How to make a difference as a time management coach

Task & Time Management

Do you often think “If I can just get through this week, I’ll be okay,” and the next week you feel just as out of control? In our current work climate, there just isn’t enough time to get your important work done. This is where time management skills and strategies come in. With proper support you CAN increase your productivity.

As your Productivity Coach I will:

  • Customize productivity tools to maximize your strengths
  • Show you how to prioritize your tasks so you work with less stress
  • Simplify your routines so you can focus on the work that counts
  • Streamline your work space to increase your productivity
  • Leverage your technology to enhance your work
“Time Management isn’t about managing your time – it’s about managing your work.” Ellen Faye
The difference between successful people and really successful people is that really successful people say no to almost everything.”

Focus and Setting Priorities

Saying “NO” is the most powerful productivity tool ever, however, saying “NO” isn’t always so easy. The Myers Briggs Foundation estimates that 46% of the US population are Perceivers (last letter – P or J). Perceivers inherently like to keep their options open, and it goes against their nature to say “no.” What are you supposed to do? Getting clear on goals and priorities helps.

As your Productivity Coach I will:

  • Support you in developing a personal strategic plan to guide your work. This plan will help you to
    • Clarify what’s important and set your goals accordingly
    • Set priorities to support your goals and drive results
    • Support you in conducting weekly focus sessions to keep you on target
  • Help you to help those you work with to develop goals and priorities, and if desired, work with them as well
  • Teach you my personalized system for managing ongoing priorities

Teach Your Players Time Management as a Coach

So you’ve crossed the threshold from time manager, to time management trainer as part of your coaching. You have a few great opportunities here and you will end up giving your players skills that will last them a lifetime!

Start Early

That’s right; from day one with your client or team you should be focusing on building their time management skills. This is especially key if you have the chance to work with young players. The younger the better as they retain time management skills brilliantly at young ages, and less so into teenage or adult years.

Use every minute of your first practice to make your players aware of the time that is at stake, and that this is time they’re never getting back. Instead of using the rush method which will eventually become useful, use these tactics to bring in time management awareness:

  1. Constantly remind the players of how many minutes you are into the practice.
  2. Follow up in a specific time frame, and then ask them to do the same.
  3. Remind players how long they will be spending on one task, and don’t budge on the time.

Put Another Player in Charge of the Clock

There is a trust between players and coaches that is constantly being tested. However, they often turn to their teammates for support. Instead of taking on every responsibility, use a player for each time block to hold the clock. An old school stop watch is great and it allows them to take a few minutes as a break.

What this does is reinforce that you are not the almighty master of the clock. Instead it spreads that the time spent in practice is the same every time. Regardless of who is holding the clock and who is calling out the times? It will also deter your clients from keeping a countdown for the end of practice. They never know when they’ll be called on to be the time keeper.

Teach the Pomodoro Technique

One of time management leader’s favorites is the Pomodoro technique. Otherwise known as time blocking. Using a time block of about twenty minutes you can get peak productivity out of each player for a determined amount of time. You also cut down on the time spent between tasks as they feel the need to start as soon as the next twenty minute time frame begins.

Using the Pomodoro technique and encouraging your players to use it too will help them understand how much time passes sometimes without us noticing. Time must be managed appropriately and if there is a chance to be aware then it must be taken.

Goal Setting

Unlike other time management techniques that can often be felt right away, goal setting is about the long-term vision. You can work with your players to set micro-goals in each practice and then large goals for each month.

Teaching them goal setting will allow them to better understand how their everyday activates affect how well they will perform in the future. Time management is crucial to goal completion and setting goals is the onset of many time management skills being developed. It is the classic, which came first, question.

Help you players develop a vision, then build a focus and eventually achieve their goal with success. Through focus and vision they can execute the many time management methods available to them through your coaching.

Whenever you are struggling to teach time management methods to your players, work with them on a goal. Even if it is a goal that will only be for the practice session.

Time Management & Booking App

Using technology and a time slot booking web application like Time Slot Pro will decrease the amount of time spent on tasks that should be automated when it comes to clients booking and paying for your time.

  • Coaching Approach
  • management

It is not uncommon to hear the terms “managing” and “coaching” used interchangeably. Those who understand the difference (including you, after you read this article) cringe a little inside when this occurs because it is likely they have worked for or with a manager who certainly was not a coach—and therefore was ineffective.

In a nutshell, coaching employees is a function of managing that every good leader of others must be able to do well.

What Is Managing?

How to make a difference as a time management coach

The term “managing” refers to the job of overseeing the work of others. The responsibilities of a manager typical include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Onboarding and orienting new employees
  • Conducting meetings
  • Delegating tasks and assignments
  • Giving feedback
  • Monitoring progress and performance
  • Making decisions
  • Dealing with conflicts

Unfortunately, much of the time, “managing” employees means solving their problems for them. Poor employees often rely on the boss to solve their problems because that’s what they’ve been trained to do—regardless of whether that training was intentional or not.

This is not to say that there aren’t times when managing is necessary . When you’re rushing to meet a deadline, or when a client has very specific needs and you are the most familiar with them, it may be best for your employees to defer to you and trust you to get the team where it needs to go. Other situations that require pure management include:

  • Handling new or inexperienced staff, especially if this is their first foray into that particular assignment.
  • Resolving emergencies that demand immediate action.
  • Completing an undesirable task.

These situations require expediency, decisiveness, and accuracy. They are driven by results and there is little, if any, room for error. In these cases, the team just needs someone to be in charge and distribute assignments.

However, being a controlling, order-giving manager is generally a less effective leadership style because it usually results in disengaged employees who rely on their superiors to make all the decisions. Ideally, managers can step up and serve as coaches for employees as well.

What Is Coaching?

The term “coaching” refers to a two-way communication process between members of the organization (leaders to team members, peers to peers, team members to leaders) aimed at influencing and developing the employees’ skills, motivations, attitudes, judgment, or ability to perform, along with their willingness to contribute to an organization’s goals.

Coaching employees involves teaching them how to arrive at a solution on their own. It’s about teaching critical-thinking skills that lead to self-reliance instead of just falling back on the boss. Managing is typically a one-way street; the coaching approach to management relies on open communication in both directions (employee to supervisor and supervisor to employee).

Effective leaders guide their employees in their work and then get out of the way. These leaders trust their employees to make smart decisions. When employees feel trusted, workplace satisfaction increases, work gets done more efficiently, and the quality of that work improves.

Unfortunately, too many managers fall short of success because they focus on the task and bottom line results, overlooking the fact that results are best achieved through developing and inspiring others to achieve those results. While achieving results through others is a challenging task, organizations cannot grow and compete if their managers don’t talk to people about their performance and contributions to the organization. By implementing regular and skillful coaching , managers can fulfill their responsibility to deliver:

  • Enhanced performance and improved productivity.
  • A work environment where people are highly engaged.
  • A culture of trust within the organization.

Once a manager learns how to think, talk, and act like a coach, the “coaching process” not only becomes second nature to the coach but changes the attitudes and behaviors of his or her team members.

Improve Your Coaching Skills

With this in mind, it’s clear that coaching skills have an important place in your leadership toolkit. Here are four ways to improve your abilities in this area:

1. Motivate instead of command.

Motivating others to take action is one of the primary goals of coaching. A coach learns how to balance providing direction with remaining inspiring and accessible to employees. Coaches show employees their potential by pointing out the value in their work and helping them develop self-confidence. This approach creates more effective and engaged employees because they begin to develop a sense of pride in what they do for a living.

2. Support your peers.

Be a source of support to your colleagues. Recognize that it can be draining when you merely vent or complain to those who work in roles similar to your own. Instead, ask specific questions when you have a problem to solve that feels beyond your experience. Seek advice—not just an outlet for frustration.

You can further build relationships with colleagues by offering at least as much support as you ask for. Allow them to bring problems to you and get your perspective. Be generous with your time when they need similar help.

3. Make it desirable to do quality work.

Let’s say, for instance, that there’s an employee who has a heavier workload than usual. This extra work makes him feel anxious and stressed. A manager might just tell him to make sure he gets it done somehow—but this is rarely effective and can even exacerbate the employee’s anxiety.

A better way to handle it would be to acknowledge and validate his feelings, and then encourage him: tell him that he is capable, that you know he has the capacity to go above and beyond the minimum requirements of the job. Emphasize how much you’ve appreciated his work in the past, and then make sure there’s a reward of some kind when he’s done (whether that’s a gift card, a small bonus, or even just public or private recognition is up to you).

When possible, offer additional help with the workload in the meantime as well. For instance, ask if there are resources he needs that would streamline the task. Sensing your support along the way can help employees feel more enticed to reach that final carrot.

4. Make it a pleasure to work for you.

Remember that the culture and climate of a workplace are key components of employee motivation. The atmosphere should be fun, safe, and inspiring for employees because satisfied employees foster satisfied customers.

Check out the related services from CMOE below that can help you improve your coaching skills in a more systematic way.

Jan 5 2018

How to make a difference as a time management coach

There has never been a time where sports have garnered as much of the public’s attention. Successful coaches are successful motivators, first and foremost. Some even attain celebrity status equaling that of their key players. With a myriad of sports being broadcast 24/7, today’s young athletes don’t just compete for fun, they envision a lifestyle of the rich and famous and are motivated to train like professionals, committing hours daily of physical and mental conditioning to achieve peak performance. And while emphasis in coaching once focused primarily on physiology to improve athletic performance, other disciplines of human behavior have become just as important in training athletes.

Coaches impact their players by teaching life skills in hopes of developing positive relationships. Establishing a positive athlete-coach relationship is critical to achieving effective communication. No relationship, whether on the playing field or off, can blossom without communication and the relationship between players and coaches is no different. Players need to feel that their coach cares about them as a person; not just as a tool to win games. Players are people first and effective coaches take the time for the young student as well as the player. And as a positive athlete-coach relationship develops, many athletes begin considering their coaches as role models.

Dr. Tara M. Collins, earned her Doctor of Philosophy in Business Administration in Sports Management and Leadership from Northcentral University. She states, “Coaches have a large influence on the athletes, who transition through their programs. They make a difference and have an impact on their success. As a coach, I think it is important to listen and pay close attention to what the athletes are saying. You have to remember it is not just about playing sports, but assisting with building character and growth in order for them to succeed in life. My overall goal is to build a player’s confidence level, thought process, skill set, and integrity. There are varying ways for me to accomplish these tasks and they are built around each athlete and how they process information. This allows me to show that I know who they are and I am interested in their success on and off the court. These factors build an unbreakable relationship between the coach and athlete. My high school coach (Ann Candies) did the same for me and I truly respect her for what she did for me.”

Coaches motivate the athletes they work with by motivating mind as well as muscle to improve performance and train effectively. But to do so, the athlete must commit to embracing the information the coach provides because of a true belief in that mentor. By listening as well as instructing, positive relationships are developed with their players, increasing the chances of team success. And that one-to-one communication must be infectious so that team members communicate effectively with each other during the game. While coaches may have the ideal game plan drawn up, if they can’t communicate with their team, the potential for victory is reduced.

Ultimately, coaches should be passionate about teaching sport skills to their athletes. Coaches must be life-long learners of sport in order to properly train their athletes for peak performance. As the profession of sport coaching has evolved and sport has become a multi-billion dollar industry, many coaches have discovered sport incorporates both physical and mental training.

How to make a difference as a time management coach

When defining time management, the terms “effective” and “efficient” are often used interchangeably. You can drastically improve your ability to get important things done when you understand the difference between these two mindsets of how to manage time.

Effective vs. efficient time management

Let’s start by looking at the definition for each:

Effective (adj.): Adequate to accomplish a purpose; producing the intended or expected result.

Efficient (adj.) Performing or functioning in the best possible manner with the least waste of time and effort.

To remember this, think of efficiency as being part of effectiveness. It’s not just about getting things done, but doing the best things, and doing them in the best way.

At work, these time management skills play a large role in performance. Knowing how to manage time both effectively and efficiently can be a real game changer in your career.

How to manage your time for better results

Why do some people seem to manage their time and get things done so much better than others? They consider effectiveness before efficiency.

Say you have a list of people you need to call about an upcoming meeting. If you think in terms of efficiency, you consider the best time to call, whether the list is accurate and current, and so on.

But, if you think in terms of effectiveness, you would ask yourself, “Is calling these people the best use of my time?” You examine options, such as delegating the task, using a different mode of communication, or whether it can be eliminated altogether so your time can be used more effectively.

Efficient time management is about how well you do something, but effectiveness first considers whether you should be doing it at all!

For truly effective time management, you need to back up from your to-do list and first determine your priorities and goals. Where are there unnecessary tasks that you can streamline or get rid of altogether? What are the big important things that you’ve been putting off?

Think about your day-to-day tasks. Are you focusing on results or activities? If you focus on activities, you may get to the end of the day and feel like you haven’t accomplished anything at all. Rather than focusing on checking things off or just trying to pass the time, think about the big picture results you’re aiming for.

A lot of people try to get more things done by multitasking. They stay busy all day, switching between tasks, yet they’re no closer to reaching any personal or professional goals. This is because the human brain isn’t built for multitasking.

Working on two or more things at the same time is scientifically impossible. We can rapidly switch from one task to another, but the brain can only process one activity at a time.

Multitasking always gets in the way of effectiveness. By focusing on results, you are more likely to avoid distractions and focus on a single task from start to finish, until you can cross it off your list.

Now that we’ve established the importance of effectiveness, let’s discuss how you can optimize efficiency to reach the results you want.

Set daily goals

Goal setting is a key component of time management. Setting daily goals allows you to align your activities with the big picture results you’re working toward. Some people find it helpful to make a list of their daily tasks. Lists can bring order to chaos, and help you organize what is otherwise overwhelming.

Goals provide clarity, purpose, and meaning at work.

Prioritize your goals

Now prioritize for effectiveness. Remember, there’s no point in doing a job efficiently if you shouldn’t be doing that job at all. Think about what’s really important and how much time you’ll need to accomplish each goal. Then schedule an uninterrupted block of your time to do it.

Dwight Eisenhower, the 34th President of the United States, was famous for his incredible ability to sustain productivity. He developed a method (now know as the Eisenhower Matrix) for prioritizing tasks based on urgency and importance. To build more efficient time management skills, you should focus primarily on tasks that are important and need to be done on the same day.

After those tasks are done, then you can move on to the things that are less important and less urgent.

Shut down distractions

Distractions at work are the number one productivity drainer.

One study found that Americans check their phones every 12 minutes, on average. You might not notice a big difference, but when you switch your focus to your phone and back to the task you were previously working on, you have a hard time immediately concentrating again. This habit can add up to significant amounts of productivity lost to the effects of task-switching.

Now think about other distractions at work: emails, coworkers, social media, etc. Making a conscious effort to shut down distractions so you can focus on a single task will dramatically increase your productivity and overall performance.

Add to Mendeley

Abstract

Decision-making is a fundamental element of any sport, especially open, fast, dynamic team sports such as volleyball, football, soccer, rugby, and basketball. In order to succeed in winning any game and competition at national and international level in all individual and team sports there is a need to reconsider all success factors in order to make a better decision to win. At the elite level, coaches and athletes appear to consistently make good decisions in situations that are highly temporally constrained. Although there is no systematic ways of decisionmaking in sports for decision making agents such as coaches, athletes, and referees, there are some characteristics that seem general enough to take away from these fields. This article is to identify these features, then relate them to the methods applied to study decisions in sports by mostly focusing on coaches and athletes.

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Peer-review under responsibility of the Organizing Committee of the ERPA Congress 2014.

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At many companies, low morale is a fact of life. Any number of problems can stifle people, leaving them unmotivated and struggling to do their job.

As a manager, you may feel low morale yourself; no one is immune to the harsh realities of the modern workplace.

Gallup’s engagement stats show us year after year that little is changing. On average, two of every three people are not engaged at work.

How to make a difference as a time management coach

What can you do about it?

It’s easy to feel helpless in one of these bad work situations. In fact there’s a term for when you lose hope: learned helplessness.

However, today is about what you can do to make a difference.

Remember: As a leader or manager of any kind, you can make things better for those around you. It’s one of our all time favorite quotes from the legendary leader, author, and former CEO of Intel, Andy Grove:

How to make a difference as a time management coach

So whether you’re thinking about leaving yourself, or you see low morale in your department, here’s what you can do to make a difference for you and your team.

Below are suggestions, data, and tactics you can try with your team. Every situation is unique, so your mileage may vary. However, there’s a good chance some of these will make a bigger difference than you might expect.

How to make a difference as a time management coach

1) Talk about the elephants, and why you’re staying

Some of the most dangerous things that can undermine a good team are the things that go unsaid. As a manager, you have to get comfortable having difficult and uncomfortable conversations.

Ed Catmull, cofounder of Pixar Animation Studios wrote in Creativity, Inc on the value of candor in management:

“Candor isn’t cruel. It does not destroy. On the contrary, any successful feedback system is built on empathy, on the idea that we are all in this together, that we understand your pain because we’ve experienced it ourselves.”

There are few bigger elephants in the room for a manager than you and your team members being unhappy and thinking about leaving.

One elephant that is even bigger though is death. Sheryl Sandberg wrote about dealing with her husband’s death, where no one knew what to say or how to help her. So she tackled it head on. As she wrote in a poignant public Facebook post:

“Once I addressed the elephant, we were able to kick him out of the room.”

Kick the elephant out of the room.

There’s a few things you can do to tackle the sticky issue of low morale and people thinking about quitting or interviewing elsewhere.

First, you can be honest about your situation. Share a bit about what you’ve found challenging and heard from others on the team. If you’ve thought about leaving, they probably have too, so if you have trust in your relationship you can be frank there.

It can also help to just let them vent. In many cases, people just want to feel heard.

If you’re lucky you might even hear something that is within your control. At that, point you can do something about it to help them.

You may be surprised how much even small wins and progress can help them feel better about their job and boost morale.

Most importantly, by talking about this elephant in the room, you’re more likely to have your team member support you; if they end up leaving, you may need their help finding and training a replacement, or need them to help you with more than the standard 2 weeks notice.

Time management seminars can help you become more efficient. Haven’t you always wanted to control your schedule, manage papers and files, and tackle your email in a way that frees up your time and skyrockets your productivity? After attending one of the top class time management courses, you’ll find yourself breezing through these tasks effortlessly.

Why Try Time Management Seminars?

It hasn’t been this easy ever before to correctly set a priority on your daily tasks and keep your life and work organized. There is enough expertise around with running an efficient and effective household, office or business. Most time management seminars will guarantee that your productivity will go up even after the very first day of implementing the training program lessons in your time management processes.

Among the various things covered in a time management event are:

  • how to deal with incoming messages, emails and documents
  • how to organize your life so you can find whatever you need immediately
  • how to meet deadlines and get done ahead of time
  • how to avoid procrastinating, and stop worrying about delays
  • how to focus on whatever you’re doing, and bounce back from interruptions

All these skills will transform your way of working, and enhance your efficiency in several ways.

Productivity and Time Management Seminars

A study by the University of Alabama about how time management can save costs and increase profits, it was confirmed that productivity grew by almost a fifth after employees attended an event teaching time managing skills. There’s little doubt that seminars can help your company or business become better organized.

Be it in a corporate setting or in a smaller office environment, simple time management systems can help you get better organized. Any working environment is the receiving point for a flood of material – letters, documents, email, project reports, packages, and more. Sorting through it all, sifting the important material, and dealing with it efficiently is your highest priority.

Having a system that deals with this issue can streamline operations and help save time. Managers and employees are all part of the same set of processes, and the system itself grows stronger with repetition and improvement. Having a common framework and decision-making sequence helps to organize work and reduces confusion.

Another benefit from time management lectures or events is getting managers and workers on the same page. By identifying priorities and ensuring that they match, you create better accountability within your organization. Even if someone goes on leave, the others can smoothly take over the work because everyone does things in a similar fashion.

What To Expect From Time Management Seminars?

You should expect to receive instruction and feedback which will help you create systems with step by step details that are relevant to your company or business, can be easily implemented, and that are sustainable over time. Some seminars are conducted by teams of instructors who will visit your office, assess the situation that prevails, and provide customized solutions that fit your specific needs. Others are general and principle-driven, and you might have to ask clarifying questions to ensure that the concepts can be adapted to your business.

No matter what approach time management seminars take, all of them are rooted in the principles of Time Management Tao, and will teach you how to:

How to make a difference as a time management coach

When defining time management, the terms “effective” and “efficient” are often used interchangeably. You can drastically improve your ability to get important things done when you understand the difference between these two mindsets of how to manage time.

Effective vs. efficient time management

Let’s start by looking at the definition for each:

Effective (adj.): Adequate to accomplish a purpose; producing the intended or expected result.

Efficient (adj.) Performing or functioning in the best possible manner with the least waste of time and effort.

To remember this, think of efficiency as being part of effectiveness. It’s not just about getting things done, but doing the best things, and doing them in the best way.

At work, these time management skills play a large role in performance. Knowing how to manage time both effectively and efficiently can be a real game changer in your career.

How to manage your time for better results

Why do some people seem to manage their time and get things done so much better than others? They consider effectiveness before efficiency.

Say you have a list of people you need to call about an upcoming meeting. If you think in terms of efficiency, you consider the best time to call, whether the list is accurate and current, and so on.

But, if you think in terms of effectiveness, you would ask yourself, “Is calling these people the best use of my time?” You examine options, such as delegating the task, using a different mode of communication, or whether it can be eliminated altogether so your time can be used more effectively.

Efficient time management is about how well you do something, but effectiveness first considers whether you should be doing it at all!

For truly effective time management, you need to back up from your to-do list and first determine your priorities and goals. Where are there unnecessary tasks that you can streamline or get rid of altogether? What are the big important things that you’ve been putting off?

Think about your day-to-day tasks. Are you focusing on results or activities? If you focus on activities, you may get to the end of the day and feel like you haven’t accomplished anything at all. Rather than focusing on checking things off or just trying to pass the time, think about the big picture results you’re aiming for.

A lot of people try to get more things done by multitasking. They stay busy all day, switching between tasks, yet they’re no closer to reaching any personal or professional goals. This is because the human brain isn’t built for multitasking.

Working on two or more things at the same time is scientifically impossible. We can rapidly switch from one task to another, but the brain can only process one activity at a time.

Multitasking always gets in the way of effectiveness. By focusing on results, you are more likely to avoid distractions and focus on a single task from start to finish, until you can cross it off your list.

Now that we’ve established the importance of effectiveness, let’s discuss how you can optimize efficiency to reach the results you want.

Set daily goals

Goal setting is a key component of time management. Setting daily goals allows you to align your activities with the big picture results you’re working toward. Some people find it helpful to make a list of their daily tasks. Lists can bring order to chaos, and help you organize what is otherwise overwhelming.

Goals provide clarity, purpose, and meaning at work.

Prioritize your goals

Now prioritize for effectiveness. Remember, there’s no point in doing a job efficiently if you shouldn’t be doing that job at all. Think about what’s really important and how much time you’ll need to accomplish each goal. Then schedule an uninterrupted block of your time to do it.

Dwight Eisenhower, the 34th President of the United States, was famous for his incredible ability to sustain productivity. He developed a method (now know as the Eisenhower Matrix) for prioritizing tasks based on urgency and importance. To build more efficient time management skills, you should focus primarily on tasks that are important and need to be done on the same day.

After those tasks are done, then you can move on to the things that are less important and less urgent.

Shut down distractions

Distractions at work are the number one productivity drainer.

One study found that Americans check their phones every 12 minutes, on average. You might not notice a big difference, but when you switch your focus to your phone and back to the task you were previously working on, you have a hard time immediately concentrating again. This habit can add up to significant amounts of productivity lost to the effects of task-switching.

Now think about other distractions at work: emails, coworkers, social media, etc. Making a conscious effort to shut down distractions so you can focus on a single task will dramatically increase your productivity and overall performance.