How to make a cup of genuine italian coffee

How to make a cup of genuine italian coffee

Italian coffee may sound fancy, but in essence, it is very simple to prepare. Unlike the big, expensive coffee makers and Espresso machines, Italians use a Moka Pot. The most significant advantage of a Moka pot is it can make all kinds of coffee. It means your coffee options go beyond Italian coffee. If you are in college or in need of a good cup of coffee to kick start your day here is how to make a cup of delicious Italian coffee.

Obtain high-quality coffee grounds from a local store. The coffee grounds play a significant role when it comes to making good coffee. The best quality is 100% Arabica coffee beans.
The Moka Pot has three parts; the top chamber, the bottom chamber, and the basket.

  1. Unscrew the top chamber to detach all the parts.
  2. Fill the bottom chamber with water up to one and a half inch to the top.
  3. Fill the basket with the ground coffee beans. The basket is perforated and acts like a filter.
  4. Place it in the bottom chamber full of water and tap slightly to fit. The amount of coffee will depend on how strong the coffee should be.
  5. The top chamber is shaped like a coffee pot. Place it on top of the bottom chamber.
  6. Place over low heat. The advantage of the Moka pot is; it can use a stove or a cooker burner as a source of heat. In extreme cases, it can be employed on an open fire for campers.
  7. The Moka pot works with the science of steam. When the water boils in the bottom chamber, the steam brews the coffee in the basket and collects in the top chamber as brewed coffee.
  8. The Pot will make a brewing sound while there is still water at the bottom. The sound stops as soon as all the water is steamed out of the chamber.
  9. Switch off the source of heat and allow the pot to settle for a while. This is the point at which the coffee blends, and it gives the Moka pot a chance to cool off. The container is made of metal except the handle on the top chamber. After a brew, the pot is scorching.
  10. You can take the coffee as it is at this point. Sweeten with sugar or honey. But to make an Italian Cappuccino reduce the water in the bottom chamber leaving enough for a shot or two.
  11. Heat a cup of milk in a frothing pot. If you do not have one, you can use a whisker to create the froth as the liquid boils.
  12. Add the previously prepared shot of Italian coffee into a mug. Add the hot milk to the coffee for a delicious cappuccino.

Cappuccinos are famous for their frothy taste. Adding the milk directly into the mug may quickly liquefy the fluid, and the end product will be a Latte. To maintain the froth add the milk into the mug with a spoon till it is enough. It will retain its foam nature for a good cup of Italian Cappuccino.

How to make a cup of genuine italian coffee

To Make Authentic Italian Coffee it starts with Espresso:
Espresso is a technical term for the type of coffee grind being used to make the coffee. In Italy when you order a coffee you would ask for ‘un caffe’, which is simply a coffee made with espresso. Now all you need is a moka pot also known as a macchinetta (literally “small machine”).

Espresso is brewed by expressing or forcing out a small amount of nearly boiling water under pressure through finely ground coffee beans. It has a rich flavor with a thicker consistency and is the base for other drinks, such as a Latte, Cappuccino, and Macchiato. If you are interested in coffee drink recipes go here.

Typically, you would not order a Cappuccino, Caffe latte, or Caffe Macchiato after 10:30 a.m. and especially not after a meal. The Italians believe that too much milk on your stomach mid-day or after a late night meal is not good for digestion.

Now here’s what you will need to make an Italian Coffee (Espresso):

Bialetti Espresso Maker
Cool Water
Espresso Grinds: I like Lavazza
Sugar (for added sweetness or the Cremina)

Below is how you setup the Moka Pot step by step and make the Espresso. I am also showing you how to make the cremina, which is the sugar cream that you will find in certain regions of Italy. If you don’t want the cremina simply ignore those steps.

Preparation: Italian Coffee

1. First you will break down the moka pot into it’s 3 parts. Fill the bottom part with very cold water to the rim.

How to make a cup of genuine italian coffee

2. Fill the filter with the grinds to the top of the rim (do not pack it in).

How to make a cup of genuine italian coffee

3. Next float the filter with the grinds on top of the water (see pic below).

How to make a cup of genuine italian coffee

4. Next screw the top part on tightly and put it on the stove with medium to low heat.

How to make a cup of genuine italian coffee

If you want to make the cremina (sugar cream) take a regular coffee cup and fill with about 3 to 4 teaspoons of sugar. If not just wait for the coffee to percolate and once it is finished you can pour yourself an espresso. The directions below continue on to make the cremina.

How to make a cup of genuine italian coffee

5. When it starts to percolate pour about 2 to 3 teaspoons of the espresso into the sugar and with a spoon stir fast to break it down. This will make sugar for about 3 cups of espresso.

How to make a cup of genuine italian coffee

Note: put the moka pot back onto the stovetop until it is finished and then you take it off the heat.

6. Stir fast until you have a light caramel color like this

How to make a cup of genuine italian coffee

7. Now that you have your creama you can take a teaspoon of it and add it to a separate espresso cup.

How to make a cup of genuine italian coffee

8. Pour the espresso into this cup and stir, you will see a caramel color surface to the top and now you have a beautiful coffee to drink!

That’s It! Now you are can be your own personal Barista at home!

How to make a cup of genuine italian coffee

About Carrie Pacini

Welcome, Friends! I’m so glad you’ve found your way to For the Feast. I am a food writer, photographer, and stylist based in Houston, Texas, where I live with my husband and two children. I am co-founder of the Mom 2.0 Summit and have also had the pleasure of participating in projects such as The Wine Conference. Read more.

Make espresso without a fancy machine

How to make a cup of genuine italian coffee

To get a really good cup of espresso you need a proper espresso machine, but most of us can’t afford to have a professional-quality piece of equipment at home, and unfortunately, some of the espresso machines made for home use turn out really inferior coffee. Most Italians, however, make their morning espresso with a stovetop coffeemaker called a moka, first produced by the Bialetti company in 1933. These stovetop kettles use steam pressure to force water up through coffee grounds and into a separate serving chamber. They are inexpensive, lightweight, easy to use, and quickly turn out a great cup of coffee in just a few minutes. Keep in mind that this type of pot works best with a gas stovetop; the aluminum pots don’t work on induction stoves and an electric burner is too difficult to regulate.

Technically, it is not the same as espresso, as it is made using a much lower pressure than a professional espresso machine, but if you use a good-quality coffee at the proper grind for moka pots (which is a medium grind, not as fine as for an espresso machine), it will produce quite good results, even with a bit of crema on top—the coveted layer of light foam on top of a well-made cup of espresso.

Step-By-Step Use of a Moka Pot

With just a few basic steps, you can have a hot cup of rich espresso in about 10 minutes.

  1. Unscrew the top half of the moka pot, remove the filter basket, and fill the lower section with water just to the level of the bottom of the round safety valve (you should be able to see this inside of the water chamber).
  2. Replace the filter basket on top of the bottom half of the pot.
  3. Fill the filter basket with medium-grind coffee. The coffee should be level with the top of the filter. You can gently pat it with the back of a spoon or your fingers to make the surface level, but do not tamp it down tightly (that would create too much pressure and could cause hot coffee to spray everywhere).
  4. Run the tip of a finger around the edge of the filter basket to remove any stray coffee grinds so that you’ll be able to screw on the top half without any obstructions.
  5. Screw the upper section on tightly, making sure it is straight.
  6. Set it on the stove over a brisk flame that is not larger than the diameter of the bottom of the pot. If you do not have a small-enough burner, you might need to use a stovetop heat diffuser to tame the flame.
  7. As soon as coffee begins to emerge (you will hear it starting to gurgle and bubble out), turn off the flame and let the rest of the coffee slowly percolate through.
  8. The coffee is done when the upper section is full and just steam emerges from the spout.

Tips and Variations

The type of coffee you purchase and the size of the grinds are very important when using a moka pot to make espresso. You must use coffee that’s specifically roasted for making espresso and is a medium grind. Standard American/Northern European drip coffee (even “espresso blends”) won’t work because they are not ground to the proper consistency and contain too many bitter oils. A good coffee to try is Illy medium-grind espresso, which is designed for use in moka pots. It comes in silver-and-red cylinders and is also sold as whole beans that you can grind yourself.

To make a caffè macchiato (espresso shot with a touch of foamed milk) or a cappuccino out of the coffee from your moka pot, use a milk-foaming mug by Frabosk. They make both ceramic versions (for use in a microwave) or metal ones (for stovetop use). You simply heat the milk (for about 45 seconds in the ceramic version, and over low heat just until the milk is hot in the stovetop version) and then pump the milk-foaming attachment vigorously for about 20 seconds until it forms a thick and velvety foam. Give the bottom of the mug a sharp tap on the counter to break up any larger bubbles, and then let it sit for 1 minute before adding it to the coffee to let the foam grow denser and smoother. You can also use a French-press coffee maker to foam milk in the same way.

How to make a cup of genuine italian coffee

Luca Piccini Basile / iStock

Coffee Sambuca is probably the easiest Italian coffee drink out there. It is very popular in southern Italy, though the eastern region of Le Marche is where you’ll find this drink most often.

To make the Coffee Sambuca, all you need to do is float three coffee beans in one to two ounces Sambuca and sip it slowly as an aperitif or digestif. Some drinkers prefer to light it on fire (known as a Flaming Coffee Sambuca) because it lightly toasts the beans.

The three coffee beans symbolize health, happiness, and prosperity. They can be chewed to complement the anise notes in the Sambuca or left as a garnish. Additionally, it is considered bad luck to serve an even number of beans.

In Italian, the Coffee Sambuca is also known as ghiaccio e mosche, which literally translates to ‘ice and flies.’ The ‘flies’ refer to the floating coffee beans, of course. You might also hear this drink called ‘fire and ice.’

Ingredients

  • 3 coffee beans (whole, roasted)
  • 1 to 2 ounces Sambuca (chilled or room temperature)

Steps to Make It

Gather the ingredients.

Pour the sambuca into a small, clear glass.

Float the coffee beans on top and serve.

Another Way to Enjoy Coffee and Sambuca

You will quickly find that coffee and the anise found in sambuca are a perfect match. In fact, it is one of the best flavor pairings you’ll come across. Even people who are not fans of anise find they enjoy this combination tremendously.

It is particularly popular in Italy, home of both sambuca and espresso. The Caffè Corretto is another popular Italian drink that showcases the two flavors in a single cup. It translates to mean ‘corrected coffee’ and is as simple as adding a drizzle of sambuca to a freshly pulled shot of espresso.

However, if you’re ordering a caffè corretto in Italy, be sure to specify the liquor as it can also be made with grappa, a style of brandy.

To distinguish the two, order either:

Caffè corretto alla grappa

Caffè corretto alla sambuca

What Is Sambuca?

Sambuca seems like a great liqueur, but what is it? Sambuca is a traditional Italian liqueur that is thought of as one of the world’s great digestif drinks, meaning that it will help aid digestion after a meal.

The liqueur is predominantly flavored with anise (or aniseed, the spice that tastes like black licorice) along with other herbs and spices. Each brand of sambuca has its own (often) secret recipe and while all sambucas have the same general flavor profile, there are subtle differences.

Sambuca is a liqueur that can be drunk straight (as we see in the Coffee Sambuca), either at room temperature or slightly chilled. It is also common to ​use it in a variety of cocktails and shooters like the B-53. If you come across a cocktail recipe that simply states ‘anise liqueur,’ sambuca is one of your best options.

If your quarantine beverage rotation goes from coffee to wine and back again, we’re right there with you. Here’s how to craft the perfect cup of pour-over at home.

Quarantine got you crazed for caffeine but unsure how to craft that just-right cup of coffee that your local café used to make you every morning? Before you go into panic mode and splurge on a zillion-dollar espresso machine, make yourself a pour-over. All you need is a kettle, a filter, and a pour-over cone—PSA: my favorite from Melitta costs $4—in addition to fresh ground beans of your choice. If you have a kitchen scale, even better, but you can measure your coffee out just as well (just be sure to follow the amounts below).

“Pour-over brewing is a simple way to brew a clean, bright cup,” says Patrick Main, the beverage innovator at Peet’s Coffee. “It brings out subtle nuances in coffee, particularly those with bright, sparkling flavors.” Here are Main’s simple, step-by-step instructions for brewing a balanced cup of pour-over coffee at home.

1. Heat fresh water to 200°F. To reach the right temperature without a thermometer, bring water to a boil and then let it stand for 30 seconds.

2. Measure 25 grams of freshly roasted coffee beans. This is about 5 tablespoons or 2.5 standard coffee scoops.

3. Fold down the seam of the paper filter and place it into the pour over cone so it lies flat. Then rinse the filter with hot water. Grind coffee to the coarseness of sand. “Rinsing the filter helps eliminate any paper flavors and preheating cone and carafe can help keep temperature consistent throughout the brewing process,” says Main. “Grind size also affects drip time and extraction. If your brew is too slow, try a slightly coarser grind. If it drips through too quickly, try a little finer.”

4. Discard the hot water and place the pour-over cone and carafe or mug you’re brewing into on your scale. Add ground coffee and then zero out or “tare” the scale. Pour just enough water (50 grams, or twice the weight of the coffee grounds) in a spiral motion to saturate the grounds, then wait 30 seconds. When hot water meets coffee grounds, CO2 escapes and expands, creating a “bloom.” Once the off-gassing is complete, the grounds are more receptive to absorbing water, resulting in a better extraction of flavors.

5. At the 30 second mark, resume pouring water over the grounds until your scale reaches 400 grams and your timer reaches 2 minutes. Pour first in a spiral pattern, and then straight down, keeping coffee grounds fully saturated from start to finish.

6. Give the coffee in your carafe a final swirl and enjoy.

Except for a select few of us, practically everyone drinks coffee in the morning. For many of us it’s a crutch — we just can’t live without it. And it’s a good reason why a certain chain coffee shop has stayed in business all these years, but we’ve got a bone to pick with them. Not only has this coffee company created Italian-sounding names that were never Italian to begin with (Frappuccino) but it’s also caused some confusion with authentic terms, namely the macchiato. Most people would know an espresso or a cappuccino when they saw one, but would you know a real macchiato?

The Macchiato Defined

How to make a cup of genuine italian coffee

The macchiato (mah-key-AH-toe) is a cornerstone of Italian coffee culture, along with the espresso and cappuccino, among other coffee drinks. It’s basically an espresso (served in a demitasse cup) with a small amount of foamed milk on top — the name macchiato means “marked.” So really, you could look at it as a cross between an espresso and a cappuccino. Since Italians only drink cappuccino in the morning, a macchiato gives the afternoon drinker the option of having a little milk in their espresso for some extra flavor. It’s also a good option for those who can’t tolerate a strong espresso but find a cappuccino too weak and milky.

There is another type of macchiato called “latte macchiato,” which is a cup of hot milk with a shot of espresso, but it does not have caramel-flavored syrup added, which is what the chain coffee shop would have you believe is a true macchiato.

How To Order

An authentic macchiato is one of those coffee drinks that’s served at any reputable coffee bar or restaurant, so you won’t necessarily see it written up on the menu. Go ahead and order one without hesitation. But if you decide to order one at the chain coffee shop, you’ll probably have to specify an “espresso macchiato” unless you want to get that caramel concoction. In Italy, all you have to ask for is a “caffe macchiato” and everyone will know what you want — but don’t ask for a frappuccino unless you want to be embarrassed.

What’s your favorite kind of coffee? Let us know below.

See the slideshow below for some great drink ideas using coffee.

How to make a cup of genuine italian coffee

Introduced in the 1500s, coffee has developed its own culture in Italy. Learn how to blend in at any Italian “bar” with our five-step guide!

The day is defined by coffee rituals: a cappuccino with breakfast, a caffè macchiato – or two – as an afternoon pick-me-up, and espresso after dinner. And like any culture, that of Italian coffee comes with seemingly mysterious laws. Order a latte, and you’ll receive a glass of milk (which is exactly what you ordered). Ask for a to-go cup or order a cappuccino after 11 a.m., and risk an instant tourist label.

Watch this video for a step-by-step explanation of Italian coffee culture from CEO of Eataly USA, Nicola Farinetti.

1. BUONGIORNO! The morning begins with a breakfast comprising a pastry paired with a delicious, milky coffee:

Cappuccino: equal parts espresso, steamed milk, and foamed milk
Caffè latte: espresso with more steamed milk and less foam
Latte macchiato: steamed milk “marked” with a splash of espresso

To blend in: Don’t order these drinks after 11 a.m. Italians only enjoy milky coffee in the morning – never in the afternoon, and especially not after a meal!

How to make a cup of genuine italian coffee

2. PRENDIAMO UN CAFF È! “Let’s get a coffee!” Appropriate anytime, a caffè (or caffè normale) is simply an espresso, a small but strong shot of black coffee. Italians often sip a caffè as an afternoon pick-me-up or after a meal.

To blend in: While you can order a caffè doppio for a double shot of espresso, this is not typical in Italy. If you need that extra jolt of caffeine, just visit your favorite barista multiple times a day – you won’t be the only one.

3. MIX IT UP. Over the centuries, Italians have created a variety of alterations to the powerful punch of espresso. Branch out by ordering these at Eataly’s Lavazza.

Caffè macchiato: For the softer side of coffee, enjoy this espresso “marked” with a splash of frothy milk. Unlike the breakfast drinks, this lightly milky caffè can be enjoyed as frequently as caffè normale.
Caffè corretto: Literally translated to “corrected coffee,” this drink features espresso with a splash of alcohol, such as grappa or sambuca.
Caffè americano: After trying drip coffee in the United States, Italians decided to offer tourists a taste of home. Their interpretation: espresso diluted with plenty of hot water.
Caffè lungo: This “long coffee” comprises espresso with a splash of hot water but is stronger than the americano.

To blend in: Since the coffee experience is designed to be enjoyed socially and in small doses, to-go cups are nonexistent in Italy.

4. THINK REGIONALLY. Each of Italy’s 20 regions boasts its own unique coffee culture. Espresso may be ubiquitous, but there are many regional twists to the caffè. In the northern Le Marche, enjoy a caffè anisette for an anise-flavored espresso; in southern Sicily, try caffè d’un parrinu, an Arabic-inspired coffee flavored with cloves, cinnamon, and cocoa.

To blend in: Before ordering, research the region for local ingredients – or subtly listen to your fellow coffee drinkers at the cafe!

5. AL BANCO. In Italy, coffee is typically enjoyed al banco, or at the bar, with friends. When you visit Caffè Vergnano at Eataly, you will likely find our Italian colleagues standing al banco, chatting with a caffè in hand.

To blend in: In Italy, it is common to order and drink your coffee first, then pay at the register. Practice this method at Caffè Vergnano, which follows the same tradition.

How to make a cup of genuine italian coffee

Now that you’re an Italian caffè aficionado, create your own coffee culture with our wide selection of Italian coffee and espresso. Then, stop by our cafés at your local Eataly!

How to make a cup of genuine italian coffee

    March 6, 2021
  • Source: Upscale Living Magazine

When we want a superior cup of coffee that surpasses any filter or instant coffee taste, we have to turn to low-tech methods. Those methods produce only a small batch of coffee, usually enough for two to four cups, but they’re superior in taste.

If you want to uplift your coffee-making skills, we’ve got you covered. In this guide, we’ll give you tips on using slow coffee brewing methods and creating great cups of coffee every day.

Get a Good Coffee Grinder

Before we start talking about various brewing techniques, we have to stress the importance of a good coffee grinder. Since stale coffee lacks taste, it’s slightly more bitter compared to a fresh one; getting a good grinder is the first step towards creating new coffee habits.

Oxidation is a process that breaks down organic molecules and changes the flavor of food. When it comes to coffee beans, oxidation causes the oils to evaporate, thus varying the taste from fruity or floral towards bitter.

You can see that in the Baratza Encore review , it takes less than one minute to assemble the grinder and have it ready for some coffee. Beginners can use the 40 grind sizes and find which one works best for them. You can easily adjust the settings until you find the perfect range.

For example, for espresso, you should do between 4 and 9; Chemex uses 18-23, while for French press, it’s best to opt for 24-34. This way, every coffee pot will have the same taste, and you’ll start noticing different aromas as well as nuances of your morning coffee.

Make Italian Moka Pot

Stovetop espresso maker, also known as Moka pot, uses basic physics to make a tasty espresso. It has a sturdy built that consists of three champers for water, ground coffee, and espresso. It was created in 1933 when an Italian coffee maker realized how to utilize boiling water to get an appropriately dense espresso.

Today, the Moka pot is one of the favorite coffee brewing, and it had a comeback due to its simplicity. If you’re going to use it at home, you’ll need approximately 22 grams of fresh grind and boiling water. When you put the water in the lower chamber, cover it with the coffee filter and screw the spouted top.

Now, it’s time to place it on the stove on medium heat and listen. When the water starts boiling, you’ll hear how the pressure pushes it through the coffee to make the silky brew. Lastly, if you like a splash of milk in your coffee, warm it up, and you’ll have a taste of Italy every day.

How to make a cup of genuine italian coffee

Morning Coffee from AeroPress

Every coffee lover knows about AeroPress by now as it’s one of the biggest trends in small brewing coffee. It’s a simple system that requires warm water, ground coffee, and a small filter. When you assemble your AeroPress, one of the things you need to be careful of is the residual moisture. When you dry it with a cloth, it will be ready for brewing.

When you place it on your scale, add coffee, pour hot water, and stir the grounds. After a few minutes, it’s time to push. Baristas claim that coffee brewed like this has a specific taste.

Brewing Coffee with Chemex

Many people compare Chemex brewing to a calming morning ritual. Before you get started, keep in mind that it’s a very simple process that will give you a flavorful coffee without using complex techniques to enhance its natural aroma .

The Chemex is made from premium quality heat-resistant glass that imparts no additional flavors to the coffee. With good filter bags, you’ll be able to make coffee every day without any other equipment. It looks well on any kitchen counter as its design is very contemporary and minimalist. One of Chemex’s most likable characteristics is that it’s made from everyday materials, and when you stop using it for coffee, it can serve many other purposes.

Start Your Day with an Aromatic Coffee

With a lot of coffee accessories and complex brewing pots, there’s always a new way to make your morning coffee. Within that universe, the Chemex and Moka pot are one of the few that appeal to a wide range of coffee enthusiasts. However, with new trends emerging every few years, it’s impossible to foresee which direction the coffee brewing will develop.

Now that you have a few ideas on making a perfect coffee cup, you can decide which one you find most appealing and get it. Don’t forget that good-quality coffee ground in the right way is equally important for the taste and texture of your favorite warm drink.

How to make a cup of genuine italian coffee

Luca Piccini Basile / iStock

Coffee Sambuca is probably the easiest Italian coffee drink out there. It is very popular in southern Italy, though the eastern region of Le Marche is where you’ll find this drink most often.

To make the Coffee Sambuca, all you need to do is float three coffee beans in one to two ounces Sambuca and sip it slowly as an aperitif or digestif. Some drinkers prefer to light it on fire (known as a Flaming Coffee Sambuca) because it lightly toasts the beans.

The three coffee beans symbolize health, happiness, and prosperity. They can be chewed to complement the anise notes in the Sambuca or left as a garnish. Additionally, it is considered bad luck to serve an even number of beans.

In Italian, the Coffee Sambuca is also known as ghiaccio e mosche, which literally translates to ‘ice and flies.’ The ‘flies’ refer to the floating coffee beans, of course. You might also hear this drink called ‘fire and ice.’

Ingredients

  • 3 coffee beans (whole, roasted)
  • 1 to 2 ounces Sambuca (chilled or room temperature)

Steps to Make It

Gather the ingredients.

Pour the sambuca into a small, clear glass.

Float the coffee beans on top and serve.

Another Way to Enjoy Coffee and Sambuca

You will quickly find that coffee and the anise found in sambuca are a perfect match. In fact, it is one of the best flavor pairings you’ll come across. Even people who are not fans of anise find they enjoy this combination tremendously.

It is particularly popular in Italy, home of both sambuca and espresso. The Caffè Corretto is another popular Italian drink that showcases the two flavors in a single cup. It translates to mean ‘corrected coffee’ and is as simple as adding a drizzle of sambuca to a freshly pulled shot of espresso.

However, if you’re ordering a caffè corretto in Italy, be sure to specify the liquor as it can also be made with grappa, a style of brandy.

To distinguish the two, order either:

Caffè corretto alla grappa

Caffè corretto alla sambuca

What Is Sambuca?

Sambuca seems like a great liqueur, but what is it? Sambuca is a traditional Italian liqueur that is thought of as one of the world’s great digestif drinks, meaning that it will help aid digestion after a meal.

The liqueur is predominantly flavored with anise (or aniseed, the spice that tastes like black licorice) along with other herbs and spices. Each brand of sambuca has its own (often) secret recipe and while all sambucas have the same general flavor profile, there are subtle differences.

Sambuca is a liqueur that can be drunk straight (as we see in the Coffee Sambuca), either at room temperature or slightly chilled. It is also common to ​use it in a variety of cocktails and shooters like the B-53. If you come across a cocktail recipe that simply states ‘anise liqueur,’ sambuca is one of your best options.