How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

Apple recently released multi-room audio functionality on iOS, HomePod and Apple TV which is one jolly news for Apple fans. This latest upgrade by Apple allows you to play music on multiple devices in multiple rooms at the same time.

Like you can play a song on your iPhone and it can simultaneously be streamed in your living room or bedroom or kitchen wherever you want. Thanks to AirPlay2 for this added functionality as we can now jam up our party sessions.

Let’s see how to use multi-room audio feature on iOS devices via AirPlay 2. But, before that let’s explore how AirPlay 2 is better than AirPlay.

What’s the Difference Between AirPlay and AirPlay 2?

AirPlay 2 is the latest version of AirPlay which now supports multi room audio functionality on iOS devices. With AirPlay you could only stream music on a single device which was a huge limitation. But now with AirPlay 2, as long as all your devices are connected on the same WiFi network you can easily play music across your house on multiple devices or multiple rooms.

Which Devices are Compatible with AirPlay 2?

For AirPlay 2 to work smoothly you just have to take care about two things. One, just make sure that all your devices are connected to the same WiFi network and secondly, ensure that you have an AirPlay 2 compatible hardware. Here’s a list of all devices which are compatible with AirPlay 2:

  • iPhone and iPad (Running on iOS 11.4 or later)
  • Apple TV
  • HomePod
  • Any Third-party Bluetooth Speaker that is compatible with AirPlay 2. Here’s the complete list of Bluetooth speakers that are AirPlay 2 compatible and offer multi-room audio functionality. Everyday, new manufacturers are submitting their names to support AirPlay functionality.

How to Use AirPlay 2 on iPhone or iPad?

Now as we’re are through and aware about compatible devices, let’s see how we can use AirPlay 2 on iOS devices.

Pull up the control center on your iPhone or iPad and long press on Music Control.

Once the music control window expands, tap the AirPlay icon on the top right corner.

Now, choose the speaker output and select on which all devices you want to stream music.

Go ahead and select multiple devices, also adjust the volume levels for individual speakers (if required).

Here’s how you can play music across your home on multiple devices via your iPhone or iPad.

How to Use AirPlay 2 on HomePod?

With AirPlay 2 you can stereo pair more than one HomePod altogether and play music across the multiple speakers simultaneously. Suppose, you have two HomePods in a room then you can use both your HomePod speakers together and the sound will automatically split across both the devices.

To use multiple HomePod speakers altogether with AirPlay 2 follow these quick steps:

Launch the default Home app on your iPhone or iPad.

Now, long press on the connected HomePod speaker to open settings.

In the settings window, select “Create Stereo Pair”.

On the next screen you’ll see a bunch of speaker options, select the devices to pair.

Once the multiple HomePod speakers are paired, they’ll stream music together like a single speaker.

So folks, here was a quick guide on how to use multi-room audio feature on iOS devices via AirPlay 2. Guess now it’s time to jam up your house parties and stream music on multiple speakers in perfect sync!

Apple’s AirPlay 2 was a long time coming. First announced at Apple’s 2017 World Wide Developer Conference (WWDC), the much-needed update to Apple’s own streaming protocol didn’t become public until a year later, as part of the iOS 11.4 software update in June 2018.

What’s the big deal? First and foremost, AirPlay 2 supports multi-room streaming. Apple is rarely at the bleeding edge with new technologies, but even by its standards, 2018 was a little late to be joining the multi-room party – such devices had become a household staple over the preceding decade or so. But typically Apple, when it did finally join it became the life and soul of the party, with knockout performance and products to compliment it.

Whether it’s using Apple’s own HomePod or HomePod Mini speakers or other audio brands’ compatible speakers (including the ‘plays nice with AirPlay 2’ Sonos One), Apple has certainly made its mark in the multi-room market. There are even AirPlay 2-compatible TVs available, expanding the experience beyond the AirPlay 2 speaker or AirPlay 2 receiver.

But what’s the big deal with AirPlay 2, and which products support it? And if you already own an AirPlay product, can it be automatically updated or will you need to buy new AirPlay 2 devices? We have all the answers…

AirPlay: the origins

The first iteration of AirPlay launched back in 2010 as part of iOS 4 (around the time of the iPhone 4). Originally it was a way to stream audio, video and photos wirelessly to the Apple TV, but eventually this opened up to include dedicated audio products.

It was based on Apple’s ‘AirTunes’ software from 2004, which was predominantly used to stream audio from iTunes to AirPort Express, so you could wirelessly listen to music across your home network from your Apple device.

Setting itself apart from Bluetooth, AirPlay uses your home’s wireless network to send content from one source (iPhone, iPod etc) to one compatible product (speaker, AV receiver, soundbar). During the early days of AirPlay, setting products up was a complicated, long-winded process that required an extra app – it was hardly seamless. Those early products also didn’t have the most stable connection, so music would often drop out.

Updates to AirPlay over the years have made the setup process much simpler and quicker, and streaming is far more reliable. As long as your Apple device and the AirPlay speaker are on the same wi-fi network, music can be streamed between the two at the tap of a button. Easy.

How to use Apple AirPlay 2

The biggest feature of AirPlay 2? Multi-room.

It’s Apple’s first real move into multi-room technology, with AirPlay 2 finally letting you stream music from your iOS device to more than one product.

Originally meant to launch with the (now retired) Apple HomePod smart speaker, it was designed to let you set up two HomePods as a stereo pair (which we’d recommend) and pepper multiple HomePods around your home – all controlled by your iOS devices.

But it’s not restricted to Apple’s own ecosystem. You can mix-and-match AirPlay-2 compatible speakers from other audio brands to create a more versatile multi-room system. As long as all the devices are on the same wi-fi network, you just have to access the music controls on your iPhone, Apple TV or MacBook’s iTunes and select a connected speaker (or more than one) to send the music to.

Much like Sonos’s app, you can define where in your house the speaker is located, using labels such as ‘Bedroom’ or ‘Kitchen’ to identify them. This can be done in the Home app, which you’ll also need for any Apple smart home actions.

After that, simply access the Control Centre at any point on your iOS device to control which speakers are playing at any time, both individually and as a group.

Other benefits of AirPlay 2 include improved audio buffering, integration with Siri voice control and multiple control access across iOS devices (a useful touch for multi-room streaming). While Siri is integrated into the HomePod, other speakers (such as the Sonos One) rely on AirPlay 2’s connection to your iOS device to speak to Siri.

One key thing about AirPlay 2 is that the music source (and control) is always an Apple product. You can’t get AirPlay 2 on an Android device.

  • Read ourApple HomePod review

Which Apple products support AirPlay 2?

To support AirPlay 2, an Apple product must run iOS 11.4 or later, or the equivalent iPadOS or tvOS version. The following Apple products fulfil that criteria.

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iOS 11.4 is here, and it brings with it a few highly anticipated features for Apple’s HomePod speaker, including the ability to create a stereo pair of two HomePods and support for Apple’s new multi-room AirPlay 2 standard. Here’s how to get everything all set up:

Before you get to the fun part, you’ll have to first make sure everything has been updated to iOS 11.4. To update your phone, you’ll need to head over to the Settings app → General → Software Update. As for the HomePod, it should automatically look for and install the update at midnight, but you can check that it’s been updated or force the install yourself by heading over to the Home app. There, you’ll be able to see if there’s a HomePod update available, download and install the update, and manage other features for your HomePod. And in a neat option, the Home app can automatically detect if you’ve got multiple HomePods, and download and install the update for all of them in one shot.

Multi-room audio:

Once you’ve got all your updates installed, Multi-room audio should just work right out of the box. To use it, simply head over to your music app of choice on iOS and start playing music over AirPlay, and then select one of your HomePod devices. Now, with iOS 11.4, instead of just playing to a single source, AirPlay 2 compatible speakers will appear in the AirPlay pop-up with a small checkbox next to them, allowing you to toggle multiple speakers to all play the same song from your iPhone. This part will work for the HomePod, and presumably any other AirPlay 2 speakers you’ll get farther down the line.

But with HomePods, there’s an extra level of multi-room audio that you’ll be able to do, where you can have each speaker play independent audio streams over Wi-Fi without having to use AirPlay at all. For now, this feature is limited to the HomePod, and specifically limited to Apple Music subscribers (although, hopefully the Apple TV will also get some sort of similar ability further down the line when it eventually gets updated to AirPlay 2.) To take advantage of that feature, head to the same AirPlay menu as before — which can be accessed from the AirPlay icon in most music apps, or the music widget, and then scroll down below the topmost locally playing track on the iPhone to select one of your HomePod devices. There, you’ll be able to select an Apple Music track to use as a source, and play that track to other AirPlay 2 speakers using the same checkbox system as when you were playing from your iPhone directly.

Stereo Pair:

If you’re planning on keeping your two HomePods together in one room, though, there’s also the option to group them together as a stereo pair.

To create a stereo pair — which treats the two HomePods as one, discrete unit for AirPlay and Siri purposes — head on back over to the Home app, select one of your two HomePods, head into the settings for it, and hit “Create Stereo Pair…” Next, you’ll have the option to select your second HomePod to create the pair with. Once selected, you’ll be taken to a second screen to confirm that you’ve got the left and right channels chosen properly — tapping on each HomePod will cause it to light up with a chime to make sure it’s set up right, and you can easily swap them with another tap — after which you’ll be good to go. When paired, the left HomePod will become the “main” device, handling microphone duties for Siri requests (which probably won’t matter since both speakers will be in the same room in this case.)

The grouped HomePod will show up in Apple Music, iTunes, AirPlay, and everywhere else as a single pair, which will play whatever content you stream to it in stereo audio. The same limitations of multi-room AirPlay will apply with a stereo-paired HomePod as with a single one, where you’ll still need Apple Music to make the most of the set up. Lastly — and I haven’t been able to fully confirm this, due to not having a third HomePod around — but you’ll still presumably be able to use the paired stereo HomePod set with multi-room AirPlay 2 audio as well, should you wish.

To ungroup the stereo pair and have your two speakers function independently again, head back over to the Home app, select your paired HomePods, and scroll down to hit the “Ungroup accessories” button. You’ll be able to re-pair them at any time by following the steps above.

Apple introduces AirPlay 2 and its “multi-room” support for HomeKit

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

Once again Apple brings us good news for HomeKit users. This time it’s the new and improved version of AirPlay. At this time AirPlay only works from one device to another, from your iPhone or Mac to another device. Well, with AirPlay 2 we can connect several speakers to play the audio throughout our house.

AirPlay 2 will be compatible with a large handful of well-known brands such as:

  • Bose
  • Denon
  • Bang & Olufsen
  • Bowers & Wilkins
  • Libratone
  • Marantz
  • Polk
  • dynadio
  • naim

Of course, Beats, which Apple owns, will be included. The absence of Sonos is the most surprising, as it is a leading brand in the speaker sector.

It remains to be seen how these speakers will be integrated with the HomeKit application to enjoy all its advantages. We assume that this adaptation will be done through a simple firmware update.

The HomeKit and Music apps will also be supported. In addition, Apple TV will be able to connect to this new technology to reproduce the audio, so it will be perfectly integrated into this new multi-room system.

This wireless technology will be in charge of connecting, controlling and sending the audio to the compatible speakers in our house. Now it remains to be seen if services like Spotify and Google Play Music integrate quickly to get the most out of it.

Another nice feature will be that from your iPhone you’ll be able to set the speaker locations as ‘kitchen’ or ‘living room’, and then control and adjust the volume for each one individually, as well as the master volume for the whole thing. the system.

It is clear that with the launch of HomePod, Apple continues with the strategy related to home training. We are waiting to know the information that the developers will obtain when they start using these news to tell you about it.

Apple’s AirPlay 2 was a long time coming. First announced at Apple’s 2017 World Wide Developer Conference (WWDC), the much-needed update to Apple’s own streaming protocol didn’t become public until a year later, as part of the iOS 11.4 software update in June 2018.

What’s the big deal? First and foremost, AirPlay 2 supports multi-room streaming. Apple is rarely at the bleeding edge with new technologies, but even by its standards, 2018 was a little late to be joining the multi-room party – such devices had become a household staple over the preceding decade or so. But typically Apple, when it did finally join it became the life and soul of the party, with knockout performance and products to compliment it.

Whether it’s using Apple’s own HomePod or HomePod Mini speakers or other audio brands’ compatible speakers (including the ‘plays nice with AirPlay 2’ Sonos One), Apple has certainly made its mark in the multi-room market. There are even AirPlay 2-compatible TVs available, expanding the experience beyond the AirPlay 2 speaker or AirPlay 2 receiver.

But what’s the big deal with AirPlay 2, and which products support it? And if you already own an AirPlay product, can it be automatically updated or will you need to buy new AirPlay 2 devices? We have all the answers…

AirPlay: the origins

The first iteration of AirPlay launched back in 2010 as part of iOS 4 (around the time of the iPhone 4). Originally it was a way to stream audio, video and photos wirelessly to the Apple TV, but eventually this opened up to include dedicated audio products.

It was based on Apple’s ‘AirTunes’ software from 2004, which was predominantly used to stream audio from iTunes to AirPort Express, so you could wirelessly listen to music across your home network from your Apple device.

Setting itself apart from Bluetooth, AirPlay uses your home’s wireless network to send content from one source (iPhone, iPod etc) to one compatible product (speaker, AV receiver, soundbar). During the early days of AirPlay, setting products up was a complicated, long-winded process that required an extra app – it was hardly seamless. Those early products also didn’t have the most stable connection, so music would often drop out.

Updates to AirPlay over the years have made the setup process much simpler and quicker, and streaming is far more reliable. As long as your Apple device and the AirPlay speaker are on the same wi-fi network, music can be streamed between the two at the tap of a button. Easy.

How to use Apple AirPlay 2

The biggest feature of AirPlay 2? Multi-room.

It’s Apple’s first real move into multi-room technology, with AirPlay 2 finally letting you stream music from your iOS device to more than one product.

Originally meant to launch with the (now retired) Apple HomePod smart speaker, it was designed to let you set up two HomePods as a stereo pair (which we’d recommend) and pepper multiple HomePods around your home – all controlled by your iOS devices.

But it’s not restricted to Apple’s own ecosystem. You can mix-and-match AirPlay-2 compatible speakers from other audio brands to create a more versatile multi-room system. As long as all the devices are on the same wi-fi network, you just have to access the music controls on your iPhone, Apple TV or MacBook’s iTunes and select a connected speaker (or more than one) to send the music to.

Much like Sonos’s app, you can define where in your house the speaker is located, using labels such as ‘Bedroom’ or ‘Kitchen’ to identify them. This can be done in the Home app, which you’ll also need for any Apple smart home actions.

After that, simply access the Control Centre at any point on your iOS device to control which speakers are playing at any time, both individually and as a group.

Other benefits of AirPlay 2 include improved audio buffering, integration with Siri voice control and multiple control access across iOS devices (a useful touch for multi-room streaming). While Siri is integrated into the HomePod, other speakers (such as the Sonos One) rely on AirPlay 2’s connection to your iOS device to speak to Siri.

One key thing about AirPlay 2 is that the music source (and control) is always an Apple product. You can’t get AirPlay 2 on an Android device.

  • Read ourApple HomePod review

Which Apple products support AirPlay 2?

To support AirPlay 2, an Apple product must run iOS 11.4 or later, or the equivalent iPadOS or tvOS version. The following Apple products fulfil that criteria.

It may have taken longer than we would have liked, but Apple’s AirPlay 2 is now very real following the arrival of iOS 11.4 today.

That means everyone with an iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, or Mac can now take advantage of AirPlay 2 and everything it offers including music and audio playback throughout multiple rooms simultaneously.

Because this is likely one of the most requested features of AirPlay 2 and something that should perhaps have arrived much sooner, we wanted to make sure everyone had the opportunity to take multi-room audio for a spin, so we’re going to cover just what you need to do in order to do exactly that. Whether you’re using iOS or a Mac, he’s what needs to be done to make AirPlay 2 work for you.

iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch

  1. Open Control Center on your device.
  2. Using 3D Touch or by tapping and holding on the audio card you will see additional audio controls presented. Tap the AirPlay logo to display more options
  3. Tap every device via which you want to play audio.

Mac or PC

  1. Fire up iTunes.
  2. At the top of the iTunes window, click the AirPlay icon.
  3. Check the box beside every device through which you want to play audio. If one of those is an Apple TV, then you may have to enter a passcode in order to authenticate.

Apple TV or HomePod

  1. Using Siri to play audio via a HomePod is perhaps the best way to achieve what we’re trying to do. If you’re using an Apple TV, though, you can swipe up on the remote control and select the AirPay icon. You can also do this by pressing and holding Play/Pause button on Siri Remote.
  2. Select every device through which you want to play audio.

As for volume control, not only do you get volume control slider for each individual device which is part of AirPlay 2 experience, but you also get a universal volume slider to control volume of all the devices at once which are part of AirPlay 2 experience.

Apple’s AirPlay 2 was a long time coming. First announced at Apple’s 2017 World Wide Developer Conference (WWDC), the much-needed update to Apple’s own streaming protocol didn’t become public until a year later, as part of the iOS 11.4 software update in June 2018.

What’s the big deal? First and foremost, AirPlay 2 supports multi-room streaming. Apple is rarely at the bleeding edge with new technologies, but even by its standards, 2018 was a little late to be joining the multi-room party – such devices had become a household staple over the preceding decade or so. But typically Apple, when it did finally join it became the life and soul of the party, with knockout performance and products to compliment it.

Whether it’s using Apple’s own HomePod or HomePod Mini speakers or other audio brands’ compatible speakers (including the ‘plays nice with AirPlay 2’ Sonos One), Apple has certainly made its mark in the multi-room market. There are even AirPlay 2-compatible TVs available, expanding the experience beyond the AirPlay 2 speaker or AirPlay 2 receiver.

But what’s the big deal with AirPlay 2, and which products support it? And if you already own an AirPlay product, can it be automatically updated or will you need to buy new AirPlay 2 devices? We have all the answers…

AirPlay: the origins

The first iteration of AirPlay launched back in 2010 as part of iOS 4 (around the time of the iPhone 4). Originally it was a way to stream audio, video and photos wirelessly to the Apple TV, but eventually this opened up to include dedicated audio products.

It was based on Apple’s ‘AirTunes’ software from 2004, which was predominantly used to stream audio from iTunes to AirPort Express, so you could wirelessly listen to music across your home network from your Apple device.

Setting itself apart from Bluetooth, AirPlay uses your home’s wireless network to send content from one source (iPhone, iPod etc) to one compatible product (speaker, AV receiver, soundbar). During the early days of AirPlay, setting products up was a complicated, long-winded process that required an extra app – it was hardly seamless. Those early products also didn’t have the most stable connection, so music would often drop out.

Updates to AirPlay over the years have made the setup process much simpler and quicker, and streaming is far more reliable. As long as your Apple device and the AirPlay speaker are on the same wi-fi network, music can be streamed between the two at the tap of a button. Easy.

How to use Apple AirPlay 2

The biggest feature of AirPlay 2? Multi-room.

It’s Apple’s first real move into multi-room technology, with AirPlay 2 finally letting you stream music from your iOS device to more than one product.

Originally meant to launch with the (now retired) Apple HomePod smart speaker, it was designed to let you set up two HomePods as a stereo pair (which we’d recommend) and pepper multiple HomePods around your home – all controlled by your iOS devices.

But it’s not restricted to Apple’s own ecosystem. You can mix-and-match AirPlay-2 compatible speakers from other audio brands to create a more versatile multi-room system. As long as all the devices are on the same wi-fi network, you just have to access the music controls on your iPhone, Apple TV or MacBook’s iTunes and select a connected speaker (or more than one) to send the music to.

Much like Sonos’s app, you can define where in your house the speaker is located, using labels such as ‘Bedroom’ or ‘Kitchen’ to identify them. This can be done in the Home app, which you’ll also need for any Apple smart home actions.

After that, simply access the Control Centre at any point on your iOS device to control which speakers are playing at any time, both individually and as a group.

Other benefits of AirPlay 2 include improved audio buffering, integration with Siri voice control and multiple control access across iOS devices (a useful touch for multi-room streaming). While Siri is integrated into the HomePod, other speakers (such as the Sonos One) rely on AirPlay 2’s connection to your iOS device to speak to Siri.

One key thing about AirPlay 2 is that the music source (and control) is always an Apple product. You can’t get AirPlay 2 on an Android device.

  • Read ourApple HomePod review

Which Apple products support AirPlay 2?

To support AirPlay 2, an Apple product must run iOS 11.4 or later, or the equivalent iPadOS or tvOS version. The following Apple products fulfil that criteria.

We have collected the most relevant information on Apple Multi Room Audio. Open the URLs, which are collected below, and you will find all the info you are interested in.

How to Use Apple’s New Multi-Room Audio Features in …

    https://www.howtogeek.com/354172/how-to-use-apples-new-multi-room-audio-features-in-airplay-2/
    Apple just released new versions of iOS, HomePod, and tvOS that support AirPlay 2, a huge upgrade that lets you play music from your iPhone on …

iOS 11.4 brings stereo pairs and multi-room audio . – Apple

    https://www.apple.com/newsroom/2018/05/ios-11-4-brings-stereo-pairs-and-multi-room-audio-with-airplay-2/
    HomePod, the breakthrough wireless speaker from Apple, now delivers an even more immersive listening experience throughout the home with support for HomePod stereo pairs and a new multi-room audio system in iOS 11.4. This free software update introduces the most advanced, easy to use, wireless multi-room audio system using AirPlay 2 to play music in any …

‎Wireless Audio : Multiroom on the App Store

    https://apps.apple.com/us/app/wireless-audio-multiroom/id1081757852
    Apple Watch. Description. The Samsung ‘Wireless Audio – Multiroom’ system enables listeners to enjoy tether-free entertainment in any room in the house, from virtually any audio source, all controlled from a downloadable app and facilitated by …

How to set up multi-room music on Apple HomePod and .

    https://www.tomsguide.com/how-to/how-to-set-up-multi-room-music-on-apple-homepod-and-homepod-mini
    The Apple HomePod and HomePod mini may not be the smartest of smart speakers, but they do sound great, and if you own more than one they’re easy to arrange in a Sonos-style multi-room setup.

Multiple Apple TVs as Muilti-Room Audio S… – Apple Community

    https://discussions.apple.com/thread/2607653
    Is it possible to have multiple Apple TV devices (say one in each room), connected to speakers, and use this as a multi-room audio system? Principal issues I’m thinking of are: 1. How would you select which Apple TV device you want to stream audio to, either from a computer or (when Airplay arrives) from an iPod/iPhone? 2.

Now you know Apple Multi Room Audio

Now that you know Apple Multi Room Audio, we suggest that you familiarize yourself with information on similar questions.

We have collected the most relevant information on Multi Room Audio Apple Tv. Open the URLs, which are collected below, and you will find all the info you are interested in.

How to set up multi-room music on Apple HomePod and .

    https://www.tomsguide.com/how-to/how-to-set-up-multi-room-music-on-apple-homepod-and-homepod-mini#:

Multiple Apple TVs as Muilti-Room Audio S… – Apple Community

    https://discussions.apple.com/thread/2607653
    Yes, you can simultaneously stream to multiple Apple TV’s from the same iTunes library. The example you give is easily done. There is no need for 3 individual iTunes libraries. It is fairly easy to control each Apple TV from one remote App. You just need to go back to the device select menu to swap TV’s

How to Use Apple’s New Multi-Room Audio Features in …

    https://www.howtogeek.com/354172/how-to-use-apples-new-multi-room-audio-features-in-airplay-2/
    How to Use Apple’s New Multi-Room Audio Features in AirPlay 2. Lowell Heddings. Lowell Heddings Founder and CEO. . We were playing music on a HomePod and an Apple TV playing through a TV’s speakers at the same time and everything stayed in perfect sync. The music filled the room perfectly despite playing through two completely different .

Multiroom audio with Apple TV and tvOS beta | Best Apple TV

    https://www.bestappletv.com/news/testing-multiroom-audio-with-apple-tv-and-tvos-beta/
    Testing multiroom audio with Apple TV and tvOS beta. The tvOS 11.3 beta contained support for AirPlay 2 when it was released back in January (screen capture above), but that functionality was stripped before its official release at the end of March. AirPlay 2 will provide advanced functionality for Apple TV and HomePod owners, such as the ability to create …

iOS 11.4 brings stereo pairs and multi-room audio . – Apple

    https://www.apple.com/newsroom/2018/05/ios-11-4-brings-stereo-pairs-and-multi-room-audio-with-airplay-2/
    HomePod, the breakthrough wireless speaker from Apple, now delivers an even more immersive listening experience throughout the home with support for HomePod stereo pairs and a new multi-room audio system in iOS 11.4. This free software update introduces the most advanced, easy to use, wireless multi-room audio system using AirPlay 2 to play music in any …

Multi Room zones and Apple TV? – Apple Community

    https://discussions.apple.com/thread/2798255
    Currently I use the Built-in TV speakers to listen to Music/films etc via my Apple Tv but If I continue I will ruin my TV speakers. I am about to invest in a 5.1 surround sound speaker setup but I also want to create the ability to add a multi zone function so that I can watch a movie in my living room (through surround sound speakers) whilst I .

Apple TV Multiroom Audio | AVForums

    https://www.avforums.com/threads/apple-tv-multiroom-audio.1905524/
    Apple TV Multiroom Audio. Discussion in ‘Home Cinema Buying & Building’ started by Ross W, Sep 15, 2014. Sep 15, 2014 at 3:39 PM. Ross W, Sep 15, 2014 #1. . Living room – apple tv 2 (already have) Bathroom – Audio out from mac mini (already have) Bedroom 1 – …

How to Make a Multi-Room Audio/Video System

    https://www.kenrockwell.com/apple/how-to-create-a-whole-house-music-system.htm
    You can use the TV’s speakers, or feed the TOSLINK optical digital audio output from the Apple TV into a DAC or your receiver and fancy speakers. This will play your entire video library from your Mac, every streaming service you can imagine from the Apple TV itself or your iDevice, any of the videos on your iDevices, or pretty much anything into this TV, and separate speakers if you …

Multi Room Audio for TV – Houzz

    https://www.houzz.com/discussions/5842817/multi-room-audio-for-tv
    Most AV guys want to show me a complicated 5.1 multi-room set up with multiple source selection. I don’t want this expansive (and expensive) of a set up. I just want to hear the TV in the kitchen. Ideally, I’d see something like Apple TV to the TV. TV Audio out to a multi zone amplifier (2 zones). Amplifier output A to soundbar. Amplifier .

How to set up multi-room music on Apple HomePod and .

    https://www.tomsguide.com/how-to/how-to-set-up-multi-room-music-on-apple-homepod-and-homepod-mini
    The Apple HomePod and HomePod mini may not be the smartest of smart speakers, but they do sound great, and if you own more than one they’re easy to arrange in a Sonos-style multi-room setup.

Multi-room audio: everything you need to know | What Hi-Fi?

    https://www.whathifi.com/us/advice/multi-room-audio-everything-you-need-to-know
    Awards. Multi-room speakers include the Award-winning Addon C3 and Addon C10, the five-star Addon C5 and the newly released Addon C10 MkII. See our Audio Pro reviews; Sonos It’s facing more competition than ever, but no multi-room offering is as complete or as pleasurable to live with as Sonos.

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How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2Andrew O'Hara | May 30, 2018

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

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Multi-room audio may be the biggest feature of AirPlay 2, but it is far from the only new tricks AirPlay 2 has up its sleeve.

Out of the gate, only HomePod, Apple TV 4, and Apple TV 4K support AirPlay 2, though manufacturers are able to add support to their third-party speakers as well. Already Apple has outlined many upcoming speakers including those from Sonos, Pioneer, Libratone, Marshall and more that will gain support.

What can it do?

Chances are, you’ve heard of the headline features of AirPlay 2, namely multi-room audio and stereo pairing on the HomePod. That doesn’t begin to scratch the surface of the true benefits of this impressive update.

Notably, there is now a substantially bigger streaming buffer. This helps reduce interruptions due to network issues. In our testing, this was very noticeable. Audio drops were down significantly from the original AirPlay.

Secondly, there is now tighter sync between devices, which reduces the lag quite a bit in most situations, and lends itself to multi-room audio. There can still be a bit of lag when starting/stopping a stream, but it is definitely less than in the past.

Siri is also better equipped for streaming audio. She can be asked to play/pause music on any AirPlay 2 speaker, regardless of the manufacturer. Your iPhone still stays in the middle with third-party speakers though, with audio going to the device first before being re-streamed to the speaker.

An extremely handy new feature is the ability to move audio. Just ask Siri on the HomePod to “move the music to the living room” and she will.

AirPlay is also now more independent. Instead of constantly being interrupted by a phone call, a game, or a video, AirPlay 2 can continue to stream in spite of all of this. These annoyances have plagued users for ages and these tweaks make it much more usable, especially compared to other smart speakers.

And, AirPlay 2 speakers are a part of HomeKit. Any AirPlay 2 speaker will appear within the Home app and can be assigned an individual room like any other accessory. Speakers can be played/paused from within the Home app, and included within favorites.

HomeKit support seems to end there though, as speakers still aren’t able to be included in any scenes or automations. Amazon recently added music to routines and schedules with Alexa, putting Apple further behind in this regard. Hopefully, Apple remedies this soon.

How do I use it?

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

Using AirPlay 2 is as easy as the original. Swipe into Control Center on your iOS device, and tap the AirPlay icon within the music control.

Here, all of your AirPlay and AirPlay 2 speakers will appear. Any speaker that supports AirPlay 2 will have a circle aligned to the right, whereas original AirPlay speakers will have nothing.

Each speaker you select to cast to will be marked with a check within the circle. You can select as many AirPlay 2 speakers as you want, though they cannot be used at the same time as an AirPlay 1 speaker.

You can also access AirPlay from within any app that supports it. Pandora, Spotify, YouTube, Audible, and many more all add a quick and easy AirPlay icon right within their apps.

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

Apple TV is also AirPlay 2 ready now, so during any playing video a swipe down from the top brings down the info bar. Swiping to Audio shows any AirPlay 2 speakers that can be streamed to. If on the home screen, a long hold of the play/pause button will also bring up the AirPlay controls.

Limitations

AirPlay 2 isn’t without its drawbacks. As mentioned before, third-party speakers can’t stream directly, keeping the phone in the equation. If the phone ever dies or goes outside network range, the music will end.

As of now, Macs aren’t invited to the AirPlay 2 party, still relying on the initial protocol. That means streaming audio to any AirPlay speaker — even one that supports AirPlay 2 — still has a substantial delay, making watching videos nearly impossible.

System audio can only be sent to one speaker at a time, but multi-room audio is still available within iTunes. We are making the guess this particular limitation has to do with the fact Macs currently don’t support HomeKit. If the Mac should gain HomeKit support, say at WWDC, this could change.

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

For manufacturers of third-party speakers, AirPlay 2 is more demanding than in the past, which makes it impossible for some to be upgraded. Take the Wren V5, a popular AirPlay speaker. It doesn’t have enough onboard memory, and won’t get the advantages of AirPlay 2. A lot of uncertainty is going around as to what will be able to be upgraded and which speakers won’t.

The biggest and most obvious limitation though is it is completely tied into the Apple ecosystem. Anyone rocking an Android handset will be completely left out in the cold. A few third-party speakers get to participate, but HomePod and Apple TV are still the shining examples of how it should work and have their own distinct advantages.

Music to our ears

Even though it was substantially delayed, AirPlay 2 is definitely worth the wait. Quicker connecting, larger buffer, multi-room audio and a HomePod that is finally starting to be competitive. This is another example of how Apple has tightly integrated their software and hardware, which really pays off for those who have embraced Apple’s family of devices.

It will be interesting to see how quickly third-party speakers adopt Apple’s latest streaming tech, with some promising updates within only one to two weeks.

Hopefully, we see more exciting news regarding AirPlay 2 speakers, as well as their integration with HomeKit, at WWDC18.

Britta O'Boyle, Deputy editor

· Updated 1 February 2022 ·

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

(Pocket-lint) – AirPlay is Apple’s Wi-Fi streaming technology and since 2018, there’s been a second-generation version that’s now widely available on iOS and macOS devices.

This is everthing you need to know about what Apple AirPlay 2 is and what can it do.

What is Apple AirPlay 2?

  • Offers multi-room and stereo pairing for HomePod
  • Supports music, photos, video and mirroring

Apple AirPlay 2 offers wireless streaming of content from Apple devices including iPhone, iPad or Mac.

It enables you to stream a wide range of content from your phone to your Apple TV, certain audio devices like a Sky Q box, an audio device like a compatible Sonos speaker or, new recently, compatible televisions. Lots of audio devices support it, including products from Bose, Bowers and Wilkins, Bang and Olufsen, Naim, Denon/Marantz, Polk, Libratone and Audio Pro.

This latest version of AirPlay also ushers in multi-room compatibility for the HomePod and the HomePod mini. AirPlay 2 also enables device mirroring to share the content of your phone’s display on another device.

AirPlay was first introduced in September 2010, having previously been called AirTunes for audio-only streaming. As mentioned, Apple AirPlay 2 arrived in 2018 and is available on a range of TVs too, specifically newer models from Samsung, Vizio, Sony and LG.

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

Which Apple devices support AirPlay 2?

AirPlay 2 rolled out as part of iOS 11.4 back in May 2018. The full list of compatible devices is as follows and these are basically the Apple devices you’ll be able to use:

iPhone

  • iPhone 13 mini, iPhone 13, iPhone 13 Pro and iPhone 13 Pro Max
  • iPhone 12 mini, iPhone 12, iPhone 12 Pro and iPhone 12 Pro Max
  • iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro and iPhone 11 Pro Max
  • iPhone XS and iPhone XS Max
  • iPhone X and iPhone XR
  • iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus
  • iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus
  • iPhone 6S and iPhone 6S Plus
  • iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus
  • iPhone SE
  • iPhone 5S

iPad

  • All iPad Pros
  • All iPad Air models
  • iPad (5th generation, 2017 or later)
  • iPad mini 2 or later

iPod touch

  • iPod touch (6th generation or later)

Apple TV

MacBook and MacBook Pro

  • MacBook: Late 2009 or later
  • iMac/iMac Pro:Late 2009 or later
  • MacBook Air: 2010 or later
  • MacBook Pro: 2010 or later
  • Mac mini: 2010 or later
  • Mac Pro: 2010 or later

How does AirPlay 2 work with music?

  • Control multiple speakers from the iPhone or iPad
  • Multiple users can add songs to one playlist
  • Multi-room for HomePod

Apple AirPlay 2 adds speaker control to the Home app, meaning you can individually control all of your AirPlay-compatible speakers from your iPhone for the first time. Note, however, that the speakers need to support AirPlay 2.

Considering it’s more down to the phone sending the audio signals to the speakers, most streaming services you have installed on your iPhone should work with AirPlay 2 speakers.

When you play music from your iOS device, you can select which speakers around your home you want it to be sent to and control individual volumes of those speakers. These controls can be found in Control Centre by swiping up from the bottom of your iPhone screen.

One feature possible with AirPlay 2 is the ability to play different songs in different rooms, although only Apple Music subscribers can take advantage of it. You can simply ask Siri to play one song on one speaker, and another on one in a different room.

Another feature of AirPlay 2 is the ability for multiple users to add songs to one playlist. Say you’re at a party, and one person has their iPhone as the music source, playing Apple Music – other Apple Music users are able to send songs they want played to the source iPhone, to save having to connect and reconnect several phones.

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

Apple AirPlay 2 with Apple TV

Provided you have tvOS 11 or later, your Apple TV can send audio to speakers around your home as well, rather than just coming from your iPhone or iPad.

Whatever speaker is connected to the Apple TV, be it a soundbar or speaker system, is automatically a de facto AirPlay 2 speaker.

Apple AirPlay 2 with Siri

Siri takes on a prominent role with AirPlay 2 and multi-room audio. You can tell her which speakers you want music playing on whichever speakers you have dotted around your home, and you can even ask her to play different songs on different speakers.

You’re not just restricted to using Siri with the HomePod or HomePod mini either, as she will play nice with any other third-party AirPlay 2 speaker.

Today sees the release of iOS 11.4 and with it Apple is adding AirPlay 2. This brings some important changes to HomePod, including the stereo pairing option that was missing at launch.

AirPlay 2 also adds multi-room audio to HomePod, bringing Apple’s smartspeaker in line with Amazon Echo and Google Home. Other new features of iOS 11.4 include the ability to access iMessages via iCloud on any Apple device.

See also:

The lack of stereo pairing and multi-room audio was seen by many as a failing of HomePod, but Apple has now addressed this. The company says that when two speakers are paired, they are capable of “delivering room-filling sound that is more spacious than a traditional stereo pair”.

When it comes to the multi-room feature, speakers use spatial awareness to automatically deliver the best possible sound, and Apple’s wireless peer-to-peer direct link ensures that music stays in sync.

Writing about the new update, Apple says:

HomePod, the breakthrough wireless speaker from Apple, now delivers an even more immersive listening experience throughout the home with support for HomePod stereo pairs and a new multi-room audio system in iOS 11.4. This free software update introduces the most advanced, easy to use, wireless multi-room audio system using AirPlay 2 to play music in any room from any room, move music from one room to another or play the same song everywhere using an iOS device, HomePod, Apple TV or by asking Siri. HomePod is available in the US, UK and Australia and arrives in Canada, France and Germany starting June 18.

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

At WWDC 2017, Apple’s HomePod speaker was finally revealed. We even discovered you’d be able to buy two of the things for an amazing stereo experience, and heard how AirPlay could become the foundation of a wireless multi-room audio system.

And then: a year of silence. Which was a bit weird.

But AirPlay 2 finally arrived in a blaze of glory, to tickle your audiophile fancy, and so we’ve whipped up a super-quick guide to what it all means for you, your Apple devices, and compatible kit.

1) It brings things right up to date

AirPlay is Apple’s wireless streaming technology, designed to fling media from devices to receivers. Although best known for enabling you to stream audio, it’s also capable of hurling photos and videos about – for example, to stream a movie from your iPhone to an Apple TV.

The tech’s a bit long in the tooth though, having been around for almost a decade, so AirPlay 2 brings things up to date. Through its integration with the iOS Home app, you can use iPhones and iPads to create multi-room audio set-ups, plus Apple fans blessed with two HomePods can serenade everyone’s ears with stereo bliss.

2) Your kit needs to be up to the job

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

If you want to take advantage of the AirPlay 2 goodness, you’ll need a device that’ll run iOS 11.4, tvOS 11.4, or macOS High Sierra 10.13.6.

Any iPhone 5s or newer will do, as will any Apple TV running tvOS (4th gen or 4K), and the iPod touch 6th-gen.

Using a Mac? Check out Apple’s macOS specs here – and you’ll need to play your audio through iTunes. Rocking an iPad? Any iPad Pro will run iOS 11.4, as will the iPad Air, iPad Air 2, iPad (2018), and any iPad mini apart from the original one.

As for receivers, Apple’s HomePod is the obvious candidate. But Apple helpfully lists third-party speakers where the manufacturers have announced compatibility, which includes the likes of Sonos, Bang & Olufsen, Bowers & Wilkins, Naim and Libratone. Need a ‘budget’ option? The best you’re going to get for now is the Sonos One – which costs £199. Eek.

3) You can now go stereo with HomePod

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

HomePod is playing catch up on the feature front thanks to AirPlay 2, and not a minute too soon. The good news is this is full stereo audio – so your HomePods don’t each belt out a mono signal, but instead play their own audio channel of left or right.

The process of pairing is mercifully simple, assuming the HomePods are both running the latest software update. Open one in the Home app, tap Create Stereo Pair, and choose another to be its mate. Once that’s done, the HomePods are effectively treated as a single receiver, and only one speaker then responds to Siri requests, rather than them both answering in a creepy chorus fashion.

4) Multi-room audio is go

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

Lucky enough to own more than one HomePod (or indeed any of the AirPlay 2 compatible speakers)? Then AirPlay 2 comes with a ready-made multi-room system built in, and it’s ready to go with minimal faff.

It works in much the same way it has for a while in iTunes, when sending audio to multiple compatible devices. But now on iOS, you can head to the Control Centre and select to which of your speakers you want to send your music to – selecting them individually or grouping them together for a harmonious flow of music through your home.

If you’re an Apple Music subscriber, you can leave Siri in charge of the whole shebang, and bark your orders at her instead of messing around with menus. She’ll even handle different music in different rooms, for when you need that perfect balance of speed metal in the lounge and Erasure’s greatest hits in the kitchen.

5) It even makes Apple TV smarter

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

While AirPlay 2’s updates have a focus on audio, it does more for your Apple TV setup than you might think.

You could already send audio to an Apple TV using bog standard AirPlay, but combined with tvOS 11.4, your Apple TV becomes more heavily integrated into a multi-room audio set-up.

This is most obvious in you being able to use the tvOS Music app to send audio to AirPlay 2 speakers around your home, while you wield the Siri Remote like a crazed futuristic DJ. Neatly, speakers plugged into your Apple TV effectively become AirPlay 2 speakers as well. Bargain.

6) Your older devices might be upgradeable

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

Maybe. It’s best to check that list we already linked to, which outlines speakers where the manufacturer has announced support. You’ll see some existing devices on there, which will at some point get a firmware update so they can play nicely with AirPlay 2. Sonos on 11 July confirmed compatibility on a range of its products, as outlined in a blog post.

Chances are, though, that most older kit will remain rooted in the past, meaning you’ll have to buy new hardware to boogie on down with AirPlay 2. That even goes for Apple’s – AirPort Express doesn’t get an invite to the party.

7) But there are alternatives…

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

If you only really care about basic streaming, Bluetooth will suffice. For multi-room support, Alexa and Chromecast systems have the capabilities, and you can always go all-in with the likes of a Sonos.

However, if you’re deeply immersed and invested in the Apple ecosystem, you likely believe there’s no more an alternative to AirPlay 2 than there’s an alternative smartphone to the iPhone that’s welded to your mitts.

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2HomePod, iPhone X, iPad and Apple TV lined up. iOS 11.4 makes it easy to control music playing in every room, on HomePod, Apple TV or any iOS device.

HomePod combines Apple-engineered audio technology and advanced software to set a new audio quality standard for a small speaker, delivering high-fidelity sound and a wide soundstage. Featuring a large, Apple-designed woofer for deep, clean bass, a custom array of seven beamforming tweeters that provide pure high frequency acoustics with incredible directional control and powerful technologies built right in, HomePod is able to preserve the richness and intent of the original recordings.

Stereo pairs create an even wider soundstage for an incredible listening experience on HomePod. With two HomePod speakers set up as a stereo pair, this soundstage gets even wider, delivering room-filling sound that is more spacious than a traditional stereo pair from a speaker that’s just under 7-inches tall. Using spatial awareness to sense their location in the room, each HomePod automatically adjusts the audio to sound great wherever it is placed and sound great together, using an Apple-designed wireless peer-to-peer direct link to communicate with each other and play music completely in sync.

With an A8 chip in each speaker, each HomePod is able to play its own audio channel — left or right — while separating out both the ambient and direct energy. This innovative stereo sound provides a wide, almost three dimensional soundstage for an incredible listening experience anywhere in the room. A HomePod stereo pair creates room filling sound with greater bass extension, resulting in a deeper, more accurate reproduction of low frequencies.

Setting up a stereo pair is simple. When a second HomePod is set up in the same room, the user is prompted whether they would like to form a stereo pair, and in just a matter of minutes, the room is filled with amazing audio. Even though these two speakers act as one, each HomePod communicates with each other so that only one speaker responds to Siri requests.

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2HomePod speaker and iPhone X displaying AirPlay 2 and Multi-Room Audio Control Center.

AirPlay 2 enables the most advanced, wireless multi-room audio system, creating an effortless way for people to stream music or podcasts anywhere in the home to different devices, all in-sync. The updated Control Center provides a quick view of what’s playing in every room and simple controls to adjust volume and more. While listening to music, it’s as easy as selecting or unselecting where the music is playing in Control Center, or users can ask Siri to play music in any room, a group of rooms, or everywhere in the home. For HomePod, AirPlay 2 features are automatically supported and music can be streamed around the house without the need to manually group speakers.

AirPlay 2 controls are available across iOS within any app and in Control Center for quick access to what’s playing in every room, on every speaker. Apple Music subscribers can also ask Siri to play different songs in different rooms or the same song everywhere, without ever leaving the room. Just like iPhone and iPad, HomePod will be able to communicate with other AirPlay 2-enabled speakers when they become available, so Siri can control music playing on speakers from Bang & Olufsen, Bluesound, Bose, Bowers & Wilkins, Denon, Libratone, Marantz, Marshall, Naim, Pioneer and Sonos.

Siri, now actively used on over half a billion devices, has a deep knowledge of music and understands personal preferences and tastes. With personal requests turned on for HomePod, Siri can send a message, add reminders and notes and check calendar appointments. Siri can set a timer, play a podcast, check the news, sports, traffic and weather, and control a wide range of HomeKit smart home accessories.

As part of iOS 11, Apple is announcing a handful of improvements to Apple Music and AirPlay. Headlining the changes is Apple’s new AirPlay 2 protocol, while the Music app is also receiving improvements with new social features and more.

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With AirPlay 2, Apple is adding speaker control to the Home app. This means that users will be able to control speakers and manage multi-room audio directly from the Home app on their iOS device. Apple TV can act as a sort-of hub for this, allowing speakers paired to an Apple TV to be controlled with AirPlay 2.

Furthermore, with AirPlay integration in Home, users can operate a shared “Up Next” play queue, meaning everyone can add their favorite songs to the queue from their own device.

In addition to AirPlay 2, Apple has announced some improvements to the Music app. For instance, there’s a new “Friends are listening to” section under the “For You” tab that lets users easily see what their friends and family are listening to. This is similar to features offered by competitors like Spotify.

There’s also a new MusicKit API. This allows developers to integrate with the full Apple Music service. For instance, Nike+ Run Club has integrated Apple Music to create workout and running playlists. Anchor will also be one of the launch partners for MusicKit, as will Shazam.

All of the Music and AirPlay improvements will be available as part of iOS 11, which will be available later this year.

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

You updated to iOS 11.4 on your iPhone or iPad, tvOS 11.4 on your Apple TV, and HomePod 11.4 on your HomePod so you have AirPlay 2 support. Now you need to assign rooms to your speakers so you can control where you’re playing music. Here’s how to do that for Apple TV and HomePod.

Assigning Apple TV to a room for AirPlay 2

Your Apple TV can share whatever speakers it uses for audio out through AirPlay 2, and AirPlay 2 supports multi-room playback. That means you can stream the same audio to multiple rooms without anything getting out of sync.

Here’s how to assign an Apple TV to a specific room:

  • Launch Settings
  • Select AirPlay
  • Select Room
  • Choose a room

You can also create custom room names if you don’t see what you want in Apple’s list.

Assigning HomePod to a room for AirPlay 2

There isn’t an interface on HomePod for navigating menus, and saying “Hey Siri, assign this HomePod to the living room” doesn’t work. Instead, you need to use the Home app on your iPhone or iPad.

Here’s how to assign a HomePod to a specific room:

  • Launch the Home app on your iPhone or iPad
  • Press and hold the HomePod tile to open its status view
  • Tap Details
  • Tap Room
  • Select a room
  • Tap Done

You can create custom rooms here, just like you can on Apple TV.

Once speakers are assigned to specific rooms you can shift where audio plays with commands like, “Siri, move music to the bedroom.” In essence, you can make your music follow you through your home.

Sonos is adding support for Apple’s AirPlay 2 wireless audio standard to its speakers, making them far more versatile for anyone who prefers Apple Music (or just likes using Apple’s music app for local music on an iPhone). AirPlay 2 support also means that you’ll be able to use a Sonos speaker in conjunction with Apple’s own HomePod in a multi-room audio setup — an intriguing option for anyone who can’t decide between the two companies. Here’s how to get everything set up:

Update the Sonos app

First off, you’ll want to update the Sonos companion app on your Android or iOS device. AirPlay support needs a firmware update to the speakers, and before you can install that update, you first need to download the update for the app that will let it do that.

Update your speakers

After the Sonos app is updated, open it up and you should automatically be prompted to install the firmware update for your speakers. AirPlay is only supported on the Sonos One, the second-generation Play:5, and the recently released Sonos Beam, so you’ll need at least one of those speakers in your Sonos setup to take advantage of it.

Play some music

Once you’ve installed the update (it’ll take a few minutes), you’re good to go. Your Sonos devices should automatically show up as AirPlay speakers in any audio menu on your iPhone or iPad (as well as in iTunes on your Mac, if you still use it). Stereo pairing works with AirPlay, too. If you’ve got that configured with your setup of two Sonos One or Play:5 speakers, they’ll show up as a single AirPlay target in the menu and output sound in stereo.

If you don’t have all new Sonos speakers, you’re not out of luck either. By grouping your older speakers together with at least one newer, AirPlay-compatible model, you can still output music over AirPlay to the entire group. You can make sure that’s set up correctly by heading to the Settings menu in the Sonos app and going to the AirPlay section. You’ll also be able to toggle whether or not you’d like the app to keep your non-AirPlay speakers grouped together with your AirPlay ones there, too.

Adding Sonos to the iOS Home app

You can tell Siri to start playing music on your Sonos system by adding your speakers to the Home app on iOS. To do that, head over to the Home app, hit the plus button in the corner, tap add accessory, and then hit the “Don’t have a Code or Can’t Scan?” option at the bottom of the screen. A new menu will pop up, displaying your speakers, which you’ll then be able to add as a Home device and assign to a room with HomeKit. Once that’s done, you can just ask Siri to play tracks from Apple Music or, if you’re not a subscriber, whatever is in your Music library.

While we covered Apple’s upcoming iOS 11.3 update yesterday, one feature flew under my radar — AirPlay 2.

Along with new iPhone X Animoji and additional battery performance information/options, multi-room AirPlay audio playback is also included in iOS 11.3.

Apple first announced AirPlay 2 at WWDC back in June, 2017, but didn’t provide details related to what the new wireless audio system improved on over its predecessor.

Multi-room playback means you’ll be able to stream to multiple Apple TVs and speaker around the house directly from your iPhone. While Apple first stated that the HomePod won’t ship with multi-room support, it’s possible AirPlay 2 integration will add this feature to the smart home speaker (this still remains unclear, though). Apple’s HomePod is set to launch on February 9th in the U.S. and other regions, but a Canadian release still hasn’t been revealed.

AirPlay 2 is the first significant update to AirPlay since its launch roughly seven years ago. Early impressions from those using the developer build of iOS 11.3 indicate that AirPlay 2 is still pretty buggy right now, but functionality will likely improve before the full release.

Competing smart home speakers like the Amazon Echo and Google Home feature multi-room playback between various connected devices.

Apple is taking on Sonos with its latest foray into Wi-Fi music, AirPlay 2, which now comes with multiroom support.

Ty Pendlebury is a journalism graduate of RMIT Melbourne, and has worked at CNET since 2006. He lives in New York City where he writes about streaming and home audio.

Enlarge Image

Apple’s head of software Craig Federighi announces the successor to the AirPlay system, which already lets you stream CD-quality music over Wi-Fi.

Apple has unveiled its latest Wi-Fi protocol, called AirPlay 2, at its WWDC conference in San Jose. AirPlay 2 will be compatible with new speakers and third-party apps.

The company also revealed its much-rumored smart speaker, the HomePod .

Apple said that it is partnering with companies such as Bang and Olufsen, Bose, Beats (which it owns), Polk, Denon, Bowers and Wilkins, Definitive Technology, Devialet, Naim and Bluesound to bring AirPlay 2 to market.

It won’t only be Apple apps such as HomeKit and Music that will be able to take advantage of the new features, as Federighi said that “third-party audio apps will be able to get in on the multiroom audio fun”.

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

Apple is working with over a dozen manufacturers to bring AirPlay 2 to market.

Based on one of the screens the company showed on stage, AirPlay users will be able to select from a list of rooms and group them. At the moment AirPlay is only one-to-one from your phone, though serving to multiple devices is possible with a Mac and/or third-party software. This new capability will bring it in line with competing systems such as Play-Fi, Chromecast Audio and Sonos.

It’s as yet unknown if AirPlay 2 is capable of working on existing equipment or if it requires new gear, though the presence of Play-Fi-supporting companies such as Polk and others such as Devialet means that it may be backwards compatible.

Apple announced AirPlay 2 as part of iOS 11 announcements at WWDC 2017. It adds multi-room audio capabilities to AirPlay’s existing abilities. AirPlay 2 also enables the use of Siri to initiate and control playback to compatible speakers and devices (such as Apple TV).

AirPlay 2 is Apple’s followup to the original AirPlay Wi-Fi-based music playback standard. While Sonos popularized Wi-Fi-based multi-room audio playback, Bluetooth became ubiquitous, and multi-platform Wi-Fi audio standards spread in popularity, Apple lacked a competing story until today’s announcement.

AirPlay 2 shares some competitive similarities to the competing Chromecast Built-in (aka Google Cast) standard, but based on current announcements it lacks video capabilities and partners with mainstream volume. According to the IHS Markit research group, the latter aspect indirectly infers that there is a third competitive weakness compared to Chromecast Built-in, which is integration cost.

With the arguable exception of Beats and Bose, AirPlay 2’s third-party hardware companies are either at the higher end of the market or with products at the high end of consumer price ranges. IHS Markit says that if this is indicative of the partner base for AirPlay 2, it is likely that AirPlay 2 shares the same limiting trait that shackled AirPlay: cost.

In today’s competitive environment filled with ways to play music wirelessly, AirPlay 2’s main benefit is in its built-into-iOS convenience. Its fortunes in terms of mainstream penetration into the third party hardware landscape will lie in whether or not Apple solves the issue of the cost adder for enabling AirPlay, according to IHS Markit.

The research group expects that AirPlay 2 largely will remain a niche proposition for consumers able to afford high-end peripherals – those devices with a high enough total bill of materials cost able to absorb the AirPlay wireless chipset cost within.

Lastly, Apple noted that AirPlay 2 speakers are able to be added as controllable devices in HomeKit households. This implies by extension that the only audio output devices that are going to be available as a common audio resource within the HomeKit smart home, are going to be AirPlay 2 compatible speakers and devices. Apple’s long-term lock-in play with the AirPlay 2 standard may run much broader than simply multi-room music playback.

iCloud storage for messages and their attachments also comes with iOS 11.4.

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

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Apple’s iOS 11.4 rolls out today, and it brings a big update to HomePods: AirPlay 2 with multi-room audio. The update allows the HomePod and Apple TV (the two Apple devices that currently support AirPlay 2), as well as forthcoming third-party AirPlay 2 devices, to play the same audio throughout your home or only in select areas of your home.

All AirPlay 2 devices can be controlled using an iOS device, HomePod, Apple TV, or by asking Siri. Users can say, “Hey Siri, play classical in the living room,” and the appropriate audio will play through the AirPlay 2-compatible speakers, but only in the living room. Essentially, the new setup makes it easier for users to play in-sync audio through all (or only some) of the speakers in their home.

Further Reading

Manufacturers that pledged to support AirPlay 2 include Bang & Olufsen, Bose, Bowers & Wilkins, Marshall, Pioneer, and Sonos. AirPlay 2 devices will now show up in the Apple Home app, since AirPlay 2 integrates with HomeKit. In addition to using Siri or individual apps to control speaker selection and music playback, all AirPlay 2 devices available in a home will show up in iOS’ Control Center.

AirPlay 2 makes HomePod a more competitive smart speaker, and a more user-friendly one. For those with multiple HomePods across their home, they will now be able to fill their entire home with in-sync audio through multiple speakers or only in select areas like a bedroom, office, or patio. Airplay 2 also helps HomePod get along with other manufacturers’ speakers (like those from Sonos) to play music through all the speakers in a home at the same time.

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

The AirPlay 2 update also allows two HomePods to connect via stereo pairing. That means one HomePod in a room plays the right-channel content while the second HomePod plays the left-channel content at the same time. Stereo pairing, combined with HomePod’s spacial awareness feature, means that the devices can fill a room with sound that has more depth, balance, and power than before.

iOS 11.4 also brings Messages in iCloud to the operating system, a feature that has been in the works since iOS 11 was first introduced last year. Messages in iCloud stores all iMessages in Apple’s cloud storage rather than on each individual device. Previously, all devices signed in to a user’s iCloud account received iMessages. Users who saved all of their iMessage conversations may have found their local storage space taken up by large iMessage logs since all that information saved to individual devices.

Messages in iCloud moves all those messages—including attachments and photos shared in those messages—from Apple devices to iCloud. That frees up storage space for other things like music, photos, and more. While this is good for device-storage optimization, it may not be good for users who don’t have a lot of iCloud storage to spare. Messages in iCloud also makes it easier to delete message information—delete a message, photo, or other attachment from one device and it automatically disappears from all of your other iCloud-connected devices.

You can check out the full release notes for iOS 11.4 at Apple’s website. Users can download iOS 11.4 by going into the Settings app and navigating to Software update under the General tab. HomePod users can update device software in Apple’s Home app.

Apple additionally released tvOS 11.4 to add AirPlay 2 to supported Apple TV models. Today also saw the release of watchOS 4.3.1, which Apple says improves performance on the Apple Watch.

Apple’s Much Anticipated Update to iOS 11 Addresses Prior Shortcoming for Multi-Room Support for a More Immersive and Complete Audio Experience Throughout Your Home

When Apple’s smart speaker HomePod first came out, we were excited to test out its acoustic performance and integration with existing Apple systems. HomePod has an impressive subwoofer for a clean bass sound and provides directional control to more accurately convey the original richness of sound in any audio recording. This is a massive improvement to the smart speaker space with high fidelity sound and a larger sound stage.

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

Image via Apple

Play and Control Music in Any Room

By adding AirPlay 2 software to the HomePod via iOS 11.4, HomePod can now play sound in multiple rooms throughout your home. You can control music playing in any room, on HomePod, Apple TV or any iOS device. You can also increase your sound stage by adding a second HomePod for a richer acoustic experience to fill any room with sound and more accurately reproduce lower frequencies such as deeper bass extensions.

With AirPlay 2, you can play music in any room, move music from one room to another, or play the same song in multiple rooms using an iOS device through an app or Control Center, the Apple TV, the HomePod or by using Siri voice commands. You can access AirPlay 2 controls within any app and also in the Control Center on an iOS device running iOS 11.4 by swiping up. In the Control Center, you will see a list of all available AirPlay 2 devices in your home. You can send audio to a single device, to multiple devices, or switch audio between devices.

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

Richer Sound Reproduction via HomePod Pairing

Equipped with a powerful A8 chip in each speaker, HomePod can play its own audio channel, left or right and separate out ambient and direct energy. This creates a fuller, almost three dimensional soundstage for any room. Stereo pairing works via an Apple-designed wireless peer-to-peer direct link that enables communication between two or more HomePods and to play music in sync. The two speakers act as one when paired, and only one HomePod responds to Siri requests.

Setting up HomePod pairs is easy as you will receive a prompt with a popup interface to pair your HomePods if you have more than one. The same information is also available in the HomePod’s settings in the Home app. In the Settings menu, menu, tap on Create stereo pair. Then select another HomePod, choose your room, and assign left and right channels to each HomePod. Set up is almost instantaneous and you can benefit from a richer sound immediately. Paired HomePods offer a richer room-filling sound experience with a deeper bass and louder sound.

If the song you are playing supports stereo sound, you can distinctly hear different instruments being played on each HomePod. This experience is further enhanced if you connect to an Apple TV.

High Fidelity Audio Playback and Improved Podcast Acoustic Experience

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

Hayden’s in London

We are thrilled to see these updates and increasing audio performance and connectivity as we get ready to launch our Hayden’s podcast, Stardust this year. www.haydensm.com/podcast

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

AirPlay 2, Multi-Room Audio and Syncing with Other Speakers

What we are most excited about is AirPlay 2 functionality as this extends wireless use of your HomePod(s) to multiple rooms and enables connections to other speakers you may have such as Bower & Wilkins, Bang & Olufsen, Bluesound, Bose, Denon, Libratone, Marantz, Marshall, Naim, Pioneer and Sonos. You can listen to your existing music collection, stream new music and listen to podcasts anywhere in your home in sync with your speakers.

The Control Center offers a quick view of what’s playing in every room and simple controls to adjust volume and more. When you select a single HomePod, you can play music in that room. Adding another HomePod, enables multi-room audio. When you have chosen two HomePods, each one receives its own volume slider for granular volume control. In addition, there is a master volume slider to adjust both speakers simultaneously.

You can also play music via YouTube or other streaming method. You will be prompted to choose the HomePod speaker for playback.

AirPlay 2 controls are available across iOS within any app and in Control Center for quick access to what’s playing in every room, on every speaker. Apple Music subscribers can also ask Siri to play different songs in different rooms or the same song everywhere, without ever leaving the room.

In addition, this synchronization addresses prior connection issues and lag while streaming audio and helps to ensure a better acoustic experience. You can ask Siri to play music in any room right from an iOS device or by asking Siri on HomePod.

Siri integrates well with Apple Music and with growing playlists and users, Siri’s knowledge of music has increased.

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

Set Up and How to Update Your HomePod

Set up is easy as the new HomePod software is installed automatically on the HomePod after you update to iOS 11.4. to update your phone, go to the Settings app → General → Software Update.

After you update your iPhone to iOS 11.4, you can also navigate to the Home app, tap Edit and tap on HomePod > Details to go into its settings. Then tap Update Software.

If your HomePod is set up to automatically download and install new firmware, the latest version should already be installed on the device. After you have all your updates installed, Multi-room audio should just work right out of the box.

Start playing music on any iOS device and then select the HomePod. Any speakers you have that are compatible with AirPlay 2 will show up in a pop-up menu with a small checkbox next to them. You can choose multiple speakers to all play the same song from your iPhone or iPad. Apple Music integrates very well with multi-room audio via HomePods.

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2

AirPlay is a technology that relies on WiFi to stream content between multiple devices. Users have a multitude of options available from Apple products to third-party devices like speakers. Connect multiple HomePods or other speakers together and play music from the source device throughout your home.

● Stream audio, video, and images to compatible devices
● Support from big-name companies like LG, Sony, Bose, and Sonos
● Screen mirroring to Apple TVs
● Share 4K video from the Photos app
● Siri support
● Collaborative playlist creation
● Mac as a target device in macOS Monterey

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AirPlay is an Apple service that allows users to share videos, photos, music, and other various forms of media across various platforms. Supported devices include Apple TV, HomePod and HomePod mini, third-party speakers, and many popular smart TV brands.

AirPlay Features

Apple designed AirPlay to require minimal user setup. Tapping the AirPlay icon, which is part of media-playback controls, on the source device pops up a menu that allows you to choose a nearby destination device. After tapping that, the video, audio, or images will begin to play within a few seconds on the playback device.

AirPlay 2

AirPlay 2, which Apple announced in 2017 and launched in 2018, added new features like HomePod stereo pairing, multi-room listening, support for Smart TVs, and improved buffer times.

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2 Using AirPlay to stream audio to other devices

Compatible devices include any iPhone, iPod touch, or iPad capable of running iOS 11.4 or later. Destination devices include the Apple TV (fourth generation and later), HomePod, and any macOS computer running High Sierra or later.

Many Smart TV manufacturers support the feature as well, including Samsung, LG, Sony, and Vizio. Smart speaker manufacturers that support AirPlay 2 include brands such as Beats by Dre, Bose, Denon, Polk, and Sonos.

AirPlay can automatically play movies and shows in the places a user is most likely to watch them. Over time, the service learns where a user prefers to watch TV and can start playing on the TV in that room with one tap.

Compatible devices can receive AirPlay over Wi-Fi or ethernet. Because AirPlay is open-source, any computer can be turned into an AirPlay receiver. However, due to Apple’s DRM encryption, some media is unable to be played on third-party, unsupported devices. This includes iTunes’ rights-protected media, YouTube, and Netflix.

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2 Start your favorite TV show by sending it to your Apple TV

Buffering has been improved in later iterations of the service. AirPlay 2 features a relatively short buffering time – about two seconds – from starting a stream until it is played on a device that supports it.

Users who own more than one device that supports AirPlay 2 can play audio throughout their house in sync with each other. AirPlay improves syncing issues compared to Bluetooth, which has a longer buffering time and can be prone to de-syncing.

Apple Music boasts a feature that allows anyone to add songs to the Up Next, allowing families and friends in the same space to build collaborative playlists. Siri can also make AirPlay suggestions to users, showing up on the lock screen or in search. Siri suggestions for audio and video content can include the option to use AirPlay, allowing users to tap to begin watching a show on the users’ preferred screen.

Mirroring

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2 AirPlay also lets you mirror content from your device to an external display

AirPlay Mirroring allows content to be broadcast from iOS devices to an Apple TV (second-generation or later.) This is especially useful for those who are looking for a convenient way to show off pictures or video without requiring a large number of people to crowd around an iPhone or iPad.

iOS 14 allows users to AirPlay 4K video from their iPhone to the Apple TV. Video that is shared via AirPlay can be placed in Picture-in-Picture mode on tvOS 14 as well.

AirPlay to Mac

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2 Send media to the Mac using AirPlay in macOS Monterey

Users have always been able to send audio and video from the Mac to another device, but the reverse couldn’t work. Soon, with macOS Monterey, the Mac will also be an AirPlay receiver.

Apple boasts superior displays and speakers in many of its Mac products, but they’ve never been able to take advantage of the media sharing technology. Sending media to a Mac works the same way as sending it to an Apple TV or other device, simply pick the Mac from the AirPlay menu.

AirPlay History

How to use apple’s new multi-room audio features in airplay 2 Steve Jobs announcing the rebranding of AirTunes to AirPlay at a 2010 event

Apple released AirTunes in June of 2004 as the company’s first foray into wireless streaming between devices. AirTunes gave users the ability to play audio wirelessly by utilizing the now-defunct AirPort router. In the latter half of 2010, AirTunes was rebranded as AirPlay. The update allowed users to stream audio, video, and images to other Apple devices. Apple added screen mirroring in 2011.

First announced in June of 2017, AirPlay 2 had been slated to release alongside part of the iOS 11 launch in September of 2017. However, due to setbacks during development, it would not be released until June of 2018. It included support for multi-room audio built into the operating system. Previously, iOS could only stream music to one speaker, while multi-speaker support was limited to macOS.

It also integrated with HomeKit for the first time, allowing Siri to be used to play music on a specific speaker.

The update also included a shared “Up Next” option for collaborative playlists while listening with friends. Third-party apps were also able to tap into multi-room audio with a new API.

While we covered Apple’s upcoming iOS 11.3 update yesterday, one feature flew under my radar — AirPlay 2.

Along with new iPhone X Animoji and additional battery performance information/options, multi-room AirPlay audio playback is also included in iOS 11.3.

Apple first announced AirPlay 2 at WWDC back in June, 2017, but didn’t provide details related to what the new wireless audio system improved on over its predecessor.

Multi-room playback means you’ll be able to stream to multiple Apple TVs and speaker around the house directly from your iPhone. While Apple first stated that the HomePod won’t ship with multi-room support, it’s possible AirPlay 2 integration will add this feature to the smart home speaker (this still remains unclear, though). Apple’s HomePod is set to launch on February 9th in the U.S. and other regions, but a Canadian release still hasn’t been revealed.

AirPlay 2 is the first significant update to AirPlay since its launch roughly seven years ago. Early impressions from those using the developer build of iOS 11.3 indicate that AirPlay 2 is still pretty buggy right now, but functionality will likely improve before the full release.

Competing smart home speakers like the Amazon Echo and Google Home feature multi-room playback between various connected devices.