How to use threads on slack to group conversations

Joel Cornell
How to use threads on slack to group conversationsJoel Cornell
Writer

Joel Cornell has spent twelve years writing professionally, working on everything from technical documentation at PBS to video game content for GameSkinny. Joel covers a bit of everything technology-related, including gaming and esports. He’s honed his skills by writing for other industries, including in architecture, green energy, and education. Read more.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

Slack is a great tool for communicating and collaborating in digital workspaces. When it gets busy, it’s difficult to sort through all the information; what’s relevant, and what’s chatter. Start grouping your conversations into threads, and watch the clutter disappear.

All conversations that you’ll have with your colleagues in Slack are sorted into channels. These channels can be based on the team, the project, the subject, or any topic that needs its own dedicated space. Click on any of the channels of the direct messages on the left side of Slack to open that conversation space in your main window.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

In any channel or message, you can type messages as the conversation progresses. Unfortunately, you’ll quickly find that topics and new messages can get lost as time goes on. To consolidate your conversations under each topic, you’ll want to use threads. You can start a thread by hovering your mouse cursor over any message and selecting the “Reply to Thread” button.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

This will open a new pane on the right side of Slack where you can type out messages and upload files as you would in a channel. Instead, everything is neatly organized in a thread under that message, rather than in the channel where it can interrupt or delay unrelated conversations. Once a thread is created, you can always return to it by clicking the link beneath a threaded conversation that displays how many replies exist, when the last one was made, and who responded.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

If you want to view your threads in order of the most recent responses, click the “Threads” button in the top left.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

With threads in Slack, it’s easy to stay productive while keeping digital spaces tidy and organized. Just remember that these are only useful if you and your team are actually using them!

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How to use threads on slack to group conversations Joel Cornell
Joel Cornell has spent twelve years writing professionally, working on everything from technical documentation at PBS to video game content for GameSkinny. Joel covers a bit of everything technology-related, including gaming and esports. He’s honed his skills by writing for other industries, including in architecture, green energy, and education.
Read Full Bio »

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

Slack is a powerful business communication platform but it can quickly become a distraction if your conversations are all over the place — especially if you’re working remotely. That’s where threaded messages in Slack can come to your rescue.

What are threaded messages in Slack?

Threaded messages in Slack are similar to your email threads- wherein, your initial message acts as the anchor point, and all the subsequent replies are attached to it. This entire collection of messages rolled into the parent message is called a thread in Slack.

Slack threads make it easier to track all your important discussions in a single place. All you have to do is head over to the ‘Threads’ tab on Slack.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

Threaded messages vs. Direct messages

We use Slack extensively at Automate.io, and following these etiquettes has helped us in communicating better when the entire team has been working remotely.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

Create a message thread in the channel when:

  1. The channel is busy.
  2. The topic of discussion only involves certain people.
  3. You want to follow-up on a message.
  4. You want to start conversations from automated messages.

Post directly in the channel or direct messages when:

  1. The channel isn’t too busy.
  2. Your response applies to everyone.
  3. Starting a new conversation.
  4. Making a company-wide announcement.

Now that you’re clear on when it’s best to use Slack threads in comparison to posting directly in the channel, let’s have a look at how you can create, reply to, follow, and unfollow a thread in Slack.

How to create a thread in Slack?

  1. Hover your mouse on the message you’d like to convert in a thread.
  2. Click on ‘Reply in thread’.
  3. Compose your message, and click on ‘Send message’ to create a Slack thread.

Note: You can create a Slack thread in direct messages, channels, and applications.

How to reply to a thread in Slack

  1. Go to the Slack thread you’d like to reply to.
  2. Click on ‘View thread’.
  3. Type in your reply, and click on ‘Send message’.

How to follow a thread in Slack?

Slack automatically turns on thread notifications if you’re a part of it. Although, there are cases when you would like to be notified of an on-going discussion in a thread. Here’s how you can follow a discussion thread when you’re not a part of it:

  1. Go to the Slack thread you’d like to follow.
  2. Click on the More actions (three dots) button.
  3. Select the Follow thread option you see at the top.

How to unfollow a thread in Slack?

Being a part of too many threads on Slack can get overwhelming due to the volume of notifications — it can hamper your work productivity. If you see that happening it’s best to loop yourself out from conversations that don’t need your attention. Here’s how you can unfollow a Slack thread:

  1. Go to the Slack thread you’d like to unfollow.
  2. Click on the More actions (three dots) button.
  3. Select the Unfollow thread option you see at the top.

A popular question that we hear from Slack customers is — how can we reply to a message in Slack without creating a thread? To answer this, it isn’t currently possible, as replying to a specific message in Slack automatically creates a thread. The only way you can reply without creating a Slack thread is by responding directly in the channel or DMs.

That’s all you need to know when it comes to organizing your discussions in Slack with threaded messages. We hope this helps you in keeping your Slack workspace clutter-free and improves team communication.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

Slack is a great tool for communicating and collaborating in digital workspaces. When it gets busy, it’s difficult to sort through all the information; what’s relevant, and what’s chatter. Start grouping your conversations into threads, and watch the clutter disappear.

All conversations that you’ll have with your colleagues in Slack are sorted into channels. These channels can be based on the team, the project, the subject, or any topic that needs its own dedicated space. Click on any of the channels of the direct messages on the left side of Slack to open that conversation space in your main window.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

In any channel or message, you can type messages as the conversation progresses. Unfortunately, you’ll quickly find that topics and new messages can get lost as time goes on. To consolidate your conversations under each topic, you’ll want to use threads. You can start a thread by hovering your mouse cursor over any message and selecting the “Reply to Thread” button.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

This will open a new pane on the right side of Slack where you can type out messages and upload files as you would in a channel. Instead, everything is neatly organized in a thread under that message, rather than in the channel where it can interrupt or delay unrelated conversations. Once a thread is created, you can always return to it by clicking the link beneath a threaded conversation that displays how many replies exist, when the last one was made, and who responded.

If you want to view your threads in order of the most recent responses, click the “Threads” button in the top left.

With threads in Slack, it’s easy to stay productive while keeping digital spaces tidy and organized. Just remember that these are only useful if you and your team are actually using them!

Slack today is rolling out message threads inside its familiar chat window, allowing teams to have more focused conversations inside a new “flex pane” that appears next to the main chat. The feature, which has been a top request of Slack users, reflects the company’s evolution from a simple communication tool to a place where an increasing amount of work gets done.

Threads are rolling out today across Slack’s web, desktop, and mobile apps. The idea of message threading is not an original one — it is used by some of Slack’s rivals, such as Convo, and is a foundational principle of email, which Slack has noisily promised to kill. But Slack’s implementation of threads is novel, and arguably more useful, than most of its peers — even if it comes at the cost of having to pay more attention to Slack than before.

Every thread must be attached to a Slack message, and each message only supports one thread. To start one, hover over a Slack message until the context menu appears. (It’s the same menu that you use to add reaction emoji or share a message.) Tap the new chat bubble and a thread will appear in a new pane to the right of the main chat.

By default, the person you’re responding to is added to the thread. You can add others by mentioning their usernames, and follow threads you’re interested in manually in the thread’s ellipses menu (. ). The thread resembles a public version of group direct messages — but unlike direct messages, threads can be searched.

Slack says threads help make public channels more readable by moving discussions about discrete topics into their own workspace. “It’s just really hard to read a channel where four conversations are happening at once,” says Paul Rosania, the product lead for threads.

Perhaps the cleverest thing about Slack’s version of threads is the way they can move back into public view. Any message inside a thread can be “sent back” to the public channel at the press of a button. A thread where employees were making a decision about where to have lunch, for example, might culminate with someone sending the group’s pick back to the main channel so everyone else can see.

How much you use threads will depend on your company and your job. But employees at Slack, who have been testing threads for months, say they are meant to complement public channels — not replace them. Joshua Goldenberg, the company’s head of design, told me that only 7 or 8 percent of his time in Slack has moved to threads.

Still, like many changes to Slack, threads will likely mean you spend more time using Slack. Threads come with their own unified inbox, located underneath “all unreads” on the left-hand pane, and notifications when you are added to a thread or there is activity in one that you follow. There is also the risk that threads will become very popular at your company, and you will be asked to weigh in on many things, instead of simply letting most discussions roll off your back the way you did in the channel-only days.

All of this is by design. Slack might have begun life as a glorified IRC channel, but it aspires to be the place where you do much of your work. For some people, says April Underwood, the company’s head of product, “they’re getting all their work done in Slack. They’re talking to each other, they’re taking advantage of notifications from dozens of applications that they rely on to get their work done, [and] they’re taking action on those notifications with message buttons. Slack is not a chat tool . it’s a place where people are producing work product, they’re collaborating around it, [and] they’re creating an archive that serves as a kind of brain for a company.”

Here at The Verge, Slack mostly is a chat tool, and for me that’s part of its charm. The nice thing about chat is that it usually only matters in the moment. One reason Slack could credibly claim to reduce email inside companies is that it encouraged people to drop their more ephemeral messages into chat, rather than email the entire staff. “I’m working from home” and “we’re gathering in the break room for birthday cake” migrated into dedicated office ephemera channels, where they could be ignored, and the load on our inboxes lightened measurably.

Threads are for work that can’t be ignored, and they are likely to demand your attention. The more they do, the less it will matter whether Slack killed email or not, because any time you saved in your inbox will now be spent doing work in Slack. From Slack’s perspective, this is great news — when you’re the place where all work gets done, customers will have a lot harder time canceling their subscriptions. And perhaps the chat-and-threads model will be faster and more efficient than your old system. But anytime I see a new inbox created in my life, I worry.

It’s hard to imagine a more elegant implementation of threads than the one Slack designed. There’s an undeniable need for a place within the app to have more focused discussions, particularly in the larger (and therefore noisier) companies that Slack is now courting. And Slack has been clear about its intentions to build an all-encompassing command console for the workplace from the start. I only wonder if one day we’ll miss the days when Slack was something you could sometimes ignore.

The Range Slack app can be configured to send Range Check-ins to your team's Slack channel.

Channel messaging options

There are two ways to configure the Range app in your team channel — threaded and unthreaded. By default, the Range app is configured to send threaded messages.

Threaded

With threaded messages, Range sends only a summary message to your whole team channel, followed by detailed updates in a thread. This helps keep your team channel quiet, so your normal conversation can continue.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations


Unthreaded

With unthread messages, Range sends each teammate's detailed check-in to the whole team channel. This option works well for teams that have specific standup or team update channels where they want to read full updates.

How to thread and unthread Check-in notifications

1. From your team channel, type /range subscriptions. You'll see an option to add a new subscription or edit an existing one.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

2. Click Edit, and toggle the threading option to on or off based on your preference.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

That's it! If you need more help, feel free to reach out over Intercom to our team.

Keep conversations organised and reduce channel clutter.

Slack for Desktop

Teamwork made easy

Slack helps even the largest groups stay connected, but it can be difficult to follow individual discussions in a busy channel.

Threads to the rescue! This Slack feature makes it easier for everyone to follow conversations – and reduces channel clutter – by grouping replies to a message directly under that message, hiding them until you want to read them.

If a message has a discussion thread, you’ll see a label like “4 replies” directly under the message. Click that text to show the thread in Slack’s right-hand sidebar without losing your position in the main channel.

Here’s how to use threads – and become a better Slack citizen.

Reply in a thread

To reply in an existing thread, just use the message field in the thread sidebar instead of the one in the main channel.

To reply to a message that doesn’t yet have a thread, move your pointer over the message and click the “Reply in thread” button (it looks like a cartoon text bubble) that appears.

Follow (and unfollow) threads

You’ll be notified of new replies to any message or thread you’re a part of. To be notified of replies to any other message or thread, simply move your pointer over the message, click the “More actions” (…) menu that appears, then choose “Get notified about new replies”.

To stop following a thread (including one you started), use the same steps but choose “Turn off notifications for replies”.

View all your threads in one place

Instead of jumping between channels to see your followed threads, browse them all at once by clicking Threads in Slack’s left-hand sidebar (or pressing Shift-Command-T). Threads are listed with newest replies at the top, and Slack bolds the Threads item whenever you have unread messages.

In the chronological world of online team chat, a threaded conversation, or “thread”, is a comment and its attached replies. Endless replies can be attached, even as newer comments flow in and push the thread further back into chat history.

Various forms of threaded conversations have been around since the dawn of Internet chat rooms. Slack is the nine-year-old juggernaut of online team chat software, but they incorporated threaded chat just one year ago. It begs the question – why did Slack wait 8 years to incorporate such a seemingly standard feature? We’ll come back to that a bit later.

Why do people like threaded messaging?

Without threading, the timeline-based linear nature of online team chat makes it hard to address older comments when newer comments have already arrived and changed the subject. Threaded conversations make online team chat rooms a bit more user-friendly, but they typically don’t fully solve the problem – they merely delay it.

What’s wrong with typical chat threading?

In some cases, apps actually make it harder to see replies. In order to make it look pretty and reduce excessive scrolling, apps like Slack often minimize replies with a clickable count, e.g. “View 13 previous replies”. Without that click, users are missing potentially critical updates.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

But here’s a bigger issue. Even threaded conversations eventually get pushed out of view by newer comments, often well before they’re considered irrelevant. Chat rooms, channels – whatever you want to call them – aren’t meant to be abandoned. In a corporate setting, channels are often set up for each department and are forced to support conversations about a wide range of subjects until the end of time. Is that really the best way to organize conversations? Of course not. This is the root of the problem with typical online team chat software.

Even if channels are set up for something more temporary, such as projects, the conversations are still displayed chronologically. Fairly recent comments, replies, and attachments are still pushed out of view, increasing the chances that someone misses a critical piece of information or has to spend more time finding it.

At first, maybe Slack thought hashtags would be the new way to tie comments together. After all, they did adopt the hashtag symbol as their brand icon, but it appears their users couldn’t live in a linear chat world without threads, so Slack folded in with the rest and became just another app that couldn’t quite deliver proper team collaboration functionality.

How is Samepage better?

Instead of having just a single channel for the marketing team, separate marketing team pages help divide and organize multiple ongoing projects and conversations. Active pages float to the top of the page list, so relevant activity is always easy to spot.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

Pages – the ultimate team collaboration tool

Pages are capable of storing just about anything – files, tasks, calendar events, diagrams, images, videos, meeting notes, and more. Here’s the game-changer though: you can comment on any of it, and your teammates can reply. This means that no matter how many comments are posted on the page, you can drill into a conversation about any project asset with a click. No scrolling into history, no guessing the right search phrase.

Example 1: A chat thread about meeting notes

Example 2: A chat thread about an assigned task

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

Of course, if you prefer to see conversations chronologically, pages have you covered there too. Along the right side of every page is a complete historical display of all page comments and replies.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

Quoting previous comments in new ones

Commenting on another chat message is just as easy as commenting on any page content. Simply highlight the comment you’re responding to. You’ll see a quote icon pop up. Click it and add your response. It’ll display your message with a link above it, taking other readers to the original comment.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

@mentioning in chat messages

@mentioning is another great way to link content together in Samepage. Of course, you can @mention a person to really grab their attention, but you can also @mention project assets such as files and pages. This creates links in your comments, making it easier for others to access the content you’re talking about.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

Collaboration software, redefining threaded chat

This is how it looks when your team and your content are all on the same page and your threaded conversations are actually attached to the project assets you’re talking about. Learn more about our award-winning approach to team chat software.

As an alternative to email-based side conversations, agents can use side conversations in a ticket to initiate and participate in Slack threads. The Slack side conversations you initiate are viewable in the ticket and in the Slack application. Like email conversations, Slack side conversations are recorded as ticket events and you can use them as trigger conditions.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

Creating a side conversation using Slack

When you create a side conversation, you choose between using email or using Slack.

To create a side conversation using Slack

  1. From the upper-left portion of a ticket, click the plus sign (+) next to Side Conversations.
  2. Select Slack (instead of Email) as the conversation type.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

You start a side conversation in one Slack channel at a time. You cannot combine Slack and email conversations. If you have a lot of Slack channels, it may take a few moments to display the list of available channels.

If you have multiple Slack workspaces connected to Zendesk Support, the workspace appears before the channel address. For example. Slack Workspace 1 – #general, Slack Workspace 2 – #general, and so on.

The team in the Slack channel can view your message and reply to the thread directly, without logging into Support.

The Slack replies are automatically included in the ticket’s side conversation. The conversation can continue back and forth, as long as necessary, until you get the information you need.

Deleting a Slack side conversation

To delete a Slack side conversation, you must be the agent who created the Slack side conversation or an administrator.

To delete a Slack side conversation

  1. From the upper-left portion of a ticket, click Side conversions to see a list of conversations.
  2. Select the side conversation you want to delete.

You can only delete Slack side conversations. You cannot delete email side conversations.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

When you delete, the side conversation is removed from the ticket and it is also removed from Slack. Messages edited or deleted on the Slack side are also reflected in side conversations.

About limitations and breaking the link between Support and Slack

You can add attachments to Slack side conversations, but you cannot insert ticket comments or initiate macros. The following Slack features are not supported:

As a workaround, the administrator can set up private Slack channels that only have one member. For example, #lkelly-private and add them to the Slack for Zendesk integration.

Slack @mentions are not supported, but you can include @here to notify everyone currently logged in or @channel to alert every member of a channel.

If the link breaks between Zendesk and Slack, for example, if an admin removes the Zendesk app from a Slack channel or if they archive or delete a Slack channel that you used for side conversations, you can still open and view these side conversations in a ticket, but you can no longer use that Slack channel to send or receive updates to side conversations.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

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Slack is your company’s virtual headquarters. It connects everyone in your business and supports the way people naturally work together — in real-time or not, in-person and remote, structured and informal.

It’s where conversations come together, information can easily be found, collaboration is seamless, and your team’s favorite apps are connected in one place. Slack encourages knowledge sharing across the organisation and gives everyone direct and instant involvement with ideas — and the people who have them.

With Slack, collaboration is just the beginning. Like Salesforce, Slack is a platform with almost limitless potential for custom integrations, automated workflows, and solutions. In short, Slack is where the future works.

Why is it called Slack?

What does Slack have in common with lasers and scuba diving? For one thing, you might not know that the name is an acronym: it stands for Searchable Log of All Conversations and Knowledge.

That name should give you a pretty good idea of what Slack is all about, but let’s take a look at some of the features that make Slack a great tool for our work-from-anywhere world.

Channel your conversations

There are two main ways to communicate in Slack: channels and direct messages (DMs).

A channel is a conversation involving a group of people that focuses on a specific topic. Channels can be open (anyone can join) or private (only people who are invited can join). Channels are the key to productivity in Slack. When you have conversations in channels, you increase visibility and can easily make sure the right people are involved.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

A channel is a conversation involving a group of people that focuses on a specific topic.

Use direct messages for conversations that don’t belong in channels. Say, for example, you need to reschedule a one-on-one with a coworker or have a question specifically for the project lead.

Communicate with panache

Slack also goes way beyond the basics of messaging. Emoji reactions, @mentions, and threads make communication in Slack that much more effective.

Use emoji reactions to simplify communication or acknowledge a message with just a few clicks. You can show someone you’ve seen their message with a tick emoji, or let someone know you’re looking into it with eyes emoji.

Use @mentions to get someone’s attention in a channel. They’ll get a notification and everyone else in the channel can follow along with the conversation. If you have a message for everyone, use @here to notify everyone currently online in a channel.

Maybe you want to respond to a message in a channel without interrupting the flow of the conversation. In that case, respond in thread. (Here’s one more emoji-related tip: Let people know to thread their replies with a thread emoji.

Find what you’re looking for

Use the search bar at the top of your Slack workspace to search for messages, files, channels, or people. Once you’ve entered a search term, you can narrow your search to a specific channel or conversation, then further filter your results by date, reactions, and more.

Search is useful for when you’re looking for something specific (like a project plan) or for context around a decision, client, or project that you’re getting up to speed on.

Make Slack work for you and your team

Slack fosters workplace connections, especially when your coworkers might be in different physical spaces with different time zones and varying schedules. Adding a profile picture and keeping your status up to date when you’re incommunicado are just a couple of ways to bridge the gap between remote and in-person workers.

How to use threads on slack to group conversations

Use direct messages for conversations that don’t belong in channels.

After you’ve filled out your profile, take a few minutes to customise your preferences. You can, for example, decide how and when you get notifications and create a notification schedule.

The Slack-style feature is currently in early testing with bot developers.

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Big Discord servers can be something of a nightmare to keep track of. Fortunately, the chat client has begun testing Threads, temporary sub-channels that’ll let you pop open a sidebar to continue a conversation in peace.

Exclusively revealed by our sister site TechRadar, Discord has introduced Threads in a very limited capacity. Testing is currently restricted to bot developers (to ensure the feature doesn’t break compatibility) in servers with less than 5 users and 1 bot.

TechRadar did get access to one such testing server, however. And in practice, Discord’s threads function almost identically to a similar feature in Slack. Hit a button underneath any message, and it’ll effectively open a brand new channel in a sidebar.

After a set amount of time the thread will be automatically archived, though admins can revive them at any time. Threads can also be pinned like any other message, making them immediately available at all times.

Discord previously attempted to solve its channel clutter with replies, which made it clearer when a message was responding directly to an earlier post. But with some larger channels moving at outrageous speed, the idea of stepping into a thread to take a breather on a topic sounds more than welcome.

20 years ago, Nat played Jet Set Radio Future for the first time—and she’s not stopped thinking about games since. Joining PC Gamer in 2020, she comes from three years of freelance reporting at Rock Paper Shotgun, Waypoint, VG247 and more. Embedded in the European indie scene and having herself developed critically acclaimed small games like Can Androids Pray, Nat is always looking for a new curiosity to scream about—whether it’s the next best indie darling, or simply someone modding a Scotmid into Black Mesa. She’s also played for a competitive Splatoon team, and unofficially appears in Apex Legends under the pseudonym Horizon.

The Slack Web API allows you to build applications that interact with Slack in more complex ways than the integrations we provide out of the box.

Access Slack’s API methods requires an OAuth token – see the Tokens & Authentication section for more on how Slack uses OAuth tokens as well as best practices.

Each of these API methods is fully documented on our developer site at api.slack.com

Sending a message¶

One of the primary uses of Slack is posting messages to a channel using the channel ID or as a DM to another person using their user ID. This method will handle either a channel ID or a user ID passed to the channel parameter.

Sending an ephemeral message, which is only visible to an assigned user in a specified channel, is nearly the same as sending a regular message, but with an additional user parameter.

Formatting with Block Kit¶

Messages posted from apps can contain more than just text, though. They can include full user interfaces composed of blocks.

The chat.postMessage method takes an optional blocks argument that allows you to customize the layout of a message. Blocks specified in a single object literal, so just add additional keys for any optional argument.

To send a message to a channel, use the channel’s ID. For IMs, use the user’s ID.

Note: You can use the Block Kit Builder to prototype your message’s look and feel.

Threading Messages¶

Threaded messages are a way of grouping messages together to provide greater context. You can reply to a thread or start a new threaded conversation by simply passing the original message’s ts ID in the thread_ts attribute when posting a message. If you’re replying to a threaded message, you’ll pass the thread_ts ID of the message you’re replying to.

A channel or DM conversation is a nearly linear timeline of messages exchanged between people, bots, and apps. When one of these messages is replied to, it becomes the parent of a thread. By default, threaded replies do not appear directly in the channel, instead relegated to a kind of forked timeline descending from the parent message.

By default, reply_broadcast is set to False . To indicate your reply is germane to all members of a channel, and therefore a notification of the reply should be posted in-channel, set the reply_broadcast to True .

Note: While threaded messages may contain attachments and message buttons, when your reply is broadcast to the channel, it’ll actually be a reference to your reply, not the reply itself. So, when appearing in the channel, it won’t contain any attachments or message buttons. Also note that updates and deletion of threaded replies works the same as regular messages.

See the Threading messages together article for more information.

Updating a message¶

Let’s say you have a bot which posts the status of a request. When that request changes, you’ll want to update the message to reflect it’s state.

See chat.update for formatting options and some special considerations when calling this with a bot user.

Deleting a message¶

Sometimes you need to delete things.

See chat.delete for more info.

Opening a modal¶

Modals allow you to collect data from users and display dynamic information in a focused surface.

Modals use the same blocks that compose messages with the addition of an input block.

See views.open more details and additional parameters.

Also, to run the above example, the following Slack app configurations are required.

Enable Interactivity with a valid Request URL: https:///slack/events

Add a global shortcut with the Callback ID: open-modal-shortcut

Updating and pushing modals¶

You can dynamically update a view inside of a modal by calling views.update and passing the view ID returned in the previous views.open call.

See views.update for more info.

If you want to push a new view onto the modal instead of updating an existing view, reference the views.push documentation.

Emoji reactions¶

You can quickly respond to any message on Slack with an emoji reaction. Reactions can be used for any purpose: voting, checking off to-do items, showing excitement -— or just for fun.

This method adds a reaction (emoji) to an item ( file , file comment , channel message , group message , or direct message ). One of file, file_comment, or the combination of channel and timestamp must be specified.

Removing an emoji reaction is basically the same format, but you’ll use reactions.remove instead of reactions.add

Listing public channels¶

At some point, you’ll want to find out what channels are available to your app. This is how you get that list.

Archived channels are included by default. You can exclude them by passing exclude_archived=1 to your request.

Getting a channel’s info¶

Once you have the ID for a specific channel, you can fetch information about that channel.

Joining a channel¶

Channels are the social hub of most Slack teams. Here’s how you hop into one:

If you are already in the channel, the response is slightly different. already_in_channel will be true, and a limited channel object will be returned. Bot users cannot join a channel on their own, they need to be invited by another user.

Leaving a channel¶

Maybe you’ve finished up all the business you had in a channel, or maybe you joined one by accident. This is how you leave a channel.

Listing team members¶

See users.list for more info.

Uploading files¶

See files.upload for more info.

Calling any API methods¶

This library covers all the public endpoints as the methods in WebClient . That said, you may see a bit delay of the library release. When you’re in a hurry, you can directly use api_call method as below.

Web API Rate Limits¶

When posting messages to a channel, Slack allows applications to send no more than one message per channel per second. We allow bursts over that limit for short periods. However, if your app continues to exceed the limit over a longer period of time it will be rate limited. Different API methods have other rate limits – be sure to check the limits and test that your application has a graceful fallback if it should hit those limits.

If you go over these limits, Slack will start returning a HTTP 429 Too Many Requests error, a JSON object containing the number of calls you have been making, and a Retry-After header containing the number of seconds until you can retry.

Here’s a very basic example of how one might deal with rate limited requests.

Telegram allows commenting on a channel post or on a generic supergroup message, thanks to message threads.

Message threads

Threads are usually automatically created when replying to any message in a group.
For example, all replies to a message with ID 420 are associated to thread with ID 420 , unique to this group; this thread ID is contained in the reply_to_top_id field of reply_to messageReplyHeader, along with an eventual reply_to_msg_id , for replies to messages within a thread.
Replies to messages in a thread are part of the same thread, and do not spawn new threads.

When receiving a message from a group that is also the top of a thread (the message with ID 420 ), the replies optional field will contain a messageReplies constructor, containing the message ID and PTS of the latest reply in the thread, and the message ID of the latest read thread reply, along with the total number of replies in the thread.

Replies to a thread can also be manually fetched using messages.search, providing to top_msg_id the thread ID.

Channel comments

The same messageReplies constructor seen above will also be contained in channel posts, this time containing information about the comment section of a specific channel post.
The comment section of a channel post is simply the message thread of the automatically forwarded channel message in the linked discussion supergroup; the ID of the linked discussion supergroup will be contained in the messageReplies.channel_id field.

For channel posts, the recent_repliers field will also contain information about the last few comment posters for a specific thread, to show a small list of commenter profile pictures in client previews.

@replies

Since a user can comment in channel posts without joining the actual discussion supergroup, there must be a way for them to receive notifications about replies in comment sections.
For this reason, a special @replies username is provided. Its ID for main and testing endpoints can be seen in the tdlib sources.

When someone replies to one of our messages in the comment section of a channel post, and the user is not subscribed to the discussion group, the client will receive two updates:

  • An updateNewChannelMessage from the discussion group itself, structured just like any other update coming from a subscribed group, with:
    • id set to the ID of the reply
    • from_id set to the peer that replied to us
    • peer_id set to the peer of the discussion group
    • reply_to.reply_to_msg_id set to the ID of our message
    • reply_to.reply_to_top_id set to the thread ID.
    • id set to the common ID sequence for users
    • from_id set to the peer of @replies
    • peer_id set to our own peer
    • fwd_from.saved_from_msg_id set to the ID of the reply
    • fwd_from.from_id set to the the peer that replied to us
    • reply_to.reply_to_peer_id set to the peer of the discussion group
    • reply_to.reply_to_msg_id set to the ID of our message
    • reply_to.reply_to_top_id set to the thread ID

    Clients should display messages coming from @replies as a read-only supergroup, with each reply displayed as a separate message from the author of the reply, with a “View in chat” button like for channel comments.

    Log in to your Slack account and you’ll see a list of groups and people you can send messages to in the left sidebar. Once you’re logged in, click on the small “+” right next to direct messages, and it will pop up a new dialog box.

    How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    In the dialog box, you’ll see a group of people from your organization who are using Slack. Just select the people you want to create a group chat with, either by choosing from the list or typing them manually and click “Go”.

    How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    You can now talk to the people in the new Group Chat. You can also add more people to the group chat if you want to. Click on the “Channel Details” icon on the top of the group chat as shown below.

    How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    Now, a sidebar will pop up on the right side, click on the “Members” drop-down menu and select “Add someone”. From there, just choose the person you want to add to the conversation.

    How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    This feature is quite useful when working with specific individuals on projects or for having an online meeting.

    Zulip combines the immediacy of real-time chat with an email threading model.
    With Zulip, you can catch up on important conversations while ignoring irrelevant ones.

    Take the tour How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    In Zulip, you subscribe to streams. Streams are like channels in Slack or IRC.

    How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    Each stream message also has a topic. Topics are unique to Zulip.

    How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    Topics make it easy to catch up after a day of meetings.

    How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    Let’s click on “Tuesday night catering.”

    How to use threads on slack to group conversations How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    Messages in Zulip retain their context even if they’re sent hours after the conversation started:

    Messages sent hours apart are linked in the same topic.

    Without topics, it’s hard to catch up efficiently, and hard to participate in conversations that started while you were away.

    The last message about Tuesday night catering is hidden 56 messages ago. Meanwhile, you just see a mix of unrelated messages.

    You can chat with both people within your organization and with external guests.

    Create a space from Chat or Gmail

    1. Go to Google Chat or your Gmail account.
    2. Next to “Spaces,” click Create or find a space Create space.
    3. Enter a space name.
    4. Optional: At the top left, click Choose an emoji . If you don’t select an emoji, a default avatar is used.
    5. Enter names or email addresses of people and groups you want to add. You can also select from suggestions. If you use a Google Workspace account, suggestions include everyone in your organization, even if they don’t have Google Chat.
    6. Optional: To allow threaded replies, select Use threaded replies.
      Important:
      • You can’t change this setting.
      • Threaded spaces can only be created by Google Workspace accounts.
    7. Optional: To allow external people to join the space, select Allow people outside your organization to join. If your administrator doesn’t allow this feature, you may not have this option.
      Important:
      • You can’t change this setting.
      • The option to create spaces that allow guests is only available on Google Workspace accounts.
    8. Click Create.
    9. Optional: To add more people and bots to the space, click Add people & bots. Enter names or emails. Click Send.

    Turn a group chat into a space

    1. Go to Google Chat or your Gmail account.
    2. From the Chat panel, find and click the group chat you want to change to a space.
    3. At the top, next to the group chat name, click the Down arrow Turn this chat into a space .
    4. Add a space name. To add an optional space icon, click Add .
    5. Click Done. A notification confirms your chat is now a space, and notifies members in the group of the change.

    Delete a space

    Important:

    • You can only delete a space if you’re the space creator.
    • When you delete a space, all messages and tasks in the space are deleted. Permissions on Drive files are removed, but the file isn’t deleted.
    • Once a space is deleted, you can’t recover it.
    • This feature might not be available on your work or school account.
    1. Go to Google Chat or your Gmail account.
    2. Open the space that you want to delete.
    3. At the top, next to the space name, click Down arrow Delete space Delete.
    • Edit : Make your changes, then click Update .
    • Delete : To confirm, click Delete.

    To add markdown formatting to your Google Chat messages, you can include special characters in the text.

    • To bold text, add asterisks * before and after the text you want bolded.
      For example, if you type *Tuesday*, the chat will display Tuesday.
    • To italicize text, add underscores _ before and after the text you want italicized.
      For example, if you type _every week_ , the chat will display every week.
    • To strike through text, add tildes

    You can also click Emoji and select the emoji you want to add.

    1. Go to Google Chat or your Gmail account.
    2. Next to a space name, click More options Leave.
    3. Click Leave space.
    1. Go to Google Chat or your Gmail account.
    2. On the left, next to the person’s name, click More Delete conversation.
    3. Click Delete to confirm.
    1. Go to Google Chator your Gmail account.
      • Optional: Enter a message.
    2. Choose an option:
      • To add an emoji, click Emoji .
      • To send a GIF, click GIF .
        • If you use Google Chat on a work or school account, you may not have the option to send a GIF.
      • To attach a file from your computer, click Upload file .
        • The file is not added to Drive. Other users get the file directly in the message.
      • To add a link to a video meeting, click Add video meeting .
      • To attach a Drive file, click Integration menu Drive .
        • When you send the file, you’re notified if someone needs access.
        • With edit access, you have an option to grant access.
        • If you grant access to a space, people who join the space later also have access.
        • If people leave the space, they lose access to the file unless they’re given access individually or through a group.
      • To create a Google Calendar invite, click Integration menu Calendar invite .
    3. Optional: If you attach a file, select the file you want to send.
    4. Click Send .
    1. Go to Google Chat or your Gmail account.
    2. At the top, click in the search box that says “Search all conversations” or “Search in chat and spaces.”
    3. Enter search text and press Enter.
      • In Gmail: Under the search box, click Chat & Spaces.
    4. To open a result, click on it.
    1. Open Chat.
    2. At the top, click your statusNotification settings.
    3. Under Desktop, click the Down arrow and choose an option:
      • All Messages—Get a notification for all direct messages and all messages in spaces.
      • New threads, threads I’m following and direct messages—Get a notification for all direct messages, the first message of every new thread, and all threads you’re following.
      • Threads I’m following and direct messages—Get a notification for all direct messages and threads you’re following.
      • Only @mentions and direct messages—Get a notification for direct messages and @mentions in Spaces.
      • Off—Turn off all notifications.
    4. (Optional) To hear a sound for incoming notifications, check the Play notification sounds box.
    5. (Optional) To set mobile notifications, under Mobile, click the Down arrow and choose an option.
    6. (Optional) To turn email notifications for unread messages on or off, under Email, select Only @mentions & direct messages or Off.

    Email reminders apply to messages that you haven’t read after 12 hours. They are not sent for @mentions.

    Google, Google Workspace, and related marks and logos are trademarks of Google LLC. All other company and product names are trademarks of the companies with which they are associated.

    In this blog we explain the reason why we use Slack, and give some tips and best practices on how you can start using Slack with your team as well.

    At Toomba we work with customers and developers from all around the world. We have teams in The Netherlands, Spain and Vietnam. Our daily standup is always a fun mix of languages and cultures. To make this all work with the time difference and not being able to walk to the person in the office we use 2 applications. Google Meet for all of our meetings and Slack for our daily communication about projects and the planning.

    In this blog we’ll give you a few tips of how you can get the best out of the use of Slack.

    What is Slack?

    Slack is a channel-based messaging platform, imagine WhatsApp but with a lot more options to organize, with lots of useful options like muting, using threads, pinning files and messages, reminders and workflows. With Slack you can connect all your software tools and services. It lets you work more efficiently. If you start with Slack and want a very basic guide you can start here: Start guide Slack and check this cheat sheet for all the shortcuts.

    Tips and best practices

    If you know the basics of Slack let’s move on to how to get the best experience out of Slack. We’ve combined some best practices, what not to do and some useful tips.

    1. Use threads for different topics!
      Don’t turn Slack channels into a regular messaging app. Slack is not meant to be used as one, and it will become very distracting. You’ll end up with countless messages for your whole team to read to make sure they didn’t miss anything important. Instead, you want your team to use the conversations in channels as message threads. This allows everyone to reply to specific messages, creating a new thread without interrupting and distracting everyone. You can always tag the person via @name that needs to know about it as well, giving them a notification. To easily catch up on your threads, go to the left menu and click ‘Threads’. There you will find all the latest replies.
    2. Timezone
      When you talk with customers or coworkers in another timezone it's useful to setup your timezone and work hours. You can set this up by going to Preferences -> Notifications > Notification schedule (put in your working hours). And check if you have set up your timezone correctly at Preferences -> Language & region > Timezone. When everything is setup correctly, people that message you can click on the sidebar in the chat and see your timezone. They will also get a warning if they want to send you a message after working hours.
    3. Star important channels, people or groups.
      Want to find an important channel, group or person you discuss with a lot back fast? You can use the star function. Star that important channel and mute channels you rarely visit and don’t need to check regularly. You can also star a person or group.
    4. Categorize channels with sections
      Use sections, you can categorize your channels! (right-click on a channel and click on additional options). This way you can categorize marketing channels, your own projects etc.
    5. Pin or save important messages/files
      Slack offers multiple ways to organize messages and channels. If a file or message has important information for the channel, you can pin it for everyone. They will get a quick access link on the info bar of the channel. This is very useful for project channels, you can pin all the important files, messages and links. Another feature is saving a file or message, this however is only added to your own saved items.
    6. Saving messages for yourself:
      You can save messages you’ve sent or received in Slack, locate them in your saved messages by clicking Saved Items in the left column of the screen. You can also start a chat with yourself to save your notes. It's a great way to always have access to something you need to remember.
    7. Slack channels seem to multiply.
      Don’t let your workspace become cluttered with channels and group chats that you don’t actually use. The problem with channel clutter is that you waste a lot of time trying to find where something was added or where you have to post a specific link or ask a question etc. Was that file or link shared in #marketing, #marketing-team, or #marketing-ideas? To stay productive, clean up every once in a while. Archive channels when they are not used and keep conversations organized in a few key places. When people get off-topic, remind them to move the conversation to the right channel or use a thread, so other people aren’t distracted. Otherwise, the notification spam will be distracting.
      • Be focused when creating new channels but also not too specific. For example, instead of creating 3 channels for marketing, you can probably use fewer and use threads in the channel when discussing something specific.
      • Consider making certain channels private. That way, only those who have a need to be in a specific channel will be able to access it.
      • Don’t create additional channels for quick discussions. Instead, create one-off group chats by inviting the applicable team members into a single direct message. If you do create temporary channels, don’t forget to delete or archive them after.
      • Take advantage of Slack’s built-in prefixes when naming channels to keep them organized. Slack gives you the suggestion for help-, proj- and team-. You can also add your own custom prefixes by going to Settings & Administration > Workspace Settings > Menu > Customize > Channel Prefixes. How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    Leverage mentions in messages to boost productivity by filtering, organizing, prioritizing, creating shortcuts, and setting reminders.

    Start threads and learn how they support working asynchronously.

    Understand the best practices for using threads for discussions and when posting in a channel is most useful to boost the reach of information.

    By the end of this project, you will learn how to optimize organizational communications with Slack, a business communications platform. You will use your Slack workspace to reduce noise and interference to effective communication, while organizing discussions and boosting your team’s productivity. To do this, you will work in the Slack app on your Rhyme virtual machine, and use your current Slack workspace or set up a sample workspace under Slack’s free plan so that you can gain hands-on experience notifying members that something needs their attention by using mentions. You will then learn how to view messages in which you were mentioned. When viewing your mentions, you will filter, organize, prioritize, create shortcuts, set reminders, pin, share, and respond to them. You will then apply the skills you gained handling mentions to communicating in threads. To do this, you will learn how to create threads and use them in conjunction with mentions to work asynchronously with your team by tying your feedback to specific messages or files, organizing conversations and flagging meaningful items, and encouraging open discussion without distracting others by posting in a channel’s regular announcements. Note: This course works best for learners who are based in the North America region. We’re currently working on providing the same experience in other regions.

    Навыки, которые вы получите

    Digital communication platform

    Будете учиться пошагово

    На видео, которое откроется рядом с рабочей областью, преподаватель объяснит эти шаги:

    Access Slack, sign into your workspace, and create a new workspace if needed.

    Using "mentions" and viewing messages that mention you.

    Leverage mentions in messages to boost productivity by filtering, organizing, prioritizing, creating shortcuts, and setting reminders.

    Leverage mentions in messages to amplify communications by pinning, sharing, and responding to them.

    Start threads and learn how they support working asynchronously.

    Understand when to use threads vs. when to post in a channel.

    Apply methods to boost productivity and amplify communications in threads.

    Как устроены проекты с консультациями

    Ваше рабочее пространство — это облачный рабочий стол в браузере. Ничего не нужно загружать.

    🤯 Need some help? 👉 Get in touch with my consulting company Charm Consulting Ltd..

    Someone has probably sent you a link to this blog post in response to you posting multiple messages in a slack channel on the same topic.

    Don’t worry, we’re not angry with you, we just want to help. We also know that the slack interface can be a bit confusing, especially on mobile, and it’s easy to accidentally respond in channel instead on a thread.

    This post is not intended to shame or berate you, just to share information on how we can all make slack a nicer and less distracting thing to use for everyone.

    How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    The above screenshot is an example of two consecutive messages in slack, this happens if you send the message in two parts. (Send one message, think of something extra, send another message.)

    This post is here to explain to you with kindness why posting multiple messages like this might be causing issues for other people and offer some alternate approaches.

    Why multiple messages are a problem for others

    It seems harmless to just post another couple of messages, right?

    Slack in any active organisation can quickly become a firehose of information that can be quite hard to keep up with. It takes some effort from all involved to protect everyone’s focus and flow time. As an aside if you want an insight into just how damaging distractions can be I recommend diving into Cal Newport’s writings https://www.calnewport.com/books/, particularly “Deep Work”. Some of us have the luxury of turning off slack for most of the day, but some people need to keep up more actively than that.

    Notifications and unread messages

    Slack allows you to carefully manage what notifications you receive, but for a channel it basically comes down to notifications on or off for channel messages.

    If you have a channel that you want (or need) to keep up to date with in a timely manner then when someone sends a new channel message you will have intrusive notifications and as shown below an “unread channel” in bold-and-white sat glaring at you waiting to be read:

    If you use the convenient “All unread” feature then that will also sit glaring at you as below with an eye-catching “1 new message” button until you go and look:

    How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    The problem with multiple related channel messages in this case is that if someone gets your first message, decides that it’s not a conversation relevant to them and then goes back to trying to concentrate your second message will set off all their notifications once again and send them back to having unread messages to worry about.

    If you had instead used the below alternatives of editing or threads then there would be no new notifications and no new unread messages when you edit your message or add to the thread.

    Deciding what conversations to follow

    As someone who is trying to avoid slack-overwhelm the ability to follow and unfollow threads is a very useful feature. Slack will automatically give new notifications for threads where you have been mentioned with an @ or have added a message of your own to the thread.

    To follow/unfollow a thread, hover over the top message in the thread, click the dots, and click “turn off notifications for replied” as shown below:

    If people are not correctly using threads to group themes of discussion then this feature becomes mostly useless.

    As an aside this applies just as much to failure to start a new thread when the discussion changes topic as it does to failing to use threads in the first place.

    Catching up with a channel

    Sometimes you will join a channel and then mute it (right-click, mute) because you want to be able to keep up to date on your own schedule, say daily or weekly.

    How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    When people in the channel have conversations in the form of channel messages you can easily end up having to read 1000 messages to just know what’s been going on for a day and catch up on anything important.

    If instead the people in the channel are disciplined in using threads then it can easily be down to 20 messages with some very long threads that you can dive into if you feel the need.

    What you can do instead

    By using the following methods you can help everyone else in your slack channel make better use of their time, more easily follow relevant conversations, and have fewer distracting FOMO moments (Fear Of Missing Out).

    Start a thread

    Start a thread on your own message and add more messages in there:

    How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    This allows you to add further context etc for those interested without writing a massive message in one go directly in the channel or creating a string of independent channel messages.

    How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    Edit your existing message

    Did you just forget to mention something? You can edit the message you’ve already posted to make corrections or add more information.

    Hover over the message and then press the “more actions” dots:

    How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    Delete your subsequent messages

    If you’ve already posted more than one channel message and then realise your mistake, you can delete the extra messages before converting to a thread or edit, leaving the channel nice and tidy for anyone who shows up later to read.

    How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    This is particularly important to avoid ending up with multiple threads on different channel messages (on the same topic) as other people reply to different bits of your message resulting in confusion and a disjointed conversation.

    How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    Offering gentle reminders with an emoji

    If your team knows to do this but forgets sometimes then add :start_a_thread: as an emoji (under “customize workspace) to easily remind people when they forget.

    How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    Summary

    So in summary, please give a thought to others before you send a second message. It may be quick for you but if there are 50 people in the slack room then you are costing them much more time and attention than it saves you by not taking the time to construct a clean message or thread.

    We have been using Slack for more than a year now and I have a hard time finding information now. As an analogy, in email, I can structure it by folders, then move the relevant emails on these folders. But for slack, how would I do this? For example,

    On Jan 1, an important topic was discussed. Then on Aug 1, that same topic was discussed but the terminology used was different. But both of these topics should be grouped together in my head.

    In a direct message conversation, a topic was discussed. Then a similar topic was discussed later on in a public channel. I would love to group them together.

    I would love to have a way to group these "conversations" so that I would avoid trying to figure what:

    Where did I talk about that topic?

    What specific terms did I use so that I can try to search for it?

    When did I talk about it?

    The issue here is that, unless the conversation was in a thread, it would be difficult to get them all in one 'folder'.

    Here are a couple suggestions

    Create a private channel as you would a folder, for example #folder-important-topic-1

    When the conversation about such topic starts, share the first message of it into this channel.

    In the channel, click on 'view message' underneath the one you just shared, to jump to it wherever it was located.

    Do 2 every time the topic is brought up again

    I saw someone mention they use #hashtags to be able to easily find messages again, simply by using the search. I don't personally like this since you're the only one who can type it AND everyone else can see it. So it doesn't work if it's something you don't want people to see you're storing. Like collecting receipts on someone for example.

    Its tricky to enforce but it’s really about compliance, especially tricky if you’re a smaller company where “you might as well go straight to the source”, which with Slack is a DM.

    We’ve been using Slack for 3-4 years in our business now, and for newer users/admins I cannot stress how important it is to discuss topics in their channel. And it’s about getting everyone to understand the mantra that “it’s discussed in the appropriate channel”. Related to a project? Use the project channel. Related to a certain R&D item? Use the channel. Specific process? Use the channel for process discussion. Picking up an old topic where the channel is archived? Unarchive that channel and continue the discussion there.

    How to use threads on slack to group conversations

    Slack today introduced message threads within the familiar chat window, allowing teams to have more focused conversations in a new “flex window” that appears alongside the main chat. The feature, which was highly requested by Slack users, reflects the company’s evolution from a simple communication tool to a place where more and more work gets done. Threads will roll out to Slack’s web, desktop, and mobile apps starting today.

    The idea of ​​the message thread isn’t new: it’s used by some of Slack’s competitors, like Convo, and it’s a fundamental tenet of email that Slack has loudly promised to do away with. But Slack’s threading implementation is new and arguably more useful than most of its competitors, even if it comes at the price of having to pay more attention to Slack than before.

    Each thread must be attached to a Slack message, and each message only supports one thread. To start one, hover over a Slack message until the context menu appears. (Tap the new chat bubble and a thread will appear in a new window to the right of the main chat. By default, the person you are replying to is added to the thread. You can add other people by mentioning their usernames and you can Manually follow threads that interest you in the thread’s ellipsis menu. Thread is similar to a public version of group direct messages, but unlike direct messages, threads are searchable.

    How to use threads in Slack

    How to create a thread in Slack

    • Hover over the post you want to turn into a thread.
    • Click ‘Reply in Thread’.
    • Compose your message and click ‘Send Message’ to create a Slack thread.

    How to reply to a thread in Slack

    • Go to the Slack thread you’d like to reply to.
    • Click ‘View Thread’.
    • Type your reply and click ‘Send Message’.

    How to follow a thread in Slack

    • Go to the Slack thread you’d like to follow.
    • Click the More Actions button (three dots).
    • Select the Follow thread option that you see at the top.

    How to unfollow a thread in Slack

    • Go to the Slack thread you’d like to unfollow.
    • Click the More Actions button (three dots).
    • Select the Unfollow the thread option you see at the top.

    Final words: How to Use Threads on Slack

    I hope you understand this article How to Use Threads on Slack, if your answer is no then you can ask anything via contact forum section related to this article. And if your answer is yes then please share this article with your family and friends.

    Discord has introduced the ability to create threaded conversations in server chats. Here’s what to know about using them.

    Discord is a fun place to hang out with your online friends and take part in various communities. However, you can have a tough time conversing in a populated server where several people send messages every minute.

    The topic of conversation could quickly go off on a tangent when a lot of members are involved. Discord Threads is the solution for all these problems.

    You can use Threads to create a side conversation from a channel's main feed, making the server chat seem less spammy and cluttered.

    In this article, we'll cover how you can create a conversation thread in Discord.

    What Is a Discord Thread?

    A Discord Thread is simply a branched conversation that doesn't show up in the main chat. The sole purpose of a thread is to make sure anyone can discuss a topic in detail without cluttering a server's channel.

    No matter how active a chat is, you can have meaningful discussions without interrupting other members and their conversations.

    This feature is identical to Slack threads if you've ever used the platform. You'll get the hang of Discord Threads pretty quickly if you're familiar with how Reddit comment threads or in-line replies in iMessage work.

    At the moment, you can only use this feature in a server.

    How to Create a Discord Thread on Desktop

    Before you begin, we'd like to point out that Discord Threads may not be available in all servers you're a part of.

    While Discord enables this feature by default for a server, it's up to the server's administrators and moderators to allow members to create threads.

    Assuming your Discord client is up to date, follow these simple instructions:

    1. Right-click on the message you want to make a thread for and select Create Thread from the dropdown menu.
    2. Next, give a preferred name for the thread and change the Archive setting as required. Click on Create Thread, and you're all set.

    By default, Discord will automatically archive your thread after 24 hours of inactivity. But you can change this to one hour or even increase it depending on your server's level from boosts.

    Level 1 servers can unlock the three-day archive setting, whereas Level 2 servers can keep inactive threads for as long as one week.

    How to Create a Discord Thread on Mobile

    The steps you need to follow are pretty similar on mobile devices too, whether you're an iOS or an Android user.

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