How to restart your plex media server

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Do you want to uninstall Plex Media Server completely from the computer? Do you receive strange errors when uninstalling Plex Media Server? Do you fail to install the updated version or other program after uninstalling Plex Media Server? Many computer users can not completely uninstall the program for one reason or another. If some files and components of the program are still left in the system, that means the program is not completely removed and uninstalled. Those leftovers will slow down your computer and stuff your system with invalid files as well as result in many problems for your life, such as strange error popups and unable to install other programs. There are many methods to uninstall the program, please see below:

Windows Add/ Remove Programs offers users a way to uninstall the program and every Operating System has Add/ Remove Programs feature.

* Click Start menu and run Control Panel.

* Locate Plex Media Server and click Change/ Remove to uninstall the program.

* Follow the uninstall wizard and uninstall the program.

How to restart your plex media server

Most computer programs are installed with its build-in uninstaller that can also help uninstall the program.

* Click Start menu and move your mouse to All Programs.

* Find Plex Media Server folder and click on its Uninstaller.

* Follow its uninstaller and uninstall the program.

To run its uninstaller, you can also

* Go to the folder where the program is installed.

* Locate its uninstaller usually named as unins000.exe or uninstall.exe

* Double click on its uninstaller and follow it to uninstall the program.

Please know that both of Windows Add/ Remove Programs and its build-in uninstaller can only uninstall the main executable files of the program, but not all program files and components. Some invalid files may be left in system registry and folders. To completely remove Plex Media Server, you need to get rid of those remnants, otherwise, it will slow down your PC and block you installing other incompatible programs.

To thoroughly delete its files, please follow the steps:

* Run Registry Editor

* Find and delete all registry entries of the program in HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software, HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE and HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Run\eg ui

* Find and delete all files of the program in system folders C:\Program Files\, C:\Document and Settings\All Users\Application Data\ and C:\Documents and Settings\%USER%\Application Data\.

Video Guide: How to edit registry

Note: We only recommend advanced computer users to manually edit registry and remove Plex Media Server, because deleting any single registry entry by mistake will lead to severe problem or even system crash.

There is a much easier and safer way to uninstall Plex Media Server completely. A third party uninstaller can automatically help you uninstall any unwanted programs and completely remove all of its files and free up your hard disk space. Especially when users can not find the program in Add/ Remove Programs or its build-in uninstaller, a third party uninstaller can save your much time and frustration.

Jason Fitzpatrick
How to restart your plex media serverJason Fitzpatrick
Editor at Large

Jason Fitzpatrick is the Editor in Chief of LifeSavvy, How-To Geek’s sister site focused life hacks, tips, and tricks. He has over a decade of experience in publishing and has authored thousands of articles at Review Geek, How-To Geek, and Lifehacker. Jason served as Lifehacker’s Weekend Editor before he joined How-To Geek. Read more.

How to restart your plex media server

Plex Media Server is renowned for smooth and intuitive user experience, so you might be a bit surprised if you find yourself puzzled over exactly how to restart your server. Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered.

Where’s the *@%^ing Restart Button?

If you’re a regular Plex user, you’ve gotten well used to interacting with your Plex Media Server through the web-based GUI—the place where you can handle all sorts of tasks like setting up remote access, sharing your library with friends, and optimizing your media, among other routine tasks and enhancements.

While you can do nearly anything from within the Plex interface, there’s one thing you may have noticed: there’s no reset button. No button, no toggle, no link, not a single reference to start, stopping, or restarting the Plex Media Server to be found anywhere in any of the system menus.

As baffling at that might seem at first, it’s actually a clever way to ensure server stability: you can only restart Plex Media Server if you’re either sitting at the computer it is running on, because that’s the only way to ensure you can turn it back on. If you’re accessing your Plex install through the web GUI away from home (like say on a business trip) and you accidentally shut it down then the server is off until you get home to start it back up again.

How to Restart Your Plex Media Server

So if you can’t restart it from the web control panel, then how do you get the job done? How you restart Plex Media Server varies significantly depending on the system you’re running it on, ranging from the kludgy to the useful. On Windows and macOS, there is no dedicated restart function, and you’re left simply quitting the application and starting it again.

Look for the Plex icon in the Windows system tray (or the macOS menu bar).

How to restart your plex media server

Select “Exit” to safely shut down the server.

How to restart your plex media server

Relaunch the application as you normally would using a shortcut in your Start Menu, Dock, or the like to fire it up.

If you’re running Plex Media Server on a unix-like platform like Linux or FreeBSD, you’ll start, stop, and restart your Plex Media Server from the command line. The following self-explanatory commands trigger each event:

The command-based approach is significantly more flexible because it allows you, if you wish, to set up a cron job to schedule when your server is started, stopped, or restarted.

If you’re running Plex Media Server on a storage appliance like a Synology NAS, you’ll typically find a place within the dashboard of the appliance itself (not the Plex GUI) to restart the Plex application. Synology, for example, has a “package manager” on their devices and you can use the “Action” menu for individual packages to start and stop them, as seen below.

How to restart your plex media server

Because most storage appliances are running a NIX-like environment under their GUI’s, you can often set up a cron-like-job—here’s an example from the Synology forum where someone used the Task Scheduler built into the device to schedule a start/stop sequence to restart their Plex Media Server on a schedule.

With the mystery of the missing restart button solved, you’ll know just where to look the next time you need to restart your Plex Media Server.

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How to restart your plex media server Jason Fitzpatrick
Jason Fitzpatrick is the Editor in Chief of LifeSavvy, How-To Geek’s sister site focused life hacks, tips, and tricks. He has over a decade of experience in publishing and has authored thousands of articles at Review Geek, How-To Geek, and Lifehacker. Jason served as Lifehacker’s Weekend Editor before he joined How-To Geek.
Read Full Bio »

Here are the directions for how to make a powershell script restart plex daily to help reduce the chances of your plex media server becoming unreachable outside your home network after it’s been running for a while. This contains step by step directions for Windows 7. Things will be a bit different for other windows OS’s

Make a folder for the files you’re about to create. Put it wherever you want. I put mine in plex’s data directory (folder isn’t name “data”, it’s just where it stores all the data for your media server).

Make the first file. Name it “script” with a .ps1 extension. Open it up in notepad and paste in the following:

This will kill any process that starts with “Plex”, then run the plex exe to start it back up again. If your plex is installed in a different location, change the path in the Start-Process line to the location of your plex exe. Above is the default location for 64bit windows OS’s. 32bit should remove the ” (x86)”.

Make the second file and name it StartPS.bat (or anything with a .bat extension) Open that file in notepad and paste in the following:

That will run powershell with the privs it requires to start/stop processes.

Open windows task manager and go to the processes tab.

If you don’t have PIDs shown, go to view=> select columns, then check “PID (Process Identifier)”. Hit OK.

Sort by the name of the process (Image Name) and find the running Plex exes.

Write down the Plex Media Server.exe’s PID.

Click your .bat file.

Go back to task manager and see if the PID changed for your plex media server process. If it changed, it worked. If not, it didn’t.

If it errored out you can add the following to the end of the .ps1 script to prevent the powershell script from closing immediately after it runs so you can read the error.

If it didn’t error out, you can now make your scheduled task to kick the script off automatically. You can do this by:

Opening the task scheduler. (start => all programs => accessories => system tools => task scheduler or just search for task scheduler)

Click “Create task” on the right pane.

Name the task whatever you want

Change the “Configured for” at the bottom of the window to Windows 7. (may not be necessary)

Go to the trigger tab. Click new. For the settings, select “daily” and enter the time of day you want it to run. Click OK

Go to the action tab. Click new. The action is “Start a program”. Click browse and find the location of the .bat file. The “start in” field is not optional for us. Enter the path to the folder your two scripts are in (you can copy this from the textbox above, just remove the StartPS.bat from the path. Click OK.

Test it again using the task scheduler. (Record the PID for the plex process, right click the task in the task scheduler library and click run. Check the PID again and see if it changed)

How to restart your plex media server

Sometimes when you try to log into a Plex Media server you might successfully log in only to be kicked out.

The problem can present itself in different ways, but the one element that they all share is that when you try to log into your web-based control panel for your Plex server you won’t be able to access the control panel and you’ll get an error message that says “You do not have permission to access this server.”

Also, if you have used multiple servers or installed your Plex server on the same computer with a different account, you will be left incapable of logging in with the account you want to use.
The issue is. in the Windows Registry, and in the text-based equivalent files on macOS and Linux. There is a problem with how the login credentials for your Plex account have been stored. By going into the settings and deleting the stored tokens for your login, you can make Plex to ask for them again and get a new error-free login.

How to Reset Your Plex Login Token

Even though the basic data we need to remove is exactly the same on every OS, that information is stored in a different place depending on your operating system. We’ll look through each of them starting with Windows.

Note: you must log out of your Plex Server if you’re still logged in.

How to Reset Your Plex Login Token on Windows

Launch the Registry Editor by entering “regedit” in the Start Menu search and hitting Enter. Go to Computer\HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Plex, Inc.\Plex Media Server in the Registry.
Locate the following four entries:

  • PlexOnlineMail
  • PlexOnlineToken
  • PlexOnlineUsername
  • PlexOnlineHome (you are not using the Plex Home managed users feature, then you will not see this entry.)

Right-click on each of these entries and press “Delete”.

How to Reset Your Plex Login Token on macOS

On macOS, the same tokens we erased above are located inside the com.plexapp.plexmediaserver.plist file, which you can find in the

/Library/Preferences/ directory. The easiest way to edit the file is to open Finder, click Go > Go to Folder in the menu bar, and paste

/Library/Preferences/ into the search box. Then you must scroll down until you see the com.plexapp.plexmediaserver.plist file.

Open the file with a text editor and remove the following entries:

PlexOnlineHome

PlexOnlineMail
[email protected]

PlexOnlineToken
XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

PlexOnlineUsername
YourUserName

Like with Windows, you will not have an entry for “PlexOnlineHome” if you do not use the Plex Home feature.

Jason Fitzpatrick
How to restart your plex media serverJason Fitzpatrick
Editor at Large

Jason Fitzpatrick is the Editor in Chief of LifeSavvy, How-To Geek’s sister site focused life hacks, tips, and tricks. He has over a decade of experience in publishing and has authored thousands of articles at Review Geek, How-To Geek, and Lifehacker. Jason served as Lifehacker’s Weekend Editor before he joined How-To Geek. Read more.

How to restart your plex media server

For the most part, the Plex Media Server experience is pretty flawless. You install the server software, you point your Plex clients at it, and start watching your movies. But sometimes, you’ll go to log into your server only to be mysteriously shut out. Let’s dig into some arcane settings and get you back to media nirvana.

The issue manifests itself in a few different ways, but the common element is that when you go to log into your web-based control panel for your Plex server either you can’t access the control panel at all, and get an error like “You do not have permission to access this server.” Or, if you’ve ever dabbled with multiple servers or have removed and installed your Plex server on the same machine with a different account, you’ll be unable to log in with the account you wish to use.

The problem is that deep behind the scenes in the Windows Registry (or in text-based configuration files on macOS and Linux), there’s an issue with how the login credentials for your account have been stored. By diving into the settings and erasing the stored tokens for your login, you can force Plex to ask for them again and get a fresh error-free login.

Note: Before we proceed, to be clear, this process is not about resetting your password and getting a new one from the Plex company (if you need to do so, you can do that here). Instead, this is about forcing your local Plex server to forget previously entered information so you can reenter it and properly authenticate with the central Plex login server.

How to Reset Your Plex Login Token

While the basic information we need to remove (to trigger the reset) is exactly the same on every operating system, that information is located in a different place depending on your system. Let’st take a look first at how to reset your login token on Windows, and then highlight where to find the necessary files on macOS and Linux (and other UNIX-derived) operating systems.

Before performing any edits on any operating system, stop your Plex Media Server first.

Windows: Delete the Appropriate Registry Entries

Open up the Registry Editor by typing “regedit” in the Start Menu search box and run the application. Inside the registry, navigate to Computer\HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Plex, Inc.\Plex Media Server in the left-hand tree as seen below.

How to restart your plex media server

Locate the following four entries:

  • PlexOnlineMail
  • PlexOnlineToken
  • PlexOnlineUsername
  • PlexOnlineHome (Only some users will have this—if you are not using the Plex Home managed users feature, then you will not have this entry.)

Right-click on each of these entries and select “Delete”.

These four entries correspond to your email address, a unique identifier supplies by the central Plex server, your username, and your Plex Home status, respectively. Removing them will force your Plex server to populate them again the next time you attempt to log into your server from your browser.

macOS: Edit the Plist File

On macOS, the same tokens are located inside the com.plexapp.plexmediaserver.plist file, which you’ll find in the

/Library/Preferences/ directory. The fastest way to edit the file is to open FInder, click Go > Go to Folder in the menu bar, and paste

/Library/Preferences/ into the box that appears. From there, scroll down until you see the com.plexapp.plexmediaserver.plist file. Be sure to stop your Plex server before performing the following edit.

Open the file with a text editor and remove the following entries:

You may not have an entry for “PlexOnlineHome” if you don’t use the Plex Home feature, but you should have an entry for the remaining three tokens. After editing and saving the file, start your Plex Media Server again and log into your server from your browser to reauthenticate yourself.

Linux: Edit the Preferences.xml File

In Linux, you just need to make a little edit to a text-based configuration file—in this case, Plex’s Preferences.xml . The general location for the file on Linux is $PLEX_HOME/Library/Application Support/Plex Media Server/ , but it is located in /var/lib/plexmediaserver/Library/Application Support/Plex Media Server/ for Debian, Fedora, Ubuntu, and CentOS installs. If you have a UNIX-derived OS like FreeBSD or a NAS device, check out the full location list here.

Open the Preferences.xml file in the text editor of your choice. Locate and remove the following entries:

PlexOnlineHome=”1″
PlexOnlineMail=”[email protected]
PlexOnlineToken=”XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX”
PlexOnlineUsername=”YourUserName”

Save the file and then start your Plex Media Server again. Log into your server from your web browser with your Plex credentials and you should be up and running again.

That’s all there is to it. As frustrating as the phantom login problem can be, as soon as you locate the correct file and make a small edit then you’re back in business and able to login with your Plex credentials.

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How to restart your plex media server Jason Fitzpatrick
Jason Fitzpatrick is the Editor in Chief of LifeSavvy, How-To Geek’s sister site focused life hacks, tips, and tricks. He has over a decade of experience in publishing and has authored thousands of articles at Review Geek, How-To Geek, and Lifehacker. Jason served as Lifehacker’s Weekend Editor before he joined How-To Geek.
Read Full Bio »

I’m running PMS on Ubuntu 16.04, and find that after a couple of weeks, it starts to play up.

Occasionally you simply can’t access the server from any client- says it can’t be found.

Other times metadata just stops being pulled, for both TV and Movies.

A quick restart of PMS and everything is good again.

Anyone else experiencing this? It’s quite annoying.

Never. Unless I have to install a patch for my OS. PMS is rock solid for me.

This, and my server runs on my desktop.

And there it is

I get 503 errors every few days and I have to kill all services and restart. Really bugs me

I started to have that recently and when I checked task manager I had multiple Plexrelay.exe processes running and I would have to manually close them. To fix this I ended up renaming the plexrelay.exe in the installation directory since it isn’t required for my use case and I haven’t received a 503 since (4-5 weeks).

Only for updates

When I had it running on pc I only restarted when Windows update made me. On my unraid server I’ve never needed to restart to fix Plex either.

Patches a few times a year.

Very very rarely

I almost never need to restart PLEX itself, and the only time the machine it’s on gets rebooted (again rarely) is due to things totally unrelated to PLEX. I’ve never noticed any issues with PLEX running my set-up like this.

Every couple of weeks or so, no one can connect to the PMS. Service is running, process is running. Not sure what’s up, but I kill the process and start it again and it’ fine for a few more weeks.

I’ve setup tasks to restart the service every few days, but this still happens. It hasn’t been such a huge problem that I’ve needed to really dive into it though.

It is entirely possible to access your Plex server remotely while connected to IVPN at the same time. All your Plex traffic stays completely encrypted which guarantees your privacy and security. To make this work, follow the instructions below:

Windows

Activate Port Forwarding in your Client Area

Connect to any non-US based IVPN server location (Port Forward is disabled on all USA servers) & note the external IP address you were assigned by visiting the dnsleaktest.com

Add an exception rule in your Windows firewall to allow the connection.
Hit the Windows button -> type wf.msc -> enter. Click on Inbound rules in the left sidebar. Click on New Rule on the right sidebar. In the wizard that appears check Port -> hit Next . Choose TCP -> enter the port number assigned in step 1 and Allow the connection . Apply the rule for both Private & Public networks. Give it a name and finish the wizard.

Launch the terminal with the Administrator rights. Hit the Windows button -> type cmd -> Right-click & choose Run as Administratorand execute the following command:

Replace “yyyyy” with the port number you received in step 1

Your Plex server can now we accessed via the http://xx.xx.xx.xx:yyyyy , where “xx.xx.xx.xx” is the IVPN external IP address you were assigned in step 2 & “yyyyy”– port number received in step 1.

Open a notepad app ( Windows button -> notepad -> enter ), paste the netsh command from step 4 & save the file with the .bat extention, e.g. plex.bat

Launch the Task Scheduler ( Windows button -> taskschd.msc -> enter ). In the right pane, choose Create basic task . Give it a name and hit Next . Choose the When I log on -> Next . Select Start a program -> Next . In the Program/Script field browse for the plex.bat file you created in the previous step and finish the wizard.

Double click on the newly created task to bring its properties & check Run with highest privileges in the General tab -> save the changes. Now the netsh command will run automatically every time you reboot/log in to your system.

macOS

Activate Port Forwarding in your Client Area

Connect to any non-US based IVPN server location (Port Forward is disabled on all USA servers) & note the external IP address you were assigned by visiting the dnsleaktest.com

In your terminal, enable forwarding across network interfaces:

Add a forwarding rule from the VPN network adapter to the Plex server. Run the following command in the terminal:

Replace “yyyyy” with port number you received in step 1

Your Plex server can now we accessed via the http://xx.xx.xx.xx:yyyyy , where “xx.xx.xx.xx” is the IVPN external IP address you were assigned in step 2 & “yyyyy”– port number received in step 1.

Open your terminal and navigate to /etc/pf.anchors folder:

Create an anchor file:

In the opened editor, paste the forwarding rule used in step 4:

Replacing “yyyyy” with IVPN Port Forwarding number. cntrl+x -> y to save the changes

Create com.plex.pfctl.plist file in the /Library/LaunchDaemons folder:

…and past the following:

cntrl+x -> y to exit & save the changes

Done. Now the rdr command is applied automatically when you log in to your system.

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The Photos app provides an easy way to select a background image (called wallpaper) for your lock screen, home screen, or both. Open the Photos app, and then go to the Albums or Library tab. Tap the photo to select it. With the image selected, tap the Share button at the top of the screen. Tap Use as Wallpaper.

How do I make wallpaper from my photos?

Android Open the “Settings” app. Tap “Display”. Tap “Wallpaper”. Tap “Photos”. Tap a picture to preview it as a wallpaper. Tap and drag the picture to adjust its positioning. Tap “Set Wallpaper” at the top of the picture.

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How to restart your plex media server

These days, more and more people are cutting the cord from cable and using services like Netflix and Hulu to stream video content online. Something you may not realize though is that setting up your own personal media server is easier than ever before.

DockSTARTer is a software bundle designed to make setting up your own media server as easy as possible. It provides one-click installation of all of the components you will need to run your very own Netflix-like server.

This article will outline how to setup DockSTARTer, a complete home theatre in a box, with Plex media server as the central focus.

Please Note: A Plex media server should only be used to stream content for which you hold a license to view. Please review our acceptable use policy for details on our anti-piracy policies.

Why Setup Your Own Media Server?

The Problem:

You have a lot of media files like movies and TV shows that you want to instantly stream across all of your devices such as desktop, laptops, Smart TVs, and mobile devices.

You also want one centralized server hosted on blazing fast connection that can deliver your content with no slow buffering times, just like Netflix does.

The Solution:

Setting up your own Plex Media Server gives you one easy to use interface to stream media to any internet connected device. You’re in full control as the server administrator.

After the initial setup and configuration, your Plex server will automatically load newly downloaded media and make it available across all of your devices.

What is a Plex Media Server?

Plex (www.plex.tv) is an open source piece of software designed to allow you to stream media such as TV and movies. Think of it like your very own Netflix, storing all the media files you own and allowing you to stream them on your laptop and desktop computers, Apple TV, Smart TVs that have the Plex App, Roku devices, etc.

How to restart your plex media server

Hardware Recommendations

The system recommendations for a Plex media server vary widely depending on the codec of the content being streamed, the frame rate of the content, and the device being streamed to. For an in-depth discussion on the topic, view our Plex Media requirements help article.

For example, a piece of content encoded in H264 mpeg to a desktop PC will typically be able to directly stream to the device without any transcoding required. This will use significantly less CPU and memory than a Plex server streaming and transcoding content to 25 users.

As such, it’s difficult to provide accurate system requirements breakdown as every setup will be different. A modest setup streaming to a handful of users will perform adequately with the following specifications:

  • Latest Debian Operating System
  • At least 8GB of RAM
  • Sufficient disk space to store media files
  • 2.4GHZ+ processor speed

Preparation

In order to prepare for installation, we’re going to order a Dedicated Server from ServerMania.com loaded with the latest version of Debian.

ServerMania offers a variety of bare metal servers that are provisioned within just a couple of minutes after ordering. This is the perfect option for a Plex Media Server and will be sufficient for most personal media servers.

Depending on the amount of content you will be streaming and the number of active connections to the server, your server requirements will change. Book a free consultation today with one of our server experts to determine which server is best for you.