How to use the steamos desktop

SteamOS is a Linux-based operating system that aims to provide a seamless gaming experience from Steam’s own game store.

While it has been in existence for about a decade now, there are a few things that you should know about it.

In this article, we try to address most of the common questions regarding SteamOS.

What is SteamOS?

SteamOS is a Linux distribution from the game distribution platform Steam. It is not a generic desktop operating system like Debian, Linux Mint or Ubuntu though you could use the desktop features. By default, SteamOS gives you a console like interface because SteamOS is intended to be the operating system on Steam devices like Steam Machine (discontinued) and Steam Deck.

How to use the steamos desktop

While you can install the Steam game client on any Linux distribution and other platforms, SteamOS was developed to provide a console-like experience to play games from the Steam store.

Which Linux distribution SteamOS is based on?

SteamOS is a Linux-based operating system originally based on Debian 8. With Valve’s new Steam Deck handheld gaming device, SteamOS’s latest version (SteamOS 3.0) uses Arch Linux as its base because of its rolling-release update schedule.

The developers believe that Arch Linux as a base for SteamOS is useful to push quick updates and optimize SteamOS for Steam Deck.

How to use the steamos desktop

System requirements for SteamOS

Ideally, any machine with the following minimum requirements should work:

  • Intel or AMD 64-bit capable processor
  • 4GB or more memory
  • 250GB or larger disk
  • NVIDIA, Intel, or AMD graphics card
  • USB port or DVD drive for installation

Will SteamOS Work on your PC?

SteamOS (version 2.0) comes with drivers and chipsets that support a specific set of hardware.

It should theoretically work on every PC, but there’s no official support for the latest and greatest hardware.

Is SteamOS just another Linux distribution?

SteamOS is technically one of the gaming Linux distributions available. But, unlike some others, it is not meant for a full-fledged desktop experience. While you have the ability to install Linux applications, it supports a limited number of packages.

In short, it is not suitable to replace a desktop Linux OS.

Is Steam OS Actively Maintained?

Yes and No.

SteamOS is based on Debian 8 for a long time now with no updates whatsoever.

So, if you are looking to install it on your personal machine, the version available to the public (SteamOS 2.0) is not actively maintained.

However, Valve is actively working on SteamOS 3.0 for its Steam Deck hardware. Hence, there is a possibility that you should find it available soon enough for your desktop.

Should You Prefer SteamOS for PC Gaming?

No. SteamOS is not a proper replacement for Windows or other Linux distributions.

While it was primarily tailored to play games, there are many caveats to know before you proceed.

Do all games work on SteamOS?

No. SteamOS relies on the Proton compatibility layer to make most of the Windows-exclusive games work.

Of course, Gaming on Linux has been made possible with the same underlying tech, but at the time of writing this, you cannot make all the games available in Steam work with it.

Even though many games should work on it, that does not guarantee that all games you have in your library will work as expected.

If you are looking to play supported games and Linux-only games, you can consider trying it.

Is SteamOS open source?

Yes (SteamOS 2.0).

The operating system is open-source, and you can find the source code in its official repo.

But, the Steam client that you will be using on it is proprietary.

It is worth noting that SteamOS 3.0 is still a work in progress. So, you cannot find the source code or any progress of it available to the public.

Is SteamOS free to use?

You won’t find the new SteamOS version available to the public yet, but it is essentially free to use. The older version based on Debian is available to download from the official site.

Can I find a gaming system with SteamOS built in?

How to use the steamos desktop

SteamOS was originally created to be the operating system on Steam’s very own PlayStation/Xbox styled console called Steam Machine. Released around 2015, Steam Machine did not see much success and was eventually discontinued.

Now the only device to feature SteamOS is the much-anticipated Steam Deck.

If SteamOS is available to download for other hardware, you may see commercial choices to have SteamOS pre-installed with a gaming machine.

But, for now, you should not believe any claims by unknown manufacturers to offer SteamOS out of the box.

Will Next-gen SteamOS Make Linux a Viable Choice for Gaming?

Linux may not be the recommended choice for gamers out there. You can explore if we recommend Linux for gaming. Still, if SteamOS evolves to support every game for its Steam Deck hardware, desktop Linux users can finally experience all unsupported Steam games.

SteamOS is a public release of our Linux-based operating system. The base system draws from Debian 8, code named Debian Jessie.

Download

What’s New

Specs

  • UEFI systems
  • non-UEFI systems
  • SteamOS Source

We’ve been hard at work to deliver on our promise of a new kind of living room entertainment environment – one that is accessible, powerful and open.

In making SteamOS available to you, we’re excited to take the next major step towards that goal. But before you dive in, please take a few minutes to understand what SteamOS is and what it is not.

So, what is SteamOS?

SteamOS is a public release of our Linux-based operating system. The base system draws from Debian 8, code named Debian Jessie. Our work builds on top of the solid Debian core and optimizes it for a living room experience. Most of all, it is an open Linux platform that leaves you in full control. You can take charge of your system and install new software or content as you want.

So, what is it not?

We expect most SteamOS users to get SteamOS preinstalled on a Steam Machine. Although we have made SteamOS freely available for anybody to install, the installation experience is not intended for a non-technical user.

Most importantly, SteamOS only supports a certain set of hardware (you can read more in our FAQ). We will add support for newer hardware over time, but we have no plans to add more support for older hardware.

Users should not consider SteamOS as a replacement for their desktop operating system. SteamOS is being designed and optimized for the living room experience.

Is all of SteamOS open source software?

No. SteamOS ships with our Steam Client program, which is proprietary software, in addition to proprietary 3rd party drivers. In the SteamOS standard configuration, the Steam Client program serves as a user interface and provides connectivity to our Steam online services. That being said, you can still access the standard Linux desktop.

In-home Streaming

You can play all your Windows and Mac games on your SteamOS machine, too. Just turn on your existing computer and run Steam as you always have – then your SteamOS machine can stream those games over your home network straight to your TV!

Music, TV, Movies

We’re working with many of the media services you know and love. Soon we will begin bringing them online, allowing you to access your favorite music and video with Steam and SteamOS.

Family Sharing

In the past, sharing Steam games with your family members was hard. Now you can share the games you love with the people you love. Family Sharing allows you to take turns playing one another’s games while earning your own Steam achievements and saving your individual game progress to the Steam cloud.

What’s New:

This is a very large update. It includes a new 4.11 Linux kernel, and updated drivers for AMD, Intel, and NVIDIA graphics hardware. This update also switches SteamOS from the proprietary AMDGPU-PRO driver to the open source mesa driver. Debian 8.8 and security updates are also included.

Please note: Restarting your Steam Machine does not automatically apply updates.

Valve is pleased to announce the preview of the next SteamOS release, codenamed "brewmaster" and based on the latest Debian 8.1 stable release.

Please note that this is a very early preview release and we have done only limited hardware compatibility and functional testing. We are releasing this early to get feedback from the community. You should not install brewmaster on any machine containing data you are not prepared to lose completely.

Although there are a lot of changes under the covers, the overall functionality and experience of brewmaster is the same as alchemist and most of the SteamOS FAQ applies to both releases.

Q. Where can I download the brewmaster installer?
A. ISO (for legacy systems) ZIP (for UEFI systems)

Q. How do I install brewmaster?
A. See "How do I install SteamOS?" in the SteamOS FAQ. The process is the same for both brewmaster and alchemist releases.

Q. How do I upgrade alchemist to brewmaster?
A. Upgrade is not supported. You will need to completely reinstall.

Q. How does this affect my existing SteamOS alchemist installation?
A. There is no change to alchemist support yet. For now, we will continue updating alchemist with the relevant security updates and Steam will continue to support alchemist. At some point we will drop support for alchemist and only support brewmaster.

Q. What version of the Linux kernel does brewmaster use?
A. The brewmaster kernel is based on the 3.18 LTS kernel with additional SteamOS patches. The kernel sources can be found in the steamos_kernel [github.com] repository.

Q. How do I give feedback or report bugs in brewmaster?
A. Please post on the SteamOS Discussion Forum, or file an issue in the SteamOS issue tracker [github.com] .

Q. What kind of issues should I report?
A. We are especially interested in any regressions in hardware compatibility or Steam games. If it worked in alchemist and doesn’t work in brewmaster, let us know!

How to use the steamos desktop

It seems Valve has managed to drastically reduce the size of SteamOS just a couple of months before pre-orders start shipping out to consumers.

The size of the operating system on gaming devices is important due to the storage limitations they all have. In the case of the Steam Deck, the base model only includes 64GB of storage, meaning every gigabyte counts due to how big some of the more recent and most popular games are.

As PCGamesN reports, until now builds of SteamOS for the Steam Deck had weighed in at 24GB, but that changed with the latest version (v20211120.2). According to release notes shared by user madjoki on the MetaCouncil forums, SteamOS now only requires 10GB of space. There’s every chance it could continue to get smaller with new builds early next year, but a 14GB reduction is already impressive.

Recommended by Our Editors

For comparison, the Switch OS requires around 4GB of space, the PS5 OS requires 158GB, and the Xbox Series X requires 198GB. Anyone who ordered the 64GB Steam Deck model will be pleased to hear they should have around 50GB in which to store their games and before having to buy a microSD card. Future Steam Deck owners were also pleased to discover yesterday that the handheld’s quick resume feature is on a par with consoles, allowing games to be suspended and resumed in just a couple of seconds.

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The all-new home screen is everything you love about Steam in one place.

Home is where you’ll find all the things you need—dive back into a game whether you were playing it on Steam Deck ™ or your PC, see what’s new in your library and the store, as well as what your friends are up to.

How to use the steamos desktop

All the Steam features you’d expect

Steam Chat

Your friends are all here—access Steam Chat at the push of a button.

Notifications

All notifications are now in one place, so you can check-in without leaving your game.

Cloud Saves

Start playing on a PC and pick up right where you left off on Deck or vice versa.

Remote Play

Stream games from your home PC directly to your Deck no matter where you are.

Store

The entire Steam Store experience is accessible from Deck.

Community

Keep up to date with friends, news, and all the latest activity from Steam.

Actual gameplay running on prototype hardware

Your Steam Library, anywhere

Once you’ve logged into Steam Deck, your entire Steam Library shows up, just like any other PC. You’ll be able to find your collections and favorites – exactly where you left them.

How to use the steamos desktop

Steam just works on Deck.

No matter how you prefer to interact with Steam on Deck—thumbsticks, trackpad, touchscreen, or mouse and keyboard—it just works.

You won’t need directions.

Pull up the main menu with a press of the Steam button to access the Library, Store, Community, etc.

Important stuff is always available.

The Quick Access menu is your dedicated source for notifications, friends, peripherals and important settings.

Check your notifications, see what time it is, and message friends without leaving your game.

Find what you’ve been looking for.

Universal Search pulls together results from your library, your friends list and even the Steam Store. Just tap on search and get typing using the all new virtual keyboard.

Keep your head in the game!

The Steam Overlay has been overhauled to give you access to more Steam features while your game is running.

How to use the steamos desktop

How to use the steamos desktop

How to use the steamos desktop

How to use the steamos desktop

How to use the steamos desktop

How to use the steamos desktop

How to use the steamos desktop

How to use the steamos desktop

How to use the steamos desktop

How to use the steamos desktop

  • Steam on Deck
  • Navigation
  • Quick Access
  • Search
  • Gameplay

Actual gameplay running on prototype hardware

A new Steam operating system

On Steam Deck, your games run on a different operating system than the one on your desktop PC. It’s a new version of SteamOS, built with Steam Deck in mind and optimized for a handheld gaming experience. It comes with Proton, a compatibility layer that makes it possible to run your games without any porting work needed from developers. For Deck, we’re vastly improving Proton’s game compatibility and support for anti-cheat solutions by working directly with the vendors. “Hold on to your butts!”

It’s a Linux system, you know this!

The new version of SteamOS is optimized for handheld gaming, and it won’t get in your way with other stuff. But if you want to get your hands dirty, head on out to the desktop.

How to use the steamos desktop

Add Deck to your Wishlist!

Steam Deck starts shipping February 2022 to the United States, Canada, European Union, and the United Kingdom. More regions to come—stay tuned for more info.

As Valve is preparing to launch its handheld gaming console called Steam Deck, the company is investing a lot of resources into the software side of things. Powering the console is the company’s custom SteamOS distribution, a modification of Arch Linux in today’s form. In previous releases, Valve has been pushing its SteamOS as a modification of Debian Linux. However, that version didn’t get updated in over two years, and the last release happened with version 2.195. When the Steam Deck console lands in the consumer’s hands, we are supposed to see a new version of SteamOS, called SteamOS 3.0, become available for the public to download as any standalone Linux distribution.

With the release of 3.0, the company is switching to a rolling release OS embedded with bells and whistles to make gaming on Linux a viable option. All that is needed to fire up Steam and start gaming is already pre-installed, and you can get the same Steam Deck experience on your PC or any device that can run Linux. The moment this becomes available to the public, we will update you with more information.

How to use the steamos desktop

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41 Comments on Valve's Arch Linux-based SteamOS 3.0 to be Available to Public as a Standalone Distribution

This is so wrong and useless on many fronts.

KDE + Wayland isn’t ready yet. It is quite useless atm you have to use raw betas, that are unstable also. The combinations of what works and doesn’t. The video driver binary blobs.. ugh. it looks ugly tbh.

While AMD has released UEFI CPPC2 CPU driver code in September, it ain’t really shipping into mainstream kernel yet. Linux doesn’t know which cores to boost it you have Ryzen 5000+ CPU.

I’m ready. There are some proprietary drivers included with their distro. I have been using Manjaro for a while now, will switch once 3.0 clockwerk is made available. Arch based will give them more control of their distro, versus debian based rolling releasing and lack of control.

AMD open-source drivers are amazing, and I’m getting better average FPS than on Windows 11 / 10. I’m glad they switch to Arch, pacman AUR is the way of the future, and giving users the option to choose kernel is great. I prefer KDE over gnome as well, although any user could download gnome DE if they choose.

For Linux beginners, there are some advantages to apt based because of the vast documentation out there. Pop_OS! is a great Linux distro to start with, the strict systemd approach they take will drive some crazy for not using grub.

The Kernel is mostly the same for all distros.

It was based on Debian in the past but i partially died off because valve gave up on developing it. For the Steam Deck they changed it to being arch based.

ThribitsThe Kernel is mostly the same for all distros.

It was based on Debian in the past but i partially died off because valve gave up on developing it. For the Steam Deck they changed it to being arch based.

Valve stopped at version 2.195 as far as releases (the last debian based update). There was a version bump recorded in April 2019 & July 2019 after I posted an issue github.com/ValveSoftware/SteamOS/issues/674 from 2.194 to 2.195. Months later GamerOS was forked.

Valve has not given up on development, 3.0 has been in development since mid 2019 at least. The repositories were being updated with Clockwerk since that time.

Those are the best. making nvidia binaries more broken than they are already 😀 I don’t even want to start whining about it. it is what it is.

At current point, I cannot even boot a stable LIVE image release of my distro, I’ve used Fedora for years and currently KDE+Wayland+nvidia even on nouveau cause me system freeze. I had to fall back to Gnome. So the Steam OS release kinda surprises me. Well I don’t know. maybe it doesn’t use Wayland and it is safe. for a while at least. But as the Ryzen 5000 aware scheduler is still MIA, putting it on the real deck HW would be a disaster at current moment. I haven’t poked my eyes for upstream changes in upcoming kernel thou, maybe it is included.

I wouldn’t touch Ubuntu, it had made me sad so many times in the past. IMHO Father Torvalds even never had installed it, he was joking that almost once had to do it. almost.

Ferrum MasterThose are the best. making nvidia binaries more broken than they are already 😀 I don’t even want to start whining about it. it is what it is.

At current point, I cannot even boot a stable LIVE image release of my distro, I’ve used Fedora for years and currently KDE+Wayland+nvidia even on nouveau cause me system freeze. I had to fall back to Gnome. So the Steam OS release kinda surprises me. Well I don’t know. maybe it doesn’t use Wayland and it is safe. for a while at least. But as the Ryzen 5000 aware scheduler is still MIA, putting it on the real deck HW would be a disaster at current moment. I haven’t poked my eyes for upstream changes in upcoming kernel thou, maybe it is included.

I wouldn’t touch Ubuntu, it had made me sad so many times in the past. IMHO Father Torvalds even never had installed it, he was joking that almost once had to do it. almost.

How to use the steamos desktop

7″ touchscreen

Type and swipe through the Steam UI with Deck’s capacitive multi-touch display.

How to use the steamos desktop

Trackpads

Play PC games that were never designed to be handheld. With increased precision and customizability, trackpads also give you a competitive edge when playing fast paced FPS games.

With an IMU and capacitive touch thumbsticks on-board, Deck helps you aim better. By physically positioning the device you can achieve more precision than using a thumbstick or trackpad alone.

Actual gameplay running on prototype hardware

Everything you need

Fast storage

Get the built-in storage you need: 64GB eMMC, 256GB NVMe SSD (faster), or 512GB NVMe SSD (fastest). If you’re looking for more space, augment your built-in storage with a microSD card and fill it up with even more games.

Hi-Fi audio

Steam Deck’s stereo speakers pack a punch. An embedded DSP provides clarity and a wide soundstage for an immersive listening experience. Connect your favorite headset, or use the onboard dual microphones to chat with your friends.

40Wh battery

Steam Deck’s onboard 40 watt-hour battery provides several hours of play time for most games. For lighter use cases like game streaming, smaller 2D games, or web browsing, you can expect to get the maximum battery life of approximately 7-8 hours.

Expandable I/O

The single USB-C jack is multi-purpose: used for charging, peripherals, or even throwing the game onto a big screen at the same time. Any USB-C hub can be used to expand your options, or get our official dock when it is released. More info on the dock below.

Wireless

WiFi keeps you connected to the world, and Bluetooth allows for a wide variety of wireless peripherals – from controllers to headsets, keyboards, and mice.

Fast Suspend / Resume

We’ve built a quick suspend / resume feature into SteamOS. Press the power button, and Steam Deck will suspend your game and go into sleep mode. Push the power button again and it will wake up right where you left off.

Expand your Library with a microSD card

All models of Steam Deck support expanding your storage via microSD cards. Games stored on a microSD card will appear in your library instantly.

Use your Deck as a PC.
Because it is one.

Actual gameplay and applications running on Steam Deck prototype connected to an external display.

You can also install and use PC software, of course. Browse the web, watch streaming video, do your normal productivity stuff, install some other game stores, whatever.

How to use the steamos desktop

Plays nice with all your accessories

Steam Deck is Bluetooth-ready, and its USB-C port can handle all sorts of I/O. Want to have a fighting tournament on the go? Covered. Want to play with Bluetooth mouse and keyboard? Covered. Want to pair your favorite Bluetooth headphones? You’re good to go.

How to use the steamos desktop

Deck can be plugged in to your TV

Deck can be plugged in to your TV, monitor, or even your old CRT if you have the right cables. When docked, the Steam Deck’s USB-C port can carry video, audio, input, etc. Just plug in your peripherals, or use the official dock, and you’re ready to go.

There’s a dock, too.

The official dock props up your Steam Deck while connecting to external displays, wired networking, USB peripherals, and power. You can also use a powered USB-C hub, if you’ve got one lying around.

The official dock will be sold separately. More information coming soon.

How to use the steamos desktop

Actual gameplay running on prototype hardware

Add Deck to your Wishlist!

Steam Deck starts shipping February 2022 to the United States, Canada, European Union, and the United Kingdom. More regions to come—stay tuned for more info.

Is it possible for me to convert my current gaming PC into a home server running some linux, then use that PC as a giant NAS and web server, but also to play some Steam games like Dota2 through some remote desktop application. I have never done anything like this but this would be great if latency is low enough. Poorly explained but my main problem is that I want to have big nas to hold all my data and powerful home server, but I wouldn't like o give up gaming completely. Building another computer is not option because money.

For the most part, gaming over any remote desktop protocol (VNC, RDP, etc.) is going to result in a poor experience simply because they're not designed for the ultra-low display latency that games typically need. This is doubly true for anything that requires fast twitch reflexes like DotA 2. However, that's not to say it can't be done with the right software.

For Windows, I've had the best success with nVidia's Gamestream technology. Using software like Moonlight allows you to take advantage of this without using a nVidia Shield device. You can pretty much stream to any device you want to (case in point: I've streamed GTA V to an underpowered Chromebook with it).

For Linux, Valve has written some decent streaming technology directly into SteamOS. I don't have a lot of experience with SteamOS, but I believe it's pretty much just a standard Debian distro with a pretty front-end and some better graphics card support, so there's really no reason you couldn't run your file server/NAS and Web Server off of it at the same time.

Steam in home streaming actually works better for some games than the nVidia gamestream. Rocket League for example. I can't even get it to recognize my controller properly through nVidia but it works great through steam's streaming.

I think you may have gone slightly sideways with the RDP/VNC, this is causing the assumption you have a second machine to use to remote in. There are 2 main options.

If you board supports passthrough and your GPU is one that also supports it, you can install ESXi (or xen I believe) and then pass the GPU and a usb controller through the a gaming virtual machine. Difficult to do, things lockup, not officially supported and requires very specific hardware. I have done this in the past to have 2 virtual gaming machines in one host with two GPUs. Works well for a week or so, then a usb controller would drop, requiring a full reboot before it would work again.

Second option, and the easiest/one that will work on pretty much anything. Install Virtual Box (free), VMwarePlayer/VMwareWorkstation or Hyper-V on your current gaming machine. Make a linux VM for you webserver stuff. Use either a VM or you current machine for your NAS (on the host is easiest). Note this will require your machine to be on for any machines to be up (consider you power usage and costs), rebooting for a windows update etc will stop all you other machines also.

If you have never played with virtual machines before I can't stress option 2 even if its just in the short term to learn. Passthrough is a pain to setup, and requires a full rebuild of your data to get it into the VM first (off a external drive or simular) as well as a full reinstall of your OS.

Hey OP, this contains the answer you were really looking for.

Unraid is also an option, not as suffisticated in many regards, as the more enterprise oriented hyper visors, but a lot less picky about hardware, and fairly quick to get up and running from scratch.

For what you're describing, I just use steam in home streaming

You can try nomachine. It is the fastest / most responsive I have tried. Otherwise perhaps get a steam link.

you have the option steam in home steaming, but depends on your setup. Have tested a bunch of this using server 2012r2 (my home server) games dont work tell well on it (yes it can run but doesnt always) what is your current OS, you can look at unraid.

The only way to do this that won't totally suck is if you use VMWare Horizon View with a good card like a NVidia Quadro/GTX/GRID/TESLA card that is supported by Horizon. You then would use PCoIP or whatever they call it in View.

I made a subreddit for stuff like this and other media streaming r/VirtualHTPC but I haven't really been on it in a while, but there are some good links over there along the lines of the stuff you're trying to do. You can also do it with Xen but I don't know very much about it since I'm a VMWare guy.

If you don't want to go with the Horizon option, you could just passthrough your video cards (as long as they are supported) as well as your peripherals and stuff to a VM that you would like to game on. I have no idea why I didn't lead with that option first because it's definitely the most viable one and is MUCH easier than using Horizon. You could also use a HDMI over CAT6 and USB over CAT6 adapter if you wanna use your VM in another room. I really reccommend doing this over Horizon, it's been a long time since I've thought about any of this and I guess I had Horizon on the top of my head. The guy over at TheHomeServerBlog did this really well. Check out his build and howtos for more information.

I've been wanting to do something like this for a while, but I have nowhere near the amount of money I would need.

Here's some other links for reference and examples

Dedicated Virtual GPU Pass-Through Technology from GRID | NVIDIA –> http://www.nvidia.com/object/dedicated-gpus.html

VMware Horizon View PCoIP with vDGA (NVIDIA GeForce GT [email protected] K1) –> https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pudvZ6jNH2s

I could keep going with links, but I suggest checking out google, there's a lot of examples out there. If you want to talk more about it, lmk. I'm all about this stuff (but as I said, I'm broke and can't really afford to do it yet).

As you probably already know, Valve is developing their first ever gaming handheld called Steam Deck, which runs SteamOS, Valve’s in-house built GNU/Linux distribution that’s now derived from Arch Linux rather than Debian GNU/Linux, as previous versions were.

SteamOS was available to download for free, like many other GNU/Linux distributions out there, and you were able to install it on any machine if you wanted to turn it into a full gaming computer. I personally followed its development, and the latest version ever released was SteamOS 2.195, more than two years ago.

Apparently, during this time, Valve rebased their SteamOS distro on Arch Linux, a powerful and flexible rolling-release distribution, most probably to provide users with the latest security and software updates as soon as they are available upstream.

When Valve announced Steam Deck, they also revealed the fact that it will be running SteamOS 3.0, based on Arch Linux and the KDE Plasma desktop environment running on Wayland. As you could expect, the community wanted to download SteamOS 3.0 and install it on their PCs, but there isn’t anything to download yet.

Today, during the Steam Deck Development live steam, Valve finally gave us some good news and said that SteamOS 3.0 will be generally available for everyone to install on their computers. They also revealed that SteamOS 3.0 will have an immutable root file system to prevent unauthorized access and use PipeWire for audio.

But the question remains, when will SteamOS 3.0 be available for download. Valve engineer Lawrence Yang said that there isn’t a solid date at the moment as their are still finishing things up for the Steam Deck launch, but after the launch it will be generally available.

So there you have it, SteamOS 3.0 is coming soon to your PC, and by soon I mean after February 2022 when Valve will start sending order invitations so you can actually buy the device. For more details about Steam Deck and SteamOS, check out the full Steam Deck Development live stream below and the official website.

Esatto, non c’è nessun modo di rimuovere gnome-shell, nemmeno se un pacchetto che vuoi installare ha conflitti con gnome-shell e vuole rimuoverlo, nemmeno con –skip-broken.
Quindi se Linus fosse stato su Fedora con lo stesso problema non sarebbe rimasto senza desktop al riavvio Semplicmente non poteva installare Steam
Ma comunque lo hanno introdotto su APT.

Fear of the duck

Utente Attivo
  • 16 Dic 2021
  • #3,512

LitterallyWho

Nuovo Utente
  • 16 Dic 2021
  • #3,513

Fear of the duck

Utente Attivo
  • 16 Dic 2021
  • #3,514

il problema é che apt viene scritto dalla comunitá debian principalmente.

Il team di Pop!_OS ha creato la patch (che é stata integrata upstream dal team di debian) solo dopo che Linus ha avuto la disavventura.

Comunque io avevo risposto solo al tuo non avere standard. 😉

EmanueleC

  • 16 Dic 2021
  • #3,515

il problema é che apt viene scritto dalla comunitá debian principalmente.

Il team di Pop!_OS ha creato la patch (che é stata integrata upstream dal team di debian) solo dopo che Linus ha avuto la disavventura.