Company Of Those Who Are Optimistic

Such people are a*sets to those in pain. Look for their company for your own good. They can be a good source of bringing you back to life.

Travel and explore

New places keep you distracted from the thoughts you want to throw away. Traveling adds colors to life and it’s always fun. A new environment can serve to lift you from the darkness and can help fill the emptiness.

Self-approval is what matters

Do not desire for getting approvals from others. ‘Self-approval’ is all that matters and defines you. Never give others a chance to decide for you. It’s your life and you have to deal with it yourself.

Valuable insight on how to overcome rejection is to gain self-confidence and strengthen self-esteem.

Learn from rejections

How to Overcome Rejection Through Learning

Rejections make us learn a lot. There are some people, who, with each rejection, grow stronger and prudent. Give yourself a chance of self-improvement. Just because you’re rejected today doesn’t mean at all that you’ll be rejected tomorrow as well.

Keep going on with the flow and never undermine yourself. Life is all about moving on. Being grateful for what you’ve rather than being ungrateful for what you’ve lost or what have caused you temporary pain, is an attribute uncommon to most of us.

FAQ – Frequently Asked Questions on How to Overcome Rejection

Why do I take rejection so hard?

It enacted indistinguishable zones of our mind from physical torment! Believe it or not – rejection causes you strict agony. Obviously, Rejection causes us more than some enthusiastic agony. It harms our confidence, causes us outrage or pity, and thumps us off kilter from feeling dependability in our lives.

How do you cheer yourself up after being rejected?

Try not to make it individual. Acknowledge rejection as soon as possible. Treat yourself with sympathy. Accomplish another thing to take your psyche off being rejected.

Why do I fear rejection so much?

The essential explanation the fear of rejection is common in your life is frequently because of an absence of confidence. You fear rejection since you have a low worth and assessment of yourself. Accordingly, you seek others for prompts to assist you with resting easy thinking about yourself.

How do you accept rejection from a guy?

Being busy with life is a powerful method to get over sentiments of Rejection. Gain from the circumstance. Get truly fit. Work it out. Trust in another person.

Conclusion:

If you really wish to overcome the fear of rejection, just don’t flood your brain with despairing thoughts. All you require is to shift your perspective. If not, you’ll have to face the music. You’ll fail to win against negative vibes which tag along with the fear of being put down. Conquer your fear to move with the flow of life.

Just keep in mind that you don’t need other’s approval for the matters of your life. Learn the lessons from rejection and then let your fear of rejection have a safe flight

Taking into account all these seven tips on how to overcome rejection, can surely help you mold into the best miniature version of yourself capable of attracting positive thoughts and energies.

5. Set a hard deadline for letting it go.

How to handle rejection and overcome the fear of being rejected

Few things feel as painful as rejection. Regardless what form it takes—not being invited to a friend’s party, not being offered a position after an interview, having your actions criticized, or failure when you’re trying to sell your idea—every “no” indicates a door closed to us. Of course, the extent of the impact largely depends on the position of the individual receiving the rejection and the one doling it out, but most people struggle with finding the best way to regroup and recover.

Research tells us that not only does rejection give us a mental pause; it can also produce physical pain. Study findings published in Science magazine by researchers from Purdue University and the University of California, Los Angeles, in 2003 demonstrated that being socially shunned or turned down by others activates the same regions in our brains—the dorsal anterior cingulate and the anterior insula—that are associated with experiencing physical pain. Numerous successive studies have corroborated the similarities between rejection and physical pain. For example, a 2011 study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science demonstrated how pain experienced from hot coffee spilled on one’s forearm is similar to the “pain” that they would experience from seeing a photograph of a former partner after an unwanted relationship breakup.

In short, it hurts.

Pain is not the only negative consequence of rejection; it can also lead us to feel more insecure in ourselves, our decisions, and our choices. Security is one of the most basic human needs, and when it is not fulfilled or is jeopardized by rejection, we start to doubt ourselves. Other aspects of rejection can include flagging concentration; increased levels of stress, irritability and aggression; inability to sleep and control one’s emotions; and gradual withdrawal from society, among others.

Not everyone copes with rejection in the same way: Studies show that people with a higher sense of self-worth, as well as individuals with more social power, handle rejection better than those with lower self-esteem and less social influence. There are salespeople who actually love cold-calling and think that every “no” just leads them closer to the next “yes.”

People who highly value a sense of individuality also experience rejection less painfully than those whose need for being a part of the group is much stronger.
Similarly, self-confident people are able to use rejection to improve themselves, get more creative, and validate their beliefs.

Rejection is going to happen. It’s a fact of life that not all relationships and situations will work out well. With distance, we can often see that a rejection was a good thing for us but at the time, it doesn’t feel good. Developing more effective responses to rejection is an important life skill. If you find yourself unable to deal with rejection, you may need to work on building your self-confidence and your self-esteem and strengthening your social ties before addressing the anxiety, anger, and other issues that arise from being rejected.

  1. Self-confidence is key.

Of course you know that self-confidence is important, but knowing it’s important and having it are two different things. Many people have grown up in environments where they were told they were worthless or useless. These messages often carry over into adulthood and other relationships. If your self-confidence is flagging, start small to build it back. Make a list every day with at least two or three things you have done well, contributions you have made, or positive things you have done. Write these down and review them before you go to bed each night and again when you get up the next morning. Fill your nighttime and early morning brain with something positive about yourself.
Change to positive self-talk.

Rejection will enhance whatever negative things you say to yourself, so practice different self-talk. Notice what you say to yourself; thoughts like “It’s all my fault” or “What is wrong with me?” are not useful and only bring you down. Rejection happens to everyone; even the most successful and confident people don’t always get what they want, but most of those people acknowledge the rejection as outside of them and don’t start telling themselves how terrible they really are. Notice what you say to yourself and choose to build yourself up, not tear yourself down.
Remember, this too shall pass.

Remind yourself of this whenever you feel down. No, you are not worthless and you are not a failure: This is a point in time. Don’t let one disappointing experience diminish the worth of everything else that you have achieved. Give yourself credit for your skills and accomplishments, and remind yourself of all those experiences when you made good progress, solved a problem or helped someone. No one is defined by one experience.
Practice reframing.

Take a deep breath, step back from the situation, and just breathe for a few minutes. Many times a situation seems worse because you react and then “frame it” as a negative about you. Instead, physically step back and begin deep breathing. Choose to reframe it. Instead of thinking, “No one will ever love me, I’m unlovable,” you could reframe by thinking, “Relationships are hard for everyone; I’m no different. This was hard for me but I can learn something from it. Let me focus on what I can learn.”
Let it go.

How to handle rejection and overcome the fear of being rejected

Dec 5, 2019 · 2 min read

Have you ever ENJOYED being rejected? Never! According to multiple studies, failure and rejection are two of the top 10 fears for why people hold back in life.

How to handle rejection and overcome the fear of being rejected

I’m currently enrolled in a course at the Ivey Business School called Start Ups: Hustle & Grit, and as an adversity challenge, I was assigned four tasks that are designed to set me up for an inevitable rejection. I was definitely nervous for the challenge but also excited to step out of my comfort zone and potentially embarrass myself. Some more difficult than others, but the four challenges I accepted include:

1 . ‘Borrow’ a cup of sugar from a neighbor

2. Try to withdraw bitcoin from my local bank

3. Tell a clean joke to a stranger

4. At a restaurant, ask for something not on the menu

Most people spend their life not wanting to deal with the pain of rejection and the pain of failure. I learned that, like everyone else, I fear rejection. I have always shied away from rejection, and because of that, I’ve inherently avoided situations where that part of my character CAN and SHOULD be developed. In all honesty, I haven’t been rejected by many things in my life and that has led me to question whether I’ve been pushing my limits and overachieving or rather settling within my comfort zone.

The purpose of this assignment was to reflect on why we may have held ourselves back in the past, what we’re afraid of, and what we might miss out on in the future if we continue living in our own comfort zones.

How to handle rejection and overcome the fear of being rejected

I remember an old high school football coach of mine screaming, “get comfortable being uncomfortable!” This was said during practice rather than on game-day because he said “practice is controlled failure.” This is the teaching point I believe my professor, Eric Janssen, was fixed on. What made this assignment easier was my initial acceptance that I will be embarrassed no matter what, and that mentality softened the blow of actually getting embarrassed. I learned that the mentality of living at the edge of your capabilities and getting to the point where you’re almost certain you’re going to fail is a necessary step for growth — the idea that you need to seek failure because failure helps you recognize the areas where you need to evolve.

Say ‘thank you, next!’ to that setback.

How to handle rejection and overcome the fear of being rejected

How to handle rejection and overcome the fear of being rejected

It’s called the sting of rejection because that’s exactly what it feels like: You reach out to pluck a promising “bloom” (such as a new love interest, job opportunity, or friendship) only to receive a surprising and upsetting brush-off that feels like an attack. It’s enough to make you never want to put yourself out there ever again. And yet you must, or you’ll never find the people and opportunities that do want everything you have to offer.

So what’s the best way to deal with rejection, and quash the fear of being rejected again? Here are some psychologist-approved tips on moving onward and upward.

Know that rejection is pain, according to science.

If a recent rebuff feels like a wound, that’s because your brain thinks it is one.

A University of Michigan study of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) scans found that rejection actually activates the same parts of our brain as physical pain does. This suggests an evolutionary advantage to experiencing rejection as pain, according to Guy Winch, psychologist and author of Emotional First Aid: Healing Rejection, Guilt, Failure, and Other Everyday Hurts.

“This phenomenon is a legacy of our hunter-gatherer past, when we lived in nomadic tribes,” Winch says. Back when a person couldn’t survive alone without their tribe, “rejection served as an early warning system that alerted us we were in danger of being ostracized—of being ‘voted off the island’.”

“Those who experienced rejection as more painful paid more attention to correcting their behavior than those who didn’t,” Winch continues. Thus, they were able to stay in the fold and protect their lives (and those of their future progeny). “Over many generations, experiencing rejection as painful had a survival advantage, and our brains became wired with this default response.”

Allow yourself time to process your hurt feelings.

You’ve had your hopes dashed. Maybe you’ve learned your crush wasn’t mutual, or your friend has stopped accepting your calls. This can evoke a complicated knot of feelings, and identifying each one can kick off the recovery process.

“Accept the fact that you’re a human being with emotions and allow time to feel what you’re feeling,” says Dr. Pam Garcy, psychologist and certified life coach. “There’s an expression that ‘the easiest way out is through.’ Sometimes allowing yourself to have your feelings leads them to slowly reduce in intensity.”

Heal your bruised ego by listing what makes you great.

“The most important thing we need to do to heal the emotional wound rejection creates is to revive our self-esteem by focusing on what we do bring to the table, whether the rejection was by a romantic partner, a prospective employer, or a neighbor,” Winch says.

Making a list of positive qualities you know you already possess can curb negative self-talk after the ego blow, and help you to bounce back sooner.

Winch uses the example of a job rejection: “We might list our strong work ethic, responsibility, reliability, our steep learning curve, etc.” Next, choose one of these qualities and write a paragraph or two about the times previous employers saw the value in it, and why another will again in the future.

“By writing, we remind ourselves on a deep level that we are, and can be, a valuable employee,” Winch says. “Doing this exercise is a way of self-affirming our worth.”

Examine your own role in why you got rejected.

Some rejections truly aren’t as personal as they feel. Love rejection on Tinder, for example, simply means that some stranger took all of 20 seconds to make a snap judgment based on criteria you’ll never be privy to. But if, say, you used to be a member of the office happy hour crew and your after-work drink invites have suddenly vanished, it may be time to review your possible role in why that came to be.

Think back to the last time you spent with the party in question (you know, the rejecter) , whether it was on a date or in a job interview. Winch suggests a mental replay of what, to your best recollection, you said or did, and how they reacted. Is there anything you could’ve done differently to improve the encounter, or can you at least prevent it from happening again in the future?

“This isn’t to say the other person had no responsibility,” Winch says, “but the value in that examination is to learn what we might need to be mindful of what we hadn’t paid sufficient attention to previously.”

Don’t beat yourself up about the role you played in your rejection, though.

Self-examination is not the same thing as self-criticism, which will only make you feel worse.

How to handle rejection and overcome the fear of being rejected

Grow Your Business, Not Your Inbox

How to handle rejection and overcome the fear of being rejected

Evolutionarily we were not meant to exist in isolation. Inside, each of us has an innate fear of not being accepted or having our contribution shunned by the community we feel the strongest resonance to serving.

As business owners and entrepreneurs, the sting of rejection can pierce like a dagger to the heart. It can be extremely hard not to take rejection personally. It’s our ideas, our blood and our sweat and tears that are being shown the exit.

The success of any business comes not with necessarily being the biggest, the best or the fastest. It comes from being the most innovative and adaptive. We often forget the underlying truth that rejection experiences have given birth to cutting-edge enterprises. In many cases, rejections have been the genesis of brilliant solutions that would otherwise have been unfathomable were it not for our mental anguish.

When you learn to embrace and practice certain strategies, you’ll no longer fear or try to avoid rejection. You may actually look forward to it.

1.) Acknowledge and prepare for rejection.

Most of us become angry when, despite putting in eighty-percent of the groundwork, our customer then decides to work with our nemesis. Overcoming rejection actually occurs from accepting the emotions that come with it. It is OK to feel angry and frustrated. The emotional and mental weight you feel is just as valid as any physical pain. In the long run, it’s more appropriate and healthy — emotionally, mentally and physically — that you allow yourself to feel that.

Always have a rejection-processing protocol in place. Debrief with personal and professional support people who can empathize and appreciate your experiences without passing judgment, criticizing or looking to give you immediate advice. Primary acknowledgment of its emotional and mental impact upon on you is essential.

Over time, examine the suite of likely reactions you have when rejection opportunities bare their unattractive heads. Know this about yourself. Being able to predict your own responses as well as build in the foresight that rejection is possible can also greatly lessen the blow. You will feel a greater sense of control knowing what may lie ahead and knowing you’ve got processes in place to handle it.

2.) Find the blessings in every rejection experience.

There will always be customers that do not like us, our service or our product. Whilst this prods us to do comparison reviews of systems, processes, products and service quality, put that aside for a moment. We often can’t see it at the time, but in many cases, rejections are blessings in disguise.

Do you want customers who wish to discuss minute details forever and a day, only to decide they want to start from the beginning again just as you were about to sign-off on the contract? Do you want to be treated like a commodity on-call 24/7, expected to make ‘urgent’ changes to a blueprint during Sunday evening quality time with your family?

You don’t want these customers. Nobody does. Refer and direct those customers to your competitors who are open to being treated this way — you are not.

In this respect, understand your competitors’ businesses actually complement your own. Even if you provide almost the exact same service as your neighbor, remember that you are the brand and that no other individual can copy you or your reasons for being in business. Customers are smart. You might also unforeseeably impress and surprise those very customers who are treating you unprofessionally.

You can put on your match-making hat and referred those clients to a business which better fit their needs? Don’t become their case manager, but what if you then followed up to find out if such a customer was happy? They certainly would not forget the lengths you went to. Such service is rare. Riding the positive wave of your satisfaction from doing this will be far better than sulking and bidding them good riddance under your breath.

3.) After licking your wounds, feed your growth mindset.

Steve Jobs was rejected and sacked from his own company, Apple, in 1985. After purchasing Pixar Animation Studios from Lucasfilm in 1986, he went on to generate his first billion dollars. Today, Pixar is the most successful animation studio of its kind. Not a bad comeback, some might say.

The whirlpool of unsavory emotions we experience in rejection is often a great catalyst for stretching our minds laterally to dimensions never visited before. You might initially doubt yourself, question your competency and your self-worth but after you have weathered the storm, activate your growth mindset and start asking questions.

What can I do differently? What have I discovered about myself? What changes can I make in my business? Could I have handled the closing conversation better? What will I do differently next time? What else is possible?

Never stop at licking your wounds only to return to the status quo. Never.

Post-rejection always builds in a strategic review not just as an individual but with a relevant business coach or consultant. Just like Steve Jobs, you could be at the cusp of a discovery that will change your business and your life forever.

4.) Transform your definition of rejection.

We often ascribe rejection to something wrong with us. Start-ups and solopreneurs are particularly vulnerable to thinking rejection means they are not good enough. Even though this might resonate with you, it doesn’t mean your thinking is accurate.

Invite yourself to consider, Are my deductions about myself actually true or is it the pain speaking? Does it hurt so much because I wanted so badly to be accepted and validated? Is my service or product simply not substandard but simply not the best fit for that customer?

Consciously practice thinking more about the positive consequences of your being rejected. What opportunities can you now see that have been hiding behind the clouds of the status quo? Rejection can, in fact, be a glorious unveiling of new possibilities.

Most of our failures are nothing more than a form of rejection, and knowing how to deal with rejection will help you lessen your pain and bounce back to your normal emotional state.

How to handle rejection and overcome the fear of being rejectedAccording to Dr. Phillip McGraw (or Dr. Phil as he is commonly called), rejection is the number one fear among human beings.

One of the deepest needs of humans is the need to belong and to be accepted.

When you are rejected in one way or another, you fail to satisfy this important need.

Some other common needs and wants such as success, and fears such as failure, do not appear to be connected to fear of rejection at first glance.

However, when you look at them closer, you will see that success often can be interpreted as a form of acceptance; and failure can be seen as a form of being rejected.

Being rejected in love

One of the hardest areas to be rejected is romantic love.

The suffering that comes with this type of rejection is considerably harder than in most other types.

Interestingly, many people tend to love and desire those who aren’t as passionate about them.

It seems like being rejected or merely the fear of being rejected makes us more passionate about what we can’t have, making us suffer even more.

When you first realize that you are being rejected, you might be unable to speak and feel physically sick.

Physical symptoms and other symptoms—such as being unable to sleep, work, and concentrate—can persist for several weeks.

Although the intensity of your negative emotions will gradually fade, you will continue having good days and bad days.

Little by little, you will learn to enjoy your life again and will start noticing other exciting opportunities.

Practical steps for dealing with rejection

While time will heal your wounds, here are some useful tips on how to deal with rejection, ease the pain and make your recovery period significantly shorter.

1. Tell yourself it will go because it really will.

Keep reminding yourself that this is only temporary and that you might be even thankful for this experience in the future.

2. Engage in physical activities.

Play tennis or take a class at a local gym.

Physical activity forces us to concentrate outside of ourselves and live in the moment.

That is why we feel so alive when we are active, and that is why exercise can actually be addictive.

Unlike other addictions, this one is positive and benefits you.

3. Focus outside yourself.

Although it might be hard to do so right now, avoid blaming and criticizing yourself. Be your own friend.

If you catch yourself analyzing your past or yourself, gently draw attention away to something external.

4. Learn something new.

Learning a new skill can be challenging; in addition to obvious benefits, it helps us heal by keeping us busy and focused.

To make things even better, learning a new skill may help discover new opportunities or meet new people.

5. Travel.

New places are always fun to explore and, just like the suggestions above, they will distract your attention from negative thoughts and add excitement to your life.

In Swahili for the Broken-hearted, Peter Moore travels all the way from Cairo to Cape Town to get over his breakup, which results in an epic adventure and… a book!

6. Meet new people.

This goes without saying. When you meet someone new, you want to put your best foot forward, and this will force you to pick yourself up.

Besides, new people have new exciting stories to tell, which helps you stay distracted.

7. Consider counseling.

If going through this difficult period alone is too much to bear, counseling or psychotherapy is an excellent way to help yourself deal with your emotions.

For example, this website offers a science-based online therapy platform equipped with all the necessary tools to help you deal with your problem.

This includes a personal therapist, worksheets, live chat, messages, a journal, and other tools. All programs are based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), which is a goal-oriented approach to treating emotional and mental health problems.

CBT is based on the idea that your feelings are caused by your thoughts and not so much by external stimuli like people, situations, and events.

It teaches you to change your thinking patterns and, consequently, helps change the way you feel.

Because CBT focuses on what you can control — yourself and your thoughts — it is one of the most popular methods of dealing with various problems, including relationship problems.

8. Use self-hypnosis.
Hypnosis helps you access the unconscious mind and shape it in ways you never knew was possible.

If you are suffering from one-sided love, download Unrequited Love to help yourself think less of that person and start to feel interested in other activities.

If you are in a committed relationship and suffer from being rejected by your spouse, download Mend Your Broken Heart.

Many of our readers found this download particularly helpful (Stop Thinking About Someone).

If you also suffer from insecurity, you might want to try this.

What not to do

While a new relationship will definitely help get over the past quicker, it is not a healthy way of dealing with rejection.

This isn’t just bad for you; you will be potentially hurting the other person’s feelings.

Give yourself time. Don’t start a new relationship when you still have unfinished emotional business.

How to handle rejection and overcome the fear of being rejected

Dec 5, 2019 · 2 min read

Have you ever ENJOYED being rejected? Never! According to multiple studies, failure and rejection are two of the top 10 fears for why people hold back in life.

How to handle rejection and overcome the fear of being rejected

I’m currently enrolled in a course at the Ivey Business School called Start Ups: Hustle & Grit, and as an adversity challenge, I was assigned four tasks that are designed to set me up for an inevitable rejection. I was definitely nervous for the challenge but also excited to step out of my comfort zone and potentially embarrass myself. Some more difficult than others, but the four challenges I accepted include:

1 . ‘Borrow’ a cup of sugar from a neighbor

2. Try to withdraw bitcoin from my local bank

3. Tell a clean joke to a stranger

4. At a restaurant, ask for something not on the menu

Most people spend their life not wanting to deal with the pain of rejection and the pain of failure. I learned that, like everyone else, I fear rejection. I have always shied away from rejection, and because of that, I’ve inherently avoided situations where that part of my character CAN and SHOULD be developed. In all honesty, I haven’t been rejected by many things in my life and that has led me to question whether I’ve been pushing my limits and overachieving or rather settling within my comfort zone.

The purpose of this assignment was to reflect on why we may have held ourselves back in the past, what we’re afraid of, and what we might miss out on in the future if we continue living in our own comfort zones.

How to handle rejection and overcome the fear of being rejected

I remember an old high school football coach of mine screaming, “get comfortable being uncomfortable!” This was said during practice rather than on game-day because he said “practice is controlled failure.” This is the teaching point I believe my professor, Eric Janssen, was fixed on. What made this assignment easier was my initial acceptance that I will be embarrassed no matter what, and that mentality softened the blow of actually getting embarrassed. I learned that the mentality of living at the edge of your capabilities and getting to the point where you’re almost certain you’re going to fail is a necessary step for growth — the idea that you need to seek failure because failure helps you recognize the areas where you need to evolve.

Contributed by Jack Martin on Apr 28, 2020 (message contributor)

Scripture: Mark 6:1

Denomination: Assembly Of God

Summary: We all face rejection at some point in time, some because of some skill that we lack, but others simply because of their faith in Jesus

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Sermon Title – Rejection and how to respond to it.

Definition of REJECTION

1 a : the action of rejecting : the state of being rejected ignored, denied attention.

Theme: Rejection – The Goal: How do Deal With It

Mark 6:1-6 (NIV) – The opening caption reads / A Prophet Without Honor

6 Jesus left there and went to his hometown, accompanied by his disciples. 2 When the Sabbath came, he began to teach in the synagogue, and many who heard him were amazed.

“Where did this man get these things?” they asked. “What’s this wisdom that has been given him? What are these remarkable miracles he is performing? 3 Isn’t this the carpenter? Isn’t this Mary’s son and the brother of James, Joseph,[a] Judas and Simon? Aren’t his sisters here with us?” And they took offense at him.

4 Jesus said to them, “A prophet is not without honor except in his own town, among his relatives and in his own home.” 5 He could not do any miracles there, except lay his hands on a few sick people and heal them.6 He was amazed at their lack of faith.

Social rejection occurs when an individual is deliberately excluded from a social relationship or social interaction. The topic includes interpersonal rejection, peer rejection, romantic rejection, faith based rejection and family estrangement. A person can be rejected on an individual basis or by an entire group of people.

This sermon deals with the reality of Rejection and How to handle it.

1. Jesus faced rejection.

2. His disciples faced rejection.

3. We will face rejection.

So what is the best way for us to handle rejection?

• One of the greatest desires that any of us have is the need to be loved, accepted and needed.

• It’s because we were created in love, to be loved and to share love.

Our Heavenly Father, the Good God of Creation created us out of love for the Bible tells us that God is love.

We were created to be loved and to share that love with God, with ourselves, with other humans and with all of creation.

In light of that, one of the greatest fears that any of us humans can experience or face is the fear of rejection.

So many times, rejection is the opposite of being loved, received and accepted.

Rejection is one of the most difficult things that any of us can experience in this life or for that matter in the next.

No one wants anyone or anything ( a team, a business etc. ) to reject them when they desperately wanted that person or that thing to accept them, receive them and include them.

And yet, rejection is something that we have all experienced and will experience in the future.

Rejection is sadly a part of the human experience. It begins in our childhood. We get laughed at or ridiculed. We’re not chosen by this certain team or that group. We’re not invited to sit at this table or allowed to hang out with this crowd. We’re not invited to go to this party or this social event.

Rejection doesn’t end when we graduate from either middle school or high school.

1. The truth is we all have to face the possibility of rejection throughout the rest of our lives.

2. People get rejection letters from trade schools and from colleges.

3. They get rejection notices from banks on loans and are told they can’t buy this house, this car or that boat.

4. They receive rejection emails or messages from prospective employers.

It is said that today only 2% of all resumes get accepted and of that number of course only 1 is offered the job.

We all know people who have faced rejection because of their skin color, the way they look or the culture that they come from.

Perhaps, one of the most difficult rejection is the one people face from a spouse who suddenly and at times very abruptly wants out – they want a divorce. They no longer want you in their life. They no longer want to share space with you.

Tragically, this is the same person who previously stood in front of a church and committed to accept you, love you and be with you until one of you or both of you die.

Lets look at the rejection that Jesus faced:

Mark tells us that Jesus has gone home for a little period of time. The reason is never given for why he came back.

Perhaps he just wanted to show his disciples where he grew up, the people he grew up with and to meet his mom and the rest of the family.

All we know is that Jesus goes home and his disciples follow him. On the Sabbath Jesus goes to the local synagogue and begins to teach.

How to handle rejection and overcome the fear of being rejected

Childhood may seem like forever ago. But the things you experienced as a child can greatly affect how you are as an adult today, whether you’re aware of it or not. For instance, nobody likes rejection. When you experienced a major rejection from your parents or your peers as a child, experts say, it may show later on.

According to Nicole Richardson, LPC-S, LMFT, “rejected child syndrome,” like middle child syndrome and codependence are real things that people experience but are not diagnoses found in the American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. “All three terms can imply many things as there is not one agreed upon definition,” she says. “A rejected child can refer to a couple of different things; a child being rejected by their parents or by their peers.”

When you’ve experienced a hard rejection in your past, you may start to believe on some deep level that you are unloveable or unworthy. This is what cognitive therapists call a “core belief,” psychotherapist Erin Brandel Dykhuizen, tells Bustle. “Often when we have experienced a lot of rejection in childhood, we develop beliefs about not being worthy of love as a way to make sense of the fact that our parents, for example, who should have accepted us and shown us love, did not do so,” Dykhuizen says.

More often than not, people aren’t consciously aware that they have these beliefs. But if you take a close look at your behavior, your thoughts, and your patterns in relationships, you may be able to trace those back to childhood. So here are some subtle signs that childhood rejection is affecting you as an adult, according to experts.

You Easily Make Negative Assumptions About What Others Are Thinking

“Automatic thoughts can provide a lot of information about our beliefs about ourselves that stem from childhood,” Dykhuizen says. These are the things we immediately say to ourselves about ourselves and the world. For instance, if you meet someone new for the first time and you immediately question why they would even bother getting to know you, that’s an automatic thought. If you have negative assumptions about what people think of you or what their motivations are, your childhood rejection may be affecting you, and if it becomes an issue it may be time to talk to a professional.