How to make every day more productive (and more meaningful)

How to make every day more productive (and more meaningful)

“All appears to change when we change.”

I admit it, I’m a change addict. I love new cities, apartments, jobs, and friends. This can be both a strength and a weakness.

On the one hand, I never shy away from a new experience or opportunity. On the other hand, it takes a strong effort for me to stick with anything once the novelty wears off.

So today I started thinking about all the ways I can make a day exciting without changing any of the big things that need to stay constant if I’m to make progress on my larger goals. Here’s what I’ve come up with.

1. Start the day with a blank piece of paper and the question: “What if today were my last?”

Write down what you’d do differently and then try to do at least five of those things.

2. Wear something much bolder than you usually do.

This gives people the opportunity to see you in a new light, which means they may interact with you differently.

3. Take a different path when you walk to work.

Maybe you’ll pass a restaurant you’d like to try sometime or a gym that’s offering free classes.

4. If you drive, park your car a mile away and take the bus the rest of the way.

I did this one time and met a man on the bus who I dated for a month. Well worth the detour!

5. If you take public transportation for your commute, make the time meditative or educational.

Practice deep breathing, listen to soothing music, or download an audio book for the ride.

6. Take pictures of things that catch your eye throughout the day.

You’ll notice a lot more than you usually do—and new people will likely talk to you to figure out what you’re doing.

7. Change your workspace.

Bring new pictures and candles, or move your desk if you’re able. Rearranging furniture always makes my space more exciting.

8. Start collecting something you often see throughout the day.

It will make the whole day more interesting if you have your eyes peeled for rare coins, specific pens, and odd food labels.

9. Make it a goal to talk to five people you don’t know.

And I mean real conversations. Ask them what they do on the weekends, what their favorite memory is, and whether or not they like spam. (Okay, the last one is less interesting, but I think it says a lot about you if you eat unidentifiable lunch meat.)

10. Commit to complimenting everyone you encounter on something.

Sometimes it will be easy; sometimes it will be challenging. Every time it will brighten someone’s day and fill you with joy.

11. Take a class during your lunch break.

Head to the gym, learn to do pottery, start guitar lessons. You can always eat a sandwich at your desk later.

12. Eat lunch at a different time than usual.

You never know what you’re missing in the office when you head out at the same time every day.

13. Make lunch and bring enough for two people.

Then offer some to someone in your office.

14. Give yourself a challenge.

Maybe it’s to find a lower car insurance rate or talk to someone you secretly admire. I get a big kick out of little victories like these.

15. Read about a topic that’s completely new and interesting to you.

Then start a conversation about it. It’s always fun to share a new passion, especially if the other person gets excited, too.

16. Learn ten new words from a thesaurus and then use them all twice during the day.

Maybe I’m just a dork, but I get excited about stretching my vocabulary!

17. Practice mindfulness during a boring activity.

In Buddhist monk Thich Nhat Hanh’s book The Miracle of Mindfulness, he explains how he stays fully present when washing the dishes—and enjoys it. Anything can be interesting if you get curious about how it works.

18. Count risks.

See how many (smart) risks you can take throughout the day, like accepting a difficult assignment or committing to something you’ve never done before.

19. Say yes to everything.

In the movie Yes Man, Jim Carrey said yes to absolutely everything, even an intimate moment with someone’s grandma. I’m not suggesting you go to that extreme, but you’ll likely have an exciting day if you say yes to most things you’re asked.

20. Commit random acts of kindness.

You’ll get a warm fuzzy feeling and you’ll create some good karma for yourself. You never know when that kindness will come back to you and open up your world.

21. Bet on things.

Once on The Office everyone bet on stupid things, like how long it would take Kelly to explain Netflix to Ryan, or whether Creed would notice they replaced his apple with a potato. If you’re pulling an all-nighter, this could be a fun way to hold onto your sanity.

22. Set up a profile on a dating site (if you’re single).

I was on Match.com for a while, and I have to admit I kind of watched my email like a kid counting down ‘til Christmas.

23. Ask someone to come out to play.

Kids are always willing to jump around, get messy, and give get their blood pumping. You still have legs and endorphins—tap into that. Play basketball after work, go bike riding, or spend some time on the swings.

24. Learn something new during all your routine activities.

When you buy coffee, ask the barista how long the shop has been there. When you make copies, pay attention to how the machine works.

25. Swap apartments with a friend for a night.

Assuming you trust each other, why not? A change of scenery can work wonders; and it’s always fun to see how someone else lives.

I once read that intelligent people are never bored because they’re always curious. You’re smart—start exploring! If you keep your mind engaged and fresh during your downtime, you’ll have far more passion and focus when it’s time to get productive. And equally important, you’ll enjoy more of the minutes that would otherwise just pass by.

About Lori Deschene

Lori Deschene is the founder of Tiny Buddha. She’s also the author of Tiny Buddha’s Gratitude Journal and other books and co-founder of Recreate Your Life Story, an online course that helps you let go of the past and live a life you love. She recently launched a Mindfulness Kit to help reduce our stress and increase our peace and joy. For daily wisdom, join the Tiny Buddha list here. You can also follow Tiny Buddha on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

How to make every day more productive (and more meaningful)

By Mayo Clinic Health System staff

Do you wake up feeling sluggish most mornings? Have caffeinated beverages become a necessity to help power you through the day? If this sounds familiar, it’s time to ditch the quick fixes you rely on, and develop an energy management plan. Getting started may seem daunting, but soon you’ll be energized to keep going once you reap the benefits of a happier, healthier and more productive lifestyle.

What is energy management?

Think of your energy as a limited resource, like money in an account. You begin the day with a certain amount to spend, which varies from person to person based on factors, such as age, sleep, stress levels, medical conditions and lifestyle. Throughout your day, multiple transactions (activities) occur as you withdraw energy from and deposit energy into your account. While you may not always have control over activities that deplete your energy, you can take steps to deposit more energy into your account.

Follow these 7 tips to increase your energy and live a happier, healthier, more productive life:

1. Eat nourishing food.

We all know that wholesome food is the crux for well-being, but it’s common to regard healthy eating primarily as a tool for weight loss. However, according to the 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans, a balanced diet high in fruits and vegetables, lean protein, low-fat dairy and whole grains is what you need for optimal energy. After all, you really are what you eat to some extent. Consume a variety of foods from all the food groups to get a range of nutrients to energize you throughout the day. Opt for fresh or frozen fruits and vegetables, especially nutrient-dense dark, leafy greens and broccoli, as well as orange vegetables, including carrots and sweet potatoes. There are many types of fish and legumes to choose from for healthy protein options. Aim to eat 3 ounces of whole-grain cereals, breads, rice or pasta daily.

2. Sleep seven to eight hours a night.

Getting more sleep seems to be a healthy habit many people need to improve on. We already know that we need at least seven hours of shut-eye each night, so what prevents us from getting it? Think about how you can improve your biggest sleep disruptors and know this: Sleep deprivation can perpetuate serious health conditions, as well as negatively affect your mood, motivation and energy levels. Prioritizing sleep is one of the best things you can do to set yourself up for a successful, energized day.

3. Keep company with good people.

Maximize the amount of time that you spend with people you enjoy being around. Connecting with others who radiate positivity and have similar interests will excite and energize you. On the flip side, people you don’t relate to or who have negative outlooks, complain often or make poor choices will only drain your energy account. Be selective in the company you keep.

4. Avoid news overdose.

The news is an important way to stay connected to what’s happening in the world. It can be educational, entertaining and even uplifting. Unfortunately, the news too frequently is bombarded with stories of suffering. These stories can skew your view of the world and cause you to focus on your worst fears instead of recognizing the good that surrounds you. You can’t avoid these stories altogether, but try to minimize your exposure when you can, especially during trying times.

5. Get regular exercise.

Do you find yourself feeling lethargic halfway through the day? Have you ever gotten winded by simple everyday duties, such as grocery shopping or household chores? Contrary to what you might believe, getting the 150 minutes of weekly activity recommended by the Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans can add to your energy account and not subtract from it. How? Exercise relieves stress and tension, strengthens muscles and boosts endurance, which helps your body to work more efficiently during other physical tasks or activities.

6. Do something meaningful each day.

What do you feel passionate about? Do you have a special talent that you’d like to practice more often or share with others? Do something you enjoy every day, even if it’s something as simple as cooking a healthy meal or listening to your favorite song. Putting effort into the things that matter most to you will help you utilize and reserve your energy in ways that will bring out the best in you.

7. Think good thoughts for others.

Maintaining a compassionate mindset is another way to conserve energy. One example of practicing this way of thinking is called kind attention. For example, try to make eye contact with a stranger and smile, while thinking “I wish you well.” This positive act can, instead, keep you from judging that person. Judging others can cause us to place judgment on ourselves, and that type of negative internal dialogue can be exhausting.

You’ll feel better with each step you take toward this important self-care investment.

Here are a few simple activities that will help you become more mindful of caring for yourself:

Monitor your energy.

Take your energy “temperature” at various points throughout the day, assigning it a number from 1 to 10, with 10 being the highest energy level. Pay attention to the details of your day so you can identify the people or events that impact you the most.

Make incremental changes.

Once you are aware of some of the people or events that sabotage your energy, consider your next steps. Rather than tackling everything at once, choose an area that is important to you, and be realistic with the goals you set. For instance, if disorganization in your home is a big source of daily stress, pick one cabinet, closet or drawer to clear out each week instead of overwhelming yourself with doing it all at once. Then move on to your next goal when you feel ready.

Plan and prioritize.

Take note of the times during the day when your energy levels tend to be the highest. Decide how you can take advantage of those moments by prioritizing important tasks when you are feeling fresh and productive.

Productivity is something we all strive for, but it’s not always easy to stay focused on the tasks at hand. There are a few things you can do to create a more productive day, but keep in mind that you have to work at productivity every single day. Like any other habit, productivity has to be done consistently.

Prepare for the Day

The best way to ensure you’re as productive as possible is to prepare the night before. This means setting aside an hour or so to gather together everything you’ll need the next day. Make your lunch, lay out your clothes, set out anything you need to take with you, like your computer, and make a list of the things you need to accomplish the next day.

Use a Calendar

It doesn’t matter if you prefer an electronic or paper version; just use a calendar or planner. If you aren’t sure what kind of planner to choose, try one of these. Having a designated spot to write down and keep up with any meetings, appointments, or deadlines you have is crucial to being productive. It helps you mentally prepare for what’s coming up and plan other things around existing commitments. Regularly updating and referencing a calendar will help you avoid scrambling at the last minute.

In addition to jotting down meetings and appointments, schedule in important tasks. Treating chores and tasks like meetings makes it easier for you to finish them. Do you need to majorly clean your home? Schedule in two hours to get it done one day after work, and commit to having a sparkly house by the time those two hours are up.

Wake Up Earlier

I know this sounds impossible, but waking up one hour earlier than usual will give you more time to tackle tasks. You can use this hour to start your day however you want. You can use it to workout, to enjoy a cup of coffee in peace, or to get ready at your own pace. Having an extra hour in the morning will lessen the stress of rushing in the morning and give you more focus to handle the day.

Create the Ultimate To Do List

Personally, I live for making to-do lists and marking off each task, but making a to-do list is an art. Write down absolutely everything you need to get done and then prioritize those tasks. When prioritizing, put the tasks that you’re not as eager to do first and then finish them ASAP. Putting off tasks you don’t want to do only takes away time. If you get them done first, then you will have more time to dedicate to other areas of your life.

Don’t forget to mark off tasks as you complete them. Checking items off your list can motivate you to finish the rest of your list, and it gives you a sense of accomplishment. Because moving all the dishes from the sink to the dishwasher really is a big deal.

Step Away from Temptations

The number one killer of productivity is distraction. Eliminate the distractions you can control, such as your phone and social media. Put your phone away in a place you can’t see, hear, or feel it buzzing. Don’t even log into your social media accounts. Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram are all very easy to get sucked into. I promise you won’t miss anything important by staying off social media until you get home in the evening (except for a bunch of selfies of people you don’t actually care about).

In addition, close your email if you can. Sometimes you need to keep your email pulled up for work, but close it as often as possible. Set aside 10 minutes in the morning and afternoon to go through emails and respond to important messages.

Take Some Time for Yourself

You might think that you have to keep working until you go to bed in order to be productive. Take it from me, this will only cause you to burn out. Be focused and stay productive at work, but take an hour or two for yourself when you get home. Spend at least one hour doing something enjoyable and relaxing. Go to the gym or work out in your living room, watch your favorite movie or tv show, take a bubble bath, or just lie on your couch and veg out. It doesn’t matter what you do so long as it doesn’t involve running around like a chicken with its head cut off.

How to make every day more productive (and more meaningful)

Ever wonder why getting ahead can sometimes seem like such a struggle? The truth is: If you want to be highly successful, you need to be highly disciplined. I’ve polled countless executives and entrepreneurs about the things they’re doing every day which help them succeed, and typically they credit simple daily routines which have been proven over time to give them an edge. Check out these quotes from 33 high-achieving individuals who share the habits which help them get ahead in business and life.

1. Read about your industry and beyond.

“I spend an hour, usually after dinner, reading about my industry, related industries, current events and pop culture. I start with daily curation emails like Jason Hirschhorn’s REDEF series and then branch out. I bookmark and tag (first with Delicious, now with Evernote) posts that I like and might refer to later. When possible, I share these posts, along with a brief summary of my rationale for sharing, with my team or friends. If nothing else, this process helps me remember the salient parts of the post and gives me time to explore how they fit into my larger view of things. This is my version of something Alvin Toffler wrote about that likened our world view to a filing cabinet in our brains; whenever new information gets presented to us, we catalogue and file it and then it goes on to inform our worldview in some small way. There’s tremendous power and opportunity in understanding how seemingly unrelated trends and events will go on to affect the work you’re doing.”

Productivity is something we all strive for, but it’s not always easy to stay focused on the tasks at hand. There are a few things you can do to create a more productive day, but keep in mind that you have to work at productivity every single day. Like any other habit, productivity has to be done consistently.

Prepare for the Day

The best way to ensure you’re as productive as possible is to prepare the night before. This means setting aside an hour or so to gather together everything you’ll need the next day. Make your lunch, lay out your clothes, set out anything you need to take with you, like your computer, and make a list of the things you need to accomplish the next day.

Use a Calendar

It doesn’t matter if you prefer an electronic or paper version; just use a calendar or planner. If you aren’t sure what kind of planner to choose, try one of these. Having a designated spot to write down and keep up with any meetings, appointments, or deadlines you have is crucial to being productive. It helps you mentally prepare for what’s coming up and plan other things around existing commitments. Regularly updating and referencing a calendar will help you avoid scrambling at the last minute.

In addition to jotting down meetings and appointments, schedule in important tasks. Treating chores and tasks like meetings makes it easier for you to finish them. Do you need to majorly clean your home? Schedule in two hours to get it done one day after work, and commit to having a sparkly house by the time those two hours are up.

Wake Up Earlier

I know this sounds impossible, but waking up one hour earlier than usual will give you more time to tackle tasks. You can use this hour to start your day however you want. You can use it to workout, to enjoy a cup of coffee in peace, or to get ready at your own pace. Having an extra hour in the morning will lessen the stress of rushing in the morning and give you more focus to handle the day.

Create the Ultimate To Do List

Personally, I live for making to-do lists and marking off each task, but making a to-do list is an art. Write down absolutely everything you need to get done and then prioritize those tasks. When prioritizing, put the tasks that you’re not as eager to do first and then finish them ASAP. Putting off tasks you don’t want to do only takes away time. If you get them done first, then you will have more time to dedicate to other areas of your life.

Don’t forget to mark off tasks as you complete them. Checking items off your list can motivate you to finish the rest of your list, and it gives you a sense of accomplishment. Because moving all the dishes from the sink to the dishwasher really is a big deal.

Step Away from Temptations

The number one killer of productivity is distraction. Eliminate the distractions you can control, such as your phone and social media. Put your phone away in a place you can’t see, hear, or feel it buzzing. Don’t even log into your social media accounts. Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram are all very easy to get sucked into. I promise you won’t miss anything important by staying off social media until you get home in the evening (except for a bunch of selfies of people you don’t actually care about).

In addition, close your email if you can. Sometimes you need to keep your email pulled up for work, but close it as often as possible. Set aside 10 minutes in the morning and afternoon to go through emails and respond to important messages.

Take Some Time for Yourself

You might think that you have to keep working until you go to bed in order to be productive. Take it from me, this will only cause you to burn out. Be focused and stay productive at work, but take an hour or two for yourself when you get home. Spend at least one hour doing something enjoyable and relaxing. Go to the gym or work out in your living room, watch your favorite movie or tv show, take a bubble bath, or just lie on your couch and veg out. It doesn’t matter what you do so long as it doesn’t involve running around like a chicken with its head cut off.

How to make every day more productive (and more meaningful)

My favorite part of any process is the beginning. Or even that moment just before the beginning-;when the whiteboard has yet to be marked, the piece of paper stares back blankly, or the snow is unmarred by footprints I like the first day of school, the start of a new company and, in my business, when a fund has its first closing. It’s a moment of renewal and promise, when anything can happen and everyone is hopeful and positive.

That initial excitement and rush of the new is quickly followed by the need to get things done. As an owner or manager, you understand the importance of maintaining a relentless focus on your company’s productivity. But your personal productivity is just as important. Of course we all want to get things done, but every once in a while, we each need a little help to re-focus. Here are a few pointers:

1. Do the things you don’t like to do first A major personal productivity blocker is putting off difficult tasks and decisions. I once worked for a brilliant woman who suggested returning the most challenging phone calls first thing in the morning. Such tasks and decisions usually require a clear mind, when you are free of distraction and have the most energy. Attacking these tasks early in the day helps you overcome them and makes the rest of your day (or the project) better.

2. Don’t be ruled by your inbox There is a slew of research that says managing your life by email or text response might not be optimal. You know yourself well enough to realize that responding as fast as possible to an email or text will distract you from what you actually should be doing. Plus, you might benefit from a more thoughtful response later. Interacting with others is important, but it likely isn’t the only thing you are supposed to be doing.

3. Don’t play ping pong: We all fall into this trap. You bat something back over the table to someone else, so they now need to deal with it. You check it off your “to do” list, or perhaps it delays a decision you don’t want to make. This doesn’t always move things forward. Before you lob something back to someone else, consider if doing so really helps you get to your goal. As a corollary: Speak to the other party. Don’t just send an email. While email can be productivity enhancer, it often leads to a lot of unnecessary back-and-forth, when an in-person chat or quick phone conversation could resolve multiple issues at once.

4. Block out distraction When you need to do something that requires your full attention, stop multi-tasking. You will get things done faster, and you won’t be derailed by interruptions. You will complete truly important tasks better and faster when you are fully focused. If you pride yourself on multi-tasking, look at this approach as serial multitasking. You’ll be getting a lot done-;one thing after the other.

5. Get started Inertia is a powerful force, and the workplace is no exception. Things that haven’t been started don’t get started. Things that are going keep going. What seem to be huge, complicated or distasteful tasks often seem more conquerable once you get started. Sometimes the best way to tackle a monster task is to break it down and begin to tackle it in pieces. That momentum can get you into-;and through-;the tough parts.

6. Know thyself Know yourself and how you get things done. Are you really going to crunch through that entire report on the plane back from a business trip? Are you really going to be at your best when you pull an all-nighter? When you ultimately aren’t going to be productive, watch the bad movie on the plane, or get some rest so tomorrow you can get cracking early. You won’t waste your time or feel upset that you didn’t do it well. You’ll do better with fresh energy the next day.

Yes, new beginnings get me going, but the satisfaction of getting something done-;and doing it well-;is more rewarding. Recognize your productivity strengths (and weaknesses), so you too can get to that next new thing.

Sharing is caring!

What a person needs is not a relaxed state, but rather to strive and struggle for a worthy goal.

Most of us want to lead a happy life. That’s natural, because pleasure is more attractive than pain. But should happiness be the ultimate goal in life – as the Positive Psychology movement proposes?

There is an easy way to find out. All you need to do is to answer a simple question:

How to make every day more productive (and more meaningful)What were the three most significant moments of your life?

The three most significant moments in my life were the birth of my son, the death of my mother, and my promotion to 1. Dan Blackbelt in karate. Non of these three moments could be described as pleasurable. Giving birth is incredibly painful – until you look into your baby’s eyes. The death of my mother was a time of both grief and joy, and the promotion to Blackbelt was the toughest three hours I’ve ever spent in my life.

Although these three key experiences weren’t pleasurable at the time, they gave my life meaning. Now, when I look back, I experience satisfaction and a sense of joy. It’s the joy that comes from living a meaningful life.

Is your life meaningful?

Seven Ways To Make Your Life Meaningful:

1. Follow your aspirations. Sometimes we confuse aspirations with personal goals, but they are completely different. Aspirations are the answer to the question: “What do I want to give the world?” Whereas personal goals are the answer to the question, “What do I want the world to give me?”

2. Be passionate. Whenever you do something that you are passionate about, it gives meaning to life. Sometimes it can be difficult to balance work, relationships, and passion. But a life without being passionate about something can feel empty.

3. Live by your code of ethics. Every person needs a personal ethical code to have a meaningful life. An ethical code is a set of values that you uphold, even if the consequences might be painful for yourself.

4. Cultivate compassionate. Compassion happens when we stop being the center of our concern, and open to the suffering of others. If we focus on ourselves as the center of the universe and our thoughts revolve around how we were, how we will be, or how others see us – our life will ultimately feel meaningless. Compassion is a way of looking beyond our own needs, to those of others.

5. Be kind. Kindness is not just a feeling, it’s an emotion that leads to action. Kindness gives warmth to a life. Each kind interaction triggers a feeling of connection and pleasure. Actually, kind action is something that gives meaning to your life AND makes you feel happy!

6. Be in service to a greater cause. A great way to give depth and meaning to your life is to do volunteer work. Whether you coach a basketball team for streetkids, or help out with the elderly, or raise money to alleviate world poverty, whenever you step in to serve a greater cause, you give your life meaning.

7. Strive for a better future. Striving for a better future can take many forms, but it always entails developing as a human being. If you strive for a better future, you subscribe to life-long learning. New skills make us more effective in the world, both for our own life, as well as for the cause we serve.

So what about happiness? How do meaning and happiness intersect? My take is that happiness is the by-product of a meaningful life. On its own – as a life goal – happiness can feel shallow. But once you focus on leading a meaningful life, you will feel fulfilled and experience not only fleeting sensations of happiness, but a lasting sense of joy.

What’s your take on this?
Is happiness a worthy life goal? What are your tips for a meaningful life?

How to make every day more productive (and more meaningful)

Some Amazing Comments

Click The Book Cover Below Pre-order Steven Aitchison’s new book The Belief Principle: 7 Beliefs That Will Transform your Life

How to make every day more productive (and more meaningful)

How To Be More Productive, Use Your Time Efficiently & Get Things Done

I have just finished reading my book of the week and I would like to talk about something I read in that book. The book I read was The Science Of Getting Rich By Wallace D.Wattles.

If you want to know how to be more productive, then I am sure that a particular quote of that book would help a lot.

Do every day, all that can be done that day. If everyday is a failure, you can never get rich; while if every day is a success, you cannot fail to get rich.

Every day is either a successful day or a day of failure; and it is the successful days which get you what you want.

If there is something that may be done today, and you do not do it, you have failed in so far as that thing is concerned; and the consequences may be more disastrous than you imagine.

Actually Wallace is pointing out the importance of managing your time as this will help you be more productive, get better results and eventually…get rich.

When it comes to increasing your productivity, there are countless tips that you could incorporate to use your time more efficiently.

If you are interested in the subject of increasing productivity, here are some incredibly helpful resources:

Make a Decision: Prioritize – by Ludvig Sunstrom of StartGainingMomentum

You can also subscribe to D&C’s e-mail list and get my Free Anti-Procrastination eBook along with future news, juicy little secrets and updates on what’s coming next! (pretty good shit – guaranteed!) – And don’t worry, I won’t spam you to death (pinky promise 🙂 ).

Now, even if you have the best resources to increase your productivity – like the ones that I listed above – it’s hard to do it if you don’t have the right mindset and beliefs.

It’s like Bill Gates handing you over full ownership of Microsoft. You won’t be able to cope with owning one of the biggest corporations in the world. Neither would I do – or 99,999% of people.

If we could do what Bill Gates does, we would be billionaires now.

The same applies to becoming more productive. It doesn’t matter if you have the best productivity tips, tricks, and techniques.

You need to know how to use them properly. You might have the fastest car in the world, yet if you are not the best driver – you will struggle to make the most out of this car.

So, when it comes to being more productive – you should really understand the philosophy of the passage I posted above from The Science Of Getting Rich.

Do every day, all that can be done that day. If everyday is a failure, you can never get rich; while if every day is a success, you cannot fail to get rich.

Every day is either a successful day or a day of failure; and it is the successful days which get you what you want.

If there is something that may be done today, and you do not do it, you have failed in so far as that thing is concerned; and the consequences may be more disastrous than you imagine.

Being consciously aware of waking up with the definite goal to do all that can be done that particular day will be a game changer – supposing that you do it consistently.

Reading one hundred articles on “how to be more productive” is worthless if you don’t apply that information. And to take advantage of the 100% of your productivity techniques, you need to have the right attitude.

You must wake up with conviction to kick ass and take names that day and every day after this one!

Just like Wallace said, if you do all that can be done that day, then you turn that day to a success.

And if you succeed in getting things done every day, then there is no other possible outcome than becoming successful.

So, instead of wasting your time mindlessly – try to consciously do as much as you can every single day.

Your success will be the number of your productive days minus your unproductive ones.

If the productive days significantly outnumber the unproductive ones, then you will become successful at everything you do.

It’s all a game of maths. The result depends on how good you can play the game!

  • 6 WINNERS

SHARED

  • Share on Facebook
  • Share on Twitter
  • Email
  • LinkedIn
  • Tumblr
  • Reddit
  • Buffer
  • SMS
  • Facebook Messenger
  • How to make every day more productive (and more meaningful)

    I’ve done it. You’ve done it. We’ve probably all done it. Fallen into that trap where one-on-one meetings with your boss or direct reports become stale and feel like they’re not that useful.

    Especially for teams that work together like a well-oiled machine, these regular meetings can seem redundant. After all, if all your projects are on track and you really have nothing to check in on, why should you meet?

    I’ll tell you why: Because one-on-one meetings aren’t just about checking in on daily work. They’re about getting to know the people you work with better. They’re about discussing higher-level things: feedback, career goals, professional development, and the like. And, ultimately, they exist to help you figure out how you can make good employees happy and keep them around.

    So how can you take these meetings from a weekly necessity to potentially the most valuable 30 minutes of your week? In a recent blog post on popforms, Kate Stull addresses just that. Check out some of my favorite tips below along with a few pointers I’ve picked up on having one-on-ones that really matter.

    1. Ask the Right Questions

    One good way to get more out of your employees than, “So how’s that project going?” Ask better questions! Try and think about open-ended, thought-provoking, and big-picture questions that you can pull out when you find yourself needing a conversation starter.

    popforms actually offers a newsletter that sends you two questions every week to ask your team; everything from “What is one thing I could do to make you more productive?” to “What did you want to be when you grew up?” You can even sign your employees up so they have time to think about their answers ahead of time. While the newsletter is good, it’s also helpful to simply open your mind a little more about what you could really be hitting on during this time.

    2. Don’t Run the Meeting

    One of my favorite tips from Stull is to have your employees run the meeting, not you. After all, this time is largely about people getting face time with you, asking questions, addressing issues, and the like. Since you can’t read minds to plan out the agenda that will best suit each employee, why don’t you have them run the meetings, instead? Not only does this allow your staffers to get the most out of the time, they’ll gain skills in setting an agenda and running an effective meeting.

    If your employees are a little nervous or you find the meetings lagging, at least make it clear that this is meant to be a conversation. That way everyone knows that they can bring things to the table.

    3. Have a Backup Plan

    Nothing to talk about? Have a backup plan to get the conversation rolling. popforms suggests some ideas from Rands in Repose, including a mini performance review or “my current disaster:”

    Chances are, in my professional life, something is currently off the rails. It’s selfish, but if you’re leading with status and I can’t find an interesting discussion nugget, let’s talk about my current disaster. Do you know how many open reqs we have that we can’t hire against? Who is the best hiring manager you know and what were their best moves? The point of this discussion is not to solve my Disaster, the point is that we’re going to have a conversation where one of us is going to learn something more than just project status.

    Talking about a problem you’re facing gives your employees a little more insight into your job—and may even give them a chance to contribute on bigger picture things.

    4. Get Out of the Office

    One of the things I’ve found most helpful in having beneficial conversation during a one-on-one? Get out of the office.

    When you’re sitting in the conference room where you meet for work-related tasks every day, it’s too easy to fall into the habit of just talking about projects and the like. Or, depending on the setup of your office, the concern of being overheard could keep your employees from really opening up. So, at least once every month or two, get out of the office. Go to a coffee shop. Go for lunch. Have a walking meeting around a nearby park. Whatever it is, break up your routine to really give your team members space to talk.

    One-on-ones don’t have to be a drag—in fact, they can be a really powerful time to strengthen your relationship with your boss or employees and make everyone’s work lives better. Read the rest of the popforms post if you want more tips, and get ready to make your meetings matter more, starting now.