How to know which types of learning styles work for you

Students learn in different ways and this is known as their personal learning style . Some students prefer to look at and read new material (visual learners), some find it easier to listen (auditory learners), and some like to interact with, touch or move around when learning (kinesthetic or tactile learners).

When you know your preferred personal learning style you can take certain steps to adjust the material you need to learn.

If you are an auditory learner for example, listening to the mp3 chapters the book Amazing Grades may help you master the material more quickly.

IMPORTANT: School, with all its written tests, caters to highly visual learners. These students excel at test-taking because they turn what they read and hear into pictures in their mind, then recall those images faster during a test. Brain research supports this rapid image recall. Knowing that visual learners have an advantage at school, you can get the same advantage by adding some visual learning strategies to your preferred personal learning style. When you read, stop every little while and make images of what you just read. Add color and motion, then, during your tests, look up, see the images and turn those images back into words.

To find out your personal learning style take the free Personal Learning Styles Quiz.

There is an app that lets you email the results to your teacher and friends or place your results on social media sites to compare how you learn best with your friends and then talk about what that means in school or even in relationships. (Yes, your personal learning style affects your relationships too).

Put School in Perspective.

When you put school learning and grades in perspective, you realize that school can only measure specific types of success. Your grades alone do not determine who you really are because your intelligence and talents cannot be simply reduced to letters on a report card. That said, school is a place to develop certain habits that society believes will represent the type of person you are and can become. Your good grades indicate that you know how to organize your time, work together on a team, make tough decisions when needed, communicate well, relate parts to the whole, read, write, think, and a host of other “Bloom’s Taxonomy” skills. The habits it takes to produce good grades predict, in most people’s minds, whether you are prepared to enter the workforce or higher education equipped with positive and important skills that will serve you, and others, for a lifetime.

When you know your personal learning style you can begin to understand how you learn best. Building a strong foundation for learning begins with understanding your own personal learning style.

How to know which types of learning styles work for you

Pat Wyman is the author of several best selling books including Amazing Grades, Instant Learning for Amazing Grades, Learning vs. Testing, and co-author on two books about autism.

She is a college professor, reading and learning specialist and founder of HowToLearn.com, a website online since 1996 with nearly 2 million visitors a year. She invites you to take the free Learning Styles Quiz to find out how you learn best.

Wyman is known as America’s Most Trusted Learning Expert and is a frequent media guest. She specializes in helping students identify how they learn best by understanding their own personal learning style.

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What’s Your Learning Style? 20 Questions

Question 1 of 20

Auditory

If you are an auditory learner, you learn by hearing and listening. You understand and remember things you have heard. You store information by the way it sounds, and you have an easier time understanding spoken instructions than written ones. You often learn by reading out loud because you have to hear it or speak it in order to know it.

As an auditory learner, you probably hum or talk to yourself or others if you become bored. People may think you are not paying attention, even though you may be hearing and understanding everything being said.

Here are some things that auditory learners like you can do to learn better.

  • Sit where you can hear.
  • Have your hearing checked on a regular basis.
  • Use flashcards to learn new words; read them out loud.
  • Read stories, assignments, or directions out loud.
  • Record yourself spelling words and then listen to the recording.
  • Have test questions read to you out loud.
  • Study new material by reading it out loud.

Remember that you need to hear things, not just see things, in order to learn well.

Visual

If you are a visual learner, you learn by reading or seeing pictures. You understand and remember things by sight. You can picture what you are learning in your head, and you learn best by using methods that are primarily visual. You like to see what you are learning.

As a visual learner, you are usually neat and clean. You often close your eyes to visualize or remember something, and you will find something to watch if you become bored. You may have difficulty with spoken directions and may be easily distracted by sounds. You are attracted to color and to spoken language (like stories) that is rich in imagery.

Here are some things that visual learners like you can do to learn better:

  • Sit near the front of the classroom. (It won’t mean you’re the teacher’s pet!)
  • Have your eyesight checked on a regular basis.
  • Use flashcards to learn new words.
  • Try to visualize things that you hear or things that are read to you.
  • Write down key words, ideas, or instructions.
  • Draw pictures to help explain new concepts and then explain the pictures.
  • Color code things.
  • Avoid distractions during study times.

Remember that you need to see things, not just hear things, to learn well.

Tactile

If you are a tactile learner, you learn by touching and doing. You understand and remember things through physical movement. You are a “hands-on” learner who prefers to touch, move, build, or draw what you learn, and you tend to learn better when some type of physical activity is involved. You need to be active and take frequent breaks, you often speak with your hands and with gestures, and you may have difficulty sitting still.

As a tactile learner, you like to take things apart and put things together, and you tend to find reasons to tinker or move around when you become bored. You may be very well coordinated and have good athletic ability. You can easily remember things that were done but may have difficulty remembering what you saw or heard in the process. You often communicate by touching, and you appreciate physically expressed forms of encouragement, such as a pat on the back.

Here are some things that tactile learners like you can do to learn better:

Remember that you learn best by doing, not just by reading, seeing, or hearing.

Have you ever tried to teach someone something and had trouble getting through to them because it was clear that your learning styles were completely different?

Some people learn better through written instructions, while others learn better through verbal communication.

However, there are many types of learning styles, each of which works for different sorts of learners.

These are the eight types of learning styles.

8 Types Of Learning Styles

1. Linguistic Learning

Linguistic learning is accomplished through traditional means of a classroom environment, such as following along with a lecture, reading textbooks, and completing writing assignments that help to show understanding of the concepts.

As a linguistic learner, you can benefit from having the information communicated in as many ways as possible to help you retain it.

Getting a chance to write about previously unfamiliar concepts lets a linguistic learner prove their comprehension. You might not have a total grasp of something after only a few hours of instruction on it, but the more you put into learning about it, the more you can talk about it.

Even if you think you mostly understand something, it’s still good to engage with the material/speaker to help confirm that you’re seeing it as you’re meant to.

You can also be doing a favor for other linguistic learners in the room who might have similar questions but who are too shy to speak up.

2. Naturalistic Learning

You don’t have to always be out in the wilderness to be a naturalistic learner, but your tendencies will serve you well there. If you have a naturalistic learning style, you’re likely in or hoping to be in a career field that involves plenty of outdoor research, such as science.

Being outside appeals so much to naturalistic learners because it lets concepts really come alive.

In a world run by naturalistic learners, you might have every class conducted outside, but that would be inconvenient for many reasons. While you may learn best outdoors, it doesn’t mean you can’t learn in a classroom setting.

Even if you’re stuck inside, you can still enjoy the playground of learning that is the world.

As a naturalistic learner, don’t limit yourself to one particular setting. Outdoors might be best for you, but it’s not the only option.

3. Rhythmic Learning

We all march to the beat of our own drum, and that’s especially apt for rhythmic learners. If you’re a rhythmic learner, you learn best through sounds, including but not limited to music.

This doesn’t mean that any shrill sounds can be played and that your rhythmic-learning self will just accept it. You likely want to use things that are pleasing to your sensibilities without being too distracting, such as classical or jazz music. If music is too distracting, the ambient effects of an air conditioner could work.

You might be a rhythmic learner because you play music. All musicians, percussionists or otherwise, need to know rhythm in order for their music to sound appealing. While your career might not be music-focused, having music as a constant in your life and your learning can be very important.

If you play music, try to view every assignment like you would a new piece of music. When you sit down with sheet music, you need to know about what it’s like before you start playing. This includes seeing the time and key signatures as well as changes to either.

When you have a new task, apply similar principles. Should you need to edit a report, you could start by scanning over it to see how long it is and getting an idea of how many adjustments you’ll need to make. When you put on some music, it can help you follow the rhythm of the piece.

Whatever task you’re given, your goal should be to provide a quality final product like a musician would create a good song. The music you listen to can help by inspiring you to find your own sense of flow. As long as you’re keeping the rhythm steady and the notes clear, your rhythmic learning style should work.

4. Kinesthetic Learning

Kinesthetic learning is fairly similar to naturalistic learning because it too involves direct engagement with materials to help you understand something.

Many concepts require kinesthetic learning.

Being a kinesthetic learner means you can’t bluff your way through claiming to understand something that you barely do. If you’re learning from a carpenter, you should expect them to prove their expertise through how they use their tools and their finished project.

A benefit of this kind of learning is how it involves constant engagement with different senses, leaving little room for spacing out.

It can also break you out of a feeling of monotony that other kinds of learning might provide. With kinesthetic learning your mind has to be turned on and kept on.

5. Visual Learning

As a visual learner, words don’t help concepts come to mental fruition nearly as well as pictures and other visual aids.

Many fields involve things that can’t be seen directly and which are too dense for some people to understand just through linguistic means. That’s where visual learning comes in.

It would be hard to witness a dollar go up or down in value in real-time, just as it would be hard to witness the caloric content of food just by looking at it.

Visual aids can also lend more immediacy to an idea that needs to be communicated. Just telling people that a disease is spreading might not do a lot to interest them. However, if you provide a map that shows which areas have been affected and where it could hit next, people can understand a lot better.

It’s no secret that some of the most successful companies today are the ones that have fostered a diverse workforce. Over the years, studies have shown businesses that bring together people of different backgrounds, perspectives and talents result in a competitive edge and even higher profits.

While gender and ethnicity are critical components of diversity in the workforce, so too are learning and work styles. And as an organization attracts different types of learning styles and personality types, leadership teams need to understand how to adapt their management style to provide the best environment possible for each employee to succeed. That starts with developing a broader understanding of effective communication with workers who all process information and learn in different ways.

From visual to auditory, here’s a closer look at the different learning styles, along with some advice for managers and learning development professionals to communicate effectively with and encourage success for each type of learner.

Style 1: “The Student” (Visual & Verbal Learners)

This type of learner probably misses those big lecture hall classes from college, and thrives in a more holistic learning environment where they can both listen to and look at information. They learn best when supplementing a discussion with visual examples around key points or stats — such as charts, graphs, photos or a written outline. So, always be sure to take the time to run through things verbally and reinforce that conversation with some strong visual cues, in order to help them succeed.

This learner is great at doing research for projects and coming up with solutions, so don’t hesitate to assign them the in-depth work that comes up for your team. These learners also tend to do well at public speaking and writing, so you can also rely on them to present their findings. And finally, if you’re ever looking to recall a detail from a meeting, look to these learners: they are the most likely to have taken detailed notes that they will happily share with you.

Style 2: “The Independent” (Visual & Non-Verbal Learners)

A visual, non-verbal learner does best while alone in a quiet environment, and can get frustrated when there are too many meetings or discussions scheduled. They are excellent independent workers who can read and digest materials like documents, charts and graphs on their own — without much additional explanation or direction.

This type of learner tends to make excellent artists or graphic designers, and feels right at home in online or remote work situations. You should make yourself available to answer questions in those uncommon instances where that is needed, but try to avoid micromanaging them. Giving them space and independence to solve things own is the best way to manage them in most cases.

Style 3: “The Conversationalist” (Auditory & Verbal Learners)

As the name suggests, this type of learner is at their best during back-and-forth dialogue. They love to put coffee dates on your calendar to talk through their ideas — or stop by your desk for a quick chat on a problem. That said, they’re also often very good at writing responses and putting together reports after verbally hashing out the details.

Auditory learners also tend to feel more comfortable when there is background noise in their work environment — rather than a silent, static atmosphere. One easy tip to help them succeed is encouraging them to listen to music at work in order to help them concentrate. It’s also critical for this type of learner that you check-in with them in-person frequently to make sure they’re clear on expectations. After all, this type of learner performs best after talking things through, rather than reading long-winded instructions over email.

Style 4: “The Hands-on Learner” (Tactile & Kinesthetic)

These are the folks who learn best by doing. Tactile and kinesthetic learners can be tricky manage in certain work environments, since they primarily solve problems through methods like trial-and-error. The best management approach involves establishing a calm work environment where the hands-on learner feels supported to spread their wings and go tackle problems.

This worker may also come across as having nervous energy, and appear fidgety while listening or during a conversation. However, that can simply be related to how they tend to process information differently from other learners — only about five percent of the population learns this way.

When it comes to being a great mentor, there’s no silver bullet or one-size-fits-all approach that you can use on all the different types of learners. However, with a greater understanding and appreciation for differing perspectives, work habits, personality traits, and of course, learning styles — you can become a better leader and foster a more creative, productive, and inclusive working environment.

For more tools to support learning at your organization, visit Cornerstone Learning.

At every level of education, people have their preferences and methods which work best for them. To be able to maximize your learning abilities, it helps to understand what learning style is most efficient on an individual level. More often than not, people identify themselves as either auditory or visual learners. But if you were to ask, “what are the 7 different learning styles?” you will come to see that you may lean towards more than one style.

What Are Learning Styles?

Learning styles are the way by which students prefer to learn. One’s desired learning style is a factor of cognitive ability, emotions, and environmental factors.

In fact, many people actually tend to learn in similar ways, as in by seeing something in practice or listening to step-by-step instructions. For this reason, some experts are less likely to categorize learning into styles and are more apt to present it as different options that students can choose what works best for them.

How to know which types of learning styles work for you
Photo by Kelly Sikkema on Unsplash

The 7 Learning Styles

Theorist Neil Fleming coined VARK as a model for learning. VARK stands for: visual, auditory, reading/writing preference, and kinesthetic.

However, this model can be further expanded into the following 7 different learning styles:

1. Visual

Visual learners prefer to see things drawn out or in graphs to understand concepts. If you like to doodle, draw, or create mind maps, it’s likely that you’re a visual learner. Visual learners use images and symbols to connect concepts and be able to see relationships between ideas. It’s common for people who become architects, designers, engineers, and project managers to prefer this style of learning.

2. Auditory

This style is also known as aural or auditory-musical. Such learners like to listen and hear information in order to process it optimally. Those who lean towards aural learning are able to notice the nuances between pitch and tone. Some professions that bode well for auditory learners include: musicians, speech pathologists, sound engineers, and language teachers.

3. Verbal

If you love words and writing, you’re likely a verbal learner. Linguistic learners enjoy reading and writing and enjoy word play. Some techniques that verbal learners employ to soak up information could include role playing and using mnemonic devices. Verbal learners are likely to become writers or journalists or work in politics and administration roles.

4. Physical

Kinesthetic or physical learners are hands-on. Rather than watching a demo or listening to directions, physical learners like to perform the task. Some careers that are well-suited for kinesthetic learners include: EMTs, physical education, or working in the entertainment industry as singers or actors.

5. Logical

Logical learners have a mathematical brain. They can recognize patterns easily and connect concepts. To understand ideas, they prefer to group them into categories. Logical learners are most often found in math-related professions, like accounting, bookkeeping, computer science, or research.

6. Social

Social learners are known as interpersonal learners. They can communicate well both verbally and non-verbally. Social learners have a distinctive sensitivity and an empathetic nature. This is why they often work in social fields that help others, like counseling, coaching, or teaching. Social learners tend to also thrive in a sales environment because it relies on interpersonal connections.

7. Solitary

Intrapersonal learners like their solitude. When you think of this type of learner, you can imagine an author or researcher who spends a lot of time with their own thoughts and works best with the least distractions.

Summary Of The 7 Learning Styles

As you can see from learning about these styles, you may find yourself fitting into more than one of the above. As mentioned, most people do align as visual or auditory learners, but there are certain situations in which one learning style can help maximize the ability to process new information.

What Type Of Learner Are You?

If you’re interested in learning more about the type of learner you are, you can take online assessments and quizzes that offer insight. Through a series of questions, these assessments analyze your responses to identify your preferential learning style.

How To Apply This Knowledge In Your Learning Routine

If you’re currently a student, you may be able to find ways to leverage your learning style in practice. Even if you have graduated already, you can use your learning style in the workplace as well.

For example, if you’re an auditory learner, it could be a good idea to create songs about information to better recall facts.

Or, if you prefer to learn visually, then you can create visual presentations or mind maps. As a solitary learner, you can ensure you set up a quiet space to study, or if you’re more of a social learner, you can create a study group with peers.

How to know which types of learning styles work for you
Photo by Austin Distel on Unsplash

How To Learn Online Successfully

No matter what type of learner you are, you can apply your learning style to study online. In fact, online colleges are growing in popularity because they are self-paced, flexible, and more affordable than traditional on-campus colleges.

With resources online, you can choose how you learn best by applying your learning style to the course’s material. This holds true for the University of the People, which boasts a diverse student population from over 200 countries and territories who have varying learning styles and preferences.

However, no matter your learning style, UoPeople sets you up for success by providing you with a quality education that is filled with a curriculum that provides you with all you need to know to work in your field of choice.

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What’s Your Learning Style? 20 Questions

Question 1 of 20

Auditory

If you are an auditory learner, you learn by hearing and listening. You understand and remember things you have heard. You store information by the way it sounds, and you have an easier time understanding spoken instructions than written ones. You often learn by reading out loud because you have to hear it or speak it in order to know it.

As an auditory learner, you probably hum or talk to yourself or others if you become bored. People may think you are not paying attention, even though you may be hearing and understanding everything being said.

Here are some things that auditory learners like you can do to learn better.

  • Sit where you can hear.
  • Have your hearing checked on a regular basis.
  • Use flashcards to learn new words; read them out loud.
  • Read stories, assignments, or directions out loud.
  • Record yourself spelling words and then listen to the recording.
  • Have test questions read to you out loud.
  • Study new material by reading it out loud.

Remember that you need to hear things, not just see things, in order to learn well.

Visual

If you are a visual learner, you learn by reading or seeing pictures. You understand and remember things by sight. You can picture what you are learning in your head, and you learn best by using methods that are primarily visual. You like to see what you are learning.

As a visual learner, you are usually neat and clean. You often close your eyes to visualize or remember something, and you will find something to watch if you become bored. You may have difficulty with spoken directions and may be easily distracted by sounds. You are attracted to color and to spoken language (like stories) that is rich in imagery.

Here are some things that visual learners like you can do to learn better:

  • Sit near the front of the classroom. (It won’t mean you’re the teacher’s pet!)
  • Have your eyesight checked on a regular basis.
  • Use flashcards to learn new words.
  • Try to visualize things that you hear or things that are read to you.
  • Write down key words, ideas, or instructions.
  • Draw pictures to help explain new concepts and then explain the pictures.
  • Color code things.
  • Avoid distractions during study times.

Remember that you need to see things, not just hear things, to learn well.

Tactile

If you are a tactile learner, you learn by touching and doing. You understand and remember things through physical movement. You are a “hands-on” learner who prefers to touch, move, build, or draw what you learn, and you tend to learn better when some type of physical activity is involved. You need to be active and take frequent breaks, you often speak with your hands and with gestures, and you may have difficulty sitting still.

As a tactile learner, you like to take things apart and put things together, and you tend to find reasons to tinker or move around when you become bored. You may be very well coordinated and have good athletic ability. You can easily remember things that were done but may have difficulty remembering what you saw or heard in the process. You often communicate by touching, and you appreciate physically expressed forms of encouragement, such as a pat on the back.

Here are some things that tactile learners like you can do to learn better:

Remember that you learn best by doing, not just by reading, seeing, or hearing.

How to know which types of learning styles work for youLearning styles refer to differences in how people learn based on their preferences, strengths and weaknesses. The differences may pertain to various elements of the learning process such as taking in, comprehending, memorizing and recollecting information.

Many observations suggest that the learning process is most effective when it is in line with our learning style preferences. Therefore, from a practical standpoint, it is useful to know which learning methods are likely to be most effective for us, to help us acquire knowledge quickly and effectively. And if you are an educator, being aware of your students’ learning styles can help you implement a teaching approach most suitable for your particular group.

There are many ways of classifying learning styles that draw from different theories: theories of intelligence, experiential theories (Kolb, 1984), sensory modalities (the VARK model – Fleming & Mills, 1992), cognitive styles, or psychological types. A prominent psychological type theory is Jung’s theory of psychological types, popularized by Briggs Myers, a Jungian theorist; let’s take a look how a person’s preferences in terms of Jung’s and Briggs Myers’ approach to personality type may influence learning styles:

  • The preference of general attitude – extraverted (E) vs. introverted (I) – reflects the direction of an individual’s general interest and, as such, indicates where their interests and motivation lie. An introvert’s motivation and interests primarily stem from and are driven by their inner world, whereas an extravert is primarily motivated by the world outside of themselves, and most of their interests are externally focused.
  • People with the intuition (N) preference perceive the world and think in broader categories, whereas sensing (S) individuals perceive the world and think about things in a more concrete, direct way.
  • People with the feeling (F) preference tend to judge and respond to events based on their feelings, whereas people with the thinking (T) preference tend to do it based on reason and logic.
  • People with the judging (J) preference comprehend information in a more structured way and are likely to prefer a more systematic and structured learning process, whereas people with the perceiving (P) preference might favor a less rigid, more heuristic approach to learning and might prefer a trial-and-error method of comprehending information.

Consequently, personality type preferences may affect an individual’s motivation and interest when it comes to learning and studying, and the ease (or difficulty) with which they take in, process and recollect information. As a result, whether or not the learning format, process, environment, and the presentation of the material are in line with an individual’s personality type preferences may help or hinder their learning.

The following are learning style descriptions for the 16 personality types based on Jung’s E-I, S-N, and T-F dichotomies, as well as the J-P relationship (Briggs Myers emphasized the importance of seeing it as a fourth dichotomy influencing personality type).

Learning Styles

ESTJ ISTJ ENTJ INTJ
ESTP ISTP ENTP INTP
ESFJ ISFJ ENFJ INFJ
ESFP ISFP ENFP INFP

We hope that these learning style descriptions can help further research on the specifics and effectiveness of using this approach to learning styles in education to benefit both students and educators.

What is your personality type? Take the Test!

Published: 15th May 2015

As a project manager you will have worked with many different types of people, all whom learn in very different ways. Part of your job in achieving a successful project outcome is to recognise the potential in those working in your project team, and work around any issues or weaknesses they may have. Every project is a new learning experience so you also owe it to yourself to understand how you best absorb information, because the role of a project manager involves a continuous learning journey – every day. So if you want to get the best out of yourself and your team, it is important to understand different learning styles.

Here’s a basic overview:

  • Visual – a person who learns in this way learns best seeing pictures and images and has a good spatial understanding. They benefit from diagrams, role play and visual demonstrations.
  • Aural – a person who learns this way learns best with sound. So spoken explanations of processes, rhythmic team building games and conversational brainstorming works well for this learning style.
  • Verbal – a person who learns this way likes to use words and writing to explain their thoughts and feelings. They would benefit from using textbooks, blogs and essays as learning sources, and using written diagrams and graphs to explain information.
  • Physical – a person who learns this way likes to use their body and hands to learn and to explain. So role play is an important tool for physical learners.
  • Logical – a person who learns this way will be able to completely understand complex methodologies and processes, as well as data spreadsheets and graphs. They may struggle to think ‘outside of the box’ and needs structured, A to B learning in order to grasp information.
  • Social – a person who learns this way is an excellent team player and their best ideas will come out during team meetings or when working with another person.
  • Solitary – a person who works this way works best alone and likes to take control of their own learning. A solitary learner does well with individual tasks and responsibilities and may struggle to share a workload.

Knowing the different types of learning styles is one thing, the skill is in recognising what type of learner a person is and, of course, we all have a little bit of each type within us. But a little critical observation of your own learning styles will help you understand how you absorb information best, which will benefit the speed and efficiency in which you take on information. It will also help you make the most of your project management training. With others, a good level of observation will help you recognise how your team learns. You may notice some are more forthright in group workshops and others seem to hit targets at speed when they work alone. Paying attention to these working styles is important so you can make the best of yourself, and your team.

How to know which types of learning styles work for you

As educators, we know all students have different learning styles. Some students are auditory learners, some are kinesthetic learners, and some are visual learners. The more engaged a student is in their learning, the more likely he or she is to succeed in the classroom. As an educator, the first step is to have the knowledge and understanding of the various learning styles and then provide your students with a variety of learning experiences to meet their individual needs. Here are three tips to guide you.

Know the Different Learning Styles in Your Class

Take a moment and visualize an ordinary kindergarten classroom. More than likely, some students are focused on the content and others are looking around, fidgeting with their clothes, or talking to a friend about what’s for lunch. I’ve learned that it can be hard to get a whole classroom of kindergartners engaged in a lesson, asking questions, discussing, and excited to participate because students learn in different ways. Some students need to move around, some need visuals, and some may need a catchy song or phrase to learn the content.

As a kindergarten teacher, I’m constantly aware of how I’m presenting the kindergarten curriculum. My students have various learning abilities and some have special education needs. In order for them to meet the learning goals and/or objectives of each lesson, I must constantly be aware of how the information is presented. At the beginning of the year, I always spend the first two weeks of school getting to know my students. This helps me understand their interests, learning styles, and needs in order to create meaningful, highly engaging lessons.

Provide an Uncommon Experience

Dave Burgess, the author of Teach Like a Pirate, writes, “Provide an uncommon experience for your students and they will reward you with an uncommon effort and attitude.” As a kindergarten teacher, I follow this advice when it comes to meeting the various learning styles of my students. For example, I was able to cater to the different learning styles of my students by creating an uncommon experience and transforming my classroom into a spy headquarters. In this lesson, my students were actively engaged in reviewing skills that were previously taught at the beginning of the year. All the skills in this lesson were aligned with our reading and math curriculum. These concepts included: beginning sounds, uppercase to lowercase matching, and number identification using mathematical concepts like tally marks, base ten blocks, fingers, and ten frames.

Let Them Work at Their Own Pace and Use a Multisensory Approach

I’ve learned that regardless of their learning style, students learn best when you give them the freedom to work at their own pace and provide a number of hands-on, multisensory activities. This high level of engagement will help hold their attention and keep them focused on the task at hand—even if there are distractions.

I try to plan activities that are well-suited for auditory, kinesthetic, and visual learners. During our spy headquarters activity, for instance, students were able to freely move around the room from activity to activity while using various colors and songs to complete a series of reading and mathematics activities. This allowed them to work at their own pace and receive any necessary one-on-one support to meet their learning needs.

The next time you plan a lesson or activity for your students, take these helpful tips and tricks into consideration when thinking about the different learning styles in your classroom. Start by setting aside time to really understand the different learning needs of your students. Then foster engagement by providing a unique experience, allowing them plenty of time to complete activities, and taking a multisensory approach.