How to help nausea go away fast with these 5 fixes

Marc Felgar is an aging, health & senior care expert focused on improving the lives of mature adults. Read full profile

How to help nausea go away fast with these 5 fixes

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There’s no mistaking nausea when it strikes. Your stomach gets unsettled and queasy. Your throat gets an odd, heavy sensation. You may even get the cold sweats, dizziness and feel like you’re about to vomit. It’s unmistakable and entirely undesirable.

But it’s important to note that nausea is not an ailment. It’s a symptom of something else that’s upsetting your body. It could be the flu, motion sickness, migraines, anxiety, hangovers, pregnancy, food poisoning, eating too much, a concussion or medication.

What causes nausea? While it’s not certain, it’s believed that the gastrointestinal tract is always in motion, contracting and expanding to help food move down the tract. Nausea is caused when that pattern is upset, either moving too fast, or too slow.

No matter the cause, the one thing everyone can agree on, is that absolutely no one enjoys nausea.

So what to do? There are a series of time tested techniques that help relieve nausea. Here are the top 5:

1. Sit Upright

When you’re feeling nauseous, avoid lying down. Either sit up or prop yourself up in bed to a prone position.

When you lie down, the liquids in your stomach tend to move up, creating additional pressure and discomfort.

2. BRAT Diet

Grandma was right. Eat small portions of bland foods. The BRAT diet stands for Bananas, Rice, Applesauce and Toast. Keep it plain, keep it simple.

Avoid fatty, fried, spicy or very sweet foods. That means no red meat, dairy, donuts or fries.

In addition to eating small portions of plain food, try eating your food cold or at room temperature to avoid overpowering odors and tastes. The more bland the better while your nauseous.

3. Ginger

Ginger has been used since ancient times to treat all types of gastrointestinal related illnesses from nausea to motion sickness and vomiting.

One meta study concludes that “ginger is an effective and inexpensive treatment for nausea and vomiting and is safe.” [1] In fact, ginger is often recommended to help mothers avoid nausea during pregnancy and cancer patients during chemotherapy.

There are several ways you can eat ginger to help you overcome nausea. You can buy it fresh, pickled, candied, dried, powdered or consume it as a tea, soda, syrup and even baked into cookies.

The recommended safe daily dosage is 1,000 mg of powdered ginger a day. 1,000 mg is the equivalent of 1 grated teaspoon of freshly grated ginger, four cups of prepackaged ginger tea or two pieces of crystallized ginger.

4. Peppermint

Peppermint is also reported to help ease nausea. It’s currently being used to help pregnant women combat morning sickness, [2] post-operative patients [3] and palliative and hospice patients. [4] While mint hasn’t been shown to reduce the frequency of nausea, it has been shown to reduce its intensity.

One of mint’s benefits, is that unlike many medications, it doesn’t come with any harmful side effects, but can still be effective in treating nausea.

In most clinical situations, patients were given mint oil. You can also use packaged peppermint tea, fresh mint from the grocery store or even peppermint gum.

5. Medication

It’s nice to go all natural, and it can certainly work, but sometimes you may want a little extra horsepower to tackle your nausea. Moreover, sometimes medication can actually treat the cause of your nausea, not just the symptom.

Get rid of the cause, and you won’t have to worry about treating your nausea, it will go away by itself:

  • Migraines: If you’re nauseous because of a migraine, consider taking Excedrin for migraine headaches. If you can get rid of the migraine, you’ll hopefully get rid of the nausea.
  • The flu: If you have the flu, you might want to take ibuprofen. While it doesn’t relieve nausea per se, it can challenge the virus and relieve headaches, pain or fevers, all of which can cause nausea.
  • Motion sickness: If you’re prone to getting motion sickness in the car, train, ship or plane, you should definitely consider something like Dramamine or gravol. It’s an antihistamine that works as a mild sedative. Take it 20-30 minutes before your trip to prevent nausea symptoms from emerging.

There are more powerful drugs used for chemotherapy and post-operative situations that are probably best left to individual medical practitioners to discuss with you.

Conclusion

Aside from trying any or all of the above strategies to relieve your nausea, there are a few other things you should do to avoid making yourself even more nauseous.

When you first get nauseous, don’t eat or drink anything for a couple of hours. Let your stomach settle down a little bit.

Second, your nausea may want you to heave at the site of food or drink. However, you need to avoid dehydration at all costs. This is especially true if you’re nausea is accompanied by diarrhea because of the flu or gastro. Replacing your lost fluids is essential to avoid a smaller health issue turning into a larger one.

Lastly, if your nausea continues, don’t hesitate to call your healthcare practitioner. As we mentioned above, nausea is a symptom, not an ailment itself. If your nausea persists, and it’s not obvious why, you should get it checked out by a doctor.

How to help nausea go away fast with these 5 fixes

Nausea refers to the sensation of an unsettled stomach and a general unease, which often leads to vomiting.

It is a widespread and unpleasant experience, which can have many different causes ranging from overeating to a migraine.

This article will offer some tips that may help to relieve the feeling of nausea.

Nausea can have many different causes and can be difficult to avoid entirely. However, feelings of nausea can be eased using some of the following methods:

1. Antiemetic medication

How to help nausea go away fast with these 5 fixes

Share on Pinterest Antiemetic medication may be recommended to help treat vomiting and nausea symptoms.

These are anti-nausea drugs that can help to reduce feelings of nausea or vomiting. They are often used to treat nausea or vomiting symptoms caused by motion sickness or infection.

Common side effects can include:

  • dry mouth
  • fatigue
  • indigestion
  • changes in appetite
  • restlessness

There are many different types of antiemetic drugs, and each can have different side effects.

2. Ginger

Ginger is widely used for reducing nausea. Studies have shown ginger to be effective in treating symptoms of nausea and vomiting caused by pregnancy and by chemotherapy. It has relatively few side effects and could be as effective as antiemetic drugs. Fresh ginger can be used in cooking or eaten on its own. Ginger can also be consumed as a tea.

3. Peppermint

A recent study has shown peppermint to reduce nausea caused by chemotherapy. It can be consumed in a capsule, tea, or oil.

4. Sports drinks

Salty liquids, such as those found in electrolyte replacement sports drinks may help to reduce nausea, according to research.

5. Protein

Meals that are primarily made up of protein-rich foods, rather than carbohydrates, have been suggested by researchers to reduce nausea.

6. Cinnamon

A study in 2015 found that cinnamon can help to reduce nausea caused by menstrual pain. Cinnamon is commonly used in cooking as a flavoring.

7. Avoid carbonated drinks

Carbonated drinks, such as cola, can cause bloating and worsen nausea.

8. Staying hydrated

If nausea is accompanied by vomiting, it is essential to stay hydrated by taking small sips of water on a regular basis. Eating salty foods or drinking a non-carbonated, sugary drink can be helpful to restore the sugars and salts lost through vomiting.

9. Avoid spicy or rich foods

Sticking to a bland diet will help to reduce nausea. Any foods with strong flavors might unsettle the stomach further.

For example, the BRAT diet is often used to relieve symptoms of food poisoning or infection.

It consists of bananas, rice, applesauce, and toast.

10. Avoiding bending forward and crunching the abdomen.

Some everyday activities and postures such as this can also increase nausea. Avoiding bending forward can reduce pressure on the stomach and may improve symptoms.

11. Sitting upright

Keeping the body upright can support digestion and may help nausea to pass.

12.Moving less

Too much movement can worsen nausea, particularly if it is sudden or intense.

13. Controlling breathing

Research has shown that deep breaths taken at a slow and steady pace can help to ease feelings of nausea. It may help to engage in mindfulness meditation, which focusses on controlled breathing techniques.

14. Wrist acupuncture

A well-designed review of evidence in 2009 found that wrist acupuncture could help to reduce nausea after operations. However, a more recent updated version of the review suggested the evidence was of low-quality, and further research is required to determine whether wrist acupuncture could effectively reduce nausea.

15. Vomiting

Vomiting can help to reduce nausea in some cases, such as when the nausea is caused by food poisoning or alcohol. However, this will usually only provide short-term relief and can also worsen nausea.

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2007
Mar 8

Modern medicine has provided people with many options in terms of how illnesses are treated, how diseases are cured, and how the symptoms of sickness are handled. Unfortunately, with many of these medications comes an uneasy stomach. Just because a medication is good for relieving a headache, for example, doesn’t mean that it won’t upset your stomach. Fortunately, there are things that you can do to ease medication-induced nausea.

There are several things that you can do to try to help ease medication-induced nausea. Mint and ginger are both known to have a soothing effect on an upset stomach. Many people have had success with a variety of types of peppermint teas, for example. If tea isn’t your thing, you can mix some peppermint oil into a drink of juice or lemonade. You can get ginger in a variety of ways, such as ginger tea or ginger root supplements. Some people have tried using these types of natural supplements in an aromatherapy recipe, as well.

While it is controversial, some people have tried to ease the nausea that comes with certain medications, such as with chemotherapy used to treat cancer, with marijuana. However, this substance is illegal in most places, and its long-term health effects are often considered to be too risky to be used for the purpose of easing nausea.

Sometimes, taking your medication along with some food can help to ease the medication-induced nausea. Something bland, such as a piece of unbuttered toast or a little bit of rice, may help to soak up the extra digestive juices that are produced when you take your medications. Other people have had luck using milk along with their medications, as for many people milk will help to coat the stomach.

In some cases, the best way to relieve medication-induced nausea is with another medication. There are several medications that are on the market, both in prescription form and available over-the-counter, that can counteract the effects of medication-induced nausea. If your medication produces nausea, you should speak with your health care provider about the options available to you in terms of nausea-relief medications.

In this Article

  • Try a Cold Pack
  • Use a Heating Pad or Hot Compress
  • Ease Pressure on Your Scalp or Head
  • Dim the Lights
  • Try Not to Chew
  • Hydrate
  • Get Some Caffeine
  • Practice Relaxation
  • Try Massage
  • Take Some Ginger
  • Use Meds in Moderation
  • When to Call Your Doctor

Headaches happen. The good news is there are several simple things you can do to ease the pain without a trip to the doctor. Try these tips and get to feeling better fast.

Try a Cold Pack

If you have a migraine, place a cold pack on your forehead. Ice cubes wrapped in a towel, a bag of frozen vegetables, or even a cold shower may ease the pain. Keep the compress on your head for 15 minutes, and then take a break for 15 minutes.

Use a Heating Pad or Hot Compress

If you have a tension headache, place a heating pad on your neck or the back of your head. If you have a sinus headache, hold a warm cloth to the area that hurts. A warm shower might also do the trick.

Ease Pressure on Your Scalp or Head

If your ponytail is too tight, it could cause a headache. These “external compression headaches” can also be brought on by wearing a hat, headband, or even swimming goggles that are too tight.

Dim the Lights

Bright or flickering light, even from your computer screen, can cause migraine headaches. If you’re prone to them, cover your windows with blackout curtains during the day. Wear sunglasses outdoors. You might also add anti-glare screens to your computer and use daylight-spectrum fluorescent bulbs in your light fixtures.

Try Not to Chew

Chewing gum can hurt not just your jaw but your head. The same is true for chewing your fingernails, lips, the inside of your cheeks, or handy objects like pens. Avoid crunchy and sticky foods, and make sure you take small bites. If you grind your teeth at night, ask your dentist about a mouth guard. This may curb your early-morning headaches.

Hydrate

Drink plenty of liquids. Dehydration can cause a headache or make one worse.

Get Some Caffeine

Have some tea, coffee, or something with a little caffeine in it. If you get it early enough after the pain starts, it could ease your headache pain. It can also help over-the-counter pain relievers like acetaminophen work better. Just don’t drink too much because caffeine withdrawal can cause its own type of headache.

Practice Relaxation

Whether it’s stretches, yoga, meditation, or progressive muscle relaxation, learning how to chill out when you’re in the middle of a headache can help with the pain. You might talk to your doctor about physical therapy if you have muscle spasms in your neck.

Try Massage

You can do it yourself. A few minutes massaging your forehead, neck, and temples can help ease a tension headache, which may result from stress. Or apply gentle, rotating pressure to the painful area.

Take Some Ginger

A small recent study found that taking ginger, in addition to regular over-the-counter pain meds, eased pain for people in the ER with migraines. Another found that it worked almost as well as prescription migraine meds. You can try a supplement or brew some tea.

Use Meds in Moderation

Pharmacy shelves are stocked with pain relievers for all kinds of headaches. To get the most benefit with the least risk, follow the directions on the label and these guidelines:

  • Choose liquid over pills. Your body absorbs it faster.
  • Avoid ibuprofen and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) if you have heart failure or kidney failure.
  • Do not give aspirin to a child under age 18.
  • Take painkillers as soon as you start to hurt. You’ll probably beat it with a smaller dose than if you wait.
  • If you get sick to your stomach when you get a headache, ask your doctor what might help.
  • Ask your doctor what to take to avoid a rebound headache, which is pain that sets in after a few days of pain relievers.

And be sure to talk to your doctor about what headache symptoms you should not treat at home.

When to Call Your Doctor

Get medical care right away for:

  • A headache that follows a head injury
  • A headache along with dizziness, speech problems, confusion, or other neurological symptoms
  • A severe headache that comes on suddenly
  • A headache that gets worse even after you take pain medications

Sources

Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center: “Have a Headache at Work? 13 Quick Fixes.”

National Headache Foundation: “Hot and Cold Packs/Showers,” “Bruxism.”

National Health Service (UK): “Sinus headache,” “10 Headache Triggers.”

Blau, JN. Headache, published online May 2004.

The International Headache Classification ICHD-2: “External Compression Headache.”

Mount Sinai Hospital: “Managing Your Migraines”

American Headache Society: “Dental Appliances and Headache,” “Types of Headaches,” “Sinus Headache or Migraine?” “Acute Therapy: Why Not Over-The-Counter or Other Nonspecific Options?” “Ten Things That You and Your Patients with Migraine Should Know.”

The Migraine Trust: “Medication for Migraine.”

Lawrence C. Newman, MD, President, American Headache Society and Director, Headache Institute, Mount Sinai Roosevelt Hospital, New York City.

American Academy of Neurology: “Migraine Headache.”

American Migraine Foundation: “Headache Hygiene – What is it?”

American College of Physicians: “Managing Migraine.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Chronic Daily Headache.”

Mayo Clinic: “Acupuncture,” “Migraine,” “Migraines: Simple steps to head off the pain,” “Rebound headaches,” “Tension headache.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Self-Care Treatments for Headaches: Procedure Details,” “Headache Treatment Overview,” “Self-Care Treatment for Headaches,” “When to Call the Doctor About Your Headache Symptoms,” “Headache Treatment Overview.”

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: “Acupuncture: In Depth,” “Butterbur,” “Feverfew.”

Cephalalgia: “Double-blind placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial of ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc.) addition in migraine acute treatment.”

Phytotherapy Research: “Comparison between the efficacy of ginger and sumatriptan in the ablative treatment of the common migraine.”

FamilyDoctor.org: “Hydration: Why it is so important.”

HealthyChildren: “Choosing Over-the-Counter Medicines for Your Child.”

No one likes an upset stomach. It can ruin your day or at least make you feel crummy. So, how do you fix it? We’re sharing five remedies to settle your upset stomach and take you from feeling bad to feeling great.

Eat Something Bland.

An upset stomach often occurs when you’re sick. While doctors no longer recommend exclusively eating bland food while you’re feeling ill, eating a few bland foods throughout the day might help ease your troubled tummy. Try lightly salted crackers, unbuttered popcorn, bananas or plain rice to help give your upset stomach time to recover. Remember, please consult your doctor if your symptoms become irregular or last longer than two days.

Take Some Pepto Bismol.

When an upset stomach is caused by eating or drinking too much or accompanies diarrhea , it’s Pepto Bismol to the rescue! Our favorite remedy is also a quick way to fix your tummy woes. Pepto Bismol soothes your discomfort with proteins that enhance the viscosity of the protective layer in the upper gastrointestinal tract to help you feel better.

Drink a Fizzy Beverage.

Many people have fond memories of sipping on a ginger ale or Sprite while home sick. Although there is no medical benefit to enjoying a fizzy beverage, it can often provide immediate (and temporary) relief of your upset stomach.

Go to the Bathroom.

If your stomach is feeling queasy, a simple and immediate solution is to go to the bathroom. Often, that’s all you need to do to feel some relief. If you find yourself visiting the bathroom more than usual , remember to stay hydrated and take some Pepto.

Wait It Out.

Sometimes, an upset stomach can settle itself — you just need to give it time. Distract yourself by watching your favorite show or diving into a good book. Soon, you’ll feel better and be ready to get back to your day. If not, try one of the remedies above for a quicker solution.

Thankfully, an upset stomach isn’t forever. Choose a remedy that makes sense for you and your circumstances, and chances are you’ll be back to normal in no time.

How to help nausea go away fast with these 5 fixes

Many of us have been stuck inside for…a long time at this point. So if you accidentally spent a little too much time in the sun recently and you’re wondering how to get rid of that sunburn, hey, I get it.

Even if you do your best to protect your skin from the sun, sometimes shit happens. You probably know that you should be wearing SPF every day (if you don’t, hi, you should!), and it’s even more important to put sunscreen on before you spend time out in the sun—and reapply it regularly. But, listen, there’s a lot going on right now, and we understand if it slipped your mind. And now maybe you’re dealing with a sunburn on those shoulders that haven’t seen the sun since well before the pandemic. Maybe you’re anxiously Googling “how to get rid of sunburn around a face mask.” We don’t know your life. But we are here to help. That’s why we consulted dermatologists for the best steps you can take to treat your sunburn symptoms.

What causes a sunburn

That burnt-to-a-crisp feeling happens when your skin is exposed to too much ultraviolet (UV) light from the sun. UV light is a wavelength of sunlight, the Mayo Clinic explains. There’s Ultraviolet A (UVA) radiation, which is the kind that causes skin aging, and Ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, which leads to sunburns. Both can result in skin cancer. There’s also Ultraviolet C (UVC) radiation, although the ozone layer blocks most of these rays from reaching Earth, according to the National Cancer Institute.

When your skin is exposed to UV light, your body tries to protect itself by making melanin, the dark pigment in the outer layer of your skin, which causes your skin to darken a bit, according to the Mayo Clinic. But that can only help so much, even in people with dark skin, which signals that they have a lot of protective melanin. If you’re roasting in a ton of UV light, you can pass right by the tanning threshold, winding up with the redness, stinging or itching sensation, and swelling that characterize sunburns. Your skin may also actually feel hot and bubble up into small blisters. If your sunburn is really intense, you might deal with a headache, fever, nausea, and fatigue as well, according to the Mayo Clinic.

These symptoms usually show up a few hours after your sun overexposure, but it could take a day or longer to know just how bad your burn is, the Mayo Clinic says. A few days after the burn, the top layer of your skin may peel off (this is your body’s attempt to heal itself), and the layer below that may have an unusual color and pattern for a bit.

Every sunburn is different, but bad ones can take several days or longer to heal, the Mayo Clinic says.

How to get rid of sunburn redness and pain

Okay, so unfortunately there’s nothing you can do to magically make your sunburn disappear, but there are a few tactics you can try to ease your suffering.

Once you realize you’ve been burned, it’s important to get out of the sun and treat the burn as soon as you can, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) says. Try a few (or all) of these tips to help:

Take cool baths or showers.

Hot water can irritate your (already aggravated) skin, but relaxing under a cool stream can help soothe inflammation, Gary Goldenberg, M.D., assistant clinical professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Hospital, tells SELF. If you can submerge yourself in a cool bath, even better.

As soon as you get out of the tub or shower, gently pat yourself dry. Leave a little moisture on your skin, then apply a moisturizer, the AAD advises. This helps trap the water on your skin and can reduce dryness that would exacerbate your irritation.

If you don’t have time to hang in the shower or bath, try placing a cool, damp towel on your skin for relief, Dr. Goldenberg says, and then follow it up with moisturizer.

Use a moisturizer with aloe vera, soy, or calamine. If that’s not enough, try a hydrocortisone cream.

People often champion aloe vera for its skin-soothing properties, including the Mayo Clinic and the AAD. And it can indeed help with the irritation of a sunburn. Soy might be a more surprising ingredient for sunburn aftercare, but it could allow your skin to trap more moisturizing water, according to research published in the journal Nutrients. You might also want to apply calamine lotion, according to the Mayo Clinic, to help with the itching and discomfort. And if you’re really having a rough go of it, you can use an OTC hydrocortisone cream, according to the Mayo Clinic.

Heads up: You’ll want to avoid products with petroleum, as moisturizing as they may seem, because they can trap heat in your skin, the AAD says.

Here are a few sunburn relief products that our editors tried and loved.

Take a pain reliever.

Your body sees a sunburn as an injury, so it responds with inflammation, Misha Rosenbach, M.D., associate professor of dermatology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, tells SELF. Cue the pain. Taking an over-the-counter pain reliever, especially a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug like aspirin or ibuprofen, can help calm down your dermatological fire, Dr. Goldenberg says.

Avoid using pain relief products with ingredients ending in -caine.

There are plenty of pain-relieving creams and sprays out there with ingredients ending in -caine, like lidocaine and benzocaine. Take a pass on using them for your sunburn. They can irritate your tender skin or even cause an allergic reaction, the Mayo Clinic says.

Drink a lot of water.

A sunburn brings fluid to the surface of your skin and away from your insides, the AAD explains. Drinking more water than usual when you’re sunburned can help keep you from getting dehydrated.

Everyone’s fluid needs are different, but most women should drink around 11.5 cups of liquids a day, according to the Mayo Clinic. (This includes fluids from drinks like coffee and the foods you eat.) Aim to have a few extra cups of liquid per day if you’re sunburned, Dr. Goldenberg says, but don’t push it to the point where you’re uncomfortable. Alternately, don’t stop there if you still feel parched. Listen to your body.

What to do if your skin is peeling or blistering

If you have blisters, don’t even think about popping them. Blisters, which are your skin’s way of trying to heal and stave off infection, mean you have a second-degree burn that has gone past the outer layer of your skin, the AAD says. Though it’s super tempting to pop them, don’t. You might just be signing up for an infection, or at the very least, a world of pain.

If a blister breaks on its own, the Mayo Clinic recommends cleaning it with mild soap and water, dabbing on some antibiotic cream, then applying a nonstick gauze bandage.

You don’t have to suffer through weeks of nausea. From foods to OTC meds, try these morning sickness treatments, stat!

Morning sickness doesn’t have to be something you simply grin and bear—plenty of treatment options are available that can help you feel better.

“Just because it’s a common part of pregnancy, doesn’t mean women have to suffer with it,” says Marra Francis, M.D., an ob-gyn in Woodlands, Texas, and a contributing author to the Mommy MD Guides. “People do get relief, either by using natural remedies or traditional medications.” (But tell your doc right away if you can’t keep down any food or fluids for 24 hours, are steadily losing weight, or become dehydrated—thes could be signs of severe morning sickness.)

Many women find that a combo of methods—certain foods, natural remedies, or medication—can help them feel mostly nausea-free throughout the first trimester. Try these remedies and keep a “nausea kit” in your bag for emergency moments when queasiness strikes filled with plastic bags, wet wipes, napkins, water for rinsing your mouth, a toothbrush and toothpaste, and breath mints.

And remember: This will all be over soon.

  • RELATED: 15 Tips for Dealing with Morning Sickness

Foods That Help Morning Sickness

There’s a reason why you’re feeling so sick (hello, hormones!), but these morning sickness remedies can help combat pregnancy nausea and are easy to try on your own. Plus, you can find them all in your grocery store!

Ginger

This root is popular in Chinese medicine and noted for its tummy-taming properties. You can drink it in soda or tea, or try ginger-laced lollipops whenever you’re feeling queasy.

Something Sour

If your stomach is already feeling sour, should you really add in additional sourness? Strangely, it works. “Using something sour can help,” says Michele Hakakha, M.D., FACOG, an ob-gyn in Beverly Hills and author of Expecting 411.

“Try sucking on sour candy, sipping lemon water, or even just sniffing something sour. I had one patient who carried around a lemon and scratched the peel and smelled it to make her feel better.”

  • RELATED:Your Morning Sickness Grocery List

Eating or sniffing something containing this fresh flavor can help you feel less nauseated. (Bonus: Mint can help with a not-so-fresh mouth after a round of morning sickness.)

Saltines or Toast

Simple starches like crackers can help settle a queasy stomach.

Smoothies

In lieu of eating solid food when your stomach is flip-flopping, sip a smoothie. Doing so will neutralize your stomach acids and blood sugar, giving you a calm feeling.

Trail Mix

A mix of fruits, nuts, and a hint of semi-sweet chocolate chips will satisfy your hunger without weighing you down.

Vitamin B6

A little extra vitamin B6 has been shown to reduce morning sickness symptoms in some patients. “Try 25 mg of vitamin B6, three times a day, in addition to your prenatal vitamins,” Dr. Hakakha says.

Liquids

If you’re vomiting often, increase your fluid intake to ten 8-ounce cups a day; that’s two more than the recommended eight cups a day. Alternate watermelon ice cubes and freezer pops with glasses of water and ice chips if you’re having trouble drinking enough water. Italian ice or lemon slush will also help you hydrate.

Try to drink fluids only between meals; if you must drink during meals, limit the amount to keep your stomach from feeling overly full. You can also use a sports drink to replace lost electrolytes.

  • RELATED: How to Survive Severe Morning Sickness

Natural Remedies for Morning Sickness

If food options aren’t helping, consider one of these natural morning sickness remedies to help you feel less nauseous during pregnancy.

Acupressure or acupuncture

These techniques, which use gentle pressure or tiny needles to hit certain nerve centers in the body, can be extremely effective in treating nausea. You can wear sea bands, stretchy bracelets that put pressure on a nerve in the center of your wrist, or see an Eastern medicine specialist to receive acupuncture treatments.

Test out this easy acupressure technique too: Press three fingertips gently but firmly on the base of your palm, just above where you’d take your pulse on your wrist. Breathe deeply and press that area with your fingertips for a minute or more, gradually increasing the pressure until you feel slight discomfort. The sensation should be the same as the feel of a mini-massage.

Exercise

You probably don’t exactly feel like running a half-marathon with your tummy so queasy. But a gentle walk could do wonders for your body.

“Even walking 20 minutes a day can help release endorphins to counteract the fatigue and nausea,” Dr. Hakakha says.

  • RELATED: 5 Easy and Safe Pregnancy Exercises

Changed eating patterns

Sometimes it’s a matter of simply keeping your stomach from hitting empty. “Eat small, frequent meals, and eat as soon as you wake up,” Dr. Hakakha recommends. Stick to healthy eating as much as possible, and to blander fare such as saltine crackers to avoid setting off your nausea.

Peppermint or Lemon Hand Lotion

The soothing scents may help keep you calm and relaxed. A bonus: sniffing them may help disguise other unpleasant food odors that trigger tummy pain.

Facial Wipes

A quick swipe provides an instant feel-better boost.

Morning Sickness Cures From Medicine

Medications are a doctor’s second line of defense against more severe cases of morning sickness. But with so many things, such as wine and many common meds, declared off-limits during pregnancy, many moms-to-be worry that morning sickness meds may harm your baby. But the doctors say to rest easy. “I always remind my patients that we would never give anything that isn’t safe, and that doesn’t have a long safety record,” Dr. Hakakha says. Just be sure to ask questions and consult your doc before taking any of these.

OTC medications

Benadryl and Unisom are more commonly used to treat allergies or insomnia, but they can actually help with nausea, especially if your morning sickness starts the moment you wake up in the morning.

Acid reflux meds

Frequent vomiting can damage your esophagus and throat with potent stomach acids, leading to heartburn and a continuous sour stomach. Using acid reflux medications can lower the acidity of your stomach, reducing the damage caused when you do vomit, and helping to prevent that sour stomach in the first place.

Motion sickness patches

Medications that can help with motion sickness, such as scopolamine, can actually help with nausea related to morning sickness.

Prescription medications

If you’re having pretty severe morning sickness—nonstop nausea and difficulty keeping down food and liquids—your doctor can prescribe some more serious medications, such as Zofran or Vistaril, which can be taken as a pill or dissolved on your tongue, to help you stave off some of the nausea and get the nutrients you and your baby need for a healthy pregnancy.

Kashif J. Piracha, MD, is board-certified in internal medicine and nephrology. He has an active clinical practice at Methodist Willowbrook Hospital in Houston, Texas.

Most diarrhea is caused by a virus or bacteria and will go away on its own within two to three days.   While many people will reach for the Imodium the moment a loose stool appears, the drugs are really more appropriate for frequent or severe diarrhea than an incidental bout.

How to help nausea go away fast with these 5 fixes

Treating Mild Diarrhea Without Medication

In some cases, taking an antidiarrheal drug will slingshot you from water stools straight to constipation, an equally unpleasant event. To this end, try these helpful home remedies to treat a mild bout of diarrhea without the use of pills.

Drink Plenty of Fluids

One of the biggest problems with diarrhea, and what leads many people to the emergency room, is dehydration. Diarrhea causes the body to lose a lot of water and electrolytes (like sodium, potassium, calcium, and magnesium) it needs to function normally. If not treated appropriately, dehydration can become dangerous, especially in young children.  

To manage a mild bout of diarrhea, you will need to replenish fluids and electrolytes (salts) lost. Drink plenty of water, clear juices, clear broths, or an electrolyte-rich sports drink.  

There are also things you should avoid when you have a bout of diarrhea. Avoid coffee, caffeinated drinks, prune juice, sugary drinks, sodas, and alcohol, all of which have a laxative effect. It is also a good idea to avoid dairy products.  

Young children and babies with diarrhea should be given pediatric rehydration drinks, marketed under such brand names as Pedialyte, Enfalyte, or Gastrolyte. Breastfed infants should continue to breastfeed. Children should continue with their regular diet, plus rehydrating fluids, rather than be put on a restrictive diet.  

If you want to avoid the artificial colorings or flavorings used in some commercial rehydration drinks, you can make a homemade rehydration drink using only salt, sugar, and water.   You can also purchase oral rehydration salts over the counter at most drugstores. Follow the preparation instructions as too much salt can be harmful, especially to children.

Eat a Bland Diet

The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases notes that research shows it doesn’t help to follow a restrictive diet to treat diarrhea, although there are foods to avoid and foods that are better tolerated.  

The BRAT diet was a commonly-recommended food plan for easing digestive distress. It is comprised of four bland, low-fiber foods that will help to firm up stools: bananas, rice, applesauce, and toast.   Bananas are especially useful as they help restore any potassium lost through diarrhea.

Other bland, easy-to-digest foods can be added to as the diarrhea symptoms begin to resolve, including baked skinless chicken breasts, oatmeal, baked potatoes, and chicken soup with saltines. Avoid foods and beverages that cause gas, such as carbonated drinks, beans, cucumbers, legumes, and cruciferous vegetables.

If diarrhea lasts more than a couple of days, check the foods that you are eating. Diarrhea can be exacerbated by foods high in fiber (such as bran, whole grains, and brown rice) as well as greasy foods or those sweetened with sorbitol.

Use Probiotics

Taking probiotics in food or supplement form might help shorten a mild bout of diarrhea.   Probiotics are live bacteria and yeast that are beneficial to your digestive system.

Diarrhea can cause you to lose a lot of the healthy bacteria in your stomach and intestines. Probiotics (which include Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium bacteria and Saccharomyces boulardii yeast) can quickly replace these protective microorganisms and help restore normal bowel function. This is especially true with S. boulardii which exerts powerful antidiarrheal effects.  

While dairy products should be avoided during diarrhea, yogurt or kefir with live probiotic bacteria are extremely beneficial. Other natural probiotic sources include fermented foods like miso, kombucha, sauerkraut, aged soft cheeses, cottage cheese, green olives, sourdough bread, and tempeh.

While kimchi is often cited as a “super-probiotic,” it contains hot spices that may worsen diarrhea.

Side effects of probiotics, whether in food or supplement form, tend to be mild and may include an upset stomach, bloating, and gas.

When to Seek Medical Help

Diarrhea should never be ignored. If you have tried the above-listed home remedies and still have loose stools, call your doctor or speak with your pharmacist about over-the-counter medications that may help.

On the other hand, you should see a doctor immediately if you or your child experience persistent or severe diarrhea and/or develop signs of dehydration, as follows:  

Diarrhea 3 days or more

Severe abdominal pain

Bloody or black stools

Fever over 102 F (39 C)

Little or no urination

Dry skin and mouth

Diarrhea for more than 24 hours

No wet diapers in 3 hours

Fever over 102 F (39 C)

Dry mouth or tongue

Crying without tears

Black or bloody stools

Sunken cheeks or eyes

Skin that doesn’t retract when pinched

Without exception, babies under 3 months of age with diarrhea should be taken to a doctor or emergency room immediately. Do not wait or try to treat the condition at home.

Medical problem? Call 1800 022 222. If you need urgent medical help, call triple zero immediately

healthdirect Australia is a free service where you can talk to a nurse or doctor who can help you know what to do.

Nausea is one of the symptoms of COVID-19. Even if your symptoms are mild, get tested for COVID-19 immediately — use the COVID-19 Symptom Checker if you’re not sure what to do.

What is nausea?

Nausea is the feeling you get when you think you are going to vomit. It’s not usually a sign of anything serious, and there are steps you can take to help you feel better.

Nausea isn’t an illness, but a symptom, or something you feel. It often comes before you vomit (when you throw up the contents of your stomach through your mouth). You might also experience dry retching (heaving as if you were going to vomit, but with nothing leaving your stomach).

What causes nausea?

If you suddenly feel nauseous after you’ve eaten, it could be caused by gastritis (an inflammation of the lining of the stomach), an ulcer or many other problems. If the nausea comes on 1 to 8 hours after you’ve eaten, it could be due to food poisoning. Sometimes food poisoning can take even longer to make you feel nauseous.

Most pregnant women will experience nausea during the first trimester (first 12 weeks) of their pregnancy, and sometimes after this in the pregnancy.

It is common to feel nauseous if you are in intense pain, have a head injury, or you are experiencing a lot of emotional stress.

Other causes of nausea are:

  • gastroenteritis
  • a migraine
  • labyrinthitis
  • motion sickness
  • some medicines
  • drinking too much alcohol
  • a blockage in the bowel
  • treatment for cancer
  • an inflamed gallbladder
  • some infections, including COVID-19

Children usually get nausea due to a virus, food poisoning, an allergy or food intolerance, motion sickness, eating or coughing too much, or when they have a fever.

When should I see my doctor?

See your doctor if your nausea doesn’t go away, or if you need help managing nausea when you are pregnant.

Nausea can sometimes be a symptom of something more serious, such as heart problems or an ulcer. Seek urgent medical attention if you also have symptoms such as chest pain, confusion, a high fever, a stiff neck, blurred vision, severe pain in your stomach or a severe headache.

Often nausea is accompanied by vomiting. See a doctor if you vomit consistently for more than 2 days (24 hours for children under 2 or 12 hours for infants), or if you vomit a lot for more than 1 month.

If you are vomiting, it’s important to avoid dehydration so try to keep taking sips of water.

How is nausea treated?

The best thing to do if you feel nauseous is take small sips of water or herbal tea. Sipping cold or frozen drinks may help to relieve the symptoms. Sometimes nibbling on some ginger or dry cracker biscuits can help you feel better.

Try not to skip meals, as an empty stomach can make the nausea worse. Eat small amounts more often. Some foods you may be able to manage include foods at room temperature, like sandwiches, puddings, noodles or biscuits, and salty foods like clear soup or potato crisps. Avoid fatty, spicy or very sweet foods as these can make the nausea worse.

Your doctor may prescribe medicine such as an antihistamine or an antiemetic (medicine to stop you vomiting). If you are pregnant, they will choose a medicine that is safe for your baby.

Can nausea be prevented?

If you feel nauseous often, it’s best to avoid things that bring on the nausea, such as strong smells or fatty or spicy foods. Try to eat at times when you don’t feel nauseous and avoid having an empty stomach. Eat small meals and then rest with your head elevated while you’re digesting your food.

It’s important to keep drinking fluids since becoming dehydrated will make you feel even more nauseous. Take small sips frequently and try to eat and drink at separate times.

Rest as much as you can, and avoid standing up or getting out of bed too quickly.

You can buy medicine from a chemist to prevent motion sickness. It’s also a good idea to travel facing forward and avoid reading or watching a screen when you’re in a car. If you are on a ship at sea, it may help to look at the horizon.