How to make a camera flash diffuser with a cigarette pack

Introduction: How to Make a Flash Diffuser for Macro Photography

In this tutorial we’ll go through the steps needed to make a descent diffuser for an external flash. This diffuser aims to be practical as well as easy to put together. While the primary purpose of this diffuser is for macro photography, it can also be used for general purpose photography.

Step 1: Materials

For this tutorial you will need:

  • scissors/box cutter
  • gaffer tape and clear packing tape
  • foam core or core-flute sheet (I used a sheet of 15″ x 20″ foam core with one side adhesive)
  • aluminium foil
  • translucent plastic sheet or baking paper (translucent plastic from a document folder was used in this tutorial)
  • ruler,
  • elastic/rubber bands; and
  • glue (optional – only needed if the foam-core or core-flute doesn’t contain an adhesive side).

Step 2: Work Out the Angle You Want the Diffuser to Have.

To do this I placed my flash alongside the foam-core sheet and took a couple of photos of the flash going off. I took several photos with another reflective surface above the flash to help determine the angle that I would get the light to reflect where I wanted it to go. I just measured the angle (152°) off the photo.

From this I used the Pythagorean theorem to draw up a plan for the sides of the diffuser. I also used the same technique to work out how wide the flash scattered to get the measurement for the angle (103°) on the top of the diffuser. The measurements for the diffuser I made for my Canon 580 EXII flash can be found in the pictures. However, feel free to draw up your own plans that are more suitable to the flash that you plan on using. It only takes about 10 minutes. You may want to vary the design a little to suit any adjustments you want to make.

NOTE: I used a CAD program to draw up my blueprint and there are some very precise measurements in the drawing. These do not need to be adhered too exactly. If your angles and lengths are out a bit it doesn’t really matter.

Step 3: Stick the Aluminium Foil to the Foam-core

I used foam-core that I bought from the local stationary shop for my diffuser. One side of the foam-core had an adhesive surface applied to it. To stick the aluminium to the foam-core all that you need to do is peel of the paper coating from the adhesive side and roll out the aluminium onto the surface of the foam-core. If you need to lay down more than one peace of aluminium to cover the foam-core the overlap can be trimmed using the box cutter or a razor blade.

If using core-flute or foam-core without an adhesive surface, then it is a matter of covering the surface in glue and applying the aluminium.

Step 4: Cut-out the Pieces and Stick Together

The next step is to cut out the pieces of foam-core to create the diffuser body. I placed the design sheet onto the white side and proceded to use the ruller and box cutter to cut the shapes out of the foam-core.

Once the pieces have been cut out it is a matter of re-joining them with gaffer tape. To do this I created hinges on all the joins by laying the two pieces I was joining together with the aluminium faces touching. I made sure that I ran a finger along the edges of the foam-core to get the gaffer tape to adhere to the edges. Once the gaffer tape is applied and a hinge is created, I laid the join flat and used the clear tape (sealing tape) to reinforce the inside of the hinge (second picture). The clear tape helps creates a strong hinge while still being highly reflective.

Step 5: Add the Diffuser

Once the frame for the diffuser has been built the next step is to add the diffusing surface. I used a document holder (pictured) for my diffuser. Other options are baking paper or the side of a large plastic container (e.g. large, square milk bottle side).

Trace the shape of the top of the diffuser onto the plastic, allow extra space around the edge so that the diffusing surface is slightly larger than the diffuser frame. Stick the diffuser onto the front edge of the diffuser frame with gaffer tape.

I only attached the translucent plastic to the front edge of the diffuser so that I can “flat-pack” the diffuser when I am not using it (third picture). If you want, you can have the complete diffuser permanently assembled by taping the translucent plastic all the way around. There is also no need to do the hinge joints in the previous step if you decide to make it non-collapsible.

Step 6: Done

The diffuser is now complete. All that needs to be done is to mount it on the flash and elastic bands used to hold it into place. The elastic bands also hold the translucent sheet in place when assembled (can be seen in the second picture).

When the diffuser is not being used it can be packed flat so that it fits into a camera bag or laptop bag.

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An empty cigarette pack and the foil lining. Photo by Ashley Ryan.

Using a built-in flash can be detrimental to photography due to the sharp, white glare. Flash diffusers change how the light hits your subject, but they can also be pricey. So why not make your own?

All you need is an empty cigarette pack. You start by removing the foil lining. Turn it inside out and place it back inside the pack with the shiny side facing in. You can also use colored markers to create a design on the box. This will get rid of the cigarette company’s logo while giving your project a unique style.

A homemade flash diffuser. Photo by Ashley Ryan.

Once you have finished this, open the bottom of the pack and slide it over the pop-up flash on a digital single-lens reflex, or DSLR, camera. Now, when photos are taken with the flash on, the light will reflect off of the foil instead of bouncing directly onto the subject.

Flash diffusers work to spread the light out so it is less concentrated on the subject’s face. Having a larger light source will transform the glaring shine into a warmer tone. They are often used indoors or in small spaces, typically for portrait photography. Photographers may also use them to bounce light off of the walls or the ceiling for additional diffusion or to eliminate background shadows.

Examples of how a flash diffuser changes a photograph. Photo by Ashley Ryan.

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Flash diffusers are game-changing in almost any lighting situation. They add depth, softness, and definition to the light.

They can also take your macro photography to the next level. You can find small, low-cost diffusers and softboxes that can be attached to your flash on Amazon.

But what if you only have a built-in flash, or forgot to bring your ‘real’ diffuser? I’ll show you how to build a DIY flash diffuser from stuff that you can find in a kitchen or a grocery store.

It’s a one-dollar project, but you can still achieve beautiful, smooth lighting in your photos with this DIY diffuser setup.

How to make a camera flash diffuser with a cigarette pack
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What Is a Flash Diffuser?

The flash diffuser is one of the most basic yet powerful light modifiers.

It attaches to your external flash and increases the surface where the light originates from. This allows for softer, less unidirectional lighting.

Even if you only diffuse your built-in popup flash, it will be incomparably less harsh and distracting.

What Type of Diffuser Is Best for Macro Photography?

In macro photography, you rely on artificial lighting more than in most other genres of photography.

Thankfully, you don’t need to carry huge softboxes and other large light modifiers. For portraits and some products, you would need those sizes. For macro, not so much.

As your subjects get smaller and smaller in size, you can use smaller lights and achieve the same relative effect.

So, to create an efficient macro diffuser, you don’t have to think big.

How to Build Your DIY Macro Diffuser

This diffuser is very DIY.

I experimented with more advanced designs but dropped them ultimately. The goal here is to create the cheapest, simplest, and most effective macro diffuser.

You can adapt and transform the idea to fit your gear and preferences because the key is the concept.

I made this one for the pop-up flash on a Canon 1300D camera. You can use your external flashes, too.

What You’ll Need to Make a DIY Diffuser

As I mentioned, this list is very flexible, utilise what you can find. Here is what I used:

  • Some white paper
  • White coloured adhesive tape
  • A hollow tube (I used an empty chips can)
  • Scissors

The chips can, in my case, was reflective on the inside. I advise you to choose similarly because inner reflections further soften the light. You can also cover the inside in aluminium foil.

How to make a camera flash diffuser with a cigarette pack

How to Assemble Your DIY Flash Diffuser

Ideally, the tube of our DIY diffuser should be around the same length as the lens.

If it’s too short, some of the light will be shaded by the lens. If it’s too long, it will fall behind the macro subject.

How to make a camera flash diffuser with a cigarette packThe ideal placement of the diffuser surface

So, first, cut the tube to be the length of the lens.

On one side, leave it longer than the lens to direct the light downwards. On the opposite side, cut it, so it’s the same length as the lens.

How to make a camera flash diffuser with a cigarette pack

If you need to, wrap the inside with aluminium foil at this stage. I also covered it in red paper on the outside to disguise the brand of the chips.

Then, grab a piece of white paper. Fold it in half and tape it to the tube. It doesn’t matter if the paper covers the sides or not.

Try to tape so that the paper follows a smooth curve, and there are no sharp edges.

How to make a camera flash diffuser with a cigarette pack

Now, open up the pop-up flash on your camera. Tape the diffuser to the flash, aim for minimising wobble.

If you’ve done it well, it should look something like this:

How to make a camera flash diffuser with a cigarette pack

What Can You Expect From a DIY Flash Diffuser?

Surprisingly, a lot.

In macro situations, a piece of paper and a can of chips transforms the behaviour of your flash completely.

Without it, you only have direct, harsh light coming from your pop-up flash.

But once you attach this photography diffuser, it transforms it to be flattering, smooth, and more balanced.

Let me show you a couple of examples.

How to make a camera flash diffuser with a cigarette packHow to make a camera flash diffuser with a cigarette pack

Conclusion

Macro photography offers plenty of opportunities to experiment.

This DIY macro flash diffuser costs only a few dollars and a few minutes to make, so why not build it?

Doing small projects like this keep your creativity and inspiration fresh. All this makes for more enjoyable photography and better photos.

Looking for more flash photography tips? Check out our posts on using wireless flash trigger or how to improve your bounce flash photography next!

An empty cigarette pack and the foil lining. Photo by Ashley Ryan.

Using a built-in flash can be detrimental to photography due to the sharp, white glare. Flash diffusers change how the light hits your subject, but they can also be pricey. So why not make your own?

All you need is an empty cigarette pack. You start by removing the foil lining. Turn it inside out and place it back inside the pack with the shiny side facing in. You can also use colored markers to create a design on the box. This will get rid of the cigarette company’s logo while giving your project a unique style.

A homemade flash diffuser. Photo by Ashley Ryan.

Once you have finished this, open the bottom of the pack and slide it over the pop-up flash on a digital single-lens reflex, or DSLR, camera. Now, when photos are taken with the flash on, the light will reflect off of the foil instead of bouncing directly onto the subject.

Flash diffusers work to spread the light out so it is less concentrated on the subject’s face. Having a larger light source will transform the glaring shine into a warmer tone. They are often used indoors or in small spaces, typically for portrait photography. Photographers may also use them to bounce light off of the walls or the ceiling for additional diffusion or to eliminate background shadows.

Examples of how a flash diffuser changes a photograph. Photo by Ashley Ryan.

Last updated on December 12, 2020 By Photography Spark

How to make a camera flash diffuser with a cigarette pack

Light diffusers allow you to get the best image when taking a photograph. They add softness, depth, and definition, bumping your photographs up to professional quality.

It’s possible to get diffusers that attach to your flash for a reasonable cost but this isn’t always the best option. Besides, what happens if you forget your diffuser and need to work with what you have occasionally?

How do you make a DIY flash diffuser that achieves the result you’re looking for?

All you need are items that are readily available to you or that you can purchase for a small investment at your local supermarket.

And best of all, you’ll get the same smooth, lovely lighting you’d get if you used an expensive or elaborate diffuser set up.

Understanding a Flash Diffuser

Before we get started making a DIY flash diffuser, let’s look at what a flash diffuser is and how it works.

A flash diffuser is an attachment for modifying the light in your photographs. You attach a flash diffuser to the external flash on your camera.

It works by increasing the surface from which light is originating, creating softer lighting. The end result is a photo with less distracting or harsh lighting.

Depending on the type of photography you’re doing, you might rely on artificial light a great deal. Any time you need to use the flash, you’re asking artificial light to do the heavy lifting that would otherwise be handled by natural light.

But what happens if you don’t feel like lugging softboxes and other light modifiers with you every time you go to shoot? They are an important part of capturing the right light in a photo, but they can also be cumbersome.

If you are photographing smaller images like in macro photography, softboxes and other types of standard diffusers are just too large to get the job done.

What should you do if you find yourself in this situation?

You can create your own DIY flash diffuser. It’s easy and affordable, and this is how you do it.

This information is for a basic diffuser. There are more advanced options out there, but there’s no reason to make things more difficult than they need to be.

Your mission is to get the best possible photo and if you can do that easily and with less work, you might as well.

It’s also possible to simplify this DIY flash diffuser to accommodate whatever equipment you use or based on your preferences.

How to make a camera flash diffuser with a cigarette pack

For this DIY project, you’ll need:

  • White paper (like this at Amazon)
  • Opaque adhesive tape
  • Scissors
  • Hollow tubing (You can use any kind of hollow tubing but one with a reflective interior works best as it softens the light even more. If you can’t get a hold of a reflective tube, just add aluminum foil.)

Now that you have your tools, you can put together your DIY flash diffuser.

  1. The tube should be about the same length as the lens you are using. If it’s too long, cut it down to size. Tubes that are too short mean some of the light is going to be shaded so you’ll need to adjust. When cutting into the length of your lens, leave one side longer to direct light downward. On the opposite end, cut it to match the length of the lens.
  1. At this point, if needed, wrap the inside of the tube with foil.
  1. Now, grab your white paper, fold it in half, and tape it to the tube. The paper doesn’t need to cover the sides but do your best to tape it so the paper curves smoothly around the tube and there are no sharp edges.
  1. Once that’s done, open the pop-up flash of your camera and tape the diffuser to the flash. Make sure it’s securely fastened so it doesn’t wiggle.

That’s it. Your DIY flash diffuser is done and ready to work for you.

Does a DIY Flash Diffuser Work as Well as Regular Diffuser?

How to make a camera flash diffuser with a cigarette packYes, your pictures will be just as good with a DIY diffuser as with another tool. There might even be some instances when the DIY model works better because you can fiddle with it and customize it to your needs.

Shockingly, a hollow tube and a scrap of paper can completely transform how your flash works. You no longer have to deal with harsh, direct light and you’ll soften the light to get a better, more flattering photo.

The great thing about using a DIY tool when taking photos is that you get to experiment and customize. You also save a lot of money.

Flash diffusers aren’t necessarily going to break the bank if you buy one ready-made but you’re not likely to find one as inexpensive as this DIY version.

Making your own DIY diffuser also gives you an added advantage. By putting together the diffuser and playing with what works best for you, you gain an understanding that you might not get by popping open your softboxes and going to work.

You get to know your camera more intimately and understand what you need to do to get the best exposure.

One of the most important things about improving your skills as a photographer is gaining an understanding of how the process works. The more you know about it and how to create a setting that is ideal for producing great photos, the more confidence you’ll gain.

Taking control of the process from beginning to end helps you build this confidence and understand how things work. It’s one of the best ways to take your photography to the next level and achieve professional photographs, even if you are an amateur or hobbyist when it comes to photography.

Building your own DIY flash diffuser is easy and fun and can help you practice your photography skills and become a better photographer.

Introduction: DIY Digital SLR Built In-flash Diffuser

How to make a camera flash diffuser with a cigarette pack

How to make a camera flash diffuser with a cigarette pack

How to make a camera flash diffuser with a cigarette pack

I hate built in flashes. They’re super bright, blind people, and they make spotlights for my wide-angle lens on my Canon XTI. With my wide-angle lens, it’s quite noticeable; the lens shadow is in the picture, the edges are dark.

For taking pictures of parties, I wanted something that I could use so people don’t look like rabbits in headlights and softened the lighting.

I also needed something with simple light weight construction that I can slip into my already heavy camera bag. I’m also broke from spending around 1800 dollars on camera gear. I have no more money left for an external flash. Paper is a tolerable diffuser.

This instructable inspired me, but I don’t want to be branded a smoker (even though I do occasionally):
Cigarette Packet Flash Diffuser

ONE MORE THING:
I’M NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY PROBLEMS YOU HAVE. EVER. OR WITH THIS PROJECT.

Step 1: Testing

I tested with a piece of printer paper to find the best location for the diffuser. I’m not working with the best materials, so i figured I’d try to find the optimum location.

I later gave up and made the diffuser modifiable for your needs. You can find one location and leave it there.

Step 2: Print Out Template, Cut Out and Tape

I used a CAD software program and made two versions of the template – one is a larger version for more light, I’ve never tested the smaller version. it just seems more compact.

Just cut out the print out, mount the bottom square part to a card stock/reused plastic with glue and cut out the slits

Cut out the top portion and fold on the lines. Tape the top portion to the bottom portion in the back. Fold on the back and tape the folded part down. This acts as a hinge for the top portion and keeps them together easily. Don’t let it get folded or crumpled, this will not let it stand up correctly.

I originally had the idea to use all card stock and cut out a hole in front to glue diffuser material on it. If you do this, you can play with different materials. You can mount gels, different colored office paper, or make slits to act as barn doors for your flash.

Attachments

Step 3: Go Shoot Yourself (with Your Camera)

For testing purposes, I went to the darkest room in my house, the bathroom and turned off all the lights. I then shot photos of myself and my bathroom.

The first one is with my 30mm 1.4. Since it’s a really fast lens, it doesn’t have any problems with taking pictures with low light.

However, it is possible to see the difference in the lighting. Without the flash, the highlights are far more brighter, and the lighting is harsh.

With the diffuser, my features are softer and the lighting is more natural.

Remember , this effectively cuts the distance your flash will work, you’ll need to slow down your camera speed to get the further distances. This might require you to go to manual mode because the camera is expecting a certain power output from the flash and won’t adjust for the lower output.

For closer pictures, this works well.

Step 4: Take Pictures of Your Bathroom Sans Lights

The wide angle lens is a 10-20mm 4.0-5.6 so it can see three corners of most rooms in my house. This lens I have a problem with most when using the flash. When trying to take pictures of people, I end up throwing away all of my pictures because this lens isn’t fast enough to take a party scene.

The following pictures are taken at f4.0 1/60 ISO100.

If I bump up the ISO, I could get more light here, but I wanted to see what the diffuser would do in worse case situations. I’m still afraid of noise from the higher ISOs (I know I’m an idiot since this camera doesn’t generate much noise, but whatever)

You can see the shadow caused by the lens solidly outlined in the first photo, and the edges are vignetted.

In the second photo, the lens shadow is still visible, but it’s diffused and not as harsh. The edges are less vignetted.

Step 5: Go Have Fun!

You can fold this up and stash it in your bag. I have a zippered pouch that I hold my manuals in, this fits perfectly in it and doesn’t get crushed. If it does, I’ll print out another and make another one.

The tab on the back part slips into the hotshoe – if you use something sturdy, make sure that it doesn’t damage the contacts on your hotshoe, for when you actually do get a real flash.

I used scotch tape to thicken up the plastic piece that I use as the bottom piece. The plastic is left over from a marker case that I used to have, so it’s a little hard to cut, so card stock might be a better choice.

Let me know of any changes you think of!

Be the First to Share

Did you make this project? Share it with us!

Introduction: DIY Digital SLR Built In-flash Diffuser

How to make a camera flash diffuser with a cigarette pack

How to make a camera flash diffuser with a cigarette pack

How to make a camera flash diffuser with a cigarette pack

I hate built in flashes. They’re super bright, blind people, and they make spotlights for my wide-angle lens on my Canon XTI. With my wide-angle lens, it’s quite noticeable; the lens shadow is in the picture, the edges are dark.

For taking pictures of parties, I wanted something that I could use so people don’t look like rabbits in headlights and softened the lighting.

I also needed something with simple light weight construction that I can slip into my already heavy camera bag. I’m also broke from spending around 1800 dollars on camera gear. I have no more money left for an external flash. Paper is a tolerable diffuser.

This instructable inspired me, but I don’t want to be branded a smoker (even though I do occasionally):
Cigarette Packet Flash Diffuser

ONE MORE THING:
I’M NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ANY PROBLEMS YOU HAVE. EVER. OR WITH THIS PROJECT.

Step 1: Testing

I tested with a piece of printer paper to find the best location for the diffuser. I’m not working with the best materials, so i figured I’d try to find the optimum location.

I later gave up and made the diffuser modifiable for your needs. You can find one location and leave it there.

Step 2: Print Out Template, Cut Out and Tape

I used a CAD software program and made two versions of the template – one is a larger version for more light, I’ve never tested the smaller version. it just seems more compact.

Just cut out the print out, mount the bottom square part to a card stock/reused plastic with glue and cut out the slits

Cut out the top portion and fold on the lines. Tape the top portion to the bottom portion in the back. Fold on the back and tape the folded part down. This acts as a hinge for the top portion and keeps them together easily. Don’t let it get folded or crumpled, this will not let it stand up correctly.

I originally had the idea to use all card stock and cut out a hole in front to glue diffuser material on it. If you do this, you can play with different materials. You can mount gels, different colored office paper, or make slits to act as barn doors for your flash.

Attachments

Step 3: Go Shoot Yourself (with Your Camera)

For testing purposes, I went to the darkest room in my house, the bathroom and turned off all the lights. I then shot photos of myself and my bathroom.

The first one is with my 30mm 1.4. Since it’s a really fast lens, it doesn’t have any problems with taking pictures with low light.

However, it is possible to see the difference in the lighting. Without the flash, the highlights are far more brighter, and the lighting is harsh.

With the diffuser, my features are softer and the lighting is more natural.

Remember , this effectively cuts the distance your flash will work, you’ll need to slow down your camera speed to get the further distances. This might require you to go to manual mode because the camera is expecting a certain power output from the flash and won’t adjust for the lower output.

For closer pictures, this works well.

Step 4: Take Pictures of Your Bathroom Sans Lights

The wide angle lens is a 10-20mm 4.0-5.6 so it can see three corners of most rooms in my house. This lens I have a problem with most when using the flash. When trying to take pictures of people, I end up throwing away all of my pictures because this lens isn’t fast enough to take a party scene.

The following pictures are taken at f4.0 1/60 ISO100.

If I bump up the ISO, I could get more light here, but I wanted to see what the diffuser would do in worse case situations. I’m still afraid of noise from the higher ISOs (I know I’m an idiot since this camera doesn’t generate much noise, but whatever)

You can see the shadow caused by the lens solidly outlined in the first photo, and the edges are vignetted.

In the second photo, the lens shadow is still visible, but it’s diffused and not as harsh. The edges are less vignetted.

Step 5: Go Have Fun!

You can fold this up and stash it in your bag. I have a zippered pouch that I hold my manuals in, this fits perfectly in it and doesn’t get crushed. If it does, I’ll print out another and make another one.

The tab on the back part slips into the hotshoe – if you use something sturdy, make sure that it doesn’t damage the contacts on your hotshoe, for when you actually do get a real flash.

I used scotch tape to thicken up the plastic piece that I use as the bottom piece. The plastic is left over from a marker case that I used to have, so it’s a little hard to cut, so card stock might be a better choice.

Let me know of any changes you think of!

Be the First to Share

Did you make this project? Share it with us!

An empty cigarette pack and the foil lining. Photo by Ashley Ryan.

Using a built-in flash can be detrimental to photography due to the sharp, white glare. Flash diffusers change how the light hits your subject, but they can also be pricey. So why not make your own?

All you need is an empty cigarette pack. You start by removing the foil lining. Turn it inside out and place it back inside the pack with the shiny side facing in. You can also use colored markers to create a design on the box. This will get rid of the cigarette company’s logo while giving your project a unique style.

A homemade flash diffuser. Photo by Ashley Ryan.

Once you have finished this, open the bottom of the pack and slide it over the pop-up flash on a digital single-lens reflex, or DSLR, camera. Now, when photos are taken with the flash on, the light will reflect off of the foil instead of bouncing directly onto the subject.

Flash diffusers work to spread the light out so it is less concentrated on the subject’s face. Having a larger light source will transform the glaring shine into a warmer tone. They are often used indoors or in small spaces, typically for portrait photography. Photographers may also use them to bounce light off of the walls or the ceiling for additional diffusion or to eliminate background shadows.

Examples of how a flash diffuser changes a photograph. Photo by Ashley Ryan.

When using a flash the light produced is very hard (let’s just call it what it is–ugly) without a lighting modifier. We have written before about what each lighting modifier does differently to impact the quality of light, but I still get a lot of questions about what little on-flash diffusers do to impact the light quality.

These small (usually hard plastic) diffusers are intended to spread light, make the light source slightly larger, and get a slightly softer light quality.

There are DOZENS (hundreds?) of different simple flash diffusers for sale in all different shapes and sizes. Some of them, like the Gary Fong Lightsphere, are expensive and don’t do any better than Tupperware. My point in that article was simply to show that I see no difference in the resulting photo when using an expensive specialized light diffuser when compared to any old simple chunk of plastic. The light quality in my testing is the same.

So I have written before with some great home-made options for simple lighting diffusers, but this idea is absolutely free! Before showing you how to do it, I have to credit Ed Cord. Ed Cord is one of the most active (and helpful!) readers who (like a few other readers) is kind enough to answer all of your photography questions on the Facebook page. If you are a part of the Improve Photography Facebook group, you probably already know Ed.

Anyway, let’s get down to business. How do you make this amazing little flash diffuser for free?

Step #1: Take a simple frosted plastic container that is no longer in use. Many different types of container can work for this. Ed has used a 16 oz. rubbing alcohol bottle, a relish bottle, and a vinegar bottle.

Step #2: Cut around the edges of the container to get it to about the right size for a flash diffuser (see picture for an approximate)

Step #3: Glue on a simple strip of velcro around the edge of the container that you can also connect to your flash if you want to keep it ultra secure. I’ve found that it often stays on just fine without even putting the other velcro side onto the flash, but your results may vary.

Step #4: Shoot some photos! It’s just enough to take the edge off the flash and make it look much nicer than the bare flash. For samples of what adding a simple flash diffuser can do, check out the Tupperware vs. Lightsphere comparison.

If you are new to flash photography and want to learn how it all works and how you can get amazing results with inexpensive flash photography gear, you should really take a look at our 30-day online portrait photography class, where flash photography is a main focus of the course.