How to use excel’s split screen function

Excel is the perfect software for handling massive amounts of data. Sometimes, you will have to crunch through thousands of tables with countless categories and dizzying amounts of data. Things can get even more complicated when you have to compare elements in multiple sheets, which is where the split-screen feature jumps in.

How to use excel’s split screen function

It makes it possible to keep track of multiple files on the same screen, helping you get more work done faster. The feature is easy to set up, and once you figure it out, you will get a huge efficiency boost.

Setting Things up

There are two ways you can use the split-screen feature in Excel. The first one will allow you to see multiple areas of the same file, while the other one will enable you to see different files on your screen at the same time. You can also choose if you want to split the screen horizontally, vertically, or both. Here is what you have to do:

How to use excel’s split screen function

  1. Open Excel and click on the “View” tab.
  2. Select the “Split” icon and divide the screen to split it into four different panes.

The feature includes both vertical and horizontal splitting, and each pane will show you the same worksheet. That makes it easier to monitor and compare different parts of the sheet at the same time.

You can move each bar horizontally and vertically until you find the parts you need. You can also reposition each pane by clicking and dragging it to a different position. However, having four separate panes can sometimes be a little confusing. However, you can reduce the number of panes to two.

Splitting the Screen into Two Panes

If you need only two panes, you can choose between vertical and horizontal split. Let’s say that you need only two horizontal panes. After splitting the screen into four panes, click on the vertical dividing line and drag all the way to the right. It will then disappear, and you will only have the horizontal split. The method works 2013, 2016, and 2019 versions of the software. If you are using Excel 2010, the setup is a little different.

How to use excel’s split screen function

Splitting the Screen into Two in Excel 2010

Excel 2010 doesn’t have a split-screen feature. It uses the split box instead. It can split the screen only vertically, which is what most people are looking for. Unlike the newer versions, Excel 2010 doesn’t have the split option under the “View” tab, but it’s still easy to set up. Here is what you have to do:

  1. Place the pointer just above the vertical scroll bar. The pointer will then change into a black arrow with two points.
  2. Hold down the left mouse button, and you will see a dark line appear above the first row in the file.
  3. Drag the pointer up or down, and the line will follow.
  4. Place the line where you want to split the screen and release the mouse button.
  5. When you split the screen, Excel will copy all of the data into the newly formed pane.
  6. You can repeat the same process for horizontal splitting, and you can reposition the split at any given time.

The steps above don’t work only for single Excel files. You can use the split-screen feature to open two or more sheets in parallel.

Opening Multiple Workbooks

You can also open multiple workbooks in the same excel file. That allows you to quickly refer to other files without having to switch tabs all the time. Here is what you have to do:

  1. Open all Excel files you want to use.
  2. Under the “View” tab, click on the “Arrange” option.
    How to use excel’s split screen function
  3. Select the type of split you want. You will get to choose between tiled, horizontal, vertical, and cascade.
  4. Each of the files will be displayed in a separate Excel screen within the original file.
  5. You can then even split those screens separately to access multiple areas of each file. You can split every separate window however you want it. You can also remove splits by dragging the line away from the file.
    How to use excel’s split screen function

Removing Split Screens

When you’re done, you can remove the split-screen feature by clicking on the “Split” box in the “View” tab. Everything will return to normal, and all changes will be saved automatically.

Excel in Excel

Tricks like the split-screen feature will make your life much easier when working with large Excel workbooks. Excel has many options and shortcuts and mastering them will give you more control and improve your efficiency.

Why do you use the split-screen feature in Excel? Did it help you finish your work faster? Tell us how you use it in the comments section below.

Marshall Gunnell
How to use excel’s split screen functionMarshall Gunnell
Writer

Marshall Gunnell is a writer with experience in the data storage industry. He worked at Synology, and most recently as CMO and technical staff writer at StorageReview. He’s currently an API/Software Technical Writer at LINE Corporation in Tokyo, Japan, runs ITEnterpriser, a data-storage and cybersecurity-focused online media, and plays with development, with his RAID calculator being his first public project. Read more.

How to use excel’s split screen function

Splitting screens, whether vertically or horizontally, is a great way to streamline your workflow when using Excel. Using this feature lets you simultaneously view separate sections of a spreadsheet, enabling you to compare data quickly. Here’s how.

Using the Split Screen Function

If you have a spreadsheet packed with data, navigating it can be quite cumbersome, especially if you want to compare data from several different sections of the spreadsheet. Taking advantage of Excel’s split-screen functionality can streamline this process. Excel also lets you customize how the screen is split, giving you complete control for your specific needs.

Finding the split screen function is easy enough. Just head over to the “View” tab and click the “Split” option.

How to use excel’s split screen function

That said, there are a few ways to use this feature to split the screen.

Creating Four Equal Quadrants

Excel lets you split the screen into four equal quadrants. This gives you four copies of your current worksheet, all on the same screen! To do this, first, make sure that you’ve got the A1 cell selected.

How to use excel’s split screen function

Next, head back over to the “View” tab and click the “Split” button. This will split your screen into four equal worksheets.

How to use excel’s split screen function

You can also tweak where the split is by clicking and dragging either side of one of the worksheets, or the center section.

Vertical and Horizontal Splits

If you don’t need four copies of the worksheet, you can split the screen in two instead. You can split the screen horizontally or vertically, depending on what you need.

To split the screen horizontally, select a cell from column A in any row (Except for the A1 cell). Next, click the “Split” button on the “View” tab. The split will appear above the selected row. For example, if we select cell A5, the split will look like this:

How to use excel’s split screen function

Splitting the screen vertically is just as easy. Select a cell from any column (except column A) in row 1 and click the “Split” button.

How to use excel’s split screen function

You don’t have to follow these rules exactly. Selecting any cell from any row will split the spreadsheet. The only thing to remember is that, unless you select a cell from the first row or from column A, the screen will be split into four instead of two.

How to use excel’s split screen function

Once you’re finished with the feature and are ready to get the screen back to a single worksheet, simply click the “Split” option again to turn it off. Alternatively, you can drag the sides of the split screen bars to the edge of the window to disable the feature.

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How to use excel’s split screen function Marshall Gunnell
Marshall Gunnell is a writer with experience in the data storage industry. He worked at Synology, and most recently as CMO and technical staff writer at StorageReview. He’s currently an API/Software Technical Writer at LINE Corporation in Tokyo, Japan, runs ITEnterpriser, a data-storage and cybersecurity-focused online media, and plays with development, with his RAID calculator being his first public project.
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Excel is the perfect software for handling massive amounts of data. Sometimes, you will have to crunch through thousands of tables with countless categories and dizzying amounts of data. Things can get even more complicated when you have to compare elements in multiple sheets, which is where the split-screen feature jumps in.

How to use excel’s split screen function

It makes it possible to keep track of multiple files on the same screen, helping you get more work done faster. The feature is easy to set up, and once you figure it out, you will get a huge efficiency boost.

Setting Things up

There are two ways you can use the split-screen feature in Excel. The first one will allow you to see multiple areas of the same file, while the other one will enable you to see different files on your screen at the same time. You can also choose if you want to split the screen horizontally, vertically, or both. Here is what you have to do:

How to use excel’s split screen function

  1. Open Excel and click on the “View” tab.
  2. Select the “Split” icon and divide the screen to split it into four different panes.

The feature includes both vertical and horizontal splitting, and each pane will show you the same worksheet. That makes it easier to monitor and compare different parts of the sheet at the same time.

You can move each bar horizontally and vertically until you find the parts you need. You can also reposition each pane by clicking and dragging it to a different position. However, having four separate panes can sometimes be a little confusing. However, you can reduce the number of panes to two.

Splitting the Screen into Two Panes

If you need only two panes, you can choose between vertical and horizontal split. Let’s say that you need only two horizontal panes. After splitting the screen into four panes, click on the vertical dividing line and drag all the way to the right. It will then disappear, and you will only have the horizontal split. The method works 2013, 2016, and 2019 versions of the software. If you are using Excel 2010, the setup is a little different.

How to use excel’s split screen function

Splitting the Screen into Two in Excel 2010

Excel 2010 doesn’t have a split-screen feature. It uses the split box instead. It can split the screen only vertically, which is what most people are looking for. Unlike the newer versions, Excel 2010 doesn’t have the split option under the “View” tab, but it’s still easy to set up. Here is what you have to do:

  1. Place the pointer just above the vertical scroll bar. The pointer will then change into a black arrow with two points.
  2. Hold down the left mouse button, and you will see a dark line appear above the first row in the file.
  3. Drag the pointer up or down, and the line will follow.
  4. Place the line where you want to split the screen and release the mouse button.
  5. When you split the screen, Excel will copy all of the data into the newly formed pane.
  6. You can repeat the same process for horizontal splitting, and you can reposition the split at any given time.

The steps above don’t work only for single Excel files. You can use the split-screen feature to open two or more sheets in parallel.

Opening Multiple Workbooks

You can also open multiple workbooks in the same excel file. That allows you to quickly refer to other files without having to switch tabs all the time. Here is what you have to do:

  1. Open all Excel files you want to use.
  2. Under the “View” tab, click on the “Arrange” option.
    How to use excel’s split screen function
  3. Select the type of split you want. You will get to choose between tiled, horizontal, vertical, and cascade.
  4. Each of the files will be displayed in a separate Excel screen within the original file.
  5. You can then even split those screens separately to access multiple areas of each file. You can split every separate window however you want it. You can also remove splits by dragging the line away from the file.
    How to use excel’s split screen function

Removing Split Screens

When you’re done, you can remove the split-screen feature by clicking on the “Split” box in the “View” tab. Everything will return to normal, and all changes will be saved automatically.

Excel in Excel

Tricks like the split-screen feature will make your life much easier when working with large Excel workbooks. Excel has many options and shortcuts and mastering them will give you more control and improve your efficiency.

Why do you use the split-screen feature in Excel? Did it help you finish your work faster? Tell us how you use it in the comments section below.

Windows always has been a great environment for multitasking, with the ability to run several applications at once and to switch between them with relative ease.

In Windows 10, Microsoft tightened up the snapping mechanism and expanded its functionality. Today, the latest version of Windows 10 offers a number of ways to split your screen into multiple windows and get real work done, with better support for higher-resolution displays and multiple monitors.

See more

Snap Assist

One of Windows 10’s most important contributions to split-screen multitasking is Snap Assist, which makes it easier to select an open application window when you are choosing which applications to arrange on your screen. Here’s how to use it:

Step 1: Choose the window you want to snap to one half of the screen, then drag it to the edge.

How to use excel’s split screen function

Step 2: A translucent outline of where it will snap to will appear. If you’re happy with it, let go, and your window will snap into that position.

Alternatively, press and hold the Windows key and the Left or Right Arrow key to snap the last selected window to one side of the screen.

Step 3: If you have other windows or applications open, when you snap your chosen window, you’ll also see a number of options that can fill the second half. Click on one, and it will automatically snap into place opposite the first window. If you don’t and the selection grid disappears, drag your second window to the edge of the empty space.

How to use excel’s split screen function

Step 4: To resize the two windows, hover the cursor over the dividing line until it becomes two arrows. Click and hold on the divider to adjust the two windows accordingly. However, there’s a limit to how narrow a window can be.

Note: Is Snap Assist refusing to work or acting strangely? Check your startup programs, the apps that automatically launch when you log into Windows. Sometimes these can interfere with Snap Assist, and disabling them will fix the problem. Our guide on managing startup programs is a great place to start.

Use the keyboard shortcut

Want a faster way to do this on your keyboard? There is a shortcut to split windows that is really useful. In an active window, press and hold the Windows key and then press either the Left or Right arrow key. This should automatically snap the active window to the left or right. Select another window to fill the second empty space.

If you want to expand a window to the full screen again, just press the Windows key and the Up arrow key together. If you accidentally make a quarter window instead of a half window, you can use the Windows and Up or Down arrow keys to expand it as well.

Snapping more than two windows

If you have a large or high-resolution display, you can take advantage of all of that extra screen real estate by snapping up to four windows on a single screen using Corner Snap.

Step 1: Drag and drop your first window into any corner.

Note: To use the keyboard shortcut, press and hold the Windows key followed by the Left or Right Arrow key to snap the active window to the left or right. Next, press and hold the Windows key followed by the Up or Down Arrow key to move the snapped window into the top or bottom corner.

How to use excel’s split screen function

Step 2: With the first active window in a corner, drag and drop your second window into any other available corner. You are not required to pick a specific corner.

How to use excel’s split screen function

Step 3: Repeat Step 2 to fill in the other two corners as needed.

Note that a 2020 update to Windows 10 updated this four-window design and made all the snapped windows act as a single window. This may not sound important, but it’s really handy when you have to do something else, like open an additional app or file while working with your snapped windows — they will now stay together, waiting for you to get back.

Further reading

Turning off Snap Assist and adjusting settings

Snap Assist is easy to disable if it becomes troublesome. Here’s how:

Step 1: Open the Settings app. It’s the gear icon on the Start Menu.

Step 2: Select System.

Step 3: Select Multitasking listed on the left.

How to use excel’s split screen function

Step 4: Click the Toggle displayed under Snap Windows to toggle this feature off.

If you’d rather disable specific Snap Assist features rather than toggling it completely off, there are three settings you can disable instead. Just ignore Step 4 and uncheck the boxes next to each setting as needed:

  • When I snap a window, automatically size it to fill available space
  • When I snap a window, show what I can snap next to it
  • When I resize a snapped window, simultaneously resize any adjacent snapped window

Customize grids with a third-party app

We’ll be the first to point out that the native Windows 10 option is impressive; however, there are a variety of third-party apps that give you a bit more. With these apps, you can enjoy more definitive, grid-like changes to your windows so you can obtain all the tools you love so much (in the perfect size) and place them wherever you desire. Our recommendation is AquaSnap .

AquaSnap lets its users develop and change as many split windows as necessary with a neat snap function that operates similarly to Windows 10. That being said, it’s slightly more flexible and consists of a few cool, extra tools such as snapping small windows together and other sweet gimmicks.

You can download and start using the Personal version of AquaSnap for free. With it, you’ll have access to basic features like docking, snapping, stretching, various keyboard shortcuts, and a whole lot more. If you’re ready to step it up, you can opt for the Professional edition, which comes in two different versions: Standard and Site. You can pay $18 for the Standard version and $600 for the Site version. These special editions allow you to acquire licenses, add convenient mouse shortcuts, benefit from multimonitor support, and relish three other premium features.

Splitting screens, whether vertically or horizontally, is a great way to streamline your workflow when using Excel. Using this feature lets you simultaneously view separate sections of a spreadsheet, enabling you to compare data quickly. Here’s how.

Using the Split Screen Function

If you have a spreadsheet packed with data, navigating it can be quite cumbersome, especially if you want to compare data from several different sections of the spreadsheet. Taking advantage of Excel’s split-screen functionality can streamline this process. Excel also lets you customize how the screen is split, giving you complete control for your specific needs.

Finding the split screen function is easy enough. Just head over to the “View” tab and click the “Split” option.

That said, there are a few ways to use this feature to split the screen.

Creating Four Equal Quadrants

Excel lets you split the screen into four equal quadrants. This gives you four copies of your current worksheet, all on the same screen! To do this, first, make sure that you’ve got the A1 cell selected.

Next, head back over to the “View” tab and click the “Split” button. This will split your screen into four equal worksheets.

You can also tweak where the split is by clicking and dragging either side of one of the worksheets, or the center section.

Vertical and Horizontal Splits

If you don’t need four copies of the worksheet, you can split the screen in two instead. You can split the screen horizontally or vertically, depending on what you need.

To split the screen horizontally, select a cell from column A in any row (Except for the A1 cell). Next, click the “Split” button on the “View” tab. The split will appear above the selected row. For example, if we select cell A5, the split will look like this:

Splitting the screen vertically is just as easy. Select a cell from any column (except column A) in row 1 and click the “Split” button.

You don’t have to follow these rules exactly. Selecting any cell from any row will split the spreadsheet. The only thing to remember is that, unless you select a cell from the first row or from column A, the screen will be split into four instead of two.

Once you’re finished with the feature and are ready to get the screen back to a single worksheet, simply click the “Split” option again to turn it off. Alternatively, you can drag the sides of the split screen bars to the edge of the window to disable the feature.

This page describes how to split a string in Excel using Excel’s Left, Mid and Right functions.

Split String Index:

Split a String at a Specified Position

There are three built-in Excel functions that are designed for splitting a string at a specified position. These are the Excel Left, Mid and Right functions. These functions are each described below:

Excel Left, Mid and Right Functions

The Excel Left function returns a specified number of characters from the left (the beginning) of a supplied text string.

In the example below, the Left function returns the first two characters of the string “test string”:

The Excel Mid function returns a specified number of characters from the middle of a supplied text string, beginning at a specified character.

In the example below, the Mid function returns 3 characters from the middle of the string “test string”, starting from character number 6:

The Excel Right function returns a specified number of characters from the right (the end) of a supplied text string.

In the example below, the Right function returns the last two characters of the string “test string”:

Split a String at the First Occurrence of a Specified Character

If you want to split an excel text string at the first occurrence of a specified character, (e.g. at the first space), there is no built-in Excel function to do this. However, you can perform this task using the Left, Mid or Right functions, combined with other built-in Excel functions.

The other Excel functions that you may find useful when splitting a string at a specified position are:

Find Returns the position of a sub-string within a supplied string (case-sensitive).
Search Returns the position of a sub-string within a supplied string (not case-sensitive).
Len Returns the length of a supplied text string.

Note that the only difference between the Find and Search functions is that the Find function is case-sensitive, while the Search function is not.

Split String at a Specific Character – Examples

Example 1 – Return Text From the Beginning of a Text String, Up to the First Space

If you want to use a formula to split a text string at the first space, and then return the left part of the split string, this can be done by combining the Left function with the Find function. This is shown in the example below:

A B
1 test string =LEFT( A1, FIND( ” “, A1 ) – 1 ) – returns the result “test”

In the above formula, the Find function returns the value 5 as the position of the space within the supplied text “test string”. Subtracting 1 from this value gives the value 4, which is then supplied to the Left function.

Example 2 – Return Text From the End of a Text String

If you want to use a formula to split a text string at the first space, and then return the right (the end) part of the string, this can be done by combining the Right function with the Excel Find function and the Excel Len function. This is shown in the example below:

A B
1 test string =RIGHT( A1, LEN( A1 ) – FIND( ” “, A1 ) ) – returns the result “string”

In the above formula, the Len function returns the value 11, as the length of the string “test string” and the Find function returns the value 5 as the position of the space.

Therefore, the expression LEN( A1 ) – FIND( ” “, A1 ) evaluates to 6 (= 11 – 5), which is then supplied to the Right function.

Therefore, the Right function returns the last 6 characters of the supplied string.

Split a String at the N’th Occurrence of a Specified Character

The problem with the Excel Find and Search functions is that they can only be used to find the first occurrence of a specified character (or string of characters), after a specified start position. So what can you do if you want to split your string at the N’th space?

One way to find the position of the N’th occurrence of a character is to use the Excel Substitute function, combined with the Excel Find or Search function.

The Substitute function substitutes the N’th occurrence of a specified string, with a second supplied string. The Find function can then be used to return the position of your substitute string, and this position can then be supplied to the Left, Mid or Right function.

An example of this is provided below.

Split String at the N’th Occurrence of a Specified Character – Example

In this example, we return the left part of the original text string “An example text string”, up to the third space. For clarity, we will first break the formula down into 3 stages:

A
1 An example text string
2 =SUBSTITUTE( A1, ” “, “|”, 3 ) – returns the result “An example text|string”
3 =FIND( “|”, A2 ) – returns the result “16”
4 =LEFT( A1, A3 – 1 ) – returns the result “An example text”

In the first stage of the above formula, we have substituted the third space with the character “|”. The reason for choosing this character is that we know it does not occur in the original text.

The three stages shown in cells A2 – A4 of the above spreadsheet above return the left part of the original text string, up to the third space. If you are confident with Excel formulas, you may prefer to combine these three stages into a single formula, as shown below:

Bottom Line: Learn how to view and compare two worksheets in the same workbook with the New Window feature, split screen view, and synchronous scrolling.

Skill Level: Beginner

Video Tutorial

Make Comparisons Between Sheets Easier

Sometimes we need to flip back and forth between two worksheets in order to compare numbers, copy and paste entries, or create formulas. In these instances, it can be much easier to look at the two (or more) sheets side by side.

To accomplish this, we can use the New Window feature in Excel, as well as some desktop shortcuts to create a split screen view of the the sheets we want to look at simultaneously. It’s a fairly easy habit to pick up and will save you lots of time and frustration in the long run.

Creating a New Window

We can view two or more sheets from the same workbook by using the New Window feature.

To make a new window, go to the View tab on the Ribbon and press the New Window button. This will create a new window of the active workbook (the workbook you were viewing when you pressed New Window).

The keyboard shortcut to open a new window is Alt + W + N .

Once you’ve created a new window, you can differentiate between the new and the old by looking at the title bar at the top. The new window will have a dash and the number 2 (then 3, 4, 5 and so on as you continue to open new windows).

How to use excel’s split screen function

Changes are Synced Between Windows

Keep in mind that you are NOT creating a duplicate file, just a new window to look at the same file. Any change you make to the workbook in one window will be reflected in the other. It does NOT matter which window you make changes in. All windows will be updated immediately.

Toggling Between Windows

You can now select a different sheet in the new window to view and edit it. You can then quickly flip between windows by using the Alt + Tab

keyboard shortcut. Hold Alt, then press and release Tab.

This is a very handy shortcut that makes it easy to flip between windows (sheets) when doing common actions like copy & paste.

Create a Split Screen View

To tile the windows side by side, you can simply click on the title bar and then drag the window to the right of the screen. If you have multiple windows open on your computer, you may have to select which window you want to view on the left.

How to use excel’s split screen function

I’ve written a whole post about tips for split screen usage for both Windows and Mac users. I encourage you to check it out and see how you can improve your productivity game with split screens.

Note: This behavior is slightly different in Excel 2010 and earlier. See the section below for details.

Synchronous Scrolling

One cool feature to employ while using a split screen is that you can scroll both sheets at the same time. This is especially helpful if you need to compare line by line, looking for differences in similar sets of data.

To turn on synchronous scrolling, just go to the View tab on the Ribbon and choose the Synchronous Scrolling button.

The Synchronous Scrolling Button may be grayed out. If so, you need to turn on View Side by Side. You can do this by clicking the button directly above Synchronous Scrolling. Keyboard shortcut: Alt + W + B

When you click on View Side by Side, it tends to reset any split screen setup you already had, so you may need to drag your window to the right again to see them side by side.

Once your windows are side by side and you’ve clicked the Synchronous Scrolling button, you will see how both sheets scroll simultaneously. This is the case whether you are using the up and down arrows on your keyboard, the scroll bar in either of the windows, or the roller wheel on your mouse.

See the video above for more details on this issue.

And just so you know, you can also use Synchronous Scrolling with two different workbooks as well.

Closing the New Window

Once you are finished, you can simply close either of the windows by pressing the red X in the top right of the application window. This will just close the additional window, and NOT close the file. The “-2” will disappear after the file name and you will be left with only one window open for the file.

You will NOT be prompted to save the file when you close the additional window. You will only be prompted to save when you close the last remaining window for the file.

Close the “-2” Window First!

Even though you can close either window, it’s best to close the “-2” window first. The new window does not retain the settings for gridlines or freeze panes. This is an unfortunate limitation of Excel.

If you close the “-1” window and then make changes to the workbook, you will lose the gridline and freeze pane settings that are applied to each sheet.

I posted a macro in the comment below that apples the gridline settings for each sheet to the new window. I’ll do a dedicated post on this in the future.

And a big thanks to Andre for pointing out the issue with closing window “-2” first.

Excel 2010 and Earlier

If you’re using Excel 2010 or earlier for Windows then the process for viewing multiple windows is slightly different.

These versions of Excel used the Multiple Document Interface (MDI). This means all Excel files/windows are opened in the same application window. Excel is able to display multiple documents.

You can view multiple windows within Excel by clicking the Restore button for the current window.

How to use excel’s split screen function

The Arrange All and View Side by Side buttons can still be used as well. That will be the same as the instructions above.

When you want to view a single window again you can click the Maximize button in any window.

Excel 2013 and beyond moved to a Single Document Interface (SDI), which is what I explained in the article above.

Conclusion

I hope this post has been helpful to you for learning how to create a new window and view two (or more) worksheets from the same workbook.

The full keyboard shortcut to setup the new window in split screen is:

Alt + W + N , Alt + W + B

This view can save us a lot of time when comparing data and tying out numbers between sheets.

Please leave a comment below with any questions or suggestions. Thank you! 🙂

Your friend Tomas finished a 5-K run last weekend, and you want to see the times of the top 10 finishers to compare his time with theirs. You found his name down in row 180 of your spreadsheet. Would you like to know how to see his result together with the top 10 finishers at the top of the worksheet?

By splitting the worksheet, you can scroll down in the lower pane and still see the top rows in the upper pane.

How to use excel’s split screen function

To split this worksheet as shown above, you select below the row where you want the split – selecting row 13 splits the worksheet below row 12. Then, click View > Window > Split. You can remove the split simply by clicking the Split button again.

You can also split a worksheet on the columns. Select the column to the right of the column where you want to place the split, and use the Split command. You can also split on both a row and a column. by selecting the cell below and to the right of where you want the split—then click Split. In the figure below—because D5 was chosen—columns to its left (A-C) and rows above it (1-4) are frozen by the split. Then, by selecting a row below row 4 and scrolling up, you no longer see rows 5 through 9. Also, you don’t see columns D through F. This brings a tight focus onto Q4 and the YTD totals in columns G and H.

How to use excel’s split screen function

To undo a split, simply click View > Window > Split again.

This Excel tutorial explains how to use the Excel SPLIT function with syntax and examples.

Description

The Microsoft Excel SPLIT function will split a string into substrings based on a delimiter. The result is returned as an array of substrings.

The SPLIT function is a built-in function in Excel that is categorized as a String/Text Function. It can be used as a VBA function (VBA) in Excel. As a VBA function, you can use this function in macro code that is entered through the Microsoft Visual Basic Editor.

Syntax

The syntax for the SPLIT function in Microsoft Excel is:

Parameters or Arguments

Optional. This is the type of comparison to perform when parsing the substrings and can be one of the following:

VBA Constant Value Explanation
CompareMethod.Binary 0 Binary comparison
CompareMethod.Text 1 Textual comparison

Returns

The SPLIT function returns an array of string values.

Applies To

  • Excel for Office 365, Excel 2019, Excel 2016, Excel 2013, Excel 2011 for Mac, Excel 2010, Excel 2007, Excel 2003, Excel XP, Excel 2000

Type of Function

  • VBA function (VBA)

Example (as VBA Function)

The SPLIT function can only be used in VBA code in Microsoft Excel.

Let’s look at some Excel SPLIT function examples and explore how to use the SPLIT function in Excel VBA code:

In this example, the variable called LArray would now contain the array <"TechOnTheNet", "com">. The two MsgBox statements would display the value stored in each element of the array.

How to use excel’s split screen function

When working on your computer, it’s sometimes useful to view more than one document or application at the same time, side by side. In Microsoft Windows, you can do this on a single monitor if you split the screen. Or, if you have more than one monitor, you can extend the screen. The following guide shows you how to toggle both methods on and off.

Split screen on one monitor

To split the screen on one monitor, allowing you to see two program windows at the same time, side by side, follow the steps below.

  1. Press and hold the Windows key .
  2. Press the left or right arrow key. If you press the left arrow key, the active program window shows on the left side of the split screen. If you press the right arrow key, it shows on the right side of the split screen.

How to use excel’s split screen function

To exit split-screen mode, maximize one of the program windows by clicking the maximize icon at the top-right of the window.

Extend screen across multiple monitors

If you have more than one monitor connected to your computer, you can extend the screen across them. Called extended display, this feature allows you to view two or more program windows at the same time, one per monitor. Follow the steps below to turn on extended display for your version of Windows.

Windows 8 and 10

  1. On the Windows desktop, right-click an empty area and select the Display settings option.
  2. Scroll down to the Multiple displays section. Below the Multiple displays option, click the drop-down list and select Extend these displays.

If you press the Windows key + P key, you can click the Extend option to turn on extended display.

In step 2 above, if you select Duplicate these displays, each of your monitors display the same screen. When doing a presentation and connecting your computer to a projector, duplicate displays can be very useful to show others what you are viewing on your computer monitor.

To turn off extended display, in step 2 above, select one of the Show only on options, depending on which monitor you want to use. You can also press the Windows key + P key and select PC screen only to display the screen on the primary monitor or Second screen only to display the screen on the secondary monitor.

Windows Vista and 7

  1. On the Windows desktop, right-click an empty area and select the Screen resolution option.
  2. Next to the Multiple displays option, click the drop-down list and select Extend these displays.

If you press the Windows key + P key, you can click the Extend option to turn on extended display.

In step 2, if you select Duplicate these displays, each of your monitors display the same screen. When your computer is connected to a projector, duplicated displays can be very useful to show others what you are viewing on your computer monitor.

To turn off extended display, in step 2 above, select one of the Show desktop only on options, depending on which monitor you want the screen to display. You can also press the Windows key + P key and select Computer only to display the screen on the primary monitor or Projector only to display the screen on the secondary monitor.