How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Have you used Reveal Codes in WordPerfect? These scripts will help users display their text content with the format, similar to HTML. However, if you use Microsoft Word, it is difficult to find the same function .

TipsMake.com – Have you used Reveal Codes in WordPerfect ? These scripts will help users display their text content with the format, similar to HTML. However, if using Microsoft Word , it is difficult to find such a function.

Technically, WordPerfect will display the same text content and format codes, automatically insert the start code and end the text with the corresponding format. When you display the Reveal Codes window, you will see the characters that mark the code formatted with the text content, and can perform other operations such as inserting or deleting. For example, if you delete the closed code, the entire text will be formatted according to the open code.

In Microsoft Word , the text content and format codes are arranged, arranged and displayed completely separately. Word stores the format information of the text somewhere else, and it is not inserted into the text. Instead, Word monitors the characters and paragraphs of each format applied in the entire document, along with the opening and ending codes.

Meanwhile, WordPerfect has both modes: WYSIWYG – what you see is what you get and Reveal Codes , Word only has WYSIWYG . When highlighting a certain text, we will only see the text without being able to see the surrounding code. However, there is a way to display the format code of the selected text, because Word is not the same as WordPerfect . In Word , we select a text and press Shift + F1, the Formatting Reveal control panel will display the relevant elements like Font , Paragraph , and Section :

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

And if you want to change the format, you can use the options available in Reveal Formatting:

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Select the text to format, click the Font link in the Formatting Reveal panel, the Font display window. Do any changes and click OK .

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

However, you should not confuse the Formatting Reveal and the function of displaying formatting icons in Word. Press the paragraph symbol in the Paragraph section of the Home tag to display hidden characters such as spaces, tabs, markup characters . shortcuts are Ctrl + *

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Maybe we want to display both Reveal Formatting and hidden special characters to track certain paragraphs in the text to distinguish. Good luck!

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

When working with styles in Word, you may need to reveal formatting in Word document text. The “Reveal Formatting” pane lets you reveal formatting in Word documents. This pane lets you see the details of text formatting in Word. You can also use it to compare formatting in Word.

How to Open the Reveal Formatting Pane in Word

To open the “Reveal Formatting” pane in Word, first select the text for which to see the formatting. Then open the “Styles” pane. To open the “Styles” pane in Word, click the “Home” tab in the Ribbon. Then click the “Styles” task pane launcher button in the lower-right corner of the “Styles” button group. Then open the “Style Inspector” pane. To open the “Style Inspector” pane in Word, click the “Style Inspector” button at the bottom of the “Styles” pane. In the “Style Inspector” pane, click the “Reveal Formatting” button to open the “Reveal Formatting” pane.

Alternatively, to more quickly open the “Reveal Formatting” pane in Word, select the text to inspect. Then press the “Shift” + “F1” keys on your keyboard.

How to Use the Reveal Formatting Pane in Word

In the “Reveal Formatting” pane, the “Selected text” appears at the top of the pane in a text box. The text’s formatting appears in the “Formatting of selected text” box in the center of the pane. Note that the specific formatting is contained within expandable and collapsible groupings for “Font,” Paragraph,” and “Section.” You may also see additional formatting groups, like “Bullets and Numbering,” “Table,” or “Cell” appear for selected text that contains bullets or numbering or exists within a table, too. You can click the arrows next to each group’s label to expand or collapse the formatting within each.

How to Compare Formatting in Word

To compare the formatting of the selected text with another selection, check the “Compare to another selection” checkbox. Another text field then opens, and you can then click and drag to select the text within the document to which to compare the initially selected text. The newly selected text then appears in the second text field. The formatting differences between the two selections then appear in the “Formatting differences” box in the center of the pane.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Reveal Formatting in Word – Instructions and Video Lesson: A picture of a user comparing text formatting differences within the “Reveal Formatting” pane in Word.

How to View the Style Source and Show or Hide Formatting in Word

If viewing a single, selected section of text within the “Reveal Formatting” pane, then you can view the style source of the selected text by checking the “Distinguish style source” checkbox in the “Options” section. To hide or show all formatting marks, regardless of the number of text selections, check or uncheck the “Show all formatting marks” checkbox. To close the “Reveal Formatting” pane, click the “X” button in the upper-right corner of the pane.

Reveal Formatting in Word: Instructions

Instructions on How to Open the Reveal Formatting Pane in Word

  1. To open the “Reveal Formatting” pane in Word, first select the document text whose formatting you wish to inspect.
  2. Then open the “Styles” pane by clicking the “Home” tab in the Ribbon and then clicking the “Styles” task pane launcher button in the lower-right corner of the “Styles” button group.
  3. Then click the “Style Inspector” button at the bottom of the “Styles” pane.
  4. In the “Style Inspector” pane, then click the “Reveal Formatting” button to open the “Reveal Formatting” pane.
  5. Alternatively, to more quickly open the “Reveal Formatting” pane in Word, select the text to inspect and then press the “Shift” + “F1” keys on your keyboard.

Instructions on How to Use the Reveal Formatting Pane in Word

  1. In the “Reveal Formatting” pane, the text field at the top of the pane shows the “Selected text” in the document.
  2. The text’s formatting appears in the “Formatting of selected text” box in the center of the pane.
  3. Note that the specific formatting is contained within expandable and collapsible groupings for “Font,” Paragraph,” and “Section.”
  4. You may also see additional formatting groups, like “Bullets and Numbering,” “Table,” or “Cell” appear for selected text that contains bullets or numbering or exists within a table, too.
  5. You can click the arrows next to each group’s label to expand or collapse the formatting within each.

Instructions on How to Compare Formatting in Word

  1. To compare the formatting of the selected text with another text selection, check the “Compare to another selection” checkbox.
  2. Another text field then opens, and you can then click and drag to select the text within the document to which to compare the initially selected text.
  3. The newly selected text then appears in the second text field.
  4. The formatting differences between the two selections then appear in the “Formatting differences” box in the center of the pane.

How to View the Style Source and Show or Hide Formatting in Word

  1. To view the style source of the selected text if viewing a single, selected section of text in the “Reveal Formatting” pane, check the “Distinguish style source” checkbox in the “Options” section.
  2. To hide or show all formatting marks, regardless of the number of text selections, check or uncheck the “Show all formatting marks” checkbox.
  3. To close the “Reveal Formatting” pane, click the “X” button in the upper-right corner of the pane.

Reveal Formatting in Word: Video Lesson

The following video lesson, titled “ Using the Reveal Formatting Pane ,” shows how to reveal formatting in Word documents. This lesson is from our complete Word tutorial , titled “ Mastering Word Made Easy v.2019 and 365 .”

Go behind the scenes of your text to resolve formatting issues

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What to Know

  • Temporary reveal: In Word, go to the ribbon and select Home. Choose the Show Formatting Symbols icon to toggle marks on and off.
  • Permanent reveal: In Word, go to the ribbon and select File > Options > Display. Select Show all formatting marks > OK.

This article explains two ways to reveal the formatting marks and codes in a Microsoft Word document. It also includes information on the Reveal Formatting panel. These instructions apply to Word for Microsoft 365, Word 2019, Word 2016, and Word 2013.

Temporarily Show Formatting Symbols

Microsoft Word uses bullets, numbered lists, page breaks, margins, columns, and more. To see how Word structures a document, view the formatting marks and codes associated with the text.

Quick-view the formatting Word uses in a document by toggling the feature on and off when you need it. Here’s how.

To reveal the formatting symbols, go to the ribbon and select Home.

In the Paragraph group, select Show/Hide (the icon looks like a paragraph mark).

The formatting symbols appear in the document and each symbol is represented by a specific mark:

  • Spaces display as dots.
  • Tabs are indicated with arrows.
  • The end of each paragraph is marked with a paragraph sign.
  • Page breaks display as dotted lines.

To hide the formatting symbols, select Show/Hide.

Permanently Show Formatting Symbols

If you find that having the formatting symbols visible makes working with Word easier and you want to have them visible all the time, here’s how to change the setting:

On the ribbon, select File.

Choose Options.

In the Word Options dialog box, select Display.

In the Always show these formatting marks on the screen section, select Show all formatting marks.

Select OK to save your changes.

Display the Reveal Formatting Panel

To find more information about the formatting of a Word document, display the Reveal Formatting panel.

Press Shift+F1 on the keyboard to display the Reveal Formatting panel.

To view information about a portion of the document, select that text.

In the Reveal Formatting panel, select a link to see detailed information about the formatting components and to make changes to the formatting.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Are you used to the Reveal Codes feature in WordPerfect? These codes show you your text with integrated formatting codes that seem similar to HTML formatting. However, if you’re using Word, there is no comparable function.

WordPerfect treats text and formatting codes the same, putting start and end codes around text as you format it. When you display the Reveal Codes window, you see the formatting code markers integrated with the text. You can select the code markers and even insert and delete them manually. For example, if you manually delete an end code, the rest of the document will be formatted according to the start code that now has no corresponding end code.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

In Word, text and formatting are treated completely independently. Word stores the formatting for the text in a different part of the file than the text to which the formatting applies. It is not inserted in the text stream. Instead, Word tracks the character and paragraph formatting you apply throughout your document, and does concern itself with start and end codes.

Whereas WordPerfect has both modes, WYSIWYG (“what you see is what you get”) and Reveal Codes, Word only has the WYSIWYG mode. You apply bold to some text and you see that text as bold text. You cannot see the bold codes around your text.

However, there is a way to see how selected text is formatted. Word won’t show you start and end codes like WordPerfect because it doesn’t use them. But, when you select some text in Word and press Shift + F1, the Reveal Formatting pane displays. Word shows you, in list format, how the selected text is formatted with respect to the Font, Paragraph, and Section.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

If you want to change the formatting of the selected text, you can do so using the Reveal Formatting pane. For example, if you want to make the selected text not bold, but italic instead, click the Font link in the Reveal Formatting pane.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

The Font dialog box displays. Make any changes you want and click OK. The text reflects the change as does the Reveal Formatting pane.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Do not confuse the Reveal Formatting pane with the feature in Word that shows hidden formatting symbols. Clicking the paragraph symbol in the Paragraph section of the Home tab, shows hidden symbols such as spaces, tabs, and paragraph marks. These are different than the formatting listed on the Reveal Formatting pane.

NOTE: You can also press Ctrl + * to show and hide the formatting symbols.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

You might want to show both the Reveal Formatting pane and the hidden formatting symbols to easily track your formatting and the spacing between words and paragraphs and tabs.

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To use Reveal Formatting, select the text for which you want to view the formatting information and press Shift+F1.

The Reveal Formatting pane will open:

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

  • To view the formatting on a word, click on the word
  • To view the formatting on more than one word of text, select the text fragment

Another, more long way to open the Reveal Formatting pane:

1. On the Home tab, in the Styles group, click the dialog box launcher:

2. In the Styles pane, click the Style Inspector button:

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

3. In the Style Inspector dialog box, click the Reveal Formatting button:

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Use the Style Inspector

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

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How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

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To use Reveal Formatting, select the text for which you want to view the formatting information and press Shift+F1.

The Reveal Formatting pane will open:

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

  • To view the formatting on a word, click on the word
  • To view the formatting on more than one word of the text, select the text fragment

Another, more long way to open the Reveal Formatting pane:

1. On the Home tab, in the Styles group, click the dialog box launcher:

2. In the Styles pane, click the Style Inspector button:

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

3. In the Style Inspector dialog box, click the Reveal Formatting button:

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Use the Style Inspector

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

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How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

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You can bring up the reveal formatting pane by simply pressing the combination of Shift + F1 in the word document as shown below in screen image.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

You can treat the formatting and text fully independently in word 2010. Microsoft word can store text formatting in various part of the main file than the text to which text formatting is applicable. However, it is not included or inserted in the main stream of text. So, instead of this Microsoft word tracks the paragraph and character formatting that you applied in your document, do distresses itself with end codes and start. Microsoft word comes up with only WYSIWYG mode. You can apply bold to some of your text and you can view the text as a bold text. However, you will not see the bold codes around your body text. You can select the text in your word document by simply pressing the combination of keys, Shift + F1. This combination will bring up the reveal formatting pane as mentioned above. In below screenshot, you will find in the list format how your selected text is formatted in the document Such as font, section and paragraph.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

You can change the formatting of the selected text if you wish to do. Use the reveal formatting pane. Below example suggest you how to do.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

You can see the Font dialog box. After making necessary changes which you want and then click on OK button. The changes will reflected in the text as done in the Reveal Formatting pane. Same has been shown in below screen image.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

However, you don’t need to be confused with the hidden formatting symbols shown in the reveal formatting pane with the new feature in Word 2010. You can click on the paragraph section in the main home tab, it will show you spaces, hidden symbols, paragraph marks and tabs, etc. You can press the combination of Ctrl + * in order to hide and show various formatting symbols in your word 2010 document. We are showing you in below example.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

You can easily track you’re formatting and words spacing between paragraphs and tabs by simply showing both hidden formatting symbols and reveal formatting pane.

There is nothing in Word directly comparable to Reveal Codes in WordPerfect. There is a very good reason for this. WordPerfect can be thought of (and I understand is) basically a text stream with codes interspersed (for more on this, see John McGhie’s article on Word vs. WordPerfect). This is what you see when you Reveal Codes. You have codes or markers that turn on and off certain formatting characteristics (similar to the and <\b> codes to turn bold on and off in HTML).

Word, on the other hand, is a series of nesting containers: characters inside words inside paragraphs inside sections inside documents. The formatting of these is by styles and by pointers at the beginning and end of the document. I am reliably informed that if you open a Word document (Word 2003 and earlier) in a hex editor, you see a forest of gibberish at the beginning and end that represent these codes and pointers (you can get a small idea of this by opening a document using the Recover Text from Any File setting under �Files of type� or �All Files� in the File Open dialog). So Reveal Codes, even if there were such a thing in Word, would not be very helpful. But there are many helpful cues and clues in Word if you know how to use them.

Reveal Formatting

The feature commonly touted as Word’s equivalent to Reveal Codes in earlier versions was the �What’s This?� button on the Help menu. Click on that (or press Shift+F1), then click in a paragraph, and you’d get information about formatting applied both by the style and directly. Rarely, however, did this tell you much more than you could tell by just looking at the paragraph on the screen.

The �What�s This?� button has been replaced in Word 2002 and above by the Reveal Formatting task pane, which gives you specific information about the text at the insertion point (font, paragraph, and even section formatting). If you check the box for �Distinguish style source,� you can easily see what formatting is defined in the style and what has been directly applied.

Figure 1. Reveal Formatting task pane with style source distinguished

Styles

As a general rule, you want to avoid direct formatting. If you use styles to do your formatting and avoid manual formatting as much as possible, you will find that simply looking at the style name will usually tell you all you need to know. You can see which style is applied to the text at the insertion point by looking at the Style box on the Formatting toolbar in Word 2003 and earlier, the Styles and Formatting task pane in Word 2002 and above, or the Styles group on the Home tab in Word 2007 and above (you can also add the classic Style dropdown to the Quick Access toolbar in Word 2007 and above). The Styles and Formatting task pane has the added advantage that, if you mouse over the name of a style, a popup will give you a description of the style formatting. The Style Inspector and Style Area provide additional ways to get information on styles.

Style Inspector

Word 2007 added a new dialog that helps distinguish direct and style formatting and allows you to remove it selectively. To open the Style Inspector, display the Styles task pane by clicking on the dialog launcher arrow in the bottom right corner of the Styles group on the Home tab or by pressing Alt+Ctrl+Shift+S. In the bottom left corner of the task pane are three buttons. Style Inspector is the middle one (the Style Inspector button can also be added to the Quick Access Toolbar, but only through the Customize dialog; there is no right-click option to �Add to Quick Access Toolbar�). It opens the dialog shown in Figure 2.

Figure 2. The Style Inspector dialog

In the example above, red font color has been applied to the entire paragraph as direct formatting, while the Emphasis character style has been applied to a single word. The Style Inspector allows you to remove the direct font formatting without removing the character style (as opposed to using Ctrl+Spacebar, which would remove both).

Important Note: The Style Inspector will work only if �Keep track of formatting� is enabled at Office Button | Word Options | Advanced: Editing options (Word 2007 or File |Options | Advanced: Editing options (Word 2010 and above). Many users are accustomed to having �Keep track of formatting� disabled because, in Word 2002 and 2003, enabling it resulted in multiple pseudo-styles showing up in the Styles and Formatting task pane; in Word 2007 and above, the Options� button in the Styles pane allows you to select whether you want to see formatting listed or not (and to specify exactly which types of formatting you want to see). So there is no need to disable this option in Word 2007 and above.

Style Area

One of the most useful tools when working with an entire document is the Style Area, which is available only in Normal (Draft) and Outline views. As shown in Figure 3, the Style Area displays the style for each paragraph in your document so that you can scroll through and check for incorrect or improperly formatted styles. Double-clicking on a style name in the Style Area will bring up the Style dialog box with the current style selected.

Figure 3. The style area

To display the style area:

Other clues

Nonprinting characters

One of the most important and helpful visual cues in Word is the display of nonprinting characters. The Show/Hide � button toggles this display on and off. In Word 2003 and earlier, this button is on the Standard toolbar; in Word 2007 and above, it is in the Paragraph group on the Home tab.

Figure 4. The Show/Hide � button

The meaning of each of the nonprinting characters (or �formatting marks,� as they are known in Word 2000 and above), is explained in �What do all those funny marks, like the dots between the words in my document, and the square bullets in the left margin, mean? � With these symbols displayed, it is much easier to find out that, for example, your document is printing an extra blank page because you have half a dozen empty paragraphs at the end.

Text boundaries

Another visual cue that I find extremely helpful (indeed feel panicky and lost without) is text boundaries in Print Layout view (see Figure 5). This is helpful not only in visualizing page margins but also for seeing the outlines of graphics, including text boxes (even when they’re not selected), and table cell boundaries (even when gridlines are not displayed). Some people evidently prefer the cleaner page appearance they get without this display, but for a truly WYSIWYG view, you can always switch to Print Preview. To display text boundaries:

Figure 5. Display of text boundaries showing text box and table

Other Options settings

While you�re looking at the Options, there are several others you may want to enable:

The Show/Hide button turns hidden characters like spaces, paragraph markers, or tab marks on and off.

You can set them to always show:

Go to File > Options > Display.

Under Always show these formatting marks on the screen, select the check box for each formatting mark that you always want to display regardless if the Show/Hide button is turned on or off. Clear any check boxes for ones you don’t want always displayed.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Go to File > Help > Options > Display.

Under Always show these formatting marks on the screen, select the check box for each formatting mark that you always want to display regardless if the Show/Hide button is turned on or off. Clear any check boxes for ones you don’t want always displayed.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Go to Word > Preferences > View.

Under Show Non-Printing Characters, select the check box for each formatting mark that you always want to display regardless if the Show/Hide button is turned on or off. Clear any check boxes for ones you don’t want always displayed.

Microsoft Word Starter 2010 is a simplified version of Word that comes pre-loaded on your computer. Word Starter includes features that are basic to creating and working with documents, but it does not include the rich set of features found in the full version of Word. This article lists the differences in features between Word Starter and the full version of Word.

If you find that you need a richer set of features than what Word Starter provides, you can easily upgrade from Word Starter to Word. On the Home tab, click Purchase to visit an online retailer, where you can purchase and download Office right away.

Document content

This feature in Word.

Is supported this way in Word Starter.

Add-ins cannot be installed with Word Starter. If you open a document that was created with the help of a Word add-in, some features in the document may not be supported.

Not available to create

If you open a document that contains SmartArt, you can edit and format the text, format the shape, and cut, copy, paste, or delete the entire SmartArt graphic.

Not available to create

If you open a document that contains bookmarks, you can click bookmark links to jump to the bookmarks.

Not available to create

If you open a document that contains cross-references, you can refresh the data or delete the cross-reference.

Table of contents

Not available to create

If you open a document that contains a table of contents, you can refresh the data, copy and paste items, format the text, or delete the table of contents.

Footnotes and endnotes

Not available to create

If you open a document that contains footnotes or endnotes, you can click the footnote or endnote link to jump to the footnote or endnote. You can also cut, copy, or paste the footnote or endnote, and you can format the text.

Not available to create

If you open a document that contains captions, you can refresh the data. You can also cut, copy, or paste the index entries, and you can format the text.

Not available to create

If you open a document that contains an index, you can refresh the data. You can also cut, copy, or paste the footnote or endnote, and you can format the text.

Not available to create

If you open a document that contains formatted equations, you can display them inline, and you can edit them. You can also cut, copy, paste, or delete an equation, and you can format the text.

Table of figures

Not available to create

If you open a document that contains a table of figures, you can refresh the data. You can also cut, copy, or paste the items, and you can format the text.

Table of authorities

Not available to create

If you open a document that contains a table of authorities, you can refresh the data. You can also cut, copy, or paste the items, and you can format the text.

Citations and bibliography

Not available to create

If you open a document that contains citations and a bibliography, you can edit citations and sources, and you can refresh the data. You can also cut, copy, or paste citations and sources, and you can format the text.

Not available to create, digital signing not available

If you open a document that contains a signature line with a valid signature, you can view the signature details. You can also cut, copy, paste, delete, or resize the signature line.

Quick parts, including content controls, AutoText, and fields

Content controls are not available to create. If you open a document that contains content controls, you can edit the content of the controls or delete the content controls.

Certain types of AutoText (reusable content), document properties, and fields can be inserted in the document by means other than the Quick Part gallery. For example, in Word Starter you can insert the current page number or the current date and time with commands on the Insert tab.

Objects can be added to a document by dragging and dropping them onto the document. Some types of objects are rendered as images, but others are available by clicking the File tab and then clicking Open, if the software for opening the object is installed on your computer.

Not available to create or delete

If you open a document that contains comments, you can format and edit the text in the comments.

Built-in styles are combinations of formatting characteristics that you can apply to text to quickly change its appearance. For example, applying the Heading 1 style might make text bold, Arial, and 16 point, and applying the Heading 2 style makes text bold, italic, Arial, and 14 point. (Those are examples; exact formatting characteristics depend on Word’s default settings and those you might have chosen for yourself.)

Here are the top 5 reasons to use Word Styles:

1. Styles application means easy Table of Contents generation

The easiest way to create a table of contents is to use the built-in heading styles. You can also create a table of contents that is based on the custom styles that you have applied. Or you can assign the table of contents levels to individual text entries.

Mark entries by using built-in heading styles

Select the text that you want to appear in the table of contents.

On the Home tab, in the Styles group, click the style that you want.

For example, if you selected text that you want to style as a main heading, click the style called Heading 1 in the Quick Style gallery.

If you don’t see the style that you want, click the arrow to expand the Quick Style gallery.

If the style that you want does not appear in the Quick Style gallery, press CTRL+SHIFT+S to open the Apply Styles task pane. Under Style Name, click the style that you want.

2. Styles cascade and so when you make one change to a document you have made them all

Instead of using direct formatting, use styles to format your document so you can quickly and easily apply a set of formatting choices consistently throughout your document.

For more information see Style basics in Word

3. Styles allow you to use Outline View

When you enter your first top-level outline entry, Word automatically formats it with a built-in style, Heading 1. As you continue to build your outline by adding subordinate and body levels, Word in turn continues to apply the appropriate built-in style to each heading and body text entry. In this way, your outline levels (Level 1, Level 2, Body Text, and so on) are directly tied to built-in heading styles (Heading 1, Heading 2, Normal, and so on).

While you can manually change the formatting of text in your outline, veering away from the built-in styles that Word offers can result in some outline entries not being displayed correctly. So if you want to change formatting across your document, you might want to do so in another view, such as print layout view, once your outline is complete.

On the opposite end of the spectrum, if you find extra formatting distracting, you can display your entire outline as plain text by clicking Show Formatting on the Outlining toolbar.

4. Restrict formatting changes

You can lock down styles in a document to make sure that others don’t apply direct formatting and change your document creating a huge mess.

5. Templates are much more efficient and kinder to others if they’re based on styles

A template is a Microsoft Office document that’s been designed with pre-existing themes, styles, and layouts, which has placeholder information instead of real content.

Templates are a great way to save time and create consistent Office 2010 documents. They are especially valuable for types of documents that you use frequently, such as weekly presentations, application forms, and expense reports. If possible, you want to use a file that already has the look and feel that you want, with placeholders that you can change to tailor it for your current needs. That’s what a template is—a file where the hard work has been done for you, saving you from having to start with a blank page.

In addition to the templates that come with the program, you have free access to all the templates on Office.com

You can also get help from the Microsoft Community online community, search for more information on Microsoft Support or Windows Help and How To, or learn more about Assisted Support options.

If you have ever created a complex Word document, you’ve probably run into those frustrating issues where you just can’t seem to get a bullet point or paragraph of text aligned correctly or some text keeps breaking off onto another page when you need it to be on the same page.

In order to fix these types of problems, you have to sometimes manually edit the formatting of the document. In Word, the text of the document is stored separately from the formatting. This is good because it makes it easier to edit the formatting without losing any text.

In this article, I’m going to tell you how to display formatting marks in Word documents. These formatting marks include tabs, hyphens, spaces, paragraph marks, hidden text, page breaks, etc. I’ll also talk about another feature in Word called Reveal Formatting, which lets you see all of the formatting applied to any selected text.

Show Formatting Marks

There are two ways to go about showing formatting or paragraph marks in Word: either using the button on the Paragraph ribbon or by going to WordOptions. The latter method will display the formatting marks all the time for all documents. Using the button, you can toggle the display of the marks and it only affects currently opened documents.

To view paragraph marks in Word, click on the Home tab in the ribbon and then click on the paragraph mark in the Paragraph section.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

As an example, here I have some text in Word with basic formatting:

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Now if I click on the button above, I’ll instantly see all the formatting marks in the document.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

The lines with the arrow pointing to the right are tabs and the single dots are spaces. The hidden text is underlined with a dotted line and the page break shows up at the bottom. If you want to display any particular formatting mark all the time, you can do that by clicking on File and then Options.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Now click on Display in the left-hand menu and you’ll see a section called Always show these formatting marks on the screen.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

At the bottom of the list, you can also choose to show all formatting marks too if you like. Now let’s talk about the reveal formatting option in Word.

Reveal Formatting

In addition to viewing paragraph and formatting marks in a Word document, sometimes it’s useful to see what kind of formatting has been applied to text. This is kind of similar to HTML and CSS, if you are familiar with those web protocols.

In order to reveal formatting in Word, just press SHIFT + F1 and a dialog window will appear docked to the right side of the screen.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Now just click anywhere in your document or select some text and you can see all the formatting applied including the font, language, effects, etc. It will also tell you the formatting applied to the paragraph and the section. This is really useful if you need to see exactly what formatting was used to produce a certain look for some text.

It’s also worth noting that the blue links in the dialog are clickable. So let’s say you want to change the font, just click on FONT and it’ll bring up the Font dialog.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Same goes for Effects, Alignment, Indentation, Spacing, Margins, etc. This is another great way to edit the formatting on a select piece of text that may be causing you trouble. These are pretty much all the ways you can edit formatting or view formatting in a Word document. If you have any questions, feel free to comment. Enjoy!

Founder of Online Tech Tips and managing editor. He began blogging in 2007 and quit his job in 2010 to blog full-time. He has over 15 years of industry experience in IT and holds several technical certifications. Read Aseem’s Full Bio

I get many people who write and express frustration because they miss the “reveal codes” feature they were used to in WordPerfect. They do not understand why there is no comparable function in Word. The reason is because there is a core difference between how documents are formatted in Word and WordPerfect, and each takes a totally different approach to text in general. I won’t try to convince anyone that one approach is better than the other; both have their pros and cons. Suffice it to say that they are just different than each other.

WordPerfect essentially treats text and formatting the same. When you format some of your text, a “start code” is inserted at the beginning of the selection, and an “end code” is inserted at the end. These are actual codes, inserted in the actual text. These are the code markers that are visible when you display the reveal codes window. You can select and delete these codes, just as you would any other character. In fact, you can insert a “start code” in your text, and if you don’t insert an “end code,” (or if you delete the “end code” without deleting the “start code”) the rest of the document is formatted according to the lone “start code.”

You can’t do that in Word. This is because Word treats text and formatting completely independent of each other. The file format used in Word stores formatting information in a different portion of the file than the text to which that formatting is applied. Thus, the formatting is not within the “text stream,” as it is in WordPerfect. Instead, Word tracks the paragraph and character formatting applied to every character in the document, without the need to worry about “start codes” or “end codes.”

In Word, basically “what you see is what you get.” If something is formatted as bold text, it appears as bold text. It is essentially impossible to have stray or unused formatting codes in your text, as you can in WordPerfect. The reason is because there are no such codes.

The closest you can get to the reveal codes is to display the complete formatting information that Word is applying to a character or paragraph. You can do this by following these steps:

  1. Press Shift+F1. (You can also choose What’s This? from the Help menu.) This causes the mouse pointer to change to an arrow with a question mark beside it.
  2. Point to the character or paragraph in question and click the mouse button.

When you do this, Word 97 and Word 2000 display a “balloon” that looks like the dialog balloons used in some cartoons. The balloon contains detailed information about the formatting of the character you pointed to, as well as the paragraph in which the character appears.

If you are using Word 2002 and 2003, the Reveal Formatting task pane is displayed at the right side of the screen. This task pane shows all the same information that is in the balloons used in earlier versions of Word, but provides the added feature of allowing you to modify formatting, as desired.

If you are using Word 97 or Word 2000, you have two options at this point. You can either click on a different character to see more formatting information, or you can press Esc to make the balloons go away. If you are using Word 2002 or 2003, the Reveal Formatting task pane remains on the screen until you either display a different task pane or dismiss the task pane all together.

WordTips is your source for cost-effective Microsoft Word training. (Microsoft Word is the most popular word processing software in the world.) This tip (1837) applies to Microsoft Word 97, 2000, 2002, and 2003.

Author Bio

With more than 50 non-fiction books and numerous magazine articles to his credit, Allen Wyatt is an internationally recognized author. He is president of Sharon Parq Associates, a computer and publishing services company. Learn more about Allen.

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To display or hide formatting marks (e.g., spaces, tabs, and paragraph breaks) in a Microsoft Word document:

Word for Windows

  1. In Word 2010, on the File tab, click Options . In Word 2007, from the Office Button menu, select Word Options near the bottom right corner of the menu.
  2. Select Display from the listing at the left.
  3. In the section titled “Always show these formatting marks on the screen”, check or uncheck the appropriate boxes to view the marks of your choice. To show or hide them all, select Show all formatting marks .
  4. To save your changes, click OK .

Word for Mac OS X

  1. From the Word menu, select Preferences. .
  2. Select View .
  3. In the section titled “Nonprinting characters”, check or uncheck the appropriate boxes to view the marks of your choice. Check All to see all formatting marks.
  4. To save your changes, click OK .

You can also toggle between displaying and hiding formatting marks. To do so:

  • In Word for Windows, on the Home tab, in the Paragraph group, click the paragraph icon.
  • In Word for Mac OS X, click the paragraph icon in the Standard toolbar. If you don’t see the icon, from the View menu, choose Toolbars , and then check Standard .

This is document ajfe in the Knowledge Base.
Last modified on 2018-01-18 13:09:34 .

If you are old enough to remember when WordPerfect ruled the roost when it came to word processing, you may also remember that one of the best features of that program was the ability to show all formatting marks in a document.

This feature allowed you to edit the document for format style and see exactly where any markup had been inserted in the page.

Word’s answer to this feature was never as convenient or powerful as that found in WordPerfect. In fact, some believe that the lack of this feature is what allowed WordPerfect to stick around as long as it did while Word was taking over as the number one word processing program.

Today, Word has improved its show formatting features so much so that they rival the old WordPerfect method of being able to see all formatting marks in a document. Read on to learn how to make formatting a page in Word easier by showing formatting marks.

Why Show Formatting Marks in Word?

Before we look at how to show formatting marks, you may be wondering why you would want to show these marks in the first place. Well, it turns out that some of the formatting in a Word document can never be viewed so it can be frustrating to figure out how to make your document look the way you want it to.

For example, just looking at a document, it is impossible to tell whether there exists an indent, a tab stop, or simply a series of spaces whenever text is indented from the left. You’ll never be able to tell, in fact, until you put your cursor on the area and play around with the formatting to see how it behaves.

By revealing the formatting marks in a document, you can instantly see what function in Word was used to create the layout. Sometimes the ruler at the top of document can help identify the formatting but that’s not a convenient interface with which to create and edit a document’s layout.

How to Show Formatting Marks

To show formatting marks in any Word document, begin by clicking on the Office Jewel in the upper left hand corner of the application and selecting the Word Options button in the bottom right hand corner of that window.

In the left hand pane of the Word Options windows, locate and click on the Display option. In the right hand pane, locate the options titled Always Show These Formatting Marks on the Screen.

You’ll notice that there exist the options to show tab characters, spaces, paragraph marks, hidden text, optional hyphens, object anchors, and even the option to show all formatting marks.

For now, let’s choose the option titled Show All Formatting Marks and see what Word reveals to us. Below is an image showing what Word look like when you reveal all of the formatting marks in a document.

You can now see where every paragraph begins and ends with the paragraph mark. Also, notice that you can see where every space appears in the document with a little dot between each word.

Having the spaces revealed in a document can make the page look cluttered but it does serve an important purpose. Notice that paragraphs 2 and 3 appear similarly indented from the left margin.

However, with formatting marks revealed, you can plainly see that paragraph 2 is indented with a tab stop and paragraph 3 is indented with a series of spaces. This kind of information is invaluable for a typesetter or editor trying to make sense of the usually invisible marks in a Word document.

You can, of course, go back to the options windows and pick which formatting marks you want revealed in your Word documents. Turning spaces off is probably a good idea and the rest serve their purpose depending on how you like to edit Word documents and how much information you can handle on the screen at one time.

This Tech Tip is brought to you by the Business and Technology Section . IT solutions for today’s CPAs. For more information and to view an archive of previous Tech Tips, please visit us here.

Many of the settings in Microsoft Word will only apply to the current document unless you choose to apply a setting to the default template. But there is one specific setting that can hide or show formatting marks in a document, and that setting will remain even after you close a document in Microsoft Word.

Your Microsoft Word 2010 document includes a lot of information behind the scenes that dictates how elements appear within that document. You can choose to show that information by enabling an option that will display formatting marks. However, these marks can be difficult to work with if you are unfamiliar with them, so you might decide that editing a document is simpler when they are hidden.

Fortunately, you can hide those formatting marks by changing a setting in Word 2010. You can also go into the Word Options menu to turn off any formatting marks that had previously been configured to display on their own.

Tip: You can add a comment to a document in Microsoft Word so that other document editors can evaluate an idea or potential change before you decide to make it.

How to Stop Formatting Marks from Appearing in a Word 2010 Document

  1. Open Word 2010.
  2. Click the Home tab at the top of the window.
  3. Click the Show/Hide button in the Paragraph section of the ribbon.

Our guide continues below with additional information on hiding formatting marks in Word 2010, including pictures of these steps.

How to Turn Off Formatting Marks in Word 2010 (Guide with Pictures)

The steps in this section were performed in Microsoft Word 2010, but will also work in other versions of Microsoft Office, such as Word 2013 or Word for Office 365.

The first three steps in this guide show you where to find the button that lets you show/hide formatting marks in Word, while the remainder of the guide discusses enabling or disabling specific formatting symbols.

Step 1: Open Microsoft Word 2010.

Step 2: Click the Home tab above the ribbon.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Step 3: Click the Show/Hide button in the Paragraph section of the ribbon.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

If there are still some formatting marks showing, then you will need to change the formatting mark setting in another location.

Step 4: Click the File tab at the top-left corner of the window.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Step 5: Click Options in the column at the left side of the window.

This is going to open a new window called Word Options.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Step 6: Click the Display tab in the left column of the Word Options window.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Step 7: Uncheck each option in the Always show these formatting marks on the screen section.

You can then click the OK button at the bottom of the window to save and apply your changes.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Our tutorial continues below with more discussion on working with Microsoft Word formatting marks.

More Information on How to Hide Formatting Marks in Word 2010

The second part of our guide above directs you to the Word Options menu where you can specify which formatting marks you want Microsoft Word to display. For example, you might want to be able to see hidden text, but you may wish to turn off paragraph marks in Word 2010. By customizing the options in the “Always show these formatting marks on screen” section you can make that configuration happen.

If you see the paragraph mark, tab characters, object anchors, or other symbols in your Word document then it means that Word is currently set up to display formatting marks. If you click the Show/Hide button in the Paragraph group of the ribbon then it is going to hide the formatting marks for the current document and future documents regardless of the marks that you enabled in the Word Options menu. Those marks will only display when you click the Show/Hide button again.

Some of the formatting marks that you can see in Microsoft Word include:

  • Tab characters
  • Spaces
  • Paragraph marks
  • Hidden text
  • Optional hyphens
  • Object anchors

If you are often toggling the formatting mark display on and off then you may wish to familiarize yourself with its keyboard shortcut. if you press Ctrl + Shift + 8 on your keyboard then it will either show or hide the paragraph marks.

Any changes that you make to the formatting display setting will apply to the entire document.

Are you trying to copy and paste from a different location on your computer, such as a Web browser, or a different document, but the font is wrong, or the wrong color? Learn how to paste into Word 2010 without formatting and save yourself some time and frustration.

Additional Sources

Matthew Burleigh has been writing tech tutorials since 2008. His writing has appeared on dozens of different websites and been read over 50 million times.

After receiving his Bachelor’s and Master’s degrees in Computer Science he spent several years working in IT management for small businesses. However, he now works full time writing content online and creating websites.

His main writing topics include iPhones, Microsoft Office, Google Apps, Android, and Photoshop, but he has also written about many other tech topics as well.

Track Changes is a tool in Microsoft Word which allows you to show any markups, changes or comments made to a document.

In this post, I’ll teach you how to use Track Changes to edit Word documents, and how to accept or reject those changes as a reviewer.

Why use Track Changes?

It is particularly useful when you are sharing documents with other colleagues, because it allows you to see exactly what changes were made, and by whom. In addition, it gives more power to the owner of the document who can accept or reject any changes made to the document.

Digital communications often shares Word documents containing website content with colleagues across the University, and asks them to use Track Changes to make edits or queries. This allows us to clearly see what edits have been made and greatly speeds up the amount of time we spend editing web pages.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Track Changes will record any text you add, delete, reformat, or comment on. Reviewers can then accept or reject changes.

How to use Track Changes

If you do not know how to use Track Changes, Microsoft has a very useful online guide to using Track Changes.

You can also follow these steps if you are using the desktop Microsoft Word app:

Turn on Track Changes

  1. Open Microsoft Word.
  2. Choose the Review tab at the top of the document.
  3. Either click the Track Changes button (PC) or toggle the Track Changes switch (Mac).
  4. Make sure that you change ‘Simple Markup’ to ‘All Markup’ from the drop down bar next to Track Changes.How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Once Track Changes is turned on, you can start editing the document. Any changes you make to the text will be marked by a grey bar on the left side of the changed text.

When you add text, the added text will be in a different colour to the normal text – making it easy to spot for reviewers.

When you delete text, the deleted text will be noted in a comment in the right margin of the document.

When you reformat text, the type of reformat will be noted in a comment in the right margin of the document.

You can also comment on pieces of text by selecting New Comment from the Review tab. The comment will appear in the right margin of the document.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Review

If you are reviewing a document, you can either accept or reject changes made by another person. To do this, simply click on the changed text (or the note in the margin) and then select either Accept or Reject from the Review tab.

You can also choose to accept or reject all changes at once from the drop down menus beside each option.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Turn off Track Changes

To turn off Track Changes, simply click on the Track Changes button or toggle again.

I’m a recovering WordPerfect user, and I’m finding it hard to see which formatting is applied to a word. Why is there no Reveal Codes option?

The Solution:

To check font formatting, choose Format » Font and check the settings in the Font dialog box (or look at the status of the controls on the Formatting toolbar).

To check paragraph formatting, choose Format » Paragraph and check the settings in the Paragraph dialog box. (Again, you can look at some of the buttons on the Formatting toolbar for settings such as alignment.)

To check tab formatting, look at the ruler or choose Format » Tabs and check the settings in the Tabs dialog box.

To check the style, display the Style area at the left of the document window (choose Tools » Options, click the View tab, and set a suitable widthsay, 1″in the “Style area width” box). The Style area is available only in Normal view and Outline view.

If you work with the Style area displayed, you can double-click a style name in the Style area to open the Style dialog box with that style automatically selected.

To check the language, choose Tools » Language » Set Language and look at the setting in the Language dialog box.

In other words, the settings are all over the place, and you need to know where to turn to learn particular pieces of formatting information.

Word 2000, in response to 10 or so years of complaints (from Word users as well as WordPerfect users), introduced another option for getting formatting information: the “What’s This?” feature. You choose Help » What’s This? or press Shift+F1, the mouse pointer displays an arrow with a question mark, and you click a paragraph to display details of its formatting (see Figure 4-4). Click further paragraphs as necessary, and then press Escape to restore the pointer to its normal self. This is better than the previous options, but not much.

Figure 4-4. The “What’s This?” formatting pop up is the precursor to Word 2003 and Word XP’s Reveal Formatting task pane.

Word 2003 and Word XP improve matters a little with the Reveal Formatting task pane (see Figure 4-5), which you display by choosing Format » Reveal Formatting. This task pane provides a breakdown of the font, paragraph, and section formatting, plus any other relevant formattingfor example, table formatting if the selection is within a table. You can click one of the links to reach the relevant dialog box for more details.

How to Bring Back Classic Menus and Toolbars to Office 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016 and 365?
Just Download Classic Menu for Office 2007 or Classic Menu for Office
Kutools for Word: 100 Powerful New Features for Word.
Office Tab: Tabbed Editing and Browsing in Office, Just Like Chrome, Firefox, IE 8/9/10.

If you have not Classic Menu for Office :

It’s not easy to find Format in Microsoft Word 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019 and 365, as all items from the drop-down menu of Format tab in Word 2003/XP(2002)/2000 are not gathered together no longer in Word 2007/2010/2013, but disorganized into different groups on the Ribbon. For example, Font, Change Styles and Text Direction are all listed in the group of “Home” tab on the Ribbon, Water mark and Page Color are displayed in the group of “Page Layout” tab on the Ribbon while Tracking, Compare and Language are included in the group of “Review” tab on the Ribbon of Microsoft Word 2007/2010/2013.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

If you are using Classic Menu for Office :

Open one word document, in the group of the “Menus” tab at the far left of the Ribbon of word 2007/2010/2013, you can view the “Format” menu and execute many commands from the drop-down menu of Format.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Obviously, you can see all commands of Format tab from the drop-down menu, like Font, Text Effect, Paragraph, Watermark, Text Direction, Change Style, etc.

More Tips

What is Classic Menu for Office

The software Classic Menu for Office is designed for the people who are accustomed to the old interface of Microsoft Office 2003, XP (2002) and 2000. It brings back the classic menus and toolbars to Microsoft Office (includes Word) 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019 and 365. The classic view helps the people to smoothly upgrade to the latest version of Office, and work with Office 2007/2010/2013/2016 as if it were Office 2003 (and 2002, 2000).

Screen Shot of Classic Menu for Word
  • All new features and commands of Office 2007, 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019 and 365 have been added to the menus and toolbars;
  • Without any training or tutorials after upgrading, users can work with Office 2007/2010/2013/2016 immediately;
  • Easy to find any command items you want to process;
  • Easy to show or hide the classic menus, toolbars and ribbon tabs;
  • Easy to install and use. Supports all languages. Free download!

Classic Menu for Office

It includes Classic Menu for Word, Excel, PowerPoint, OneNote, Outlook, Publisher, Access, InfoPath, Visio and Project 2010, 2013, 2016, 2019 and 365.

Classic Menu for Office 2007

It includes Classic Menu for Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Access and Outlook 2007.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Microsoft’s Word and Corel’s WordPerfect have long been the two dominant names in word processing software. While Word has emerged as the far more popular option, many users remain devoted to their beloved WordPerfect. Which program is best really depends on personal preference and your specific word processing needs.

Compatibility

Word’s big advantage over WordPerfect is in compatibility. The dominance of the various Microsoft Windows operating systems has enabled Word to claim more than 90% of the market. Due to its immense popularity, Word is the preferred choice for most schools, businesses and companies, forcing most WordPerfect users to either relent or to save files into an acceptable Word format before submitting. The only exception may be in the legal profession, where WordPerfect remains the top choice.

Formatting

Many WordPerfect devotees, including those in the legal field, favor it due to its many formatting benefits. WordPerfect’s “Reveal Codes” feature enables quick formatting corrections, and the program also offers many unique numbering, redacting and editing features, like easy header and footer manipulation, that make it preferable. Many users also complain about Word’s preset document formatting, which can be troublesome and difficult to change. However, Word’s “Reveal Formatting” feature has helped close the gap, providing many of the same benefits as “Reveal Codes.”

Support Costs

If choosing between Word and WordPerfect for your business, selecting Word could help reduce support costs. Employees and staff will likely be far more familiar with Word. Implementing WordPerfect may require investing more time and money in training staff, and in providing the necessary technical support. Word’s template feature also enables for standardized templates that eliminate user confusion, further enhancing business efficiency.

Features

WordPerfect Office X6, which came out in 2012, contains features not found in Word 2010. Most notably, WordPerfect Office X6 includes a built-in eBook publisher that assists in adding chapter headings, tables of content and photos, while also converting the documents into the preferred formats for eReaders and mobile devices. A new previewing function also enables users to see and edit files before opening them in Windows Explorer or Microsoft Outlook, resulting in faster, more efficient work.

  • Mashable: Bill Gates Testifies: Microsoft Beat WordPerfect Fair and Square
  • National Technology Assistance Project: Word vs. WordPerfect

William Lynch has been a freelance writer for the past fifteen years, working for various web sites and publications. He is currently enrolled in a Master of Arts program in writing popular fiction at Seton Hill University. He hopes to one day become a mystery novelist.

Some fractions (1/4, 1/2, and 3/4) automatically switch to a fraction character when you type them (¼, ½, ¾). But others do not (1/3, 2/3, 1/5, etc.).

  1. To switch to a fraction character, click Insert > Symbols > More Symbols.
  2. In the Subset drop-down list, click Number Forms and select a fraction.
  3. Click Insert > Close.

TIPS:

  • To find additional mathematical symbols, click AutoCorrect at the bottom of the Symbol dialog box. Click the Math AutoCorrect tab to see a list of keyboard shortcuts you can type into your document to insert math symbols. Be sure to select the Replace text as you type check box. Depending on where you are in the document, you may need to select the Use Math AutoCorrect rules outside of math regions option.

Microsoft Office 2010 and 2013:

    Place the cursor on the document where you would like to insert a fraction.

Microsoft Office 2007:

  1. Go to the “View” menu tab in MS Word and select ” Toolbars ” then ” Customize Quick Access Toolbar “.
  2. Under “Choose Commands from” select “All Commands” from the dropdown menu. Select ” Equation Editor “.
  3. Drag it and drop it on any place on a toolbar.
  4. Select your desired fraction type from the resulting drop-down menu. An equation box will appear where your cursor is.
  5. Type in your desired denominator and numerator in the equation box. Click outside of the box when finished.

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Comments (38)

I own Word 2010.

I clicked Insert, and then Equation.

At that point you say to select Fraction from the Structures section.

At this point in the process, there is no Structures section in my Word 2010.

Rather than simply typing in a fraction like 1/2 or 1/3, follow the directions described above and you can have any fraction in the style you choose.

– The Walsh University Librarians

I tried this because only 1/2 and 1/4 will convert to match the font size, but when I type in 1/8 is doesn’t convert and therefore looks out of place because it’s not consistent with the other fractions.

I used your method to resolve this, but it didn’t work. I’m using Word 2013. The fraction boxes show up just fine, but after typing in my numbers, nothing changes. It looks exactly the same as if I entered the 1 / 8 characters directly, without using the equations tool. What’s the purpose of the tool if not to match the formatting of the other fractions? So frustrating!

To those who have had some issues – we apologize! We have Word 2016 at Walsh University and unfortunately cannot go back and physically try the old systems.

If you are a Walsh student, please come to the reference desk – we would be happy to walk you through what to do, regardless of what year your Word is from.

to Kari’s point, it seems that you can include a “stacked fraction” in word by doing the following:

You can use Insert –>Equation, and select Fraction or create a new Equation– to insert any kind of fraction into a document. Using the Design tool, you should be able to create an equation that meets your needs. This should then create a ‘equation object’, similar to a pre-defined field (like for putting name/address/phone numbers) that you can double click on and adjust again as needed.

in work 2010 home and student the steps are

go to equation drop down menu

skip the built in equations and go down to the ‘fine print’ that says insert new equations THIS IS WHERE YOU FIND THE FACTIONS CHOICE

chose the type of faction display you want it will appear in the text where you place the cursor (ALSO LEFT OFF THE INSTRUCTIONS i kept clicking the box expecting to be able to input numbers from the chosen display)

ADDED HELPFUL HINT: when putting numbers in the boxes use the arrow keys up down for traditional fractions and left right for factions displaying 1/8

If you are going to help people you have to include ALL steps even those that seem obvious because we own computers not have degrees in IT and it might be the first time someone is using something ‘simple’ like fractions

How To Show Formatting Marks And Reveal Formatting In Word:- You have an important document which is up for submission the next day. Using a complex editor like latex could be too much to ask for, at this last minute. But Word is just driving you crazy as you can’t quite get the bullets or the spacings at the exact places you want them to be. This can be quite frustrating and often you might end up getting help from a friend or an elder. But what if I tell you that you can solve this problem on your own without depending on anyone using two simple features of Word named Show Formatting and Reveal Formatting? We need an example text as the one in the following screenshot for you to try your tricks on.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

So are you all set? Dive into the article then!

Steps To Show Formatting Marks

STEP 1

  • To view the paragraph marks in Word, click on the Paragraph Marker icon under the Home tab in the ribbon as shown in the screenshot.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

STEP 2

  • There you are, now you can view all the paragraph marks in your word document. The single dots are spaces. A right pointing arrow indicates the presence of a tab.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

STEP 3

  • Now what to do if you want to have a particular word formatting mark to be shown to you always? For that, click on the File tab at the top and then on Options as shown in the screenshot given below.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

STEP 4

  • A new window named Word Options opens up. Find and click on the option named Display from the left window pane. Now in the right window pane, find the section named Always show these formatting marks on the screen. Here you get to choose the formatting marks that you want to be shown to you always. Check the coresponding check boxes and hit OK button once you are done.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Steps To Reveal Formatting

STEP 1

  • Reveal Formatting helps us to view what type of formatting has been applied to a text document. To view the Reveal Formatting side window which is hidden by default, press SHIFT+F1 keys together.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

STEP 2

  • If you want to see the formatting applied to a particular piece of text, select that text by dragging. Now in the reveal formatting side window, you will be able to view all the formatting that has been applied to the text. If you want to change a particular attribute, simply click on it. Here I have clicked on Font.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

STEP 3

  • A new separate window opens up to change the attribute value that you have selected.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

STEP 4

  • Here you can easily change the values as per your choice. I have opted to change the font colour as an example. Once you are done, hit OK button.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

STEP 5

  • There it is! You have successfully changed the font colour of the selected text using Reveal Formatting feature.

How to use the reveal formatting feature in word 2010

Hope you are all good with your Word now. Come back for more as there is always something new waiting.