How to limit bandwidth usage on your roku

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Stop Roku from Streaming to Reduce Internet Usage

Stop Roku from Streaming to Reduce Internet Usage

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Thu Dec 28, 2017 1:11 pm

Re: Stop Roku from Streaming to Reduce Internet Usage

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Thu Dec 28, 2017 1:28 pm

Re: Stop Roku from Streaming to Reduce Internet Usage

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Thu Dec 28, 2017 1:51 pm

Basil
https://www.basilsblog.com/
Roku Ultra (4660)
Apple TV (5th gen), TiVo

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Re: Stop Roku from Streaming to Reduce Internet Usage

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Thu Dec 28, 2017 2:03 pm

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Thu Dec 28, 2017 2:23 pm

Re: Stop Roku from Streaming to Reduce Internet Usage

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Thu Dec 28, 2017 2:58 pm

I started using my Roku’s powered off of the USB port on my TVs and the ports are all switched which means the Rokus shut down completely when the TV is off. I have been paying attention to it and there have been no ill effects and the Rokus have been checking for updates and keeping updated with the newest software.

So the whole idea of leaving it on all the time is unnecessary, IMO. It’s fine with it being shut off when not in use. But I would also agree that as long as you stopped what you were streaming or (better yet) go to the Home screen, it shouldn’t use much bandwidth anyway.

Re: Stop Roku from Streaming to Reduce Internet Usage

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Thu Dec 28, 2017 6:34 pm

I started using my Roku’s powered off of the USB port on my TVs and the ports are all switched which means the Rokus shut down completely when the TV is off. I have been paying attention to it and there have been no ill effects and the Rokus have been checking for updates and keeping updated with the newest software.

So the whole idea of leaving it on all the time is unnecessary, IMO. It’s fine with it being shut off when not in use. But I would also agree that as long as you stopped what you were streaming or (better yet) go to the Home screen, it shouldn’t use much bandwidth anyway.

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Thu Dec 28, 2017 7:23 pm

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Thu Dec 28, 2017 8:20 pm

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Thu Dec 28, 2017 10:55 pm

Heh not even sure how they get the stored energy to deliver enough sustained amperage while (I assume) stepping up USB 5V to 12V to drive the Roku. Then again, wasn’t there an old thread about someone running a Roku 3 directly from 5V?

Otherwise you figure that the Roku 3 PS would be capable of delivering 4-5x the power output of a standard USB 2.0 port. Though, perhaps the Roku draws much lower for most operations.

Anyways I seem to recall while using this adapter on a couple of TV’s, that doing certain repeated operations would sometimes cause the screen to start flickering (insufficient power) until a reboot.

Re: Stop Roku from Streaming to Reduce Internet Usage

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Fri Dec 29, 2017 6:39 am

I started using my Roku’s powered off of the USB port on my TVs and the ports are all switched which means the Rokus shut down completely when the TV is off. I have been paying attention to it and there have been no ill effects and the Rokus have been checking for updates and keeping updated with the newest software.

So the whole idea of leaving it on all the time is unnecessary, IMO. It’s fine with it being shut off when not in use. But I would also agree that as long as you stopped what you were streaming or (better yet) go to the Home screen, it shouldn’t use much bandwidth anyway.

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“mmajunkie7” wrote:
Hey guys, basically I’m wondering why my roommate’s roku is taking up all of our data. I have a 300gb data plan through Cable One. I’ve just received my 3rd and final notice stating that we’ve gone over our data plan. Now I purposely stopped playing Xbox online, and I only download maybe 3-4 movies and tv shows each a week. The roommate and I have different days off from work, so I decided to check the data usage on our days off. When the roku is not in use, it still takes up data, but just not as much as when its in use. On his days off, the roku will stream around 25gb A DAY! How is this possible? Does anybody have any suggestions on what I could do to significantly lower our data usage? I believe he has a Roku 2. He also states that before he lived here, he was using AT&T and the house had about 5 rokus going at once and they never reached their data limit and the bill was always $30. I apologize if this thread is in the wrong section. Any help would be greatly appreciated, thank you!

If he’s watching in HD, he’s using about 3GB/hour, so if he’s streaming for 8 hours, that would get you to 25GB/day. You can set the Roku to lower quality, and you can set some individual channels to use a lower quality stream as well (Netflix is especially good at this).

This isn’t limited to Roku; anything you’re streaming with will pull down this much.

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“mmajunkie7” wrote:
Hey guys, basically I’m wondering why my roommate’s roku is taking up all of our data. I have a 300gb data plan through Cable One. I’ve just received my 3rd and final notice stating that we’ve gone over our data plan. Now I purposely stopped playing Xbox online, and I only download maybe 3-4 movies and tv shows each a week. The roommate and I have different days off from work, so I decided to check the data usage on our days off. When the roku is not in use, it still takes up data, but just not as much as when its in use. On his days off, the roku will stream around 25gb A DAY! How is this possible? Does anybody have any suggestions on what I could do to significantly lower our data usage? I believe he has a Roku 2. He also states that before he lived here, he was using AT&T and the house had about 5 rokus going at once and they never reached their data limit and the bill was always $30. I apologize if this thread is in the wrong section. Any help would be greatly appreciated, thank you!

Roku, like any device, doesn’t care if anyone is watching, or if the TV’s on or off. It’s a machine.

If the Roku is actually using that much data, it’s because it’s streaming. Is your roommate starting the Roku device, turning off the TV and leaving, and thinking the Roku has stopped streaming? Because, in this scenario, it’s still streaming.

By the way, how are you certain it’s the Roku? I’m not doubting that your data usage isn’t excessive, but you haven’t posted anything that indicates it’s the Roku. How do you conclude it’s the Roku?

Basil
https://www.basilsblog.com/
Roku Ultra (4660)
Apple TV (5th gen), TiVo

Previous:
Roku boxes from every generation.
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Roku taking up too much data

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Roku taking up too much data

Tue Feb 16, 2016 1:14 pm

Re: Roku taking up too much data

Tue Feb 16, 2016 1:18 pm

If he’s watching in HD, he’s using about 3GB/hour, so if he’s streaming for 8 hours, that would get you to 25GB/day. You can set the Roku to lower quality, and you can set some individual channels to use a lower quality stream as well (Netflix is especially good at this).

This isn’t limited to Roku; anything you’re streaming with will pull down this much.

Re: Roku taking up too much data

Tue Feb 16, 2016 1:20 pm

Roku, like any device, doesn’t care if anyone is watching, or if the TV’s on or off. It’s a machine.

If the Roku is actually using that much data, it’s because it’s streaming. Is your roommate starting the Roku device, turning off the TV and leaving, and thinking the Roku has stopped streaming? Because, in this scenario, it’s still streaming.

By the way, how are you certain it’s the Roku? I’m not doubting that your data usage isn’t excessive, but you haven’t posted anything that indicates it’s the Roku. How do you conclude it’s the Roku?

Basil
https://www.basilsblog.com/
Roku Ultra (4660)
Apple TV (5th gen), TiVo

Previous:
Roku boxes from every generation.
Apple TV (2nd, 3rd, 4th gen)

Limiting bandwidth available to specific device(s) on MikroTik routers.

Having moved back to the Texas Hill Country, I’m on an LTE internet connection for both work and home, forcing me to be more cautious with my bandwidth consuption. This was driven by my inability to limit bandwith / video quality when using the Amazon Prime Video client on a Roku 3 — a 45 minute episode of Justified burned about 1.25GB of data.

Unlike Netflix, I could find no mechanism with which I could limit video quality on Prime Video, either on the Roku 3 client on in my Amazon account. These notes document my forray into brute-force bandwidth throttling for Prime Video on a Roku 3.

Monitoring Bandwidth

I’m using a MikroTik OmniTik 5 ac router / access point. For an inexpensive piece of equipment, it offers some tremendous functionality. Relevant in this context is it’s support for Cisco’s NetFlow, which can stream network performance/protocol/endpoint information to a remote monitoring system for subsequent display/analysis.

For a monitoring system, I chose to use ntop (not ntopng ), as it was the easiest to get running via macports .

Configuring ntop

I installed ntop via macports . After installation, I ran it via the following command:

It can be configured via macports to start as a service at boot time.

Once it’s running, it can be accessed via browser at http://localhost:3000 .

Using the web interface, configure ntop to accept NetFlow data from the MikroTik:

  • Plugins->NetFlow->Activate
  • Plugins->NetFlow->Configure->AddNetFlowDevice
    • Enter MikroTik as the NetFlow Device , click Set Interface Name
    • Enter 2055 as the Local Collector UDP Port , click Set Port
    • Enter the MikroTik router’s address/netmask as the Virtual NetFlow Interface Network Addres , click Set Interface Address .
  • Admin->SwitchNIC , click NetFlow device

At this point, ntop is listening for NetFlow data on port 2055 .

Configuring the MikroTik Router

Although I have an OmniTik router, these instructions will apply to any MikroTik router running RouterOS 6 . Enter the following RouterOS commands via ssh or WinBox:

The IP address shown is that of the machine running ntop .

Using ntop to Monitor Bandwidth/Traffic

Once RouterOS is configured, data should appear in ntop . If it doesn’t, check Utils->ViewLog for possible hints about the problem.

Using ntop is simple. For example, browsing to browsing to IP->Summary->Traffic will display bandwidth usage by IP. Within the Network Traffic page, clicking on an IP will display detailed information about traffic to/from the IP.

Controlling Bandwidth

I am new to RouterOS; it’s quite possible there are better ways to accomplish my goal.

Apparently the key to any of the bandwith limiting mechanisms is the fasttrack feature. When fasttrack is enabled, many portions of the typical packet flow within the switch are bypassed. This seemingly includes bandwidth control, among many other things. This explains why a number of my early attempts at controlling bandwidth failed.

Disable fasttrack

The first step, then, is to disable fasttrack . This can reduce router performance due to the increased packet processing overhead, but my network is lightly used overall and I had to find some way to control bandwidth. To disable fasttrack , run the command /ip firewall filter print and look for the rule that starts ;;; defconf: fasttrack . In my case, it was rule #7.

To disable fasttrack , disable it’s firewall rule via: /ip firewall filter disable numbers=7 .

There are at least two ways to control bandwidth by IP. One involves the creation of a Queue which is linked to the IP. The other involves using DHCP settings to limit bandwidth. I chose the latter because either approach involves ensuring the target device has a stable static IP.

Limit Bandwidth via DHCP

I chose 256Kb/s as a starting point; this is about 115MB/hour. This represents at least a ten-fold decrease in bandwidth utilization for APV. I found that NetFlix would function at even lower rates but that Prime Video would not. This setting provides a suitably pixelated image on both services, making it apparent that bandwidth is being throttled.

I should point out that this approach throttles bandwidth to anything accessing the network from the Roku — Prime Video, Netflix, HULU, whatever. — it’s a pretty blunt instrument.

Find the IP and MAC of the device you wish to rate limit. In my case, the Roku had already been on the network and had a DHCP lease. Find it by:

Use the IP and MAC from the previous step and change it to a static IP and set a rate limit:

Although I’m using ntop to monitor bandwidth conumption overall long-term, it leaves a little to be desired if one is tweaking RouterOS settings and looking for near-real-time data. RouterOS can help here. Graphs are available in both WinBox and the web interface. I actually prefer the web interface for this as the axes are well labeled, whereas there are no units labels on the WinBox graphs.

With the RouterOS in WebFig mode, click on ‘Interfaces’, choose the relevant interface, and scroll to the bottom of the page for real-time bandwidth graphs. I haven’t been able to find a built-in way to graph bandwidth for IP addresses.

Note that when looking at an individual interface, the ‘Overall Stats’ tab shows cumulative Tx/Rx data. It also allows the counters to be reset. Depending upon your situation, this may be all you need, allowing one to dispense with ntop .

I expect to add a Plex client to the Roku in a month or so. At that time, I’ll have to revisit this plan. Granting the Roku unlimited bandwidth when accessing a local Plex server may require revisiting the use of Queues.

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The first step to keeping your data usage in check is to understand what is using a lot of data and what isn’t. For example, checking your email—if even if you check it four hundred times a day—isn’t going to make a dent in a 1TB data package. But streaming videos over YouTube all day will, of course.

It’s the gray area that confuses most people: Facebook, Instagram, and the like. And the issue here is that there isn’t really a clear answer on what’s “safe” and what isn’t, because it’s all defined by how you actually use these types of networks.

For example, if you scroll through Facebook and watch every video that auto-plays in your feed, guess what? You’re likely going to chew through a reasonable amount of data doing so. The same goes for Instagram.

If, however, you keep auto-playing videos disabled and selectively pick and choose the content you want to watch, you’ll likely save yourself a lot of unnecessarily used data. That said, if you’re a heavy Facebook or Instagram user, you can readily chew through several gigabytes of data per week just looking at photos. It’s actually shocking how much data you can use just thumbing through Instagram (though it probably won’t set you over unless you have a remarkably small data usage plan).

So, the loose rule here on what uses the most data down to the least when it comes to common social networks: video uses the most, by far. Music falls in the middle, and photos are going to be the smallest. Text-only, of course, is hardly even worth a mention, which is where regular web browsing falls in this line. Most of the time, just normal web use that doesn’t involve video or heavy photo viewing isn’t going to be something that makes a difference.

But since video is so prevalent on the web these days—especially if you’ve ditched cable in favor of Netflix and YouTube—let’s talk about how to save a bit of bandwidth without dramatically changing your habits.

Streaming Video: Limit Your Resolution and Bandwidth

If you stream a lot of video—be that Netflix, YouTube, Amazon Prime, or a TV-streaming service like Sling—that’s most likely going to be your biggest data hog. The good news is that you can do a few things to help reduce the amount of data you’re pulling down by watching videos.

For reference, however, let’s take a quick look at Netflix data use:

  • For SD (standard definition) video, Netflix uses around 0.7 GB an hour
  • For HD (High Definition 1080p) video, Netflix uses around 3 GB an hour
  • For UHD (Ultra High Definition 4K), Netflix uses around 7 GB an hour

You can see how that could make a dent in your data package pretty quickly.

Consider Powering off your Streaming Box when it is not in use and Keep it’s Firmware Updated

As some of our customers have already discovered not all streaming boxes are the same and some will still stream video even when your TV is off or even when the streaming box was supposedly in sleep mode.

We had a customer use over 2TB (2,000 GB) in a month due to an AppleTV with outdated firmware and it continued to stream even in sleep mode. This was a known issue which we found on AppleTV forums.

Reduce the Output Resolution of Your Streaming Box

In a world where 4K video is becoming more and more common, it’s hard to stomach the idea of going backwards, but as noted above, the higher the video output, the more data it’s going to use. So, if you use a streaming box—like Roku, Fire TV, Apple TV, or Android TV—then you might be able to limit your output on the box level, so all services that run on that box will be restricted to the resolution you choose.

So, if you’re currently streaming everything in 4K, maybe drop it back down to 1080p. I know, I know—there’s a reason you bought a 4K TV and all that, but maybe reserve your 4K watching to physical discs, yeah?

Similarly, if you’re already streaming at 1080p, you could switch over to 720p, which (to my eyes at least) is an even tougher pill to swallow. I don’t notice a dramatic difference between 4K and 1080p, but the jump back down to 720 is a hard one—at least on my TV at my viewing distance. Your situation may vary, and if it saves bandwidth and keeps your from going over your cap, it may be one that’s worth it. This is all about tradeoffs, after all.

When it comes to switching up the resolution, it will depend on which set-top box you have, but here’s the long and short of it on the most common boxes:

  • Roku: Settings > Display Type
  • Fire TV: Settings > Display & Sounds > Display > Video Resolution
  • Apple TV: Settings > Video and Audio > Resolution
  • Android TV: Settings > Display & Sound > Resolution

While some boxes may not let you drop all the way down to 720p if you’re not using a 720p TV (like NVIDIA SHIELD, for example), you’ll have to “lie” and tell others—like Roku—that your TV is a 720p set.

It’s also worth mentioning that if you can’t limit your streaming box down from 4K, you may try plugging it into another HDMI port on your TV. Only certain ports will support 4K streaming content because of HDCP [(High-bandwidth Digital Content Protection) is a form of Digital Rights Management (DRM)], so if your box is currently connected to one of those ports, you can easily limit it by switching to another port that doesn’t have HDCP (even if it’s another 4K port). Check out the HDCP section of this post by howtogeek.com.

Reduce the Output Resolution on Your Streaming Services

If you only stream video on one TV, then changing it on your box is probably good enough. But if you have multiple TVs (or other streaming sources, like phones), then you may want to limit bandwidth on the account level.

Most streaming services should offer a pretty easy way to do this— Netflix and Sling do, and most others should also offer this as a feature. The primary one worth noting here is YouTube, which doesn’t appear to have a blanket setting of “always play videos at XX resolution,” where you can absolutely control other services in this way.

On Netflix, for reference, this setting is handled on a per-profile basis. So to change it, you’ll jump into Settings > My Profile > Playback Settings. From there, pick your preferred data usage setting. (Note, however, that the settings are not as granular as changing the settings on your box—Netflix, for example, only offers 4K, 1080p, and SD options—no 720p). If you want to prevent 4K content on your Netflix account do not purchase the Premium Plan; this will limit you to two simultaneous streams vs four, but it will never switch to 4K which uses 57% more data than HD (1080p) per hour (7GB vs 3GB).

11 October 2019

It’ll stop playing if nobody moves the remote after 4 hours

Data caps enforced by your Internet Service Provider are a serious pain. We live in a world in which app updates can reach hundreds of megabytes. OS updates can be several gigabytes. And data-intensive 4K video isn’t getting any less popular.

And monthly bandwidth caps are still a thing.

It’s not unusual — at least here in the United States — to see artificial 1-terabyte caps placed on your monthly usage. Not like there’s a finite amount of data to be used out there, or anything.

Anyway. Roku knows this and has a new feature to help out a little. Roku OS 9.2 adds a new “bandwidth saver” feature. That’s actually kind of a misnomer — it’s more of a data saver in that it’ll stop whatever’s streaming if, after 4 hours, nobody has touched the remote control. That’ll be less of a problem for things like Netflix (which has a home menu to go back to) than it will for the live-streaming services like YouTube TV and Hulu Live.

But the point is taken. If nobody’s watching, no sense in potentially “wasting” data — and possibly causing you to go over your monthly allowance. (There’s another side-effect in that this may give Roku more accurate numbers about how much people are watching, though I wouldn’t expect its quarterly reported streaming hours — which were up 72 percent year over year in Q2 2019 — to decline anytime soon.)

The new “bandwidth saver” is turned on by default in Roku OS 9.2. Here’s the fine print on what it does:

If you haven’t used the remote in 4 hours, a message will display asking you if you’re still watching. If there is no response the channel will stop streaming and save your network bandwidth.

To turn off the “bandwidth saver” setting (though we’re not really sure why you’d want to) go to Settings -> Network -> Bandwidth saver and uncheck the box. Do note that this works both on Roku players and Roku TV, though the latter also has its own power scheme that can shut off the entire television if nobody’s watching.

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I already have netflix on my TV and understand that setting it to “good” quality will only burn about 300mb per hour.

I just ordered a Roku 2 box and it should arrive this week. I can not find any reliable information through google searches regarding how much this device uses per hour and if there is any way to downgrade the video quality to save bandwidth.

I have a hard cap of 100gb per month on my internet plan. I will be the only one viewing (no kids watching 24/7) and my typical viewing habits are 2 hours of use per night +/-

I saw a google post saying programs on Roku have a “star” system that tells you what the use will be. I’m wondering if you can select your quality or if you have to stream it at what is offered.

I realize that if I watch 2 hrs a night @1gb per hour I will only use 60gb a month but I have some other data intensive internet uses during the day that typically end up using 20 to 30gb per month.

Any idea on the typical mb per hour?

It will depend upon the provider within Roku. With Acorntv, I can select different quality settings. I typically select 4 star instead of 5, because the audio and images can become separated with fast action otherwise. (Exede satellite)

I generally do a couple hours at night after midnight to an old VCR for watching the following day. That shows as about 30 gig on my router over a month.

What’s you connection speed now? if it’s only 1 to 2 Mbps then I wouldn’t even worry about it, see below.

The Roku is only going to use whatever settings you have in the Netflix account or any subscription services you have.

I just ordered a Roku 2 box and it should arrive this week. I can not find any reliable information through google searches regarding how much this device uses per hour and if there is any way to downgrade the video quality to save bandwidth.

Seems there is hidden screen for limiting, sequence on remote for accessing it:
Home 5x >> REW 3x >> FF 2x

Any idea on the typical mb per hour?

Thanks guys. I was leery about busting my cap but it seems as if I may be able to control it. I am looking forward to trying the Roku player. I am not a heavy user of television but do enjoy quality shows from time to time.

I am planning to monitor the use over two months and see where I am and then adjust as needed. I am hoping to drop netflix streaming and go to Roku free TV channels 100%.

Thanks guys. I was leery about busting my cap but it seems as if I may be able to control it. I am looking forward to trying the Roku player. I am not a heavy user of television but do enjoy quality shows from time to time.

I am planning to monitor the use over two months and see where I am and then adjust as needed. I am hoping to drop netflix streaming and go to Roku free TV channels 100%.

Not sure on the PBS channel, but Smithsonian only has a few dozen shows at once. Not sure how often they rotate them out with new ones though.

We don’t have cable at all, but we get all of the major channels OTA. We do use Roku on all of the TVs, and have Netflix, Hulu Plus, and Amazon Prime. Between those we can get pretty much anything that we care about watching.

So, after switching to just ROKU almost a year ago, what are your thoughts? I just eliminated by cable last week and have been playing with the free channels on Roku and am pretty impressed so far but I was not much of a TV watcher anyways. I think I am actually watching a little more right now trying to learn what I like on the Roku. I mostly just watched a little news before, CNBC, some HGTV programs and a few re-runs at night when I wanted to veg out and forget about work at night.

Did anyone ever figure out if there is a way to easily figure out how many gigabytes are being used? My husband watches a lot of old movies and I’d like to learn how to track it as my internet usage for my plan allows 250 gigabytes. I haven’t subscribed to anything yet but I imagine once I do. he’ll watch even more.

User Experience simply refers to a user’s interaction with your website. How can you deliver the best possible user experience? By making the flow as natural and intuitive as possible. A website has good UX if it’s easy to use and meets the needs of the user.

For an e-commerce website, a great user experience is essential if you want your customer to:

  • Make a purchase
  • Return to your website
  • Recommend it to others

User Experience is arguably the single most important thing in e-Commerce. A functionally rich website coupled with ease use leaves the user with a “good experience”. But is that all? No, consider on how to limit bandwidth usage & load speed. If Amazon were to have amazing design, great functionality and superb user experience but couldn’t load fast enough, would you stay? In all probability, no. Website load speed is critical to user experience.

For an information website, user experience will be enhanced if there is:

  • Ease of finding information
  • Logical flow to the website
  • Help is readily available through FAQs etc.

Here are a few ways you can limit bandwidth usage & improve load speeds on your website:

1. Choose superfast CDN – The CDN providers you choose is key to load speed. Make sure you pick a provider who has data servers closest to your service. This decreases latency and improves image load speed. Superfast CDN hosting for static content will boost your image loading speed.

2. Caching for static and dynamic content : Caching captures your last known information and displays it to a user instead of freshly loading a page with its images, content, text, videos which increases load speed. An alternative is to build in caching for your website – gifs and videos included. Caching heavy, less important elements of your webpage and using caching like Varnish enables you to boost your website load speed.

3. Build Ajax calls of peripheral elements : Save bandwidth, server time and improve speed with this short-cut. Opt to build Ajax calls for elements that are not critical to your website to make it available on-demand for your user instead of loading separate pages each time. This not only enables your website to load faster but also consumers less of your users’ bandwidth.

Here is an example for your reference.

How to limit bandwidth usage on your roku

4. Optimization such as Minifying Jquery, HTML, CSS : Clean your code. Eliminate coding in unnecessary calls which increase load time each time there is a command. Install Jquery.min on your own server – it’s much lighter and smaller & will certainly decrease your load time.

5. Optimization of SQL queries : Optimize your queries so as to reduce the number of steps your user will take to get the results he wants. Some tips you can follow are to:

  • Only retrieve data you absolutely need
  • Index properly
  • Do away with correlated subqueries
  • Check your codes before you use them especially if they’re ready-made/ borrowed codes
  • Try to avoid dynamic SQL

6. Opt to use multiple servers : To reduce the usage of bandwidth and RAM of a single server which would reduce your load speed, use cluster of servers as load balancers instead. This is especially useful for websites with high traffic.

7. Optimize your server : Regularly run crons to flush out cache, in-line scripts and clean your servers. Think of the function of the apps you use to clean your mobiles without which, your phone speed would reduce – Clean Master, CCleaner, Startup Manager.

8. Build a good database architecture : Organise your tables and structure correctly so your commands can read and write correctly. A mixed-up or hard to read architecture only increases your load speed.

Many high traffic, well-known websites like Amazon, Flipkart, Google, Facebook use these web development techniques to increase or sustain their high load speed. For websites like those, business runs on the sheer volume of traffic and load speed is critical.

Hope this post of ours will help you limit bandwidth usage on your website for better load time and UX.

Got more tips? We’d love to hear from you in the comment section below.

This post may contain affiliate links, meaning that I may earn a small commission if you make a purchase. See our disclosure policy for more information.

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The other day my husband and I got a letter in the mail from our internet service provider stating that new data limits will be set on our current internet plan. While this does stink, it doesn’t necessarily mean that we’ll be paying more. In fact, our provider (Cox Communications) is one of the last to enforce such limits.

How much data is your family actually using? This should be listed on your account/statement depending on which internet service provider you have. With Cox, we will get an email when we reach 85% of the data usage for the month and again when we hit 100% of our data usage for the month. Curious to see just how much you can stream/data you can use before going over? This handy tool will help no matter which provider you have. We maxed out every single option on this tool and it’s still showing below the new monthly limit. If you are big into online gaming or if you stream a lot you may have an issue.

My family is currently only using about half of the allocated data usage, and according to my husband (the former cable guy at said company) only about 2% of households will surpass this 1TB per month limit.

Still going over? Read on, friend.

How to limit bandwidth usage on your roku

Ways to Reduce Data Usage in Your Home

1. Turn off maps/GPS/locator in apps on your phone. These location services are constantly running in the background and if your phone is connected to your home’s wifi that’s just soaking up the data. Go to settings and location to see which apps are tracking you and turn them off. Bonus: it’s kinda creepy.

How to limit bandwidth usage on your roku

2. Switch browsers on your computer. Google Chrome compresses (ie: uses less) data on laptops and computers. Hey, it all adds up. If you’re not looking to change browsers, consider going to the “light” version of your preferred browser.

3. Download your music instead of streaming. Streaming music and/or video hogs up the data. Instead, play from your iTunes library or bust out those old CDs.

4. Get off the wifi. Do you have unlimited cell phone data? I know we do. While the wifi will speed up your phone’s browser, it also goes against the data usage in your home. If you’ve got unlimited phone data, get off that wifi, yo!

5. Check your router. There are routers that allow you to see what all is connected at a given time, and you can allot data usage per day to certain devices.

6. Don’t just turn off the TV. My kids have a horrible habit of turning off the TV while leaving the Roku, Chromecast or Amazon Fire Stick streaming. Get them in the habit of turning it all off at once.

7. Use lower quality streaming on YouTube. Do you watch a lot of YouTube videos? There are several channels I subscribe to and watch frequently. Did you know you can watch in lower quality which uses less data? On YouTube, just click the settings on the video (the gear) and change the quality of the video.

8. Lower the quality of streaming on Netflix. Why play Ultra HD/4K quality if you don’t have a 4K TV? Lower that to a decent/tolerable level and save that data. Don’t want to lower that quality all the time? Just do it when you notice you’re about to go over your limit for the month. Find this option under account > Playback settings.

How to limit bandwidth usage on your roku

9. Turn off auto-play. Do you fall asleep to TV? You may want to check the auto play feature on your streaming service. I know Netflix, Hulu and Amazon Prime all give you the option to turn off auto play. No use streaming video after you’ve fallen asleep.

10. Make sure your security is set on your router. Is your wifi not secured with a password? Your neighbors may be using your data without you even knowing. Secure, secure, secure!

What other ways are we missing? Let us know in the comments!