How to homeschool in the 21st century (for all types of parents & kids)

Homeschooling is rising significantly in the U.S. The rise has been between 7 to 15% per year for the last two decades. There are numerous benefits of homeschooling as compared to traditional schooling methods such as one-on-one teaching, a safe learning environment, curriculum tailored to the child’s needs, and learning focused on knowledge rather than grades. Enjoy the list from professional homework help.

How to homeschool in the 21st century (for all types of parents & kids)

How to Homeschool?

Here are some of the first things that you should do if you are starting on your homeschooling journey;

Figuring out the law

Each state has different regulations regarding homeschooling. The first step is to determine the current legal requirements to get your child educated at home.

Deciding on the right approach

Each child has a different set of needs. You should carefully choose the homeschooling style that suits your child.

Supplies/Resources

Plan and prepare well on what exactly you need to educate your child at home. A paid curriculum is not always required, and you may use free resources online.

Find a community

Getting in touch with a community of homeschoolers is one of the essential parts of building an excellent homeschool environment. Check out your local community or find one online.

Different Homeschooling Methods

There are many different homeschooling methods that you can adopt to make sure your child gets the best education at home. These methods are;

  1. School-At-home

This method implements the same curriculum as the local public or private school but at home.

  1. Classical

This is one of the most used homeschooling techniques. Under this method, the subject areas are studied chronologically.

  1. Unit Studies

Under this method, the unit studies approach is implemented. This way, studies are done from the perspective of each subject area.

  1. Charlotte Mason

This technique utilizes shorts periods of study, along with history portfolios and nature walks. Students are also encouraged to practice memorization, observation, and narration.

  1. Montessori

This teaching method was developed by Maria Montessori. The primary focus of this education method is on the students setting their pace and taking indirect instructions from teacher.

  1. Unschooling

This homeschooling style is focused mainly on the interests of the students. This way, priority is placed on activity-based, experimental, and learn as you go approaches.

  1. Eclectic/Relaxed

This method is child-directed, non-curriculum based, and resourceful. Parents can also sample any combination of homeschooling styles and methods.

Facilitating homeschooling with technology

Homeschooling has become more feasible than ever due to the accessibility of different tools readily available online.

Email and Google Drive

Email is an excellent way to share assignments, videos, and links between parents and other students. Google Drive offers many different essential programs that can come in handy such as Docs, Slides, Sheets, and many more. All these files can also be exchanged electronically.

E-Books and E-Courses

E-books and E-courses offers an excellent option for saving space and money. Almost all the physical books can be obtained free or via online subscriptions. E-courses comes handy when a structured curriculum is necessary.

YouTube

YouTube is an ideal website to learn new things. Many different YouTube channels produce top-quality educational videos, free of charge!

Final thoughts

Today homeschooling looks entirely different as it did a decade ago, mostly because now there are more options and flexibility when it comes to teaching your kids at home. If you feel that homeschooling will make a positive impact on your kid or family, then don’t be overwhelmed and give it a try.

How to homeschool in the 21st century (for all types of parents & kids)

This is the second of the series of three articles discussing about the new role that 21 st century learning creates for parents. The previous article discussed how learning has changed from the past centuries and due to which the roles of students, teachers and parents in learning have also changed.

The 21 st century learning has reformed the role of parents from being mere supporters to being active participants in their child’s learning, and this role was discussed previously.

There are some other key roles that parents are required to adopt in 21 st century learning:

  • Teachers or Nurturers: Parents need to be completely involved with their child’s physical, moral, intellectual, emotional and social development. To nurture this development, parents need to provide their children with an appropriate environment that promotes learning and develops the skills and values needed to become physically, psychologically and emotionally healthy adults.
  • Communicators and Advisers: An effective two-way communication between the home and school should be established so that parents can keep track of their child’s learning and progress at school. They should also counsel their children on personal and educational issues by maintaining open communication.
  • Learners and contributors: This role focuses on parents obtaining the necessary skills and knowledge that will assist them with their children’s education and social development. Parents can contribute their knowledge and skills to the school by enriching the curriculum and providing services and support to students and teachers.
  • Collaborators and Decision Makers: Parents should participate and collaborate with the school staff and teachers to help solve problems, make decisions and develop policies that make the school system more responsive to families.

The 21 st century is marked by complexity and rapid change and parenting needs to respond accordingly. One thing that can never change is that parents are their child’s first and most important teachers. Children need their parents to be the wise teachers given the 21 st century skills they need to develop. Parents need to realize that for their children to meet their visions of success as adults in the 21st century, they are going to need some pretty sophisticated skills, which are not limited to the technology skills needed at work. Today’s young people will need to be 21st century thinkers, able to recognize problems and opportunities, understand the complex and varied systems in which those problems and opportunities exist, weigh the pros and cons of potential solutions, and proceed wisely with enacting their decisions.

21 st century learning brings with it a set of responsibilities for you and requires you to reform your role and understand the modern day learning needs of your child. Maria Chesley Fisk who is a parent involvement expert, author of Teach Your Kids to Think, co-founder of the home-school communication system, ParentSquare, and a realistic mom of two, in a ThinkParenting blog has offered tips on what being a parent you can do to prepare your children for the 21 st century life. Here are some highlights:

  • You need to affirm the importance of your role as a teacher to your child. Reflect and learn more about what and how you teach and help your child prepare for her future.
  • You should make your child understand that there are no limits to learning and that it is a life-long process. Acquisition of knowledge and mere memorization no longer work now. The Internet allows very easy and rapid dissemination of information because of which children will always need to proficiently filter, interpret, and evaluate information.
  • You should encourage your child to find opportunities for learning and self-improvement at home, at school, on the internet, and in the community. Help your child build analytical, creative, social & emotional, and practical thinking skills.
  • You should focus on the communication skills of both you and your child. Today’s parents need to effectively express their thoughts and questions and also need to be effective in more modes of communications and with a larger variety of audiences.
  • Help your child learn about cultures and languages across the globe. This will help them think globally and will enable them to bridge cultural differences that will serve them well in the future.
  • Help your child develop 21 st century attitudes by making him understand the value of hard work and that with it he can learn and improve in any area. He should believe that he can utilize resources and sincere effort to learn better and be successful.
  • To ensure success for your child you don’t just have to be a supporter in his learning, but you need to be a learner yourself. This will help you to teach your child how to thoughtfully enter new situations, set goals, and draw on resources that help create and sustain positive change and learning.

With careful attention, we can help our 21st century children grow up to be confident, well-rounded individuals, empowered to learn and change as they need and desire, and ready to embrace or adapt to the change the 21st century will bring.

The next and last part of the series will discuss about more ways for parents to become involved and support their child’s learning in the modern century.

MIT has a long history of admitting homeschooled students, and these students are successful and vibrant members of our community.

Over the past decade, we have seen a surge in homeschooled applicants. Homeschooled applicants make up less than 1% of our applicant pool (and less than 1% of our student body), but these numbers are growing. Homeschooled students come from urban, rural, and suburban neighborhoods. Some have been granted a formal high school diploma, while others have not. Please note that we do not require a high school diploma or GED from our applicants.

Successful homeschooled applicants

We do not have separate requirements for homeschooled applicants. Homeschooled applicants, like all of our applicants, are considered within their context, which includes schooling choice, family situation, geographic location, resources, opportunities, and challenges.

However, we do have some qualities we look for in for homeschooled students, based on successful applicants we have admitted in the past.

Initiative

One quality that we look for in all of our applicants is evidence of having taken initiative, showing an entrepreneurial spirit, and making the most of their opportunities. Many of our admitted homeschooled applicants really shine in this area. These students truly take advantage of their less constrained educational environment to take on exciting projects, go in depth in topics that excite them, create new opportunities for themselves and others, and more.

Advanced classes

The vast majority of our admitted homeschool students have taken advanced classes outside the homeschool setting, such as through a local college or an online school such as Stanford OHS. Transcripts of these courses, in addition to an evaluation of the homeschooling portfolio, are very helpful. Some students will also supplement with courses from MIT’s edX and OpenCourseWare.

Extracurricular activities

Most of our homeschooled students have participated in extracurricular activities and community groups, such as community orchestras and theater, athletics groups, scouting, religious groups, volunteer work, work for pay, etc. Our homeschooled applicants, like all of our students, are active in their communities.

Summer programs

Many (but certainly not all) of our homeschooled students have been active in summer programs. For some students, summer programs (some programs we have frequently seen in homeschooled applicants include CTY, TIP, PROMYS, MathCamp, RSI, Tanglewood, and Interlochen, among many others) are a great opportunity to work with other students from diverse backgrounds in a collaborative manner. Summer program mentors and job supervisors can also be great choices to write college recommendations.

Extra recommendations

Extra recommendations can be especially helpful for many homeschooled applicants. We welcome a recommendation from a parent but require at least three recommendations in total (usually a counselor and two teachers). We encourage you to submit additional recommendations (but don’t submit more than five total recommendations) from those who know you well, such as coaches, mentors, job supervisors, clergy, etc. Please attach an MIT Supplemental Document Cover Sheet to any supplemental recommendations you submit. The MIT Supplemental Document Cover Sheet can be found on the Application Forms page in your MIT application.

Interviews

MIT has alumni volunteers called Educational Counselors throughout the world who conduct interviews on behalf of MIT Admissions. We strongly encourage all of our applicants to interview, if available.

At MIT Admissions, we recruit and enroll a talented and diverse class of undergraduates who will learn to use science, technology, and other areas of scholarship to serve the nation and the world in the 21st century.

Our editors will review what you’ve submitted and determine whether to revise the article.

  • Homeschooling Today – Where The Love of Learning Takes Root
  • Home School Legal Defense Association (HSLDA)

Homeschooling, also called home education, educational method situated in the home rather than in an institution designed for that purpose. It is representative of a broad social movement of families, largely in Western societies, who believe that the education of children is, ultimately, the right of parents rather than a government. Beginning in the late 20th century, the homeschooling movement grew largely as a reaction against public school curricula among some groups.

History

Until the passage of compulsory school attendance laws, beginning in the United States in the mid-19th century, apprenticeships and communal activities were the primary ways young children learned. However, individual instruction was increasingly supplanted by systematized group methods fueled by child labour laws and other social changes that placed more children in schools. Not long after universal compulsory school laws were enacted—a process that was completed in the United States by the early 20th century—some parents and educators grew dissatisfied with the dominant school system and offered alternatives, including learning at home. For instance, in the United States in 1912, Adolf Berle, a professor at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts, wrote The School in the Home.

Although instances of homeschooling can be found throughout the 20th century in the United States, neither the term nor the practice became widespread until the last quarter of that century. In the early 1980s there were about 20,000 students homeschooled in the United States, but some three decades later the figure had increased to 1.77 million—about 3 percent of all school-age children—according to estimates by the National Center for Education Statistics. At about the same time, homeschooling was also increasing in other countries, such as the United Kingdom, Australia, and India. Twenty-first-century investigations into education in China and Colombia indicated that homeschooling had also gained a foothold in those countries. Reasons for that rapid growth vary, but they generally centre on perceived deficiencies in traditional education, such as a claimed lack of emphasis on teaching moral and ethical behaviour, a threat of violence in schools, and ineffectiveness in dealing with both learning-disabled and highly gifted children.

Some countries have placed restrictions on homeschooling. For instance, Sweden allows parents to homeschool their children only under “exceptional circumstances.” The practice of homeschooling has been banned in countries such as Brazil and Germany.

Main theories, theorists, and methods

Throughout the 1960s and ’70s John Holt, an American teacher and a leading education writer, advocated self-directed learning for children. Holt advised parents to fit the curriculum to the child’s interests, rather than fit the child to the curriculum, and he founded Growing Without Schooling (1977–2001), the first magazine about homeschooling, to share ideas and accounts of families engaged in the practice. Holt coined the word unschooling to describe learning that did not have to take place at home and did not require the school’s teaching and learning techniques. Since that time, however, homeschooling has become the commonly accepted term for many types of learning outside of school.

In the 1970s Americans Raymond Moore and his wife, Dorothy, also prominent education authors and devout Christians, advocated delaying academics for children, especially for boys, until they were developmentally ready for them. Like Holt, Moore found a more-receptive audience for his ideas among parents—and particularly Christian parents—than among school personnel, and Moore became a popular thinker and leader for the burgeoning Christian homeschooling movement. The Moores created their own curricula for homeschooling families to use, which consisted of a three-part formula for instruction: (1) academic study ranging from a few minutes to several hours per day, depending on a child’s maturity, (2) manual labour equal in time to that devoted toward academic study, and (3) home and/or community service constituting an hour or so per day. By the late 1980s, however, Holt had died, and Moore lost influence to other Christian leaders.

At the same time, the work of Charlotte Mason—a 19th-century British educator—had a resurgence among Christian homeschoolers, as a result of the publication of Susan Schaeffer Macaulay’s book For the Children’s Sake: Foundations of Education for the Home and School (1984). Mason advocated teaching Latin or other languages that once provided the foundation of a classical education. Private schools, correspondence schools, and curriculum providers—such as Montessori schools (originated by Italian educator Maria Montessori and characterized by individual initiative and self-direction), Waldorf schools (derived from the work of the spiritualist lecturer Rudolf Steiner), and Roman Catholic and Evangelical schools—all recognized a new market and made their materials available to homeschoolers.

Legal and social issues

In the United States and its territories, homeschooling has always been a legal option for parents, though with the establishment of formal education it was rarely exercised until the late 20th century. Although legal action has been taken against homeschooling households, it has been prompted by issues such as truancy and educational neglect, not the act of homeschooling itself. As homeschooling grew, so did the monitoring of homeschoolers, and by the early 21st century 40 states had adopted homeschooling regulations. Those regulations, however, vary by state. For example, several states, including New York and North Dakota, are highly restrictive, requiring the provision of achievement test scores or other formal evaluation, parental teacher qualification—for example, requiring a high-school diploma or GED (General Educational Development certificate)—state-approved curriculum, and home visits from state officials. Other states, including Florida and Washington, are more moderately regulated, requiring test scores or another form of professional evaluation. States with less regulation include Wisconsin and Utah, which require only that parents notify the state of their intent to homeschool their children. In some states, such as Texas, no state notification is required. Regulations are often revised or under study. No parent is required to be a certified teacher in order to teach his or her own child at home in Australia, Canada, Ireland, Norway, the United Kingdom, the United States, and other countries where homeschooling is permitted.

Families of the 21st Century come in all shapes and sizes. Divorce, remarriage, parenting out-of-wedlock and a host of other variables have turned nuclear families into the exception rather than the norm. As little as a half-century ago, children were typically raised in homes with two biological parents, and chances are, those two parents had the support of extended family members nearby. When one questioned their own parenting, they had only to turn to one of these supporters for reassurance and a confidence boost.

Fast forward to the first decade of the 21st Century, and you will find that the traditional, nuclear family is on the Endangered Species List. Even in nuclear families, homemaker and breadwinner roles have evolved into something that makes it impossible to define and designate an “average” family. In fact, the stereotypic breadwinner and homemaker roles rarely exist; most households require the income of two full-time wage earners just to get by.

Another significant change is the support network parents once enjoyed. It was not uncommon for extended family members to reside in close proximity to each other, if not under the same roof. Today, more and more grandparents are flocking to Florida, Arizona, or similar location to spend their retirement years while young adults are leaving the nest in search of greater career opportunities. This trend of stretching families around the globe means that there are fewer and fewer built-in support networks in our communities. Extended family members not only served as mentors and role models, but often as a sounding board or emergency caregiver. Parents and grandparents were respected and looked to for guidance during tough times. As a society, we admired and respected their stories of endurance; surviving economic challenges, marital troubles and a myriad of other circumstances associated with their times. As our role models they inspired us to work hard and persevere.

In addition to the extended family, we have lost our sense of community. Our neighbors today are essentially strangers. Fewer and fewer Americans attend church and therefore the support of the congregation is non-existent for many families. Commuters and tele-commuters reduce the opportunity to interact regularly with the people from our own neighborhoods. Instead, we drive 30, 60, 90 miles to work with people from nearby cities. This in itself is not a bad thing, but it further diminishes our sense of community and the support network we once took for granted.

Today’s families come in hundreds of shapes and sizes.
Stepfamilies are the most common form of “non-traditional” families, but think of the many variables within stepfamilies: everything from two partners with custody of their respective children to households where one partner has children and the other doesn’t. There are still even more types of families: single mothers, single fathers, grandparents raising grandchildren, multi-generational households, the list is endless. Custody arrangements following separation and divorce are almost as unique as snowflakes; no two are the same. Legal and physical custody are no longer automatically awarded to the mother. More and more, kids are bouncing back and forth between two households on a weekly basis.

Family educators and coaches are well suited to help parents meet the changing demands of family life. While counseling and therapy may be necessary in some cases, generally speaking, people are in need of resources that will assist them in major transitions, to move them forward, to balance work and family. A family coach can support parents in aligning their personal goals with their values and priorities. Family educators/coaches can also address a wide range of issues, from parenting toddlers to teenagers, childcare and elder care and resources and referrals to connect to existing community services. With a sea of services available, it can be difficult and time consuming to identify exactly which one is best suited to meet your needs. A family coach that is familiar with both the community and the family’s unique needs can take the time and guesswork out of the search.

It’s time to rebuild the support network that once helped hold the family together. Stepfamilies in particular need encouragement and insight to help them recognize the inevitable hurdles before them and proof that it can be done.

Blackwell Family Resources LLC is a coaching firm that specializes in blended and divorced families. Their coaches help divorced and remarried parents modify their expectations and help their children adapt to the new family configuration. Our coach listens to parents without judgment, respects their values and helps them develop their own solutions.

Seventy years ago, moms were younger and they worked far less.

How to homeschool in the 21st century (for all types of parents & kids)

How to homeschool in the 21st century (for all types of parents & kids)

Though the fundamentals are still the same, parenting has changed quite a bit in the past 70 or so years. Sure, moms and dads today still deal with changing diapers, taming temper tantrums, and getting grape juice stains out of white shirts, but they also have to cope with cyberbullying and the various threats to their children that seem to loom at every corner. In the 1950s, children—if you can believe it—had more freedom, very few mothers worked, and very few dads spent time with their kids. Read on to discover what parenting was like in the 1950s.

Children today might find this hard to believe, but for much of the 20th century, it was relatively common for young children to walk home by themselves. When Slate surveyed some 4,000 readers about their upbringings, they found that the closer to the 21st century someone grew up, the longer they had to wait before their parents let them go out alone.

Among the group that grew up in the 1950s, approximately 40 percent of respondents said that they were able to walk to school alone starting in just 2nd and 3rd grade. For folks who grew up in the ’90s, on the other hand, the majority had to wait until middle school to take those solo ventures.

While people certainly ended their marriages in the 1950s and ’60s, there was a deeply-ingrained social stigma against divorce that has undeniably lessened in the decades since.

According to the Pew Research Center, while 73 percent of U.S. children under the age of 17 were living with their married parents in 1960, only 46 percent of that same demographic was living under the roof of still-wed spouses in 2013. Similarly, while just 9 percent of children were raised by a single parent in 1960, 34 percent were in 2013.

In the first half of the 20th century, having a happy home life—and a few kids—was an integral part of the American Dream. But it turns out that parents were actually spending less time with their kids in those days. A 2016 study published in the Journal of Marriage and Family analyzed data from 11 Western nations and found that moms spent an average of 54 minutes with their kids each day in 1965. As of 2012, that number had nearly doubled—up to 104 minutes. Fathers spent even less time with their children in 1965: just 16 minutes a day. But by 2012, dads were clocking an average of 59 minutes of quality time with their kids.

In the 21st century, moms are able to do it all. Not only do they spend more time with their kids than ever before, they’re able to do so while simultaneously working outside the home. Of course, not every mom is a working woman—and that’s fine!—but there are far more mothers in the workplace than there were some 50 years ago, and they’re spending longer hours working, too. According to data from the Pew Research Center, the average mom in 2016 spent 25 hours a week on paid work, up from 8 hours a week in 1965.

In the 1960s, dads seldom pitched in around the house. In fact, according to the Pew Research Center, men spent an average of just 2.5 hours on child care and 4 hours on housework on a weekly basis back in 1965. But in 2011, the average father spent 7 hours on child care and 10 hours on housework, indicating a much more equal division of responsibilities.

In 1970, the average age of a first-time mom in OECD countries (as defined here) was 24.3 years old. That’s largely because back then, there was a huge amount of societal pressure placed on women to marry and have children, and less expectation that women would return to work after becoming mothers.

According to a 2017 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 1970, just over 40 percent of American women were employed; by 2015, that number was nearing 60 percent. With more women dedicating themselves to their careers during their prime earning years, it makes sense that by the mid-2000s, the average age of a first-time mom in OECD countries was 27.7 years old.

Throughout the majority of the 20th century, mental health issues like depression and OCD were largely swept under the rug entirely. Thankfully, though, medical advances and reduced social stigma surrounding mental health issues allowed for treatment to become both more focused and more widespread. For example, the creation of antipsychotic drugs and advancements in health care caused the number of mentally ill patients institutionalized at public hospitals to decrease by 92 percent from 1955 to 1994, according to a report from Out of the Shadows: Confronting America’s Mental Illness Crisis.

And, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the number of teens and tweens diagnosed with anxiety or depression rose recently, from 5.4 percent in 2003 to 8.4 percent in 2012; and more than 78 percent of those diagnosed with depression were able to receive treatment. And if you’re not sure whether your child is depressed, then listen to what they’re saying; People Who Use These Words May Suffer From Depression.

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How to homeschool in the 21st century (for all types of parents & kids)

Making Homeschooling Possible—Together

Every child is different and should have the freedom to learn in a safe, loving environment at their own pace.

  • We partner with our 95,000 member families, donors, homeschool leaders, legislators, and others who want to protect this freedom.
  • We’ve been trusted for over 35 years to advance and protect homeschool freedom in the courts, legislatures, and in the court of public opinion.
  • We equip parents with resources, educational consultants, and Compassion grants because we love homeschooling and want more families to experience it.
  • We know the benefits and challenges of homeschooling personally—most of our staff are homeschool parents and grads.

Get to Know HSLDA

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Ready to experience the benefits that 100,000+ homeschool families enjoy? Click here to start your journey.

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Careers at HSLDA

HSLDA is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, tax-exempt, religious, membership organization that advocates for homeschooling, defends the civil rights of homeschoolers, and provides assistance to homeschoolers in hard times. We are governed by a board and no profits inure to the benefit of any employees or board members. Membership dues are not tax-deductible, but as a 501(c)(3), we are able to receive tax-deductible donations. Learn more about HSLDA here.

As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, HSLDA does not directly or indirectly participate or intervene in any political campaign on behalf of (or in opposition to) any candidate for elective public office.

Our sister organization, HSLDA Action, is a 501(c)(4) organization and is permitted to endorse political candidates and engage in lobbying that is germane to its purposes. HSLDA Action’s Political Action Committee endorses candidates who support homeschool freedom and lobbies on behalf of homeschool freedom.

Learn more about HSLDA Action here.

Yes. HSLDA’s leaders, directors, and employees are Christians who seek to honor God by providing the very highest levels of service in defending homeschool freedom and equipping homeschoolers. And because of our beliefs, we want every family to have the freedom to direct their children’s education, no matter their background or religious affiliation. Therefore, we do not make religious beliefs a condition of membership or any other service we offer. You can learn more about HSLDA here.

HSLDA is the trusted movement leader that makes homeschooling possible by caring for member families and protecting and securing the future of homeschooling.

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How to homeschool in the 21st century (for all types of parents & kids)

Enrolling in a Cyber School like 21CCCS, a Pennsylvania Cyber Charter School, can provide an education that’s built around you.

21CCCS offers individualized instruction to every student and flexibility so that students can find a schedule that works best for them. This approach makes for day-to-day schedules that are unique for each student, so it’s difficult to pin down exactly what a day in the life of a Cyber School student is truly like, but there are many examples out there of 21CCCS enrollees that have developed productive and manageable daily routines with the help of their school counselors, academic advisors, and parents.

Here’s one example of how a 21CCCS Cyber School student made his schedule flexibility work for him:

“My typical day starts out like any other. I get up before 8 a.m., usually grab a bite to eat for breakfast, grab my computer and log on for school for the day. The best thing about Cyber School is I can do my schoolwork wherever and whenever I want. When I attended a normal brick-and-mortar high school, I noticed I was missing more and more days of school and was just not able to keep up with the workload. I travel to New York a lot because I am pursuing a career in the business world of the fashion industry, so with 21 st Century, I’m able to take my work with me, never miss a day of school, and always be on time or ahead on all of my course work.”

Many might think the independence granted to Cyber School students means they can’t get the help and support they need if they’re struggling with any schoolwork throughout the course of the day. But this is not the case at 21CCCS. Each student enrolled in 21CCCS receives a dedicated Academic Advisor who will be there for him or her whenever they need it.

There are also those who believe enrolling in a Cyber School leads to the loss of social interaction. Once again, this is not true at 21CCCS. Field trips, community days, and yes, even Prom and Graduation, allows 21CCCS students to build long-lasting relationships with their peers and teachers.

The typical day for a 21CCCS student consists of about five to six hours of work a day on average. Each class has weekly online lessons that are about an hour long. They are not mandatory and they are recorded in case a student would like to go back and watch them on their own time.

Students enrolled in 21CCCS also receive any educational equipment they might need to succeed academically.

Another frequently asked questioned by those considering Cyber School is ‘What’s the school year like?’

21CCCS follows a traditional school year calendar. But keep in mind, there are no snow days in Cyber School. But there are also no buses to catch early in the morning! The flexible schedule and online setting of 21CCCS also prevents scheduling conflicts throughout the school year.

Although schedules are individualized and students are encouraged to learn at their own pace, 21CCCS teachers still strive to help their students stay organized so that they can maintain consistent progress throughout their daily routines and the school year.

Seventy years ago, moms were younger and they worked far less.

How to homeschool in the 21st century (for all types of parents & kids)

How to homeschool in the 21st century (for all types of parents & kids)

Though the fundamentals are still the same, parenting has changed quite a bit in the past 70 or so years. Sure, moms and dads today still deal with changing diapers, taming temper tantrums, and getting grape juice stains out of white shirts, but they also have to cope with cyberbullying and the various threats to their children that seem to loom at every corner. In the 1950s, children—if you can believe it—had more freedom, very few mothers worked, and very few dads spent time with their kids. Read on to discover what parenting was like in the 1950s.

Children today might find this hard to believe, but for much of the 20th century, it was relatively common for young children to walk home by themselves. When Slate surveyed some 4,000 readers about their upbringings, they found that the closer to the 21st century someone grew up, the longer they had to wait before their parents let them go out alone.

Among the group that grew up in the 1950s, approximately 40 percent of respondents said that they were able to walk to school alone starting in just 2nd and 3rd grade. For folks who grew up in the ’90s, on the other hand, the majority had to wait until middle school to take those solo ventures.

While people certainly ended their marriages in the 1950s and ’60s, there was a deeply-ingrained social stigma against divorce that has undeniably lessened in the decades since.

According to the Pew Research Center, while 73 percent of U.S. children under the age of 17 were living with their married parents in 1960, only 46 percent of that same demographic was living under the roof of still-wed spouses in 2013. Similarly, while just 9 percent of children were raised by a single parent in 1960, 34 percent were in 2013.

In the first half of the 20th century, having a happy home life—and a few kids—was an integral part of the American Dream. But it turns out that parents were actually spending less time with their kids in those days. A 2016 study published in the Journal of Marriage and Family analyzed data from 11 Western nations and found that moms spent an average of 54 minutes with their kids each day in 1965. As of 2012, that number had nearly doubled—up to 104 minutes. Fathers spent even less time with their children in 1965: just 16 minutes a day. But by 2012, dads were clocking an average of 59 minutes of quality time with their kids.

In the 21st century, moms are able to do it all. Not only do they spend more time with their kids than ever before, they’re able to do so while simultaneously working outside the home. Of course, not every mom is a working woman—and that’s fine!—but there are far more mothers in the workplace than there were some 50 years ago, and they’re spending longer hours working, too. According to data from the Pew Research Center, the average mom in 2016 spent 25 hours a week on paid work, up from 8 hours a week in 1965.

In the 1960s, dads seldom pitched in around the house. In fact, according to the Pew Research Center, men spent an average of just 2.5 hours on child care and 4 hours on housework on a weekly basis back in 1965. But in 2011, the average father spent 7 hours on child care and 10 hours on housework, indicating a much more equal division of responsibilities.

In 1970, the average age of a first-time mom in OECD countries (as defined here) was 24.3 years old. That’s largely because back then, there was a huge amount of societal pressure placed on women to marry and have children, and less expectation that women would return to work after becoming mothers.

According to a 2017 report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 1970, just over 40 percent of American women were employed; by 2015, that number was nearing 60 percent. With more women dedicating themselves to their careers during their prime earning years, it makes sense that by the mid-2000s, the average age of a first-time mom in OECD countries was 27.7 years old.

Throughout the majority of the 20th century, mental health issues like depression and OCD were largely swept under the rug entirely. Thankfully, though, medical advances and reduced social stigma surrounding mental health issues allowed for treatment to become both more focused and more widespread. For example, the creation of antipsychotic drugs and advancements in health care caused the number of mentally ill patients institutionalized at public hospitals to decrease by 92 percent from 1955 to 1994, according to a report from Out of the Shadows: Confronting America’s Mental Illness Crisis.

And, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the number of teens and tweens diagnosed with anxiety or depression rose recently, from 5.4 percent in 2003 to 8.4 percent in 2012; and more than 78 percent of those diagnosed with depression were able to receive treatment. And if you’re not sure whether your child is depressed, then listen to what they’re saying; People Who Use These Words May Suffer From Depression.

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