How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

Amelia Griggs
How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objectsAmelia Griggs
Writer

Amelia Griggs is a Learning Design and Development specialist, Instructional Designer, Writer, and “Authorpeneuer.” She enjoys researching, designing, and developing all kinds of educational materials, problem-solving, helping and training others to understand technology better, writing instructional articles, blogging, and composing fictional short stories. Read more.

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

If you have several images on a slide, you can align your objects both horizontally and vertically for a more professional look. There are guides and gridlines available to help you align objects manually, and there are options to align objects for you automatically. Let’s see how it’s done.

Manually Aligning Objects

In this example, there are three objects on the slide. Point to the first object and drag upward or downward using your mouse. Once the object is centered either horizontally and vertically, a guideline will display.

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

You can also use guides and gridlines to help you align your objects. From the “View” tab, click “Guides.” Two dotted lines then show up—one aligned to the horizontal center of the slide and one to the vertical center.

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

Additionally, you can turn on gridlines that can help you align object elsewhere on your slide. From the “View” tab, click “Gridlines.” More dotted lines then display to help you align your objects. You can drag your objects and use the gridlines to align them accordingly.

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

In this example, we moved each of the three objects upward to align them using the uppermost horizontal gridline:

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

Automatically Aligning Objects

Now, let’s take a look at how to align objects automatically. First, select all the objects to be aligned. If this consists of all objects on your slide, you can press Ctrl+A to select everything. To select specific objects, click on the first object to select it. Then, while holding down the Shift key, click on other objects to select them each in turn. In this example, we have three images selected, and we would like to align all of them both horizontally and vertically.

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

From the Format tab, click the “Align” button. As you can see, you have commands here for aligning slides horizontally (the top group), vertically (the second group), and for distributing them (which makes them spaced equally apart from one another). Here, we’re aligning our selected object vertically along their middles.

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

This aligned all the selected objects vertically. Now, we want to make sure they are spaced equally apart, so with all three objects still selected, we’re going back to that menu and choosing the “Distribute Horizontally” command.

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

Here’s the final result, with all images aligned both horizontally and vertically.

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

And that’s all there is to it!

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How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects Amelia Griggs
Amelia Griggs is a Learning Design and Development specialist, Instructional Designer, Writer, and “Authorpeneuer.” She enjoys researching, designing, and developing all kinds of educational materials, problem-solving, helping and training others to understand technology better, writing instructional articles, blogging, and composing fictional short stories.
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Gridlines help give you visual cues when you’re formatting in PowerPoint.

The default horizontal and vertical gridlines make a grid of one-inch squares. You can’t change that grid size. You can change the spacing between the dots that comprise each gridline by using the Spacing option. This setting allows you to adjust the precision of object alignment.

Turn on the snap-to options

Select View on the ribbon, and in the Show group, select the dialog-box launcher.

The Grid and Guides dialog box appears.

To position shapes or objects to the closest intersection of the grid, under Snap to, check the Snap objects to grid box.

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

To see the grid on your screen, under Grid settings, check the Display grid on screen box.

To change the measurement units in PowerPoint, see Change the ruler units from inches to centimeters.

Turn off the snap-to options

Select View, and in the Show group, select the dialog box launcher .

The Grid and Guides dialog box appears.

Clear the Snap objects to grid box.

Make these settings the default for all presentations

If you want the current settings in the Grid and Guides dialog box to be the default settings for all presentations you open, select Set as Default.

Tips about grids and guides

To temporarily override the snap-to options, hold down Alt while you’re dragging an object on the slide.

To show drawing guides on your screen, under Guide settings, check the Display drawing guides on screen box.

Drawing guides are a pair of dotted guidelines, one vertical and one horizontal, that intersect at the center of the slide. When drawing guides are on, objects will snap to these lines when dragged within a threshold of a few pixels.

When Display smart guides . is turned on, guides appear to aid you in aligning and spacing one object in relation to others.

If the Snap objects to grid box is checked, you can draw in straight lines when you draw a freeform shape .

See Also

Turn snap to grid on or off

Select View > Guides > Snap to Grid.

Turn dynamic guides on or off

Select View > Guides > Dynamic Guides.

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

Tip: For fine control over placement of objects on a slide, hold down Command while dragging.

Add or remove guides

Drawing guides can help you position shapes and objects on slides. Drawing guides can be shown or hidden, and you can add or delete them. When you drag a guide, the distance to the center of the slide is shown next to the pointer. Drawing guides are not visible during a slide show and do not print in a presentation.

(This information about adding/removing guides doesn’t apply to PowerPoint for Mac 2011.)

To show or hide guides, select Guides on the View tab.

To add a guide, Ctrl+click or right-click on your slide, point to Guides, and then select Add Vertical Guide or Add Horizontal Guide.

To remove a guide, Ctrl+click or right-click the guide line, and then select Delete on the menu.

You can change the color of a guide, allowing you to use colors to denote different meanings or just make a guide stand out from the background. Right-click the guide, select Color, and make your selection. (This feature is available in PowerPoint 2019 for Mac and PowerPoint for Microsoft 365 for Mac.)

How can you customize your PowerPoint workspace to make it easier to create and edit presentations? In this article and the video below, we’ll look at how to simplify the layout and alignment of objects in your presentations by working with the PowerPoint slide layout tools including rulers, drawing guides, and gridlines.

Setting up the Ruler, Gridlines & Guides

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

When you are preparing a presentation, make sure to turn on PowerPoint’s helpful visual on-screen references, including:

  • The horizontal and vertical rulers
  • Layout gridlines
  • Drawing guides

Each of these options will help you more easily align objects in a slide. When turned on, guides, gridlines, and the rulers display on every slide and in other slide show presentations. It’s also good to know none of these PowerPoint slide layout tools will show up when your presentation is printed or displayed as a slide show.

To turn on the ruler, gridlines, or guides:

  • Pick the View tab and then move to the Show group, where you’ll see checkboxes for Ruler, Gridlines, and Guides.

Although you could turn all of them on at the same time, it will be easier to see how each one of these may be helpful to you. And so, you may want to start working first with one or two options such as the Ruler and Gridlines.

Ruler

To turn the rulers on or off:

  • Pick the View tab and then move to the Show group, where you’ll see checkboxes for Ruler, Gridlines, and Guides. Select Ruler, or
  • Press the Ruler shortcut: [Shift] + [Alt] + [F9]

Rulers display at the top and left of your Normal view of the slide. The center of the horizontal and vertical rulers are set at 0 (zero). The measurements on the rulers correspond with the dimensions set for the on-screen slide, which is a widescreen format by default. As you move your mouse on the slide, you will see a dynamic marker or reference in the rulers, which can be helpful when moving objects.

Gridlines

When you enable gridlines in PowerPoint, a grid appears like graph paper lines on your slide with primary horizontal and vertical lines every inch with markers (dots) every 1/12 of an inch (if using inches as your unit of measure).

To turn gridlines on or off:

  • Pick the View tab and choose the Gridlines checkbox in the Show group, or
  • Press the Gridlines keyboard shortcut: [Shift] + [F9].

You may have already used the grid without even realizing it because a feature called Snap objects to grid is turned on even if the grid is not displayed. The snap feature means that when you move objects or placeholders of any kind, it may seem to “jump” as you move it. It is a lot easier to understand and work with the snap to grid option when the grid is displayed.
For more specific placement of objects in a PowerPoint slide, you might find it helpful to have a smaller spacing on the grid.

To change the grid spacing:

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

  1. From the View tab, click the dialog launcher for the Show group (the arrow in the bottom-right corner of the group). The Grid and Guides dialog box appears.
  2. Optionally, turn off the Snap objects to grid feature.
  3. Change the Spacing setting for a different grid, for example, to 1/16” spacing (if your unit of measure is inches), or pick a choice that fits your layout preferences. Check the option Display grid on screen if the grid isn’t already displayed.

This dialog box is also one way to turn on drawing guides in PowerPoint.

Drawing Guides

With many presentations, it is also useful to enable on-screen guidelines. When the guides are turned on, vertical and horizontal lines display at the center points of the ruler. This is another reason why it’s helpful to turn on the ruler to use it along with your guides and potentially with the grid as well.

To turn guides on or off:

  • Pick the View tab and choose the Guides checkbox in the Show group, or
  • Press the Drawing Guides keyboard shortcut: [Alt] + [F9], or
  • Check the Display drawing guides on screen from the Grid and Guides dialog box (see above)

To move or copy guides:

  • Move: To move a guide, hover your move over the guide and press and hold your mouse as you drag the guide to a new location.
  • Copy: For more complicated layouts, you can create additional guidelines to give you more reference points in your slides. To copy a guideline instead of move it, press and hold [Ctrl] as you drag the guideline to another location.

How will you use these time-saving and handy PowerPoint slide layout options to create and edit your slides?

Were these PowerPoint tips helpful? Discover more PowerPoint techniques and shortcuts TheSoftwarePro.com/PowerPoint.

By Dawn Bjork, MCT, MOSM, CVP, The Software Pro®
Microsoft Certified Trainer, Productivity Speaker, Certified Virtual Presenter

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

Align Shapes, Images and Other Objects in PowerPoint

by Avantix Learning Team | Updated May 17, 2021

Applies to: Microsoft ® PowerPoint ® 2013, 2016, 2019 and 365 (Windows)

You can align objects in PowerPoint in several ways. Objects you align may be shapes, images, placeholders or text boxes. However, you can also align charts, tables and SmartArt objects. The most common way to align objects is to use the Align command which appears on multiple tabs in the Ribbon.

Note: Buttons and Ribbon tabs may display in a different way (with or without text) depending on your version of PowerPoint, the size of your screen and your Control Panel settings. For PowerPoint 365 users, Ribbon tabs may appear with different names. For example, the Picture Tools Format tab may appear as Picture Format and the Drawing Tools Format tab may appear as Drawing Format or Shape Format.

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1. Aligning objects using the Align command

You can use the Align command in the Ribbon to align objects.

Below is the Align command in PowerPoint 365 on a 17 inch screen:

To align objects using the Align command in the Ribbon:

  1. Select the objects by clicking the first object and then pressing Shift or Ctrl and clicking on the other objects. If you are selecting a text box or placeholder, Shift or Ctrl-click its edge. You can also select multiple objects by clicking in a blank area and dragging around them.
  2. Click the Format tab in the Ribbon. This tab may appear as Picture Tools Format, Picture Format, Drawing Tools Format, Drawing Format, Shape Format or Graphic Format depending on the objects you have selected and your version of PowerPoint. Alternatively, you can also click the Home tab.
  3. In the Arrange group, click Align. A drop-down menu appears. Align selected objects should be selected. If it is not selected, choose Align selected objects and then click Align again.
  4. Select Align Left, Align Center, Align Right, Align Top, Align Middle or Align Bottom.

The alignment options align selected objects as follows:

  • Align Left aligns objects along their left edges
  • Align Center aligns objects vertically through their centers
  • Align Right aligns objects along their right edges
  • Align Top aligns objects along their top edges
  • Align Middle aligns objects horizontally through their middles
  • Align Bottom aligns objects along their bottom edges

Note: Align is not available when you right-click and display the context or drop-down menu.

You can right-click Align in the Ribbon and select Add to Quick Access Toolbar from the drop-down menu to add it to the Quick Access Toolbar (which appears above or below the Ribbon).

In the following example, the objects in the middle of the slide have been aligned by their top edges:

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

2. Aligning an object or objects to the slide

You can also align an object or objects to the slide. It’s usually best to align one object (which could be a grouped object) to the slide.

To align an object or objects to the slide using the Align command in the Ribbon:

  1. Select the object or objects by clicking the first object and then pressing Shift or Ctrl and clicking on the other objects. If you are selecting a text box or placeholder, Shift or Ctrl-click its edge. You can also select multiple objects by clicking in a blank area and dragging around them.
  2. Click the Format tab in the Ribbon. This tab may appear as Picture Tools Format, Picture Format, Drawing Tools Format, Drawing Format, Shape Format or Graphic Format depending on the objects you have selected and your version of PowerPoint. Alternatively, you can also click the Home tab.
  3. In the Arrange group, click Align. A drop-down menu appears.
  4. Select Align to Slide if it is not selected.
  5. Click Align again.
  6. From the drop-down menu, select Align Left, Align Center, Align Right, Align Top, Align Middle or Align Bottom.

3. Aligning objects using guides

You can also display guides (static guides) and use them to align objects. Smart Guides may also appear when you drag objects.

To use guides to align objects:

  1. Right-click in a blank area of the slide.
  2. Select Grids and Guides from the drop-down menu.
  3. Select Guides from the sub-menu to show the guides. Note that these guides are different from gridlines or Smart Guides. PowerPoint displays a horizontal and vertical guide by default.
  4. Drag the guides to the desired location. You can also right-click a guide and add a new guide.
  5. Select each object and drag it to the guide to align it.
  6. Repeat for other objects.
  7. Right-click in a blank area of the slide.
  8. Select Grids and Guides from the drop-down menu.
  9. Select Guides from the sub-menu to hide the guides.

You can also show and hide guides using the View tab in the Ribbon.

In the example below, we’ve displayed guides and used them to align icons by their top edges (guides may be difficult to see because they are a light grey by default):

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

In PowerPoint 2013 and later versions, you can right-click a guide and change its color.

When an object is close to a guide, it will normally snap to the guide. Objects may also align to an invisible grid when you are moving them. To turn this off, check out How to Turn Off Snap to Grid in PowerPoint.

4. Copying and aligning objects

When you copy multiple objects, you can align them as well.

To copy an object and align it with the first object:

  1. Select an object. If the object is a text box or placeholder, click its edge.
  2. Press Ctrl and Shift and drag the object to a new location to make a copy. If you press Ctrl while you drag an object, PowerPoint makes a copy of the object. If you press Shift as well as Ctrl, the object will stay aligned with the previous object. Do not perform any other actions.
  3. Press Ctrl + Y to repeat. Another object will be created to the right or below the second object and aligned with the previous object.
  4. Continue pressing Ctrl + Y to make more copies of the object.

Use alignment to align PowerPoint objects and create well-designed slides. Unfortunately, there is not a built-in keyboard shortcut to align objects so consider adding Align to your Quick Access Toolbar.

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How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

When you’re working with multiple objects on a slide, PowerPoint offers some great tools help you perfectly align them.

Smart Guides

Smart Guides are turned on automatically. Clicking and dragging an object will reveal Smart Guides when the object aligns with other things on the slide.

    Click and drag an object until alignment guides appear.

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

Align and Distribute

  1. Select the objects you want to position.
  2. Click the Format tab.
  3. Click the Align Objects button.
  4. Select an alignment option:
    • Left
    • Center
    • Right
    • Top
    • Middle
    • Bottom

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

Gridlines

Just like a sheet of graph paper, the grid in PowerPoint consists of horizontal and vertical lines that help you draw and position objects.

  1. Click the View tab.
  2. Select the Gridlines check box to turn them on.

A grid appears on the slide which you can use to align objects.

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

Guides

Unlike gridlines, which are stationary, drawing guides can be moved around to help you arrange objects on a slide.

    Select the Guides check box on the View tab to turn them on.

Horizontal and vertical guides appear on the slide. You can click and drag them wherever you want.

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

Move with Arrow Keys

If the other alignment options don’t work for your needs, freely move objects using the arrow keys on the keyboard. This option is particularly helpful if you just need to move the object a short distance.

  1. Select the object(s) you want to move.
  2. Tap the arrow keys on the keyboard to nudge the objects to the desired position.

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

FREE Quick Reference

Free to distribute with our compliments; we hope you will consider our paid training.

Learn how to add more guides in PowerPoint 2016 for Windows.

Author: Geetesh Bajaj

Product/Version: PowerPoint 2016 for Windows

OS: Windows 7 and higher

Date Created: December 8, 2015
Last Updated: July 11, 2018

Once you have made Guides visible on your PowerPoint slides, they show up in the same position on all other slides within the presentation. You’ll find that only two Guides, one horizontal and one vertical Guide are visible at first, and these two Guides intersect at the center of the slide (see Figure 1). Most of the time, this might work for you, but you can actually add more Guides since these can help in positioning slide objects better across successive slides.

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects
Figure 1: Guides on the PowerPoint slide

You typically add more Guides in PowerPoint using the drag-to-spawn process that we explain on this page. Additionally you can also use the Guide options in PowerPoint 2016 to add new Guides.

Follow these steps to spawn new Guides:

  1. Launch PowerPoint 2016, and make sure that the Guides are visible. In Figure 2 you can see an empty slide with default Guides visible.
  2. How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects
    Figure 2: PowerPoint slide with default Guides
  3. It’s a good idea to make the Ruler visible in your presentation, as you can see highlighted in red within Figure 3. Making the rulers visible gives you a better idea of how you want to position the new Guides.
  4. How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects
    Figure 3: Rulers made visible in PowerPoint
  5. Place your cursor over any of the guides (we placed the cursor over a Vertical Guide), and click it so that it is selected, don’t let go your mouse click yet. As long as the Guide shows digits defining its position in the cursor (highlighted in red within Figure 4), you can be assured that it has been selected.
  6. How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects
    Figure 4: Digits shown on the cursor

When you move an object on a PowerPoint slide, the object will normally snap to an invisible grid by default. This can be irritating so you may want to temporarily override the snap to grid behavior or turn off snap to grid permanently.

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Temporarily override snap to grid using Alt

To move an object and temporarily override “snap to” settings, simply press Alt while dragging the object. Ensure that you are dragging the object by a border, not a handle.

This Alt + drag trick also works in combination with the Ctrl key when dragging so if you press Alt + Ctrl and drag an object, a non-snapping copy of the selected object will be created.

Temporarily override snap to grid by nudging

If you select an object and then press Ctrl + an arrow key, the object will be nudged in the direction of the arrow and will not snap to grid.

Permanently turn off snap to grid

You can turn off snap to grid permanently for a presentation using the Grid and Guides dialog box:

  1. Click the View tab in the Ribbon.
  2. In the Show group, click the dialog box launcher on the bottom right corner of the group. A dialog box appears. Alternatively, you can right-click in a slide and select Grid and Guides from the context menu.
  3. Uncheck Snap objects to grid. If you click Set as Default, snap to grid will be turned off for all presentations. Otherwise, snap to grid will be turned off only for the current presentation.
  4. Click OK.

Below is the Grid and Guides dialog box:

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

Each method has its benefits and you’ll be able to place an object exactly where you want it.

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PowerPoint can be configured to use a grid system and rulers, however these options have different uses depending on your needs.

  • Rulers are great to keep control about the width and height of the presentation slides as well as placing and keeping control of shapes and objects positions inside the slide. Rulers let you determine and measure where your objects are placed in relation to each other on one or more slides.
  • Grids can be considered as a series of imaginary horizontal and vertical lines equally spaced over the entire slide area.

In order to configure grid, rulers and snap rules in PowerPoint, you need to click somewhere in the PowerPoint background and then choose Grid and Guides to see the grid options, or Ruler option to display or remove the rulers from the edges.

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

Inside the grid options you can find several options that include:

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

  • Snap to. Checkboxes that let you choose if you want to snap objects to grid or other objects.
  • Grid settings. Let you configure the grid spacing and display the grid on the screen or not.
  • Guide settings. Let you choose to display drawing guides on the screen or display smart guides when shapes are aligned.

You can set up the grid system to be used as default for all future presentations or just for the default presentations.

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

If you have been using PowerPoint for creating your presentations and slideshows, you should be aware of the Smart Guides feature available on the platform. The option is available on almost all components of your Office Suite, including Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. However, the functionality assumes a lot of importance on PowerPoint. How would you turn on the Smart Guides on your PowerPoint? Let us check out the details on how to do it in this post.

What is Smart Guide Feature?

The Smart Guides feature has now been renamed to Snap to Grid and Snap to Object in the latest version of Office suite. This feature is an excellent option for aligning multiple objects for a cleaner and a professional look to your slides.

What exactly is the Smart guide functionality? In fact, the functionality is not exclusive for PowerPoint. You would find it on other programs on your office suites such as Word and Excel as well. The feature is quite useful when you are moving, resizing or drawing a shape or other object.

The object you are moving or resizing can be snapped right into the nearest position. The object snaps into the right intersection inside the grid. You should be able to do it even when you do not see the grid. You can also use it to snap your object with other objects.

The service does not come enabled by default. You will need to allow it to make the Smart Guides work efficiently.

How to Turn on PowerPoint Smart Guides?

The Smart Guides feature is renamed to Snap To. Enabling it should be quite simple and easy enough.

Follow the steps here below to enable or turn on Smart Guides feature on PowerPoint –

  • Launch your PowerPoint application.
  • Locate the Viewtab and find Show,group on it.

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

  • Click on the launcher for the dialog box. You will need to click on the icon showed in the above image through the arrow.
  • If you want to enable Smart Guides and looking ahead to snap the shapes and other objects to the intersection grid that is closest enough to you, find the option Snap Toand then make sure the option Snap objects to the grid is checked.

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

That does it. This is exactly where you can turn on the option for Smart Guides or the newly launched Snap to Grid option.

You can disable or turn off the function by unchecking the option.

Another method you can use for enabling the Smart Guides would be to follow the example here below –

  • Click on an Empty space on your slide.
  • Next, on the context menu that appears, hover your mouse on the option Grid and Guides
  • You can find the option to enable Smart Guides.
  • Locate Smart Guides option and click on it to enable it.

Here are a few options that should help you in effectively using the functionality of the Smart guide.

How to Align the Objects?

Aligning the objects should be an excellent and easy option with your PowerPoint application.

Here is what you are expected to do –

  • Select the objects you would want to align. If you have multiple objects to align, you can press Shift and choose your objects.
  • Once you do that, you should find the Formatoption come up on the ribbon.
  • Choose Shape Formatoption and then choose Align

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

  • You can select the options of your choice for the proper formatting requirements –
  1. Align left, Align Right or Align Center
  2. Align Top, Align Bottom or Align Middle
  3. Distribute vertically or Distribute horizontally

The Smart Guides feature can be quite practical and useful in many circumstances. One of the excellent options that the Smart Guides feature tends to be helpful would include Reposition.

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

The best benefit offered by the Smart Guides functionality shown as in the above example should provide you input into the reposition feature. Find the above two triangles and consider a situation where you need to reposition the top of both the triangles.

As you begin moving the smaller triangle upward, you will find that you get the dotted line that guides you to the top of the triangle and helps you reposition the second triangle effectively and accurately.

A few other options where a Smart Guide can help you out would be to resize your images. You can also distribute or align them in a perfect manner with the help of Smart Guides.

Can We use Smart Guides functionality in Word?

Well, the Snap To options have also been made available on Word as well. Of course, slightly off topic, we thought it might be practical enough to include a little information on the feature and how it can you enable or turn it on Word.

  • Once you have added an image, choose it.
  • On the Picture Formatoption, locate Align
  • Locate the option Grid Settingson the Align tab.

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

  • Next, under the Grid Settings Dialog box, locate the Show Gridtab and check the box for Snap objects to grid when the gridlines are not displayed. This will let you snap objects and shapes to the nearest intersection of the grid.

You may also have other options to snap the objects to the grid-

  • Locate the Object Snappingtab and check the options for Snap objects to other objects.This can help you lock the objects to other objects and shapes.
  • If you do not want to use the features, it may be a good idea to turn off the functionality by unchecking the above options.

The Concluding Thoughts

The Smart guides feature on your Microsoft PowerPoint or Office 365 should be an excellent option for an enhanced alignment of your objects. Of course, enabling it is not something rather difficult, but finding the right choices to allow it may be a little tricky. We assume that the tips and guidance as outlined in this compilation for enabling it should be helpful enough in many ways.

If you find the tips shared here helpful enough for your needs, we would consider our efforts have paid off. Please note that the Smart Guides functionality is quite useful, but has been since renamed and redesigned.

Storyline 360 has a design grid, drawing guides, and a ruler to make it easier to position and align objects in your project.

Displaying the Design Grid

The design grid is a series of horizontal and vertical dotted lines that display on your slide while you’re editing. The grid won’t appear in your published output; it’s only visible while you’re building slides. Here’s an example of what the grid looks like on a slide.

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

To show the design grid, do any of the following:

  • Press Shift+F9 on your keyboard.
  • Go to the View tab on the ribbon and mark the Gridlines box.
  • Go to the View tab on the ribbon and click Grid and Guides. Mark the box to Display grid on screen and click OK.
  • Select any object, go to the Home tab, click Arrange, scroll to Align, and choose View Gridlines.
  • Right-click anywhere in the slide workspace and choose Grid and Guides. Mark the box to Display grid on screen and click OK.

Changing Your Grid Settings

To set your preferences for the way gridlines display, use the Grid and Guides window. To open the Grid and Guides window, do any of the following:

  • Go to the View tab and click Grid and Guides.
  • Select any object, go to the Home tab, click Arrange, scroll to Align, and choose Grid Settings.
  • Right-click anywhere in the slide workspace and choose Grid and Guides.

How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

Here are the options you can set on the Grid and Guides window:

Snap options

Mark either or both of these boxes to force objects to snap to gridlines or other objects on the slide.

When these options are enabled, you can still move an object without snapping it by holding down the Alt key while dragging the object. This temporarily disables snapping. When you release the Alt key, snapping will resume.

Spacing

Enter a value (in pixels) for grid spacing, or use the arrows to increase/decrease the value.

Display grid on screen

Use this box to turn the grid on or off.

Display drawing guides on screen

Drawing guides are lines that you add to the slide to help you align objects.

They won’t appear in your published output; they’re only visible when you’re editing slides.

See the next section in this user guide for more information on adding, adjusting, and removing guides.

Display smart guides when shapes are aligned

Smart guides are temporary visual guidelines that appear when you’re moving objects around and two objects come into alignment with each other. They disappear as soon as you release your mouse button to drop an object into place.

Mark the box if you want them to appear. Uncheck it if you don’t want to use smart guides.

Lock guides

Mark this box to lock guidelines in place so you don’t accidentally move them while working with other objects on the slide.

Set as Default

Click this button to use the same settings in other projects.

Working with Drawing Guides

Drawing guides help you align objects. Drawing guides won’t appear in your published output. They’re only visible when you’re building slides.

You can turn drawing guides on by marking the box to Display drawing guides on screen on the Grid and Guides window shown above. Another way to enable drawing guides is to go to the View tab on the ribbon and mark the Guides box.

When drawing guides are first enabled, four guidelines appear on the slide—two horizontal and two vertical. You can add more guidelines and move them around the slide.

To create a new guide

Use any of these methods to create a new guideline:

  • Double-click a ruler to create a new guideline at that point.
  • Click a ruler and drag away from it to create a new guideline.
  • Right-click the slide where you want a new guideline to appear, then choose one of the guideline options.
  • Hold the Ctrl key as you drag an existing guideline to create a new one.

To move a guide

Click and drag a guide to move it.

An arrow will appear, showing the number of pixels you’ve moved the guide. Positive numbers indicate a rightward or upward movement (relative to the center of the slide), and negative numbers indicate leftward or downward movement.

You can also select a guideline and nudge it with your arrow keys, one pixel at a time.

To delete a guide

To delete a guide, select it and press the Delete key on your keyboard.

Displaying the Ruler

The ruler is another handy alignment tool. It makes common tasks easier, such as drawing shapes and positioning drawing guides.

Display and use gridlines and guides

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    Display and use gridlines and guides

    You can use gridlines to identify the center of your slide or document and position shapes and objects more precisely.

    In Excel 2007, gridlines also make it easy to enter and find data in your worksheet. And in Microsoft Office PowerPoint 2007, you can use drawing guides to position shapes and objects on slides.

    Overview of gridlines and drawing guides

    Gridlines

    Gridlines make it easier to align shapes and objects by giving you a visual cue in relation to the objects and the slide, document, or worksheet. In Excel 2007, the primary purpose of gridlines is to distinguish cell boundaries.

    You can show or hide gridlines and you can change grid and guide settings by choosing from a range of preset measurements. Gridlines are not visible during a slide show and they do not print in a presentation or document. In Excel 2007, it is possible to print gridlines.

    The drawing grid includes an option, called snap to, that aligns objects to the nearest intersection of the grid or to another object as you draw or move objects.

    Tip To temporarily override the snap to options, hold down ALT while you drag the shape or object.

    Drawing guides

    In PowerPoint 2007, you can also use drawing guides to position shapes and objects on slides. Drawing guides can be shown or hidden, and you can add or delete guides as well. When you drag a guide, the distance to the center of the slide is shown next to the pointer. Drawing guides are not visible during a slide show and do not print in a presentation.

    Use the grid to help align objects more precisely, particularly in relation to each other.

    In PowerPoint 2007 use one or more guides to arrange objects evenly, with or without the grid turned on.

    Display gridlines

    Word

    • Click the shape or object in the document.
    • Under Drawing Tools on the Format tab, in the Arrange group, click Align , and then click View Gridlines.

    If you do not see the Drawing Tools or Format tabs, make sure that you selected a shape or an object.

    • To display only some gridlines, after clicking Align, click Grid Settings, and then under Show grid, click the number of gridlines that you want to display in the Vertical every or Horizontal every lists.
    • By default, shapes and other objects snap to the nearest intersection of gridlines only if the grid is visible. You can override this by selecting the check box.

    Excel

      On the View tab, in the Show/Hide group, select the Gridlines check box.

    PowerPoint

      On the Home tab, in the Drawing group, click Arrange, point to Align , then click View Gridlines.

    Display drawing guides in PowerPoint 2007

    • On the Home tab, in the Drawing group, click Arrange, point to Align , then click Grid Settings .

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Images, icons, text boxes and shapes constitute the elements of the slides in a presentation. Keeping them properly aligned and arranged will help you grab your audience’s attention and convey your message in an effective manner. In this tutorial, we’ll teach you step by step how to arrange and align the elements in PowerPoint.

    Aligning an Object

    • Open your PowerPoint presentation.
    • Select the object you want to align.
    • Drag it around on the slide. You’ll see some little lines—these are the guides, which you can use as a reference to align the selected object with respect to the other elements on the slide.

    Aligning Two or More Objects

    • Open your PowerPoint presentation and select multiple objects. To do this, click an object, hold Shift and then click other elements to add them to the selection.
    • Once you’ve selected them, go to the Home tab and click Arrange → Align → Align Selected Objects. This way, the elements will be aligned taking their own positions into account.
    • Go back to Arrange → Align.
    • You’ll see different options to choose from:

    Align Left: The selected objects will be aligned to the left side.

    Aligning to the left

    Align Center: The selected objects will be vertically centered.

    Aligning to the center

    Align Right: The selected objects will be aligned to the right side.

    Aligning to the right

    Align Top: The selected objects will be aligned to the top.

    Aligning to the top

    Align Middle: The selected elements will be horizontally centered to the slide.

    Aligning to the middle

    Align Bottom: The selected elements will be aligned to the bottom.

    Aligning to the bottom

    You’ll find the same options in the Align drop-down menu, which is in the Arrange group, on the Shape Format tab (please note that this tab won’t appear unless you select the objects first).

    Aligning Two or More Objects to the Slide

    • Open your PowerPoint presentation.
    • Select multiple objects. To do so, click any object, hold Shift and then click other elements to add them to the selection.
    • Once you’ve selected them, go to the Home tab and click Arrange → Align → Align to Slide.
    • Go back to Arrange → Align. You’ll see different options to choose from:
      Align Left: The selected objects will be aligned to the left side of the slide.

    Align Center: The selected objects will be vertically centered to the slide.

    Aligning to the center

    Align Right: The selected objects will be aligned to the right side of the slide.

    Aligning to the right

    Align Top: The selected elements will be aligned to the top part of the slide.

    Aligning to the top

    Align Middle: The selected elements will be horizontally centered to the slide.

    Aligning to the middle

    Align Bottom: The selected elements will be aligned to the bottom part of the slide.

    Aligning to the bottom

    You’ll find the same options in the Align drop-down menu, which is in the Arrange group, on the Shape Format tab (please note that this tab won’t appear unless you select the objects first).

    Distributing Selected Objects

    • Open your PowerPoint presentation and select multiple elements. To do so, hold Shift while clicking each object.
    • Once you’ve selected them, go to the Home tab and click Arrange → Align → Align Selected Objects. This way, the objects will be distributed taking their own positions into account.
    • Go back to Arrange → Align. If you now choose Distribute Horizontally, the selected objects will be evenly distributed horizontally.
    • If you choose Distribute Vertically, the selected objects will be evenly distributed vertically.

    You’ll find the same options in the Align drop-down menu, which is in the Arrange group, on the Shape Format tab (please note that this tab won’t appear unless you select the objects first).

    Distributing Objects to the Slide

    • Open your PowerPoint presentation.
    • Select two or more elements. To do so, hold Shift while clicking each one of them.
    • Once you’ve selected them, go to the Home tab and click Arrange → Align → Align to Slide. This way, the selected elements will be distributed on the entire slide.
    • Go back to Arrange → Align. If you choose Distribute Horizontally, the selected objects will be evenly distributed horizontally.
    • If you choose Distribute Vertically, the selected objects will be evenly distributed vertically.
    • You’ll find the same options in the Align drop-down menu, which is in the Arrange group, on the Shape Format tab (please note that this tab won’t appear unless you select the objects first).

    Arranging an Object

    • Open your PowerPoint presentation.
    • Select an object.
    • Go to the Home tab and click the Arrange drop-down arrow.
    • If you choose Bring to Front, the object will be placed top of the others.
    • If you choose Send to Back, the selected object will be behind all the other elements.
    • If you choose Bring Forward, the selected object will go up one layer, which means it will be on top of all the elements that are placed on lower levels.
    • If you choose Send Backward, the selected object will go down one layer, which means it will be behind all the elements that are placed on higher levels.

    You’ll find the same options in the Align drop-down menu, which is in the Arrange group, on the Shape Format tab (please note that this tab won’t appear unless you select the objects first).

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Have you ever worked in PowerPoint and tried to move an image to an exact place it just wouldn’t go? If you could (and sometimes do) spend hours making sure your PowerPoint images are in the perfect spot, try these five tips to get your images exactly where you want them in no time at all.

    PowerPoint Tip #1 – Control

    Instead of using just the arrow key or moving images around with your cursor, try holding down the CTRL key while using the arrow key. This way, your image will be nudged in the direction you want instead of jumping to a place that’s just a little too far (or not far enough).

    PowerPoint Tip #2 – Align

    When you want two or more PowerPoint images lined up exactly, use the Align function (below). For example, if your images are aligned vertically on the page, click on one, then hold down the Shift key and click on the other images you’d like lined up with it (select all images). Select the Format tab, then click on Align. Next, click Left, Center, or Right to choose the appropriate alignment.

    If your images are horizontal, repeat the same steps, but choose Top, Middle, or Bottom for your alignment options.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    PowerPoint Tip #3 – Grid

    The grid feature provides another way to align your PowerPoint images. Click on any image, go to the Format tab and select View Gridlines. When the grid appears, you will have a better idea of image alignment and spacing by using the gridlines as your guide.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    PowerPoint Tip #4 – Distribute

    When you have a bunch of images on a slide, it’s more pleasing to the eye when they are spaced out evenly. This is simple to do.

    First, turn on your gridlines. Then, if your images are going horizontally across the slide, place the image on the far left and the image on the far right in the places you want them using the gridlines as your guide. Then select all images, go to the Format tab, click Align and select Distribute Horizontally. You can do the same if your images are vertical on the page by repeating the above steps and clicking Distribute Vertically. Now you have perfectly spaced images.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    PowerPoint Tip #5 – Position

    You can get really precise using the Position function. Click on an image, select Size and then select Position. Here you can manually change the horizontal and vertical position on the slide by putting your cursor in the text box and typing in a numerical value up to two decimal points.

    This is helpful when you want images on different slides to be in the same spot. For instance, if you are creating a case study PowerPoint and each slide has a different logo on it, the position tool works wonders when it comes to getting them all in the same position on different slides.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    That’s it! If you follow these simple tips, your PowerPoint images will always be put in their place.

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    Learn how to draw a big red line around important text for emphasis on a PowerPoint slide.

    If you’re like me, you’re always on the lookout for interesting ways to draw attention to a specific point or object in a slide. When a bold rubber stamp type emphasis is needed, you might try drawing a circle around the object or text–right before the audience’s eyes. It’s easy and it certainly gets the job done.

    First, you need an object or text—something you want emphasized! Remember, this is a rather loud effect, so the message should be equally as bold. (The yellow is just the selection color.)

    The next step is to draw a circular AutoShape over the object by clicking Oval on the Drawing toolbar and dragging inside the slide. In PowerPoint 2007 and 2010, AutoShape is on the Home tab in the Drawing group. Hold down the [Shift] key when you insert the AutoShape to force PowerPoint to draw a circle rather than an oval.

    The default AutoShape will require a little formatting, so right-click the circle and choose Format AutoShape (or Format Shape) from the context menu. On the Colors and Lines tab, set the settings that follow and click OK. (In PowerPoint 2007 and 2010, select Fill, Line Color, and Line Style from the list on the left.)

    • Fill Color: No Fill
    • Line Color: Red, or some other bold color
    • Line Weight: 2 pt or higher.

    After formatting the circle, you’ll probably need to move it around a bit. The text in the circle below is centered.

    Now you’re ready to add the animation that will actually draw the circle. There are several ways to go, but the following instructions will draw the circle in a single stroke automatically (no clicking required):

    1. Right-click the circle and choose Custom Animation.
    2. From the Add Effect dropdown, choose Entrance.
    3. Select Wheel—click More Effects if Wheel isn’t available from the short list. In PowerPoint 2007 and 2010, click the Animation tab and choose Wheel from the Animation group.
    4. From the Start dropdown, choose With Previous.
    5. From the Spokes dropdown, choose 1. In PowerPoint 2007 and 2010, click the Effect Options dropdown in the Animation group.

    This simple but effective attention-getter took almost no work! To see the result, click [F5]. There’s no red circle at first, but as soon as PowerPoint plays the slide, it starts to draw the circle from the top center.

    Feel free to experiment with the settings. The Spokes setting determines the number of line segments drawn simultaneously. Depending on your audience and message, you might want to speed this one up a bit–even Very Fast probably isn’t too fast for this specific example.

    TechRepublic’s Microsoft Office Suite newsletter, delivered every Wednesday, is designed to help your users get the most from Word, Excel, and Access. Automatically sign up today!

    Wrapping text is a formatting function that keeps text within the margins of a page and avoids wasted space by “wrapping” the text to the next line. It is often seen in text boxes and around images in Microsoft Word.

    Microsoft PowerPoint, however, lacks a one-click text wrapping function, but there are ways to work around this.

    In this article, we’ll cover:

    • How to wrap text in a text box
    • How to manually wrap text around an image
    • How to create multiple text boxes around an image

    How to wrap text in a text box

    The simplest way to wrap text in PowerPoint is to create a text box and then format your text in that box.

    To wrap text in a text box on a PowerPoint slide, complete the following steps:

    1. Create a blank slide.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Create a blank slide by clicking Insert, New Slide, and select “Blank” in the menu that appears.

    1. Click the Insert tab within the top menu, and then Text Box.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Click Insert and then Text Box.

    1. To draw a text box, click your mouse in the upper left corner, hold the button down, and drag the box to the bottom right corner.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Click in the upper left corner, hold the mouse button down, and drag your box to the bottom right corner and release.

    1. Enlarge or shrink your text box by selecting one of the corner circles and moving them in or out.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Change the size of your text box by selecting a corner circle and moving it in or out.

    1. Enter your text in the text box.
    2. Select all text by clicking anywhere in the box and pressing CTRL + A.
    3. Click the Justify button on the main menu (an icon with four lines of equal length under the Home menu).

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Click the Justify button.

    1. Your text will now wrap to align with the text box perimeter.

    How to manually wrap text around an image

    One option is to create a text box, add an image, then manually move the text to surround the image. To manually wrap text around an image on a PowerPoint slide, follow the same steps through creating a text box, then:

    1. From the top menu, press Insert and select Pictures from the resulting menu.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    From the Insert menu, select Pictures and then choose an option to insert your photo.

    1. Select your image insertion method of choice, add your file, then place it on your slide. Click the image and drag it to change the location; resize with the circles on each corner of the image.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Drag the corner circles of the image box to resize it within the text box.

    1. Manually move your text around the image to wrap it by placing your cursor next to the last word to the left of the image and pressing the spacebar until your text moves to the right of the image.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Move the text manually to surround the image.

    How to create multiple text boxes around an image

    Another way to mimic text wrapping is to create multiple text boxes and arrange them around an image.

    For example, you can place an image in the middle of the slide and then create four text boxes, one on each side of the image. This will emulate wrapped text.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Creating multiple text boxes around an image is another way to mimic text wrapping in PowerPoint.

    Follow these steps:

    1. Add an image(s) to your slide using the steps outlined in the previous section.
    2. Add a text box on one side of the image.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Add a text box on one side of your image.

    1. Add text to your box, then press the justify button. Repeat this as many times as necessary until you have a text box on each side of your image.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Continue adding text boxes until your image is surrounded.

    Explore presentation software

    While Microsoft PowerPoint has dominated the presentation software market since its development, it’s not the only option out there.

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    Hi, as title suggests I no longer get the green guidelines which show when the object I am moving is aligned with the bottom/top/middle etc of another object in my document. Tried a couple of things in ‘View’ but hasn’t seemed to solve the problem – probably being stupid but I haven’t got the time to spend ages doing it today! So, yet again, I am here for your help.

    Thanks as always,

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    1 Correct answer

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    Mark, try this. View > Smart Guides

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    whoa! finally these guides are back on my Illustrator, thanks!

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    the green guidelines which show when the object I am moving is aligned with the bottom/top/middle etc of another object in my document.

    You seem to be referring to Smart Guides. Since you aren’t specific about what you have tried or not, can you confirm you have Smart Guides activated?

    Which is Cmd + U

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    I agree this is a case of missing Smart Guides; if Smart Guides are ticked but not showing, it may be time to Ctrl+Alt+Shift/Cmd+Option+Shift during startup, or to Move the folder

    Green guidelines? Unless you customize, I presume you are working in Layer 3 (or 30, or 57, or).

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    Thanks Jacob, the Ctl / Alt / Shift during start-up worked perfectly – that’s a brilliant little tip.

    Appreciate the help as usual, not sure what I’d do without these discussion forums!

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    P.S. Does the Ctrl Alt Shift function work with Acrobat too? Since a colleague went on my computer, Acrobat has been displaying PDFs in very poor quality.

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    You are welcome, Mark.

    I am not sure about Acrobat; the normal advice in case of trouble is to reinstall. But you may have a look at Edit>Preferences and see whether there is anything set wrongly.

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    I thought that would solve it – I’ve re-installed 3 times in the hope it would work finally, but alas no luck! Thanks for the advice anyway, I only asked because the Acrobat forums didn’t offer any answers either.

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    If you go to Edit>Preferences>General>Display, are the Smooth Text/Line Art/Images ticked (I refer to how it looks in 5)?

    And does it print correctly?

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    Jacob, yes that all seems to be ticked (as shown in the attached ‘screen capture’). In fact, according to the person using my computer at the time when this happened, she had in face done a screen capture from Acrobat using Snagit. Acrobat then opened up a window asking if she’d like to improve Acrobat for screen captures in future (or something like that, apparently she didn’t take much notice and just followed the instructions because you can almost always trust what Adobe programmes suggest). It’s not been the same since then. It does however print correctly, but it just looks messy on the screen. Thanks.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Here at BrightCarbon we’re always looking for new ways to improve our own PowerPoint productivity and then share that knowledge with the presentation community (that includes you, by the way!). One of the ways we do this is by using VBA code to automate and extend the functionality of PowerPoint. We publish free PowerPoint VBA code snippets here in our blog for you to use and also offer a PowerPoint automation service. This article explains how to grab the code from our articles and use it in your PowerPoint project, so that you can take your productivity to the next level!

    What is VBA?

    Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) is a programming environment for Microsoft Office applications. It’s included with your installation of Office by default ( unless your system administrator has deactivated it ) . PowerPoint VBA provides you with a way to do one of two things using macros and add-ins:

    1. AutomatePowerPoint: If you ever find yourself repeating the same task over and over again, VBA could be your new best friend. Let’s say you have 100 slides and you need to unhide all hidden objects across all those slides . That could take you many eye-straining minutes, but with a PowerPoint VBA it takes around a second.
    1. ExtendPowerPoint: Sometimes PowerPoint doesn’t have the feature you need to complete your task . As an example, if you end up deleting default layouts from a template, there’s no easy way in PowerPoint to get them back. This article includes PowerPoint VBA code to do just that!

    How to open the VBE (Visual Basic Editor)

    Getting to meet your VBA friend is very simple. With PowerPoint open and at least one presentation file open, press Alt+F11 * on your keyboard. This will open the VBE (Visual Basic Editor):

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    *If for some reason Alt+F11 isn’t mapped on your keyboard you can right click anywhere on the ribbon, select Customize the Ribbon… and in the window that appears, tick the Developer Tab check box over on the right hand side before clicking OK to close the window. Now you can click the Visual Basic button within this tab:

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Adding PowerPoint VBA code

    To add some VBA code, you need a container to put it in so go ahead and click Insert from the menu and then select Module :

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    You now have a module ready to paste the VBA code into from one of our blog articles :

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Copy the VBA code from the required blog article by double-clicking on it and then paste it into the Module1 window above. Here’s a very simple example of some code to display a message dialogue :

    You should now see something like this:

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Because this code is just a single Sub procedure called HelloWorld , it’s referred to as a macro.

    Running the PowerPoint VBA macro

    Now you have the macro in your presentation you can use Alt+Tab to return to the more familiar PowerPoint window. From here, the macro can be run by pressing Alt+F8 on your keyboard (or b y clicking the Macros button in the Developer tab) which opens a window containing a list of available macros:

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Saving your file

    With the macro ( s ) in your presentation file you can now use it in that file or with any other PowerPoint file you have open. Bear in mind that to use your macros, the file that contains them must be open. You can add as many modules and macros as you like in a PowerPoint file so you could create your own library of macros in a single file that you then access from all other decks. When you have multiple PowerPoint files open, make sure you select the file that contains your macros in the Macro window by clicking the Macro in drop down :
    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Once you ’ve added VBA code to your presentation, PowerPoint will ask you to save it as a pptm file (the ‘m’ stands for macro) instead of the more familiar pptx format . You can go ahead and do this to either keep a n archive copy of your code-enabled project or to create your personal macro library.

    If you want to distribute your presentation, it’s advisable to save it using the familiar pptx format so that your recipients don’t see lots of verbose security messages when opening pptm files!

    Y ou can make your file saveable as a standard presentation again by right – click ing on each code module in the project explorer pane , clicking Remove ModuleX and either click Yes (if you want to keep a backup of the modules independently of your presentation) or No when asked if you want to save the module before removing it :

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Now your presentation doesn’t include any code and you can save it as a pptx file.

    So, there you have it. You now know how to open the VBE, insert a PowerPoint VBA code module, paste code into it, run the macro and save the file in either pptm or pptx formats. All you need is a cool macro to make your daily life even easier. Keep checking in with our blog for more useful macros – like this one on restoring default slide master layouts!

    Got something extra you’d like PowerPoint to do?

    Check out our PowerPoint automation service which provides you with a custom solution to your specific needs.

    Andrew Gehman
    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objectsAndrew Gehman
    Writer

    Are you looking for an eye catching way to keep your audience interested in your PowerPoint presentations? Today we’ll take a look at how to add animation effects to objects in PowerPoint 2010.

    Select the object you wish to animate and then click the More button in the Animation group of the Animation tab.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Animations are grouped into four categories. Entrance effects, Exit effects, Emphasis effects, and Motion Paths. You can get a Live Preview of how the animation will look by hovering your mouse over an animation effect.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    When you select a Motion Path, your object will move along the dashed path line as shown on the screen. (This path is not displayed in the final output) Certain aspects of the Motion Path effects are editable. When you apply a Motion Path animation to an object, you can select the path and drag the end to change the length or size of the path. The green marker along the motion path marks the beginning of the path and the red marks the end.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    The effects can be rotated by clicking and the bar near the center of the effect.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    You can display additional effects by choosing one of the options at the bottom.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    This will pop up a Change Effect window. If you have Preview Effect checked at the lower left you can preview the effects by single clicking.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Apply Multiple Animations to an Object

    Select the object and then click the Add Animation button to display the animation effects. Just as we did with the first effect, you can hover over to get a live preview. Click to apply the effect. The animation effects will happen in the order they are applied.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Animation Pane

    You can view a list of the animations applied to a slide by opening the Animation Pane. Select the Animation Pane button from the Advanced Animation group to display the Animation Pane on the right. You’ll see that each animation effect in the animation pane has an assigned number to the left.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Timing Animation Effects

    You can change when your animation starts to play. By default it is On Click. To change it, select the effect in the Animation Pane and then choose one of the options from the Start dropdown list. With Previous starts at the same time as the previous animation and After Previous starts after the last animation.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    You can also edit the duration that the animations plays and also set a delay.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    You can change the order in which the animation effects are applied by selecting the effect in the animation pane and clicking Move Earlier or Move Later from the Timing group on the Animation tab.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Effect Options

    If the Effect Options button is available when your animation is selected, then that particular animation has some additional effect settings that can be configured. You can access the Effect Option by right-clicking on the the animation in the Animation Pane, or by selecting Effect Options on the ribbon.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    The available options will vary by effect and not all animation effects will have Effect Options settings. In the example below, you can change the amount of spinning and whether the object will spin clockwise or counterclockwise.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Under Enhancements, you can add sound effects to your animation. When you’re finished click OK.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Animating Text

    Animating Text works the same as animating an object. Simply select your text box and choose an animation.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Text does have some different Effect Options. By selecting a sequence, you decide whether the text appears as one object, all at once, or by paragraph.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    As is the case with objects, there will be different available Effect Options depending on the animation you choose. Some animations, such as the Fly In animation, will have directional options.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Testing Your Animations

    Click on the Preview button at any time to test how your animations look.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    You can also select the Play button on the Animation Pane.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Conclusion

    Animation effects are a great way to focus audience attention on important points and hold viewers interest in your PowerPoint presentations. Another cool way to spice up your PPT 2010 presentations is to add video from the web. What tips do you guys have for making your PowerPoint presentations more interesting?

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    While using a click sequence is adequate for normal use, there may be special cases when you want to show only parts of a presentation at a specific time, or you may want your slide show to be interactive. The ability to trigger an animation when clicking on an object gives you better control of how objects behave on your slides. Combining the two animation control setups is ideal for an effective presentation.

    1. Launch PowerPoint, and open the document you want to edit.

    2. If you have not created an object yet, insert the desired one from the Insert tab. After that, add a custom animation to the object from the Animations tab. By default, the Animation box only shows a small number of animations. Click the small arrow at the bottom right of the box to reveal them all.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    3. Once the animation is applied, highlight the object, and click the Animation Pane button on the ribbon.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    4. The Animation Pane appears on the right side of the program. Highlight the object that you want to edit, click the small drop-down arrow, and choose Effect Options.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    5. In the new pop-up window, switch to the Timing tab. Then click on the Triggers button at the bottom to see more timing controls, choose the Start effect on click of option, and choose the object that will be clicked in the box. Make sure that the object you choose is visible on the slide, or you will not be able to click on it at all.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    6. Click the OK button to save the changes. Come back to the slides, and switch to slide show mode to see how the objects behave, depending on your clicks.

    Change the weight attribute of shape outlines in PowerPoint 2013 for Windows. PowerPoint lets you create thin or thick lines, and compounded lines that combine two or three lines, and more.

    Author: Geetesh Bajaj

    Product/Version: PowerPoint 2013 for Windows

    OS: Microsoft Windows 7 and higher

    Date Created: November 13, 2013
    Last Updated: November 13, 2013

    Learn PowerPoint

    Learn how and why you should be Hiding Slide Titles in PowerPoint.

    We have explained the basics of formatting shape outlines in PowerPoint 2013. Now we take you further ahead to explore how you can change line weight to make the outlines thinner and thicker. So why would you want to alter the weight of an outline? There are many reasons, more often than not, you may want a line that’s almost invisible or very thin, this lets your audience focus on other areas. At other times when you want the attention of your audience to focus on a particular line, then you can do so by increasing its weight. In this tutorial, we will also cover compound lines such as those that encompass double or triple lines.

    Weight is the thickness attribute of the shape outline. You can change the weight all the way from a hairline thin line to a chunky thick line. Figure 1 shows you some weight variations in outlines.

    Figure 1: Width (weight) variations in outlines

    Follow these steps to change the outline weight of a shape:

    1. Open your presentation and select the shape that you want to format.
    2. Alternatively, if you want to start from scratch, launch PowerPoint. Most of the time, PowerPoint will open with a new slide in a presentation, you can change the slide layout to Blank by selecting the Home tab | Layout | Blank option. Then, insert a shape and select it.
    3. We selected a Rectangle shape, as shown in Figure 2. Selecting the shape brings up the Drawing Tools Format tab in the Ribbon, as shown highlighted in red within Figure 2. Activate this Ribbon tab by clicking on it.
    4. Figure 2: Drawing Tools Format tab of the Ribbon

    We have put together a massive collection of resources for PowerPoint Animations. This includes free & premium tips, tricks, tutorials and templates that you can access online to polish your slides and engage your audience.

    We will cover both Custom Animations and Transitions feature in PowerPoint. This includes the new Morph Transition introduced in PowerPoint for Office 365

    About PowerPoint Custom Animations

    Custom Animation is a useful feature in PowerPoint. You can use it to add interaction to your slides and make the presentation more engaging for your audience. Almost any element in your slide – text, photos, graphs, shapes, audio and video can be animated.

    You can add PowerPoint animations to any of these elements in just three steps: (1) Select the object to animate (2) apply an animation, and (3) customize the effects.

    Let us see how to apply animation to different parts of a presentation.

    Custom animation, when used correctly can enhance the effectiveness of your message in your business presentations. #PowerPoint #Tips

    4 Types of Animations

    PowerPoint offers 4 types of Animations:

    You can add more than one animation to the same object. With this feature, it is possible to create a variety of custom animations to suit your specific requirement.

    Animation can help make a PowerPoint presentation more dynamic, and the information more memorable. The most common types of animation effects include entrances and exits.

    Learn how to set up basic animations with these tutorials on Microsoft website.

    [Basic] Add Animations in PowerPoint 2016

    In this easy to follow video, learn how to add animation in PowerPoint 2016. This video shows how to get started and is a primer.

    Customizing Animation Effects

    Once you add an animation to an object, PowerPoint offers further options to customize the animation. Each Animation effect can be controlled using the following additional settings:

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Option 1: Preview Animations

    Animations in PowerPoint can be normally viewed only in Slideshow mode. So if you want to preview the animations you added on a slide, PowerPoint allows you to view them using the Preview option.

    Option 2: Effect Options

    Some effects in PowerPoint like Fly In have additional options available. For example, Fly In animation can be set to Flyin from Left, Right, Top or Bottom of the slide.

    In addition to this, text animation can be further set to: As One Object, All at One or By Paragraph.

    Option 3: Advanced Animation Effects

    These options help you fine tune your animation further. You can:

    Add Animation: Add more animation effects to an object

    Animation Pane: View Animation Pane to view list of animations applied on the slide and modify them.

    Trigger: Start animation on a trigger like on click of a button/text etc. to make your slide more interactive.

    Animation Painter: This lesser known tool can be used to copy all the animations applied to one object and “paint” or replicate the animation to another object. This is a very useful tool to reduce the time taken to create animation effects.

    Option 4: Animation Timing

    The Animation timing tools allow you to control when and how the animations play.

    Start: Animations can start On Click, With Previous and After Previous

    Duration: Controls how long the animation should play for.

    Delay: This feature controls how long after the previous animation the current animation should be played.

    Reorder Animation: When the Animation Pane is open, you can reorder the animations and move them up or down with these tools.

    5. About Animation Pane

    The Animation Pane provides the list of all the animations applied to a slide in once place. You can do the following actions in the Pane:

    An Excel, PowerPoint, & MS Word blog providing handy and creative VBA code snippets. These macro codes are well commented and are completely functional when copied into a module.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    What This VBA Does

    I could not find any way to call the Excel-based alignment actions with VBA, so I set out to create some mathematical equations to get your shapes perfectly aligned. The below code shows how you can use VBA to align two specific shapes in 6 different ways.

    Sub AlignTwoShapes()
    ‘PURPOSE: Align Two Shapes on the Active Spreadsheet
    ‘SOURCE: www.TheSpreadsheetGuru.com/the-code-vault

    Dim Shp1 As Shape
    Dim Shp2 As Shape

    ‘Shape To Align with (Stays put)
       Set Shp1 = ActiveSheet.Shapes(“Shape 1”)
      
    ‘Shape That Gets Aligned (moves)
       Set Shp2 = ActiveSheet.Shapes(“Shape 2”)

    Aligning Based Off Of A User Selection

    I wanted to take this concept a step further and run an alignment action affecting only the shapes that are selected. The below macro code aligns all the other shapes in the selection with the first shape that was selected by the user. Again you can pick which alignment or alignment combination you want by deleting (or commenting out) the unwanted actions in the code.

    Sub AlignMultipleShapes()
    ‘PURPOSE: Align each shape in user’s selection (first shape selected stays put)
    ‘SOURCE: www.TheSpreadsheetGuru.com/the-code-vault

    Dim Shp1 As Shape
    Dim Shp2 As Shape
    Dim x As Integer
    Dim y As Integer

    ‘Count How Many Shapes Are Selected
      x = Windows(1).Selection.ShapeRange.Count

    How Do I Modify This To Fit My Specific Needs?

    Chances are this post did not give you the exact answer you were looking for. We all have different situations and it’s impossible to account for every particular need one might have. That’s why I want to share with you: My Guide to Getting the Solution to your Problems FAST! In this article, I explain the best strategies I have come up with over the years to getting quick answers to complex problems in Excel, PowerPoint, VBA, you name it!

    I highly recommend that you check this guide out before asking me or anyone else in the comments section to solve your specific problem. I can guarantee 9 times out of 10, one of my strategies will get you the answer(s) you are needing faster than it will take me to get back to you with a possible solution. I try my best to help everyone out, but sometimes I don’t have time to fit everyone’s questions in (there never seem to be quite enough hours in the day!).

    I wish you the best of luck and I hope this tutorial gets you heading in the right direction!

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    3D is here! Yes, you can now insert certain types of 3D models into PowerPoint, rotate them and even animate them. At the end, I’ll show you a video of an animated 3D model in PowerPoint.

    To be clear, to get this new feature, you have to have Office 365, which is the subscription version. Office 365 is continually updated and Microsoft adds new features almost monthly. If you paid a one-time fee for Office, you have a static product, and you won’t get the new features.

    Even if you don’t have Office 365, I think you should know what’s coming.

    Here are the steps to insert 3D into PowerPoint.

    Step 1: Get Windows 10 Creators Update

    Supporting 3D models is a pretty involved capability and it starts with Windows itself. A few months ago, Microsoft put out Windows 10 Creators Update, which supports 3D.

    The main area where you’ll see this 3D support is in a new version of an old program, Paint. When you open Paint, you’ll see an Open Paint 3D button which you click to open the special 3D version. You can also find Paint 3D directly on your Windows Start menu.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Note: You don’t have to use Paint 3D to create your 3D objects, but if you don’t already have a program that creates 3D models in one of the accepted formats, it’s an easy way to start. And Microsoft has done a pretty good job of making it easy for amateurs to create 3D models in Paint 3D.

    Step 2: Create a 3D model in Paint 3D

    I’ll assume that you’ll use Paint 3D and describe it briefly, although my point here isn’t to give you a full tutorial in how to use Paint 3D.

    Tip: There are already a number of tutorials on YouTube; just do a search. Note that a lot of what you’ll see if not suitable for business use, but hopefully you’ll learn enough to design your own 3D models.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    On the left is your canvas. At the top is a menu. On the right are tools and settings.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    A quick way to start is to click the 3D icon at the top (the cube) and then scroll down in the right-hand column. You don’t see the scrollbar at first, but click where it should be and it will appear.

    Go ahead and click one of the 3D Objects choices. Then drag on the canvas and use the various rotation options.

    You can add textures, “stickers” and text. Just click everywhere and try out the options. If you click Get More Models, you go to the Remix 3D community where you can find more models (and upload your own). In my experience, these are more silly than businesslike but do check it out to see the amazing 3D models people are creating. When you find one you like, click Remix in Paint 3D to open it in Paint 3D.

    One really helpful tool looks like a clock and it’s a kind of Undo, letting you go back step by step. It’s at the upper right of the Paint 3D window.

    When you’re done, click the File icon and save as a Paint 3D file.

    Then choose File again and export. Choose a file type and you’ll get to name your file and choose a location. I’ve been using 3MF.

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    Step 3: Import your 3D model into PowerPoint

    To insert 3D into PowerPoint, you need PowerPoint 365 and a 3D Models item on the Insert tab (in the Illustrations group). If you don’t have it, you’ll have it soon. I have the Insider Fast setting, so I get new features soonest. Read more about becoming an Office Insider here.

    To insert a 3D model, choose Insert, 3D Models, From a File and navigate to the 3D model you created. Select it and click Open.

    Here are the formats that PowerPoint accepts:

    How to use guidelines to line up powerpoint objects

    • 3D Manufacturing Format: 3MF
    • Filmbox Format: FBX
    • Object Format: OBJ
    • Polygon Format: PLY
    • Stereolithography Format: STL
    • Binary GL Transmission Format: GLB

    When selected, your 3D model will have a 3D rotation icon at its center as you see here. Just drag that icon around in all directions to see how you can rotate it.

    Step 4: Animate it with the Morph transition!

    The coolest way to animate your 3D model is to use the Morph transition, which I explain in this post.

    The Morph transition lets you resize, move, and rotate your 3D model from one slide to the next. In this video, I just rotated my goal posts. I created this model in Paint 3D, using just cylinders.

    These Excel tutorials for beginners include screenshots and examples with detailed step-by-step instructions. Follow the links below to learn everything you need to get up and running with Microsoft’s popular spreadsheet software.

    This article applies to Excel 2019, Excel 2016, Excel 2013, Excel 2010, Excel for Mac, and Excel for Android.

    Understand the Excel Screen Elements

    Understand the Basic Excel Screen Elements covers the main elements of an Excel worksheet. These elements include:

    • Cells and active cells
    • Add sheet icon
    • Column letters
    • Row numbers
    • Status bar
    • Formula bar
    • Name box
    • Ribbon and ribbon tabs
    • File tab

    Explore a Basic Excel Spreadsheet

    Excel Step by Step Basic Tutorial covers the basics of creating and formatting a basic spreadsheet in Excel. You’ll learn how to:

    Create Formulas With Excel Math

    To learn how to add, subtract, multiply, and divide in Excel, see How to Use Basic Math Formulas Like Addition and Subtraction in Excel. This tutorial also covers exponents and changing the order of operations in formulas. Each topic includes a step-by-step example of how to create a formula that carries out one or more of the four basic math operations in Excel.

    Add Numbers With the SUM Function

    Adding rows and columns of numbers is one of the most common operations in Excel. To make this job easier, use the SUM function. Quickly Sum Columns or Rows of Numbers in Excel shows you how to:

    • Understand the SUM function syntax and arguments
    • Enter the SUM function
    • Add numbers quickly with AutoSUM
    • Use the SUM function dialog box

    Move or Copy Data

    When you want to duplicate or move data to a new location, see Shortcut Keys to Cut, Copy, and Paste Data in Excel. It shows you how to:

    • Copy data
    • Paste data with the clipboard
    • Copy and paste using shortcut keys
    • Copy data using the context menu
    • Copy data using menu options on the Home tab
    • Move data with shortcut keys
    • Move data with the context menu and using the Home tab

    Add and Remove Columns and Rows

    Need to adjust the layout of your data? How to Add and Delete Rows and Columns in Excel explains how to expand or shrink the work area as needed. You’ll learn the best ways to add or remove singular or multiple columns and rows using a keyboard shortcut or the context menu.

    Hide and Unhide Columns and Rows

    How to Hide and Unhide Columns, Rows, and Cells in Excel teaches you how to hide sections of the worksheet to make it easier to focus on important data. It’s easy to bring them back when you need to see the hidden data again.

    Enter the Date

    To learn how to use a simple keyboard shortcut to set the date and time, see Use Shortcut Keys to Add the Current Date/Time in Excel. If you prefer to have the date automatically update every time the worksheet is opened, see Use Today’s Date within Worksheet Calculations in Excel.

    Enter Data in Excel

    Dos and Dont’s of Entering Data in Excel covers best practices for data entry and shows you how to:

    • Plan the worksheet
    • Lay out the data
    • Enter headings and data units
    • Protect worksheet formulas
    • Use cell references in formulas
    • Sort data

    Build a Column Chart

    How to Use Charts and Graphs in Excel explains how to use bar graphs to show comparisons between items of data. Each column in the chart represents a different data value from the worksheet.

    Create a Line Graph

    How to Make and Format a Line Graph in Excel in 5 Steps shows you how to track trends over time. Each line in the graph shows the changes in the value for one data value from the worksheet.

    Visualize Data With a Pie Chart

    Understanding Excel Chart Data Series, Data Points, and Data Labels covers how to use pie charts to visualize percentages. A single data series is plotted and each slice of the pie represents a single data value from the worksheet.