How to identify your strengths and weaknesses in 5 steps

How to identify your strengths and weaknesses in 5 steps

In most job interviews, candidates will be asked to describe their strengths and weaknesses. In preparation for an interview, candidates should consider how best to answer this question so that the information is useful to employers while not damaging your chances of being hired.

Send jobs to 100+ job boards with one submission

Post Jobs for FREE

  • Completely free trial, no card required.
  • Reach over 250 million candidates.

What employers are looking for:

Hard skills (defined by the job description)

Soft skills (such as public speaking)

Ability to work in a team

How to Address Your Strengths & Weaknesses:

How to identify your strengths and weaknesses in 5 steps

Read through our guide to answering “what are your strengths and weaknesses?” in a professional and impressive way.

Think carefully about what you should reveal.

Use the job description to frame your answer.

How to identify your strengths and weaknesses in 5 steps

Your strengths and weaknesses should reflect the requirements of the role. Ensure that you highlight your skills that are listed in the job description, and explain how you will gain or improve critical skills that you lack.

In general, your strengths should be skills that can be supported through experience. For example, if you list communication as a strength, you may want to recall a situation in which you used communication to reach a goal or resolve a problem.

Your weaknesses can include a hard skill set out in the job description, provided that you emphasize your desire to acquire this skill through a course or program. Similarly, listing a soft skill you lack should be supported with a plan to learn or improve this skill.

Try not to reveal too much.

How to identify your strengths and weaknesses in 5 steps

While it is important to be honest about your weaknesses, there are a few traits that are not appropriate or beneficial to mention in a job interview. This includes tardiness, poor attention to detail, and an inability to meet deadlines.

Example Answers:

Strengths:

I consider my leadership skills to be one of my greatest strengths. During my time as a department head, I successfully merged two teams and organized training programs for all team members to ensure that everyone was confident in their new role. As a result, we were able to increase sales by 5% within our first month as a new team.

Thanks to my experience as an HR representative, I have gained excellent communication skills. I was responsible for facilitating informational workshops for staff members and mediated any conflict in the workplace. I have also completed a course on effective communication from UCLA.

I have 5 years of experience as a copywriter and consider myself to have strong writing skills. I was promoted to an editorial position after five years at the company, so I have also improved my editing skills thanks to my new role.

I am very honest. When I feel that my workload is too large to accept another task, or if I don’t understand something, I always let my supervisor know.

My people skills are my greatest strength. I find it easy to connect with almost anyone, and I often know how to empathize with others in an appropriate way.

Examples of Strengths.

  • Communication skills.
  • People skills.
  • Writing skills.
  • Analytical skills.
  • Honesty.
  • Leadership skills.
  • Patience.
  • Writing skills.
  • Empathy.
  • Initiative.
  • Self-motivation.
  • Computer literacy.

Weaknesses:

I find public speaking intimidating and have often struggled with presentations. As a result, I am currently taking a public speaking course at a community college to become more confident and learn to structure a speech more effectively.

I often struggle with delegating and choose to take on a larger workload to ensure that a task is completed perfectly. This puts more pressure on myself, so I have been using software to assign tasks and track their completion. So far this has helped me to trust my co-workers and focus more on my own tasks.

Shyness is something that I struggle with in large groups. I find it intimidating to ask questions or raise points, so I have often remained quiet in the past. I have been trying to be more vocal in smaller groups to become more confident.

I mainly used Python in my last position, so I don’t have as much experience with Java. I did a course on Java for one semester at University, but I haven’t used it since then.

I struggle with negative criticism and can become obsessed with perfecting my work after receiving notes from a supervisor. While I appreciate the guidance, I think I can learn to be less harsh on myself.

As discussed in my previous post, your personal value proposition (PVP) is why an employer should hire you or promote you over someone else. It’s the foundation of your career strategy. A product’s value proposition only works if it’s true, if the business has the organizational competencies needed to deliver the value proposition. Likewise, a […]

As discussed in my previous post, your personal value proposition (PVP) is why an employer should hire you or promote you over someone else. It’s the foundation of your career strategy. A product’s value proposition only works if it’s true, if the business has the organizational competencies needed to deliver the value proposition. Likewise, a […]

As discussed in my previous post, your personal value proposition (PVP) is why an employer should hire you or promote you over someone else. It’s the foundation of your career strategy.

A product’s value proposition only works if it’s true, if the business has the organizational competencies needed to deliver the value proposition. Likewise, a PVP only works if it’s true — if you have the strengths required. So the first step in developing a winning value proposition is self-appraisal to assess your strengths.

Is it possible to come up with new insights about strengths? Here’s someone who did just that.

Pallab (name has been changed) was a marketing Vice President at a Fortune 100 company that acquired his company two years earlier. Before the acquisition, Pallab was one of the top ten people in an 8,000-person organization. In the new organization, he was one of the top 300 in a company with 100,000 people. He had less autonomy and was uncertain about his future. He wasn’t happy.

He needed a new career strategy. Not sure what to target or how best to present himself, he focused on identifying strengths and building a powerful PVP on those strengths.

Pallab first thought he’d emphasize his experience with marketing and growth, especially in emerging markets. But it wasn’t convincing. It wasn’t clear what made him good at that. It sounded like what others might say. What made him special?

After a couple of frustrating months at this, Pallab looked in an unconventional direction. Searching through his personal work history, he discovered empathy. His talent at understanding others was where he landed when he asked himself where his biggest successes had come from. Empathy had helped him imagine new products, create business relationships, and build productive teams. It was important, and few others in his field could match it.

Pallab began an aggressive job search. He mentioned empathy on his resume and how that led to accomplishments in his work. He led with empathy in discussions with prospective employers. He showed empathy in the way he conducted his side of the interviews — good listening skills and the ability to understand what others were saying. Empathy affected the way he presented himself and how he described his past accomplishments.

Pallab found an exciting new position. The CEO who hired him “realized he needed someone with empathy to fit his work style.” He’d founded the company and steered its substantial growth. He had very clear views on most issues. Most of his direct reports were reluctant to question his ideas, but he knew he needed to be challenged in the right way. Pallab made him comfortable they could establish a productive working relationship.

Certainly, there were other reasons — Pallab’s overseas experience, marketing know-how, and thorough preparation before each meeting — but empathy is what made him stand out. If he hadn’t recognized that about himself and emphasized it, the CEO might not have realized that’s what he needed and that Pallab was the man to provide it.

When you start thinking about your PVP, follow Pallab’s example. Don’t ignore conventional characteristics and strengths, but emphasize what makes you distinctive and how that leads to your success at work. Take these five steps:

  1. List your strengths. The concrete skills and knowledge you’ve acquired through work experience and education may come to mind first. The softer intrinsic strengths may be less obvious but more fundamental. Look back to your earlier jobs and to your time at school. What did you enjoy most? What were you best at? Your current job may hold clues. Pay attention. Look for surprises.
  2. Ask others for input.Ask current or former colleagues for honest feedback without pulling punches. They may mention strengths you don’t recognize, raise questions about the strengths you do mention, or ask questions that lead you to imagine new strengths. Get the ball rolling by asking questions like these: What am I best at? What strengths might I build on? What are my weaknesses? What jobs should I avoid? What jobs should I target?
  3. Revisit past feedback. Reread your old performance appraisals or recall coaching from supervisors, even if it’s about a different kind of position.
  4. “Hire” yourself. Think about hiring yourself for your current job, as if you didn’t already have it. Ask yourself why you would — or would not — be hired for this job.
  5. Revisit your strength list. Return to your first list of strengths, and modify it to reflect what else you’ve learned. Categorize and rank that list. Be specific. Generic strengths are easy to state. They’re seldom helpful. Specific strengths are credible. They will naturally target you to some opportunities.

A successful career strategy stands on the shoulders of a strong PVP. The PVP stands on distinctive strengths. How do you think about your strengths? What role does that thinking play in your career strategy?

A simple, practical system for turning weaknesses into strengths.

How to identify your strengths and weaknesses in 5 steps

We all have strengths and weaknesses. Being reminded of our weaknesses is unpleasant. Therefore, we often learn to avoid tasks that require skills that we think of as weaknesses. This avoidance can cause problems and hold you back.

For example, if you don’t see yourself as good at networking, you’ll likely avoid it. The more you avoid it, the harder it becomes. When you’ve avoided something for a long time, your skills won’t be as good as someone who has regularly practiced. Therefore, weaknesses can seem more pronounced over time. You can end up feeling embarrassed by them.

What’s the Solution?

A fun option to overcome a weakness is to find a new way to approach it that utilizes one of your core strengths. As per the earlier example, let’s say your weakness is networking. However, two of your strengths are being methodical and conscientious. You could look for a way to approach networking that uses your conscientiousness. Your solution could be something like methodically following up with a thank you email, note, or text message when a coworker has helped you or a contractor has done a good job. You’re then, essentially, redefining the activity not as a “networking” activity but as a “conscientiousness” activity.

Identify Your Strengths and Weaknesses

To implement the above process in your own life, you’re going to need to build your awareness of your strengths. Try starting with a list of five to six strengths and one to three weaknesses. Write them down in two columns, and then draws some arrows, from the strengths to the weaknesses, where you think you could potentially apply a strength to a weakness. You don’t need to be 100 percent sure how you’re going to do it just yet. Go with your gut of what you think might be applicable.

For the weaknesses, you should focus on things that are actually getting in your way and that you have some motivation to change. For example, they could be related to negotiating, finances, relationships, or health behaviors.

The types of strengths that can be good candidates are things like:

  • being good at researching information
  • resourcefulness
  • persistence
  • conscientiousness
  • being methodical
  • planning for and overcoming obstacles
  • finding workarounds for problems
  • decency/following the “do unto others” principle
  • ability to follow instructions
  • ability to synthesize information
  • warmth
  • thoughtfulness
  • being calm and emotionally even-keeled
  • patience

There are many options for how you can redefine an area of weakness. You could redefine networking activities in terms of living the “do unto others” principle—you might think about how you’d like to receive a thank you when you’ve helped someone, and therefore you’re going to treat others the same way.

When you redefine tasks you’d normally avoid in this way, your urge to avoid them will lessen. This will then have a snowball effect because when you start practicing a task, you’ll build both skills and confidence. This will allow you to expand your comfort zone, a little bit at a time.

Implementation Tips

  • Don’t worry if it’s hard to think of your strengths at first. Write down as many as you can think of and then add to your list over the next couple of weeks. Just notice the tasks that you do competently and ask yourself what strengths you’re utilizing to do that.
  • You can also ask others what they see as your strengths. If you explain what you’re doing (you could forward the link to this article), it will make it easier to ask people without it seeming like you’re just fishing for compliments. This exercise can also be done with a coach.

There are lots more practical exercises like this one in my book and in my other PT articles.

As discussed in my previous post, your personal value proposition (PVP) is why an employer should hire you or promote you over someone else. It’s the foundation of your career strategy. A product’s value proposition only works if it’s true, if the business has the organizational competencies needed to deliver the value proposition. Likewise, a […]

As discussed in my previous post, your personal value proposition (PVP) is why an employer should hire you or promote you over someone else. It’s the foundation of your career strategy. A product’s value proposition only works if it’s true, if the business has the organizational competencies needed to deliver the value proposition. Likewise, a […]

As discussed in my previous post, your personal value proposition (PVP) is why an employer should hire you or promote you over someone else. It’s the foundation of your career strategy.

A product’s value proposition only works if it’s true, if the business has the organizational competencies needed to deliver the value proposition. Likewise, a PVP only works if it’s true — if you have the strengths required. So the first step in developing a winning value proposition is self-appraisal to assess your strengths.

Is it possible to come up with new insights about strengths? Here’s someone who did just that.

Pallab (name has been changed) was a marketing Vice President at a Fortune 100 company that acquired his company two years earlier. Before the acquisition, Pallab was one of the top ten people in an 8,000-person organization. In the new organization, he was one of the top 300 in a company with 100,000 people. He had less autonomy and was uncertain about his future. He wasn’t happy.

He needed a new career strategy. Not sure what to target or how best to present himself, he focused on identifying strengths and building a powerful PVP on those strengths.

Pallab first thought he’d emphasize his experience with marketing and growth, especially in emerging markets. But it wasn’t convincing. It wasn’t clear what made him good at that. It sounded like what others might say. What made him special?

After a couple of frustrating months at this, Pallab looked in an unconventional direction. Searching through his personal work history, he discovered empathy. His talent at understanding others was where he landed when he asked himself where his biggest successes had come from. Empathy had helped him imagine new products, create business relationships, and build productive teams. It was important, and few others in his field could match it.

Pallab began an aggressive job search. He mentioned empathy on his resume and how that led to accomplishments in his work. He led with empathy in discussions with prospective employers. He showed empathy in the way he conducted his side of the interviews — good listening skills and the ability to understand what others were saying. Empathy affected the way he presented himself and how he described his past accomplishments.

Pallab found an exciting new position. The CEO who hired him “realized he needed someone with empathy to fit his work style.” He’d founded the company and steered its substantial growth. He had very clear views on most issues. Most of his direct reports were reluctant to question his ideas, but he knew he needed to be challenged in the right way. Pallab made him comfortable they could establish a productive working relationship.

Certainly, there were other reasons — Pallab’s overseas experience, marketing know-how, and thorough preparation before each meeting — but empathy is what made him stand out. If he hadn’t recognized that about himself and emphasized it, the CEO might not have realized that’s what he needed and that Pallab was the man to provide it.

When you start thinking about your PVP, follow Pallab’s example. Don’t ignore conventional characteristics and strengths, but emphasize what makes you distinctive and how that leads to your success at work. Take these five steps:

  1. List your strengths. The concrete skills and knowledge you’ve acquired through work experience and education may come to mind first. The softer intrinsic strengths may be less obvious but more fundamental. Look back to your earlier jobs and to your time at school. What did you enjoy most? What were you best at? Your current job may hold clues. Pay attention. Look for surprises.
  2. Ask others for input.Ask current or former colleagues for honest feedback without pulling punches. They may mention strengths you don’t recognize, raise questions about the strengths you do mention, or ask questions that lead you to imagine new strengths. Get the ball rolling by asking questions like these: What am I best at? What strengths might I build on? What are my weaknesses? What jobs should I avoid? What jobs should I target?
  3. Revisit past feedback. Reread your old performance appraisals or recall coaching from supervisors, even if it’s about a different kind of position.
  4. “Hire” yourself. Think about hiring yourself for your current job, as if you didn’t already have it. Ask yourself why you would — or would not — be hired for this job.
  5. Revisit your strength list. Return to your first list of strengths, and modify it to reflect what else you’ve learned. Categorize and rank that list. Be specific. Generic strengths are easy to state. They’re seldom helpful. Specific strengths are credible. They will naturally target you to some opportunities.

A successful career strategy stands on the shoulders of a strong PVP. The PVP stands on distinctive strengths. How do you think about your strengths? What role does that thinking play in your career strategy?

How to identify your strengths and weaknesses in 5 steps

During job interviews, there are certain types of questions that employers tend to ask, regardless of the position and company. One of the most popular interview questions is, “What is your greatest weakness?” which is often preceded or followed by, “What is your greatest strength?”

Just because interview questions are common doesn’t mean they are easy to answer.

Questions about strengths and weaknesses can provide an opportunity to show how your skills are a perfect match for the job—or they can be a trap. Give the wrong answer, and the interview might go south in a hurry.

What the Interviewer Really Wants to Know

You may hear these questions phrased in different ways, but the underlying reason employers ask remains the same. They want to know what you see as your strengths and weaknesses and also observe how you respond to a challenging question.

The interviewer is looking for honesty, self-awareness, and the ability to learn from mistakes.

So, don’t give a cliched answer like, “I’m a perfectionist!” Hiring managers hear that one a lot, and they’ll assume that you’re either not aware of your actual failings or that you’re not willing to share them.

How to Answer “What Are Your Strengths and Weaknesses?”

Strengths and weaknesses are different for almost every job. What could be a strength for one job applicant may be considered a weakness for another candidate. In general, there are some strengths and weaknesses you should—and shouldn’t—mention during a job interview.

  • Examples of Strengths for Interviews: These include analytical, communication, and leadership skills, as well as the ability to collaborate and work as a team.
  • Examples of Weaknesses for Interviews: These include hard and soft skills, plus tips on how to spin your weaknesses so that they don’t knock you out of contention for the role.

Interview Questions About Weaknesses

  • What is your greatest weakness? – Best Answers
  • What part of the job will be most challenging for you? – Best Answers
  • Tell me about something you would have done differently at work. – Best Answers
  • What do people most often criticize about you? – Best Answers
  • When was the last time you were angry? What happened? – Best Answers
  • What do you find are the most difficult decisions to make? – Best Answers
  • What is the biggest criticism you received from your boss? – Best Answers

Interview Questions About Strengths

  • What is your greatest strength? – Best Answers
  • How will your greatest strength help you perform? – Best Answers
  • What strength of yours will help you most to succeed in this job? – Best Answers
  • What can we expect from you in the first 60 days on the job? – Best Answers
  • What was your biggest strength as a student? – Best Answers
  • What strength will help you most to succeed in the job? – Best Answers

Examples of the Best Answers

When answering questions about your strengths and weaknesses, always keep the job description in mind. Remember that these questions are essentially the same from different angles: the employer wants to know that you have the skill set, experience, and attitude necessary to get the job done.

These kinds of questions are also an opportunity to demonstrate self-awareness. The best employees are the ones who tackle their deficiencies head-on and keep learning throughout their career.

Frame your answer in a way that emphasizes the qualities the hiring manager is looking for in a candidate.

Show that you’re the best person to solve their problems and achieve their goals. These sample answers can help you make your case.

Show How You Handle Priorities

Sometimes, I spend more time than necessary on a task or take on tasks personally that could easily be delegated to someone else. Although I’ve never missed a deadline, it is still an effort for me to know when to move on to the next task, and to be confident when assigning others work. In my recent position, I implemented a project management tool that allowed me to easily oversee the progress of all the tasks I assigned, which helped me feel much more comfortable delegating work.

Why It Works: This answer is honest and reflects a real weakness, unlike an answer like, “I’m a perfectionist!” It shows self-awareness and the ability to learn and grow, but emphasizes that the candidate has always prioritized what is important: hitting deadlines.

Mention a Skill Required for the Job

I have extremely strong writing skills. Having worked as a copy editor for five years, I have a deep attention to detail when it comes to my writing. I have also written for a variety of publications, so I know how to shape my writing style to fit the task and audience. As a marketing assistant, I will be able to effectively write and edit press releases and update web content with accuracy and ease.

Why It Works: Not only does this answer mention a skill that (presumably) appeared in the job description, it ties the skill directly to what would make the candidate successful in the role. The way the reply is phrased also invites the interviewer to imagine the candidate in the job.

Show Your Flexibility and Willingness to Learn

I’ve previously used Microsoft Word processing and presentation software exclusively, and haven’t used Google’s online equivalents. Although I’ll have to learn a whole new set of keyboard shortcuts, I’ll devote time to reading blog posts that walk me through the differences between the two types of software, and I’ll watch online tutorials.

Why It Works: While not misrepresenting the candidate’s skill set, this answer shows that they’ve used similar software before—and more importantly, that they know how to learn new skills.

How to identify your strengths and weaknesses in 5 steps

A great tool to help all kind of people interested in career and personal development.

The RichardStep Strengths and Weaknesses Aptitude Test (RSWAT) is a tool to help you get a better look at who you really are and how much you could grow. That acronym is about as ugly as it comes so let’s just call it the “Strengths Test,” okay?

The aptitude tests here have simple, straight to the point questions that I’m sure you’ve never thought about before.

This awesomely helpful quiz will get your brain running at 1,000 MPH and you’ll win in the end. I know, I know – this sounds super-cheesy, but this type of comment was shared with me by several past test-takers.

Are you interested in finding out what you need to focus on for your future growth?

Yes, I Want to Take The Test Now

Why Should I Take This Test?

The ‘why’ is important when it comes to career or personal development. It isn’t until you have a better understanding of the ‘why’ that you finally begin to start caring about the ‘what,’ ‘how,’ and ‘what’s next?’

How to identify your strengths and weaknesses in 5 steps

Waiting for a sign to get started? Here’s your sign – now get going!

Internal motivation is one of the hardest skills to come by and build for folks that don’t into many self-help books on a regular basis.

As a matter of fact, knowing what motivates you is something you need to know before you can use your strengths best. There’s a self-motivation quiz here on this site, if you’re interested. But let’s get back to your aptitudes and weaknesses, okay?

Once you have your rocket fuel in place, you’re able to blaze a trail along the tracks to finding what really matters inside to you most. Or are you?

Keep reading to see if this really is the best thing for you in your current state in life.

Is This Test Really For Me?

Consider taking this test if any of these match you:

  • You’re looking for your strengths and weaknesses
  • You’re looking for self-awareness, self-help, or life direction
  • You’re looking for career or job ideas and direction
  • You’re just curious or having some fun

No matter your reason, I can guarantee you are on your way to finding out some very interesting things about yourself and how you work inside. We spend so much time thinking about things happening on the outside – it’s time to really figure out what’s going on inside.

What Should I Expect?

Chances are, there are a bunch of things running through your head right now about what to expect with this test. For instance:

  • “Are there going to be more questions or tests before I get to see my results?”
  • “Will the results really help or is this just more fluffy self-help junk?”
  • “Is this just a waste of my time and I’m not going to get anything useful out of it?”

And to that end, I kindly ask you to relax.

This is only a test. 🙂

How to identify your strengths and weaknesses in 5 steps

It’s not just about helping people – we’re partners in growing the world.

I’m very passionate about helping people grow. I want to help you grow, too. Every step you can take to make your life better helps not only your future but the future development of all of the folks around you, too.

Yes, I admit to having some very lofty goals. But I firmly believe that if I only help 1 person with the tools here, then I’ve done more than I could ever hope to do.

Okay so now you’ve waited long enough… here’s the nitty-gritty details of what to expect with the Strengths Test:

  • Only 1 page of questions that should take less than 10 minutes
  • You get your top 3 strengths and bottom 1 weakness
  • You can take the test as many times as you like
  • You can take the basic test for free

I’m Ready to Take the Test!

If you’re ready to get your strengths and weaknesses and how they’ll impact your life, career, and relationships, please click the link below.

When was the last time you drafted your branding strategies’ strengths and weaknesses chart?

1. Start by simply identifying the services that you provide and which services you don’t provide. Then, pinpoint the areas in which you excel and where you need improvement.

2. Ask yourself what your brand represents today. Come up with a list of adjectives. Do these adjectives fit into your original mission statement and brand strategy? Are they in accord with your day-to-day activities?

3. Then consider, in the past year, what projects you have executed most effectively as well as what types of clients or customers are most drawn to you. Notice any commonalities or patterns.

Remember, this is an internal audit. Understanding your strengths and weaknesses is a way to see where and how your company and brand strategy can improve. This is a tool that leads to the final product of a more specific, powerful and polished brand image.

4. Determine where your brand is heading. After looking at your present branding strategies and how they square up to your goals or the original vision of your brand, you might notice some disconnects or inconsistencies. These should now command the primary attention of your brand strategy. If they are positive changes that you want to pursue as the future of your brand – great! If they are weaknesses or unfulfilled promises, consider how your brand can change course.

How to identify your strengths and weaknesses in 5 steps5. Bring the internal audit into focus. Ask yourself:

• Is my client base expanding or contracting?
• Do my clients adequately represent the types of clients I want to pursue?
• Have I gained on or lost to my closest competitors recently? (key accounts, revenue, market share, etc.)
• Do people understand my brand?

Now, take some time to reevaluate. Regroup with your team and your ad agency and begin redrafting your brand strategy. You’ll soon find the effort worth the time.

When was the last time you drafted your branding strategies’ strengths and weaknesses chart?

1. Start by simply identifying the services that you provide and which services you don’t provide. Then, pinpoint the areas in which you excel and where you need improvement.

2. Ask yourself what your brand represents today. Come up with a list of adjectives. Do these adjectives fit into your original mission statement and brand strategy? Are they in accord with your day-to-day activities?

3. Then consider, in the past year, what projects you have executed most effectively as well as what types of clients or customers are most drawn to you. Notice any commonalities or patterns.

Remember, this is an internal audit. Understanding your strengths and weaknesses is a way to see where and how your company and brand strategy can improve. This is a tool that leads to the final product of a more specific, powerful and polished brand image.

4. Determine where your brand is heading. After looking at your present branding strategies and how they square up to your goals or the original vision of your brand, you might notice some disconnects or inconsistencies. These should now command the primary attention of your brand strategy. If they are positive changes that you want to pursue as the future of your brand – great! If they are weaknesses or unfulfilled promises, consider how your brand can change course.

How to identify your strengths and weaknesses in 5 steps5. Bring the internal audit into focus. Ask yourself:

• Is my client base expanding or contracting?
• Do my clients adequately represent the types of clients I want to pursue?
• Have I gained on or lost to my closest competitors recently? (key accounts, revenue, market share, etc.)
• Do people understand my brand?

Now, take some time to reevaluate. Regroup with your team and your ad agency and begin redrafting your brand strategy. You’ll soon find the effort worth the time.

Typically we are taught to be well balanced people by strengthening our weaknesses. Now I’m not saying this is a bad thing but our strengths often correlate with our passions. If we strengthen our strengths it can increase our happiness, productivity, experience, and abundance in life.

The first step to this months challenge is identify your strengths. Write a list of at least five skills and activities that come naturally to you.

Next evaluate these strengths/skills and narrow it down to what you would do daily even if no one paid you to do it.

Now evaluate what activities/skills you’re left with and brainstorm how you could monetize these skills. For example if colour co-ordination comes naturally to you, you may consider starting an …show more content…
You can help others by volunteering your time, donating money to a cause, or practicing small acts of kindness such as holding the door for someone else. Don’t give more than you are comfortable with, instead always give from your heart. Get creative, it doesn’t necessarily need to be a monetary object, you could give someone a complement or a silent blessing upon meeting. Release any expectations of receiving something in return, your karma will come back to you in unexpected ways. Practice giving every day this month.

“To give real service you must add something which cannot be bought or measured with money, and that is sincerity and integrity.” — Douglas Adams
Identifying your values makes it easier to decide how you want to live your life. Living your life in accordance with your values increases joy, intention, and continuity in all aspects of your life. Grab a piece of paper and make a long list of values you appreciate in others such as honesty, loyalty, generosity, and selflessness. Circle 5 values that you appreciate the most. Upon discovering your top values figure out ways in which you are currently living in accordance with these values and how you can use them …show more content…
As an added benefit you will absorb some vitamin D which can decrease the risk of feeling depressed. Try to get outside for at least ten minutes a day. You can sit, walk, or do errands. Be sure to practice safe sun exposure and apply sunscreen before you get outside!

“If you can ‘t be with yourself, you ‘ll never learn to be with anyone else.” — Kelly LeBrock

Take time to be with yourself completely. During your meditations turn on a timer and unplug; turn off your phone, computer, and TV, close your eyes and enjoy the silence. If you’re up for a challenge you could schedule one day a week where you completely unplug for the entire day! You will come back the next day fully recharged and ready to go.

“Sleep is the best meditation.” — Dalai