How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

If you’re a frequent user of the Windows 10 Command Prompt, the “command history” feature allows you to view and quickly reuse recent command instead of having to retype them, making your daily tasks more efficient.

In this Windows 10 guide, we’ll walk you through the steps to access your command history and export your recently typed command to a file while in Command Prompt.

How to view Command Prompt history with F7

To use the F7 key to view your Command Prompt history, use these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Search for Command Prompt, and click the top result to open the console.

Press the F7 key.

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

Using the F7 key will open the graphical interface with a list of commands you typed in the current session, even if you mistyped them.

While in the command history, you can use the up or down arrow keys to select the command that you want to reuse. If you want to exit without running any command, press the Esc key.

How to view Command Prompt history with doskey

On Command Prompt, the doskey is a command line tool that recalls previously typed commands, edits command lines, and you can even use it to create macros.

In this case, you can use the command to view a list of the command history from the current session. Here’s how:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Search for Command Prompt, and click the top result to open the console.

Type the following command to view the command history and press Enter:

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

The only caveat with this tool is that you can view your current history, but you can’t select the command like using the F7 key. However, you can use the arrows and pages keys on the keyboard to cycle and run previously typed commands.

  • Down arrow — Re-enters the next command that you typed. If you hit the arrow key repeatedly, it’ll scroll down through the command history currently in memory.
  • Up arrow — Re-enters up the previous command that you typed. If you hit the arrow key repeatedly, it’ll scroll up through the command history currently in memory.
  • Page Down — Re-enters the last command from the current session history.
  • Page Up — Re-enters up the first command from the current session history.
  • Esc — Deletes the current content of the console line.

How to export Command Prompt history to file

Unlike the Linux console, command history is only available for the current session. If you close Command Prompt, it will also clear the history, but you can the doskey command to save the history of the commands you typed to a file.

To export your command history, use these steps:

  1. Open Start.
  2. Search for Command Prompt, right-click the top result, and click the Run as administrator option.

Type the following command to save the command history and press Enter:

doskey /h > c:\cmd_history.txt

In the command, change the c:\cmd_history.txt for the path and name of the file you want to use to export the current history.

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

Once you’ve completed the steps, the Command Prompt history will be saved on the location you specified.

We’re focusing this guide on Windows 10, but command history for Command Prompt has been around for years, which means that you can also use this feature on Windows 8.1, Windows 7, and previous versions.

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For more helpful articles, coverage, and answers to common questions about Windows 10, visit the following resources:

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

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How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

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How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

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How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

Read this article, to get the outline of How to view Command Prompt History in Windows in different ways.

View using Doskey:

Follow the steps to view Command Prompt History using Doskey in simple steps.

  • An entire list of your Command Prompt window’s commands, on the window as a text, you have to type the following command in your CMD window.
  • Go to the start menu.
  • In the search column, type as Command Prompt.
  • Tap it which appears at the top of the start menu. How to use your command history in the windows command promptCommand Prompt
  • Then type doskey /History in the Command Prompt. How to use your command history in the windows command promptDoskey
  • Use the Up and Down arrow to select the command.
  • Else you can also Copy and Paste the commands from the history which has appeared on your screen, within the window of Command Prompt.

View using F7 Key:

Follow the steps to view Command Prompt History using F7 Key in simple steps.

  • The Command Prompt window will show you history for only the current session.
  • If you close the Command prompt window, and on the next opening of the command prompt, all the previous commands will be gone.
  • Now open Command Prompt window, and start executing your commands. How to use your command history in the windows command promptCommand Prompt
  • If you need the previous command you just wrote, but it just skipped from your mind.
  • For this, press the F7key, and a pop-up window will appear to give you a list of all recently executed commands.
  • Use Up and Down arrow to navigate towards your required command. How to use your command history in the windows command promptUse Up and Down to select the required command
  • After reaching it, press Enter key. How to use your command history in the windows command promptRequired command
  • Now, your command is executed. How to use your command history in the windows command promptThe selected command is executed
  • That’s all.

Saving Command Prompt History:

  • Save your commands list as a TXT, HTML, CSV, or RTF file before closing the window so that you can have a backup of your entered commands.
  • Copy and paste the following command.
  • Then, the file will be saved in the Users folder.
  • Go to users folder and see that has file saved there or not.
  • Now, see your history of all commands and save them in a notepad file to use any of your commands anytime if you need it.
  • That’s all.

Closure:

In the above article, we have illustrated How to view Command Prompt History in Windows. If you found this article helpful? Don’t forget to share your comments in the below section.

Sometimes I forget how the exact syntax of a CMD command looks and then I would like to search my own CMD history. Clearly, within the same session, you can browse it with the up and down arrow keys but what about the history of former CMD sessions? Is there a file, a log the history gets written to or does it all go to digital Nirvana?

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

10 Answers 10

No, Windows command prompt history can’t be saved when a session ends.

Not natively but check out: http://mridgers.github.io/clink/ , makes cmd.exe much more productive. Quoting features from the project page:

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

/.inputrc when using clink? (and do you know whether it can be used Console or anything?)

Massimo is correct that your command prompt history does not persist across sessions. You could manually grab this before closing your prompt by typing doskey /history > history.txt

Or. you could use PowerShell as your CMD prompt, and follow this post to persist your history across sessions.

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

You can use clink.

Clink combines the native Windows shell cmd.exe with the powerful command line editing features of the GNU Readline library, which provides rich completion, history, and line-editing capabilities.

Easiest way to install clink is using chocolatey. Once you install chocolatey, you can install clink by typing

Starting from the next time you start cmd.exe, it should store history across sessions.

It is possible to save the current history to file,

But it seems there is no way to load it back as history. It is possible only to use a command line argument to load and execute all lines,

cmd.exe /K somefile.txt

, what can be useful to load a list of doskey macros. This invocation could be included in a shortcut so you don’t need to type it everytime; this reference has some additional info on this approach.

There is a similar question on Superuser that bring some alternatives, including clink, as suggested by @RobertBak.

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

Command History: To enable a command history (that can be accessed using the up and down arrow keys) just execute doskey at the command prompt. For example, to create a command history of 100 elements:

clink is nice and the author publishes a chocolatey package on every release, however I would suggest DeepBlueCLI.

You can use https://github.com/sans-blue-team/DeepBlueCLI to set-up Windows Security Event ID 4688.

For PowerShell, DeepBlueCLI also uses module logging (PowerShell event 4013) and script block logging (4104). It does not use transcription.

Also, because this solution uses the Windows Event Log infrastructure, you can query it through WMI or PowerShell Get-EventLog . With clink, you have to learn another tool in order to detect system- or network-wide patterns of behavior.

Yes, it’s possible

If all you want to do is save your command line history at the end of every session, here’s a simple way to do it:

As other answers indicated, doskey allows you to list the command line history for the current session. It also allows you to create macros.

This simple macro will save the command line history when you exit a CMD session:

This creates a macro that remaps the EXIT command to copy the command line history into your user profile folder (e.g., C:\Users\yourname\commands.log ). Unfortunately, you won’t be able to easily go back to any of these entries by pressing the up arrow, but you can examine the file at any point to see what you did in the past.

Autoloading

So that’s the easy part. The tricky part is autoloading that doskey macro when you start a new command session. The short and dangerous answer is to just add it to the REGISTRY in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Command Processor\AutoRun . Anything you put in this entry will be run when you start a CMD session.

While that will work, it will definitely create unexpected side effects when doing any kind of scripting*.

So here’s how I do it:

Create a file called autoexec.bat and store it in your profile folder (e.g., C:\Users\yourname\autoexec.bat ). Then change the value of HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\Command Processor\AutoRun to this:

So yes, this batch file will run every time a CMD session is opened, but we’ll do a trick to make sure it doesn’t run in any subprocesses. Here is what you put in the autoexec.bat file:

How does this avoid those unexpected side effects?

All we’re doing is creating an environment variable called AUTOEXEC . Then, when any subsequent subprocesses open a command session, they will run into the second line and immediately exit the script! This is because subprocesses automatically inherit the environment variables from the parent process.

But wait, there’s more!

This allows you to add as many macros as you want to your command session. For example:

Now you’ve got all the macros you can eat, and you’re saving your command line session each time. But remember, if you don’t explicitly type exit , the history won’t be saved. Closing the window with the mouse won’t work here.

Hope this helps!

* because batch subprocesses often open a second copy of CMD which will run this command again and again, from slowing everything down to other unforseen issues.

If you are a long time user of Windows, you must be knowing about the Command Prompt. Command Prompt is basically a command-line interpreter present on Windows also known as CMD or cmd.exe. Now, you might not need to use the Command Prompt window in your PC. However, there are Windows users out there who have to work on Command Prompt window, day in and day out. For them, it is a hassle to keep typing one command again and again. Therefore, we are now going to tell you about the Windows command prompt history feature that helps save you from typing the same commands again and over again.

The command history of Command Prompt is a history of all the commands we have typed in a particular session. Most of the users currently see their recent commands in Command Prompt by manually clicking the Arrow keys up and down. However, there is now a much easier way to view this command history and even export all those commands to an external text file.

So, read along to know how to use this Windows command history feature and make your life much easier while using the Command Prompt. Using these multitasking tips for Windows 10, you can perform multiple tasks more efficiently.

Steps to use Windows Command Prompt History

  • Press the Start button on your keyboard
  • Type “Command” inside the search bar and click on the Command Prompt application
  • Press the F7 key on your keyboard once the Command Prompt window opens. You will see a command history window same as the one highlighted below
  • Another way to open the command history window is by typing a command in Command Prompt. If the F7 key method doesn’t work for some reason, type the following command inside your Command Prompt window:
  • You will get the command history inside your Command Prompt window as an output. You can see the result from the screenshot attached below
  • You can also export the command history to an external text file. For this, just type the command same as below and your command history will be exported
  • The above command will create a new text file named cmd_history.txt on your PC and write the command history to it. This file can be accessed from “C:\cmd_history.txt”. We have attached a screenshot of the sample text file of our exported command history for reference
  • That’s it. You have just viewed your command history and exported the command history into an external text file as well.

In case you have doubts regarding this tutorial, feel free to comment below with your questions. We will make sure to solve them in the best way possible. There are a bunch of more Windows 10 secret tricks you might not be familiar with and should check out.

How can I see the Windows command line history in the cmd.exe?

At the Windows command prompt, press the F7 key to view a history of all the commands entered in this window. Below is a picture of what the Windows command line history box looks like when it is opened!

1.) . view and use cmd.exe history!
2.) . List the commands last used with doskey / history!

1.) View and use cmd.exe history!

Tip:
Use the up or down buttons! With this you can search through all commands and after marking them with the Enter key, execute the marked command again!

(Image-1) Windows command prompt history in cmd.exe!
How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

Tip:
In the cmd.exe (command prompt), or known as the Windows command line, you can quickly repeat a previously entered command and display a history of the commands using the arrow keys , even without the F7 key. This can save a lot of time for anyone typing long commands, filenames, or directory names. If you enter a command incorrectly, you can also save time by pressing the up arrow key and then the left arrow use to correct the error.

2.) List the most recently used commands with doskey / history!

Use this command to track command history in your command prompt. This command essentially shows you the full history of the commands used in CMD in the current session.

The Command Prompt is a command-line tool in black and white that comes with Windows 11. You can do so much with cmd by executing different command lines, from disabling your WiFi to creating a bootable USB. If you often use the Windows Command Prompt during your workday, you may want or need to clear the command history on a regular basis. In this guide, we will show you some easy ways to view and clear Command Prompt history on Windows 11, also you will also learn how to save the Command Prompt history.

Table of Contents

What is the Command Prompt in Windows 11?

Windows 11, just like other Windows versions, has a command line interpreter tool called Command Prompt. It is an application that uses the Windows Graphical User Interface to simulate the input field in a text-based user interface screen (GUI). It is used to carry out commands that have been inputted. The majority of those commands use scripts and batch files to automate activities, perform sophisticated administrative duties, and troubleshoot or resolve specific Windows issues.

The Command Prompt (cmd) is officially known as Windows Command Processor, although it is more commonly referred to as the command shell, cmd prompt, or by its filename, cmd.exe.

View and Clear Command Prompt History on Windows 11

Below, we’ll walk you through the process of viewing and clearing the Command Prompt (cmd) history step by step. Simply follow them.

View Command Prompt History on a Windows 11 PC or laptop

After you’ve entered a set of commands in the Command Prompt window, you can easily view and check them in two ways:

1. Using a command line

On Windows 11, you can view your Command Prompt history by entering the following command into the same Command Prompt window:

Command line to View cmd history

Following that, you will be able to see on the Command Prompt all of the commands that you typed during that session in the order that you entered them.

2. Using F7 Key

You can also use the F7 key to check or see the Command Prompt history on your Windows 11PC or laptop. In your CMD window, just press F7 or FN + F7 to show a list of recently executed commands.

F7

Then you will see a pop-up window displaying a list of all previously run commands in the session. You can go through the list by using the up and down arrow keys and then use the Enter key to pick any of them.

cmd history

Clear Command Prompt History on a Windows 11 Computer

Here as well, we will show you two ways to clear your Command Prompt history on your Windows 11 PC or laptop. To do so, use one of the ways listed below:

1. With a command

Unlike many other things on your computer, there are not many options for clearing the screen with Command Prompt. There is a simple command that can clear the screen’s history.

Enter the following command in your CMD window and hit “Enter” to clear previously executed commands.

cls

You’ll then see a lovely, clean Command Prompt screen where you may begin over.

2. Using Alt+F7 keys

Also, while the command prompt is still open, there is a simple keyboard shortcut for doing so: Alt+F7.

Alt+F7

If you are unable to clear the Command Prompt screen using either method, simply close and reopen Command Prompt, and you will have a clear screen once more.

Q. How can I open Command Prompt (cmd) on Windows 11?

There are several methods to open Command Prompt on Windows 11, the easiest of which is to type ‘command prompt’ or ‘cmd’ into the Windows 11 search box, and it will appear as the first result. If you prefer keyboard shortcuts, pressing Windows+X will bring up the Power Users menu, from which you can start Command Prompt with a single click.

Q. How do I save the Command Prompt history on Windows 11?

To store a record of the commands they used in a Command Prompt session in a TXT, HTML, CSV, or RTF file, type the following command and hit the Enter key: doskey /HISTORY > SampleHistory.txt. The file will then be saved in the same location as you executed the command in the Command Prompt window.

Q. How can I view a list of all command prompts on Windows 11?

You can view a list of available commands in your Command Prompt window by simply typing help and hitting Enter.

Q. What language does Command Prompt use?

The Windows command prompt uses a crippled language known as the DOS batch language. Later versions of Windows include a tool called PowerShell that, in principle, eliminates the requirement to utilize the DOS batch language.

Conclusion

That’s it! This guide all about how to view and clear Command Prompt history on Windows 11. Also, we answer to some cmd FAQs at the end of the article. Finally, we hope you’ve found this article useful and if you encounter any questions or have any other way in mind, please share with us in the comments section below. Good Luck!

Do you want to check Command Prompt History in Windows? If yes, then you are in the right place. If you are a Windows user then you must know about the Command Prompt. Command Prompt is like a command-line interpreter available on Windows also known as cmd.exe or CMD. Now, you probably not want to use the Command Prompt window on your computer. However, there are Windows users who like to work on the Command Prompt window. For them, it is difficult to keep typing one command again and again. Therefore, for ease, we are now going to explain to you the Windows command prompt history feature that helps to save you from typing the same commands again and again.

The Command Prompt history is a history of all the commands we have typed in a specific session. Some of us currently view their recent commands in Command Prompt just by manually tapping the Arrow keys up and down. Also, there is now an efficient way to check this command history and also export all those commands to an external text file.

In this guide, I am giving you the methods to view the list of your commands which you run currently. And you can also save that list for later use so if you ever forget any command, just head over to the saved file of commands and take your required command.

View Windows Command Prompt History:

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

  • Check Command Prompt History Via F7 Key
  • Check Command Prompt History Via F7 Doskey
  • Save CMD History

Method 1: Check Command Prompt History Via F7 Key

The Command Prompt [CMD] window will display your history for only the recent session. Once you close the Command prompt window, and after the opening of the command prompt, all the older commands will be gone.

Now head over to the Command Prompt window. Then begin running your commands. Suddenly you want the older command you just wrote but forget it.

For this, hit F7 key, and a pop-up window will appear to provide you a list of all currently run commands. However, you can then use the Up or Down arrow to move towards your required command.

And after reaching to it, simply hit the Enter key. And here you are. Your command is successfully executed.

Method 2: Check Command Prompt History Via F7 Doskey

If you want to have the complete list of your Command Prompt window’s commands, on the window as a text, then input the given command in your CMD window.

Because certainly, you don’t want any pop-up windows all the time. That’s why I am providing you a simple easy and clean method to view the history of your Command Prompt window.

Step 1:

Head over to the CMD or Command prompt from the Start Menu.

Step 2:

Then type or enter the “doskey /History”. Whenever you enter all the commands which you latterly typed are shown to you on your CMD window.

Step 3:

Then use the up or down arrow to choose the command. Also, you can copy and paste the commands from the history that appeared on your display screen, within the window of CMD.

Method 3: Save Command Prompt History

Also, you view the command history whenever your CMD window stays open. After you close it, all commands will be gone without a history mark. What if you want the same commands for the next CMD window, but you don’t know that which commands you run before.

Now you can save your commands list as a TXT, CSV, HTML, or RTF file before closing the window so that you can have a complete backup of your typed commands.

Input the following command in your Command Prompt window:

doskey /HISTORY > history.txt

Your file will be stored in the Users folder. Now head over to the user’s folder and view that has file saved there or not.

Conclusion:

Just check your history of all commands and then save them in a notepad file to use any of your commands whenever you want it. I hope you have a complete understanding of how to view/check your history in command prompt and how to save that history. If you have any questions or queries let us know in the comments section below.

Here are some basic Command Prompt Tricks and Tips to help a Windows user, while using the CMD in Windows 11, Windows 10, Windows 8, or Windows 7. To begin, first, launch Command Prompt. These tips will also work on Windows Terminal.

Command Prompt Tips

  1. Customize CMD window
  2. Copy or Paste in CMD
  3. Adjust the size of the Prompt window
  4. Use Drag and Drop in Command Prompt
  5. Auto-complete file paths in CMD
  6. CMD Help
  7. Make the Command Prompt transparent
  8. CMD Keyboard Shortcuts
  9. Command Prompt History

If you open a Command prompt with admin privileges, you will not see anything different. The customization is the same for all.

1] Customize CMD window

You can customize your black CMD window any way you want. Click on the black CMD icon which appears on the top left side of the title bar and select Properties. Here you can change options, fonts, layout, and colors too.

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

You can also change the colors using the syntax: color [attr].

2] Copy or Paste in CMD

You cannot use Ctrl+C to copy. To copy, you have to right-click inside the CMD , select Mark, and then drag the highlighted box to the text you want to copy. Right-click on the text. It will automatically get copied.

To paste your Clipboard contents, you can right-click in the CMD and select Paste to paste the copied text. Or you may use Ctrl+V.

Alternatively, open the Properties box, and from the Options tab, select the Quick Edit option. Now you will be able to copy as usual.

3] Adjust the size of the Prompt window

You can adjust the size of the Prompt window by using the following syntax:

4] Use Drag and Drop in Command Prompt

Rather than typing the full path of a file, you can simply drag and drop the file. The full path will get entered.

5] Auto-complete file paths in CMD

To auto-complete file paths, type the first part of the path, say E:\ . Now click on Tab. All available file names & folders will be cycled.

6] CMD Help

Need help with CMD? If you know a command but aren’t sure how it works, suffix the command with ‘/’ or ‘?’ and execute it. If the command is valid, the command prompt will give you all the information related to it.

7] Make the Command Prompt transparent

To quickly see what is behind your CMD window in Windows 10, press Ctrl+Shift+- to increase transparency. To make it opaque again, press Ctrl+Shift++.

8] CMD Keyboard Shortcuts

These Command Prompt keyboard shortcuts will help you work faster with it.

9] See Command Prompt History

Pressing the arrow up selects a previous command from your command history; similarly, the arrow down selects the next command. To see your complete command prompt history, press the F7 key.

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

You can see the Command history in a session, by pressing the F7 key. You can also type doskey /history in the CMD window, to see the command history in the command prompt itself.

Incidentally, running CMD in full-screen mode, by pressing Alt+Enter, is no longer supported, from Windows Vista onwards. But you can check this post for a workaround of sorts.

Looking for more? Check out these Advanced CMD Tricks for Windows 11/10/8/7.

How do I get a list of command prompts?

The easiest way to do this is to type Help and press enter on the Command Prompt, and ti will list down all the tools and commands available. If the list is too long, you can save the output into a text file, and then open it with your favorite editor to view them one by one.

What does * do in the command line?

It is a wildcard which means ALL. It can be all files, all conditions, or anything but the entire. So it will depend on where and how it is used. If you use it with the Directory command, then it will reveal all the files in the directory.

WebStorm includes an embedded terminal emulator for working with your command-line shell from inside the IDE. Use it to run Git commands, set file permissions, and perform other command-line tasks without switching to a dedicated terminal application.

Initially, the terminal emulator runs with your default system shell, but it supports many other shells, such as Windows PowerShell, Command Prompt cmd.exe , sh , bash , zsh , csh , and so on. For information about changing the shell, see Configure the terminal emulator.

If you use WebStorm on Windows 10 version 1903 or later, ConPTY API will be used as an interface for the Terminal backend. For earlier Windows versions, winpty is used.

Open the Terminal tool window

From the main menu, select View | Tool Windows | Terminal or press Alt+F12 .

By default, the terminal emulator runs with the current directory set to the root directory of the current project. For information about changing the default start directory, see Configure the terminal emulator.

Alternatively, you can right-click any file (for example, in the Project tool window or any open tab) and select Open in Terminal from the context menu to open the Terminal tool window with a new session in the directory of that file.

Start a new session

Click on the toolbar to start a new session in a separate tab.

To run multiple sessions inside a tab, right-click the tab and select Split Right or Split Down in the context menu.

The Terminal saves tabs and sessions when you close the project or WebStorm. It preserves tab names, the current working directory, and even the shell history.

To close a tab, click on the Terminal toolbar or right-click the tab and select Close Tab from the context menu.

Press Alt+Right and Alt+Left to switch between active tabs. Alternatively, you can press Alt+Down to see the list of all terminal tabs.

To rename a tab, right-click the tab and select Rename Session from the context menu.

To search for a certain string in a Terminal session, press Ctrl+F . This searches all text in the session: the prompt, commands, and output.

Configure the terminal emulator

Press Ctrl+Alt+S to open the IDE settings and select Tools | Terminal .

Project Settings

These settings affect the terminal only for the current project:

Specify the working directory where every new shell session should start. By default, it starts in the root directory of the current project.

Specify custom environment variables for every new shell session.

Application Settings

These settings affect the terminal in any project that you open with the current WebStorm instance.

Specify the shell that will run by default. WebStorm should automatically detect the default shell based on your environment. Here are some examples of different shells:

Bash for Windows: bash.exe

Command Prompt: cmd.exe

Cygwin: “C:\cygwin\bin\bash.exe” –login -i

Default Tab name

Specify the default name for new tabs.

Play the bell sound on various events.

Close session when it ends

Close the current session when the corresponding process ends (for example, by kill ).

Enable the mouse pointer support in the embedded local terminal.

Copy to clipboard on selection

Copy text selected in the terminal to the clipboard.

Paste on middle mouse button click

Paste clipboard contents by clicking the middle mouse button.

Override IDE shortcuts

Use shell-specific shortcuts instead of IDE shortcuts when the Terminal tool window is active.

Click Configure terminal keybindings to open the Keymap settings page and configure the shortcuts that are available int the Terminal tool window under Plugins | Terminal . For example, Switch Focus to Editor is mapped to Escape by default, which means that if you don’t override the IDE shortcuts, Escape will switch focus from the terminal to the editor.

Integrate the terminal with the system shell to properly keep track of your command history for sessions and load a custom config file with required environment variables.

Shell integration works for sh , bash , zsh , and fish shells.

Highlight HTTP links in the terminal and make them clickable.

Use Option as Meta key

On macOS, use the Option key as the Meta key.

Run Commands using IDE

Detect and highlight commands that can be used as IDE features instead of running them in the terminal and reading console output.

When enabled, instead of pressing Enter , which runs the command in the terminal, press Ctrl+Enter to open the corresponding GUI element. For more information, see Run IDE features from the terminal.

Select the shape of the cursor: block, underline, or vertical.

The embedded terminal emulator also inherits the following IDE settings:

On the Keymap page, you can configure the copy Ctrl+C and paste Ctrl+V shortcuts.

On the Editor | General | Appearance page, you can configure blinking frequency for the caret. The Terminal does not inherit the Use block caret option because there is a separate option for that: Cursor shape.

On the Editor | Color Scheme | Console Font page, you can configure line spacing and fonts.

On the Editor | Color Scheme | Console Colors page, you can configure font colors.

On the Editor | Color Scheme | General page, you can configure the selection foreground and background colors.

Run IDE features from the terminal

Instead of running a specific command in the integrated terminal and reading console output, you can use the relevant IDE feature, like a tool window or a dialog that implements this functionality. For example, you can launch an npm, yarn, gulp, or grunt command from the Terminal tool window and view its output in the Run or Debug tool window.

Another example is the Difference Viewer, which actually runs the diff command in the system shell to produce results, or the Log tab in the Git tool window, which is based on the output of the git log command.

Run a command in the Run or Debug tool window from the terminal

Type a supported command ( npm run serve ) in the terminal and notice how it is highlighted.

Instead of pressing Enter , which runs the command in the terminal, press Ctrl+Enter to open the corresponding GUI element. In this example, it will open the Run tool window with the output of the npm serve command.

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

To run the command in the Debug tool window, press Ctrl+Shift+Enter .

You can run most of the commands recognized by Run Anything in the Run or Debug tool window.

Run a WebStorm command from the Run Anything popup

Open the Run Anything popup by pressing Ctrl twice.

Start typing a command, for example, npm run serve .

Select the command from the list and press Ctrl+Enter to show its output in the Run tool window or Shift+Enter to show the output in the Debug tool window.

Disable running WebStorm commands from the Terminal

Click on the title bar of the Terminal tool window and clear the Run Commands using IDE option.

Alternatively, open the Settings/Preferences dialog ( Ctrl+Alt+S ), go to Tools | Terminal , and clear the Run Commands using IDE checkbox.

The Command History window displays a log of statements that you ran in the current and previous MATLAB ® sessions. The Command History lists the time and date of each session in the short date format for your operating system, followed by the statements from that session. Brackets in the left margin indicate statements that were processed as a group. A colored mark precedes each statement that generated an error.

MATLAB saves statements that run in the Command Window to the history file History.xml . These statements include those you run using the Evaluate Selection item on context menus in tools such as the Editor, Command History window, and Help browser. By default, MATLAB automatically saves the command history file after each statement. The history file does not include every action taken in MATLAB. For example, changes to values in the Variables editor are not included in the Command History window. All entries remain until you delete them, or until the number of statements in the history file exceeds the number of statements to save, as specified in the Command History preferences. When the specified limit is reached, MATLAB automatically deletes the oldest entries. By default, the Command History window saves 25,000 statements.

You can select entries in the Command History window, and then perform these actions for the selected entries. Some actions are not available in MATLAB Online™ .

How to Perform the Action

Create a script from statements.

Select an entry or entries, and then right-click and select Create Script or Create Live Script from the context menu. The Editor opens a new file that contains the statements you selected from the Command History window.

Rerun previous statements.

Do one of the following:

Press the Up Arrow key (↑) until the statement you want appears at the prompt, and then press Enter.

Double-click an entry or entries in the Command History window.

Select an entry in the Command History window and press Enter.

To extend the selection to include multiple statements, press Shift+↑.

Copy statements to another window.

Select an entry or entries and then do one of the following:

Select Copy from the context menu. Paste the selection into an open file in the Editor or any application.

Drag the selection from the Command History window to an open file or another application.

Create a favorite command from statements.

Select an entry or entries, and then do one of the following:

Click the icon to the left of the selection. MATLAB creates a new favorite command in the default Favorite Commands category.

Right-click and select Create Favorite. The Favorite Command Editor opens with the selected entries added to the Code field. Configure the desired fields and click Save.

For more information about favorite commands, see Rerun Favorite Commands.

Select the entries to delete, and then right-click and select Delete, or press the Delete key. To recall a deleted entry, right-click and select Undo Delete, or press Ctrl+Z.

To delete all entries, click (or in MATLAB Online ), and then select Clear Command History from the context menu. You cannot recall entries deleted in this way.

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

Open the Command History Window

To open the Command History window with all history showing, in the Command Window, press the Up Arrow key (↑) or enter commandhistory . To open the Command History window and display a specific statement, type any part of the statement at the prompt and then press the Up Arrow key. To change how MATLAB searches for results, click (or in MATLAB Online ) and select from the available options including Match Anywhere, Match Beginning, and Match Case.

By default, the Command History window closes after a statement is selected or the Esc key is pressed. To keep the Command History window open, in the Command History window, click and then select either Detach or Dock. If the Command History window is closed while detached or docked, go to the Home tab, and in the Environment section, click Layout. Then, under Show, click Command History and select either Docked or Popup.

To keep the Command History window open in MATLAB Online , go to the Home tab, and in the Environment section, click Layout. Then, under Show, click Command History and select Docked.

Examples

Find Previous Plot Statements

Use the Command History search feature to find and run previous plot statements.

In the Command Window, run these statements to create two line plots.

Type plot and then press the up-arrow key. MATLAB displays the Command History with all instances of plot highlighted. The last run instance of plot is selected.

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

Press the up-arrow key to select the previous run instance of plot and press Enter. MATLAB runs the statement plot(x,y) .

I was trying to run one of the perl files in command prompt from the path where the file in situated. Once I enter the debug mode, command history down and up arrow keys functionalities are not working. I have tried many properties settings, currently it is like this How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

Please guide me through how to fix this? It is becoming difficult to debug. Thanks in Advance.

1 Answer 1

The prompt you get inside the Perl debugger isn’t provided by your shell, so it should not be surprising that it has different command history features to your shell prompt.

The perldebug manual page documents the Perl debugger and has a section entitled Readline Support / History in the Debugger which says this:

As shipped, the only command-line history supplied is a simplistic one that checks for leading exclamation points. However, if you install the Term::ReadKey and Term::ReadLine modules from CPAN (such as Term::ReadLine::Gnu, Term::ReadLine::Perl, . ) you will have full editing capabilities much like those GNU readline(3) provides. Look for these in the modules/by-module/Term directory on CPAN. These do not support normal vi command-line editing, however.

A rudimentary command-line completion is also available, including lexical variables in the current scope if the PadWalker module is installed.

Without Readline support you may see the symbols “^[[A”, “^[[C”, “^[[B”, “^[[D””, “^H”, . when using the arrow keys and/or the backspace key.

So you’ll need to install Term::ReadKey and one of the Term::ReadLine::* modules.

By:

This topic covers several ways to customize the appearance of the command window and command history.

Determine the Effect of a Right-click During a Command

  1. Click Application menu Options .
  2. In the Options dialog box, User Preferences tab, click the Right-click Customization button.
  3. In the Right-Click Customization dialog box, specify the right-click behavior you want to use.

Set How Many Rows of Temporary Prompt History to Display

  1. To the left of the prompt area, click the Customize button Lines of Prompt History.
  2. At the Command prompt, enter the number of rows to be displayed (0 to 50).

Set Command Window Transparency

  1. Click the Customize button to the left of the prompt area, and select Transparency.
  2. In the Transparency dialog box, move the sliders to change transparency of the command window.

Control the Display of Recent Input

  1. At the Command prompt, enter INPUTHISTORYMODE.
  2. Enter a sum of one or more of the following values:
    • 0. No history of recent input is displayed.
    • 1. History of recent input is displayed at the Command prompt with access through Up Arrow and Down Arrow keys.
    • 2. History of recent input for the current command is displayed in the shortcut menu.
    • 4. History of recent input for all commands in the current session is displayed in the shortcut menu.
    • 8. Markers for recent input of point locations are displayed in the drawing.

The default value is 15.

Modify Colors Used for Prompt Display

Modify the background color and text on the command line, temporary prompt history, and the extended prompt history.

  1. Click Application menu Options .
  2. In the Options dialog box, Display tab, click Colors.
  3. In the Drawing Window Colors dialog box, under Context, select Command Line.
  4. Under Interface Element, select an option.
  5. Under Color, select the color you want to use.

Set Text Font and Size Used in the Command Window

  1. Click Application menu Options .
  2. In the Options dialog box, Display tab, click Fonts.
  3. In the Command Line Window Font dialog box, select the font, style, and size for the text.

Clear your Command Prompt screen with three letters

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What to Know

  • In Command Prompt, type: cls and press Enter. Doing this clears the entire application screen.
  • Close and reopen Command Prompt. Click the X on the top right of the window to close it, then reopen it as usual.
  • Press the ESC key to clear the line of text and move back to the Command Prompt.

This article explains how to clear the screen in the Command Prompt application on Windows. You can use a simple command or just close and reopen Command Prompt. We also have a bonus section at the end of this how-to for clearing a line, character, or word.

Clear the Command Prompt Screen With a Command

Unlike many things on your computer, there aren’t several ways to clear the screen in Command Prompt. There is one basic command that will rid the screen of its history.

Type the following command and hit Enter:

You’ll then have a nice and clean Command Prompt screen where you can start fresh.

Clear the Screen By Closing and Reopening Command Prompt

If, for some reason, you cannot issue the above command to clear the screen, just close and then open Command Prompt again.

Maybe your keyboard is on the fritz or has a broken C, L, or S key. (Hey, things happen!)

Close Command Prompt by clicking the X on the top right corner of the window. You can also right-click the icon in your Task Bar and select Close Window.

Then, reopen it as you normally would and you’re back in command.

To quickly exit and close Command Prompt at the same time, type: exit and hit Enter.

Bonus: Clear Text on the Command Prompt Screen

Maybe you don’t necessarily need to clear the entire Command Prompt screen, but just the current line or some text in it. Here are a few helpful key presses to keep in mind.

  • Escape: Clear the current line of text; it removes the text and moves your cursor back to the prompt.
  • Backspace: Delete one character to the left of your cursor.
  • Ctrl+Backspace: Delete one word to the left of your cursor.
  • Ctrl+C: Stop the line you’re typing or the command you’re running and move to a new prompt on the following line.

If you’re new to using Command Prompt on Windows take a look at our Command Prompt hacks.

Your command history clears every time you close the Command Prompt. Close the window manually or use the Alt+F4 keyboard shortcut.

Use the help command: Enter help to see a list of available commands. To get more information about a particular command, type help command name.

Prior to learning GDAL or scripting it is important to learn the Command Line and how to use commands from the command prompt.

6. Command line history

Sometimes you often use the same command. There are several tricks to type them more efficiently.

In your Windows Command Prompt Doskey is by default activated. Doskey is the tool that tracks the command line history. The emulator that we use has some limitations and some of the command below might not work. Remember that we had activated it in Chapter 2 of this tutorial.

Let’s test if it remembered the commands we type from now.

1. Type the button.

This repeats the last command used.

2. Clear the command prompt and press the right arrow button several times. You can see that the characters of the previous command are repeated. If you press the up and down buttons, you can browse through the previously used command.

When you use while typing a path or a filename, it will try to automatically complete it. This is very useful, because you avoid typos. In the emulator this doesn’t work, but in your own Command Prompt you can use it, so don’t type the complete file and directory names, but use tab completion.

With the doskey command we can do even more.

3. Type:
doskey /h

This prints all the commands you typed during this session to the screen.

4. Save the command history to a text file using one of the commands previously learned.

In this way you can edit the command history file in e.g. notepad. If you remove all the wrong commands and you save the file with the .bat extension, you can execute all of the commands in batch.

5. Try this for a few of the commands you have learned so far.

You can close a command prompt either by clicking on the cross in the corner, typing exit and pressing enter, or choosing Close when right clicking the Command Prompt icon on the task bar.

I saw in the morning a command prompt window for just one second. After the command finished the window was closed.

I would like to see, what command was run before it closed. Is it possible?

I know, I can see prompt history, if I press F7 , but this only works until the command prompt window is closed.

I ran my virus killer applications (Malwarebytes and Windows Defender), but I did not get any result.

I think that was a virus or an undetected malware, that’s why so important to me what’s going on in the background. More so I am afraid because I downloaded an application from a untrusted source. But I don’t want to remove this application, I would like to explore what it does to my system.

3 Answers 3

Install ConEmu and do the following:

  1. Press Win + Alt + P
  2. Go to “Features”
  3. Enable “Log console output (*)”
  4. Clear the line below “Log console output (*)” and change it to “%userprofile%\ConEmuLogs”
  5. Press the button which is at the top right. It should close or ConEmu might give you an error (ignore it unless it is about the log file)
  6. Close the tab you opened in ConEmu if it didn’t close automatically.
  7. Press Win + R and enter “%userprofile%\ConEmuLogs”
  8. Press ENTER
  9. Find a file with the following format “ConEmu-YYYY-MM-DD-pNNNN.log”
  10. Open it w/ a text editor, like Notepad.
  11. This log file will contain all the commands run and their output.
  12. Please reply back to tell me if this worked for you and/or I misunderstood you. Have a nice day!

Running win 10 17763.1, this is the 2018 October per-release of redstone 5. Win-alt-P didn’t work, so I ran the desktop shortcut as admin, then went to + in console and then went to (setup tasks) Now I highlighted features and checked log console output. I have left the default location. %UserProfile%\Desktop\ConEmuLogs.

I have run commands in CMD and Powershell as admin, then went to search and pasted in the default location and have two logs. Nether log showed the commands I have run. Appears this will not help with background commands run. Wanted to add for anyone looking at this, Malwarebytes will help with Internet browser problems such as hijackers/scripts but it is worthless for a true Virus/Trojan/worm, same as windows defender. Microsoft purchased defender from Giant, after they injected it into windows it has become very poor. Basically it will catch people who try and use programs that activate windows, it’s junk. Install or run a internet software virus check using a real tool such as Avira, Bitdefender, Kaspersky, Norton. If you don’t download anything or open any attachments you probably won’t get a true virus, just browser problems such as a hijacker. Odiebugs.

Using the command line has many advantages if your a home user or System Administrator when it comes to quick execution or checking System information.

Many times you will find yourself using the same command multiple times.

Instead of constantly typing the same command over and over, Windows command history editor provides quick access to a list of recently executed commands.

There are several ways to recall a command from history either to execute the command again, edit it by adding addition arguments or changing to different directories. But first let’s set the buffer that will determine the number of commands that can be stored.

To do this, click on Start \ Run… and type cmd for Wndows XP.

Or for Windows Vista and Windows 7, click Start and type cmd in the search box, then click cmd.exe in the search list.

When command shell window opens, click once on the command shell logo in the top left corner of the window and select properties.

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

Once the properties window opens, in the Command History section, you can leave the setting at their default values on change it to make the Buffer Size bigger (you can leave the Numbers of Buffers at 4). Also check the Discard Old Duplicates. This will delete any duplicate commands in the history buffer. When finished click OK.

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

You may also want to check the Quick Edit Mode under Edit Options which will enable cut and paste at the command prompt.

After you have begun to use commands and you need to recall a command from history, one method is to press F7. This will open a window listing all the command, in order, you have used during the session.

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

To navigate and select a command, use the up / down arrow keys and press enter to select and immediately execute the command or use the left / right arrow keys to select a command which can be edited at the prompt. The Esc key closes the window without selecting a command.

If the history buffer has many commands, use the Pg Up / Pg Dn keys to jump ahead or back through the buffer.

Another method to recall from the history can be performed at the command prompt itself. Press either the up or down arrow keys, to scroll through the buffer or use Pg Up and move to the oldest command and Pg Dn moves to the newest command.

The F8 searches the buffer by first typing a few characters of the command and pressing F8. The most recent command to match the search will display. Repeatedly pressing F8 will continue the search for the next search match.

Using the F9 key will recall commands by their number. A popup window will appear allowing you to enter the number of the command previously executed.

You can also type the first letter of a command at the prompt, then use the right arrow key to continue to spell out the most recently used command. This is usefull if their were syntex errors that need to be edited.

Windows command prompt provides a powerful tool to manage your System. Knowing the tricks when using the shell makes Administration a lot easy and fun.

Know of any command prompt tricks? Tell us a trick or two and we’ll we’ll publish them with your name attached to them!

Windows stores the list of the commands we have executed from Run window. This ‘Run’ command history can be seen by clicking on the drop down list in Run window.

This history of Run commands is saved in registry key which is specific to each user of the computer. One can clear this command history by deleting all values under this registry key.

This registry key is

How to delete run history

So to delete command history we can simply run the below command from command prompt.

Note that after running the above command you would still be able to see history for the current login session. Once you logoff and login back you won’t be able to see the history.

The above tip is applicable to all Windows editions(XP, Vista, Server 2003, Server 2008 and Windows 7).

Are you guys talking about Windows 7? Deleting RunMRU does not delete the “suggested” list of commands. As far as the “2nd way”, “Properties” in Windows 7 brings “Taskbar and Start Menu Properties” that has three tabs; Taskbar and Start Menu have their own Customize buttons. Please verify your solutions before posting them.

The solution posted in this article works for Windows 7 too.. just pause few seconds after deleting the regkey and open ‘Run’.. I have just tried this on my windows 7 machine and it has worked fine…

I am not sure about the solution posted by D2 above..

Solution works on 32 and 64 bit windows 7… Thanks!

You just have to right click the start button then properties uncheck the boxes and thats it.

Frey, thanks for adding the comment.. Yes we can do the same from UI too..But in case if you want to clear the run history repeatedly then running this command from a script is a good idea..suppose if I want to clear the cache everytime I login, then running this reg command from login script is a simpler solution compared to the UI one..

It’s working on windows 7 thanks.

Thanks,
Dear,
it (reg delete HKEY_CURRENT_USER\Software\Microsoft\
Windows\CurrentVersion\Explorer\RunMRU /va /f)
Works on Win-7

Thanks It working very nice.

Another Solution
=============
open start button properties -> click on start menu tab -> uncheck ‘store and display recently opened programs in the start menu’.

It works but not totally bcoz its limited only 28 nos of entries get listed in there it doesn’t let us delete all the histories

Great hint thanks. Win 7

Helped me find what I needed! I just went to the reg key listed and emptied the string values for the items I didn’t want in the run line history!

Very nice to not have my valid commands buried under incorrect attempts!

None of this helps a windows 10 home premium user

Not used app and install

Seems tedious to find the registry key when you can close the command window and reopen it. I was hoping someone could provide a line command that clears the history.

reg delete HKEY_CURRENT_USER \ Software \ Microsoft \ Windows \ CurrentVersion \ Explorer \ RunMRU / va / f

That solution DID NOT WORK for me! I’m using Windows 10, and the pesky history STILL shows up in my run box. How do I get rid of it! I’m almost to the point of reformatting this disk and re-installing Windows to get rid of it! Is there an easier way?

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

In the beginning, all we had was the command line. Then as Windows matured, the need to access that throwback interface waned.

That doesn’t mean the Command Prompt is completely useless. In fact, recent versions of Windows have introduced new commands. And while Windows 10’s graphical interface is generally straightforward to use, several features are still faster to execute through that last tie to MS-DOS. The same goes for accessing a few pieces of useful information, too.

We’ve listed our top Command Prompt commands below, but don’t take this list as the complete lineup of useful commands. If you like to kick it old-school, there are still plenty worth your time. For most people, though, these six will add efficiency to your regular routine without requiring excessive time in a command line interface.

To open the Command Prompt, tap the Windows key, then enter cmd.

On its own, the echo command has little relevance for the overwhelming majority of Windows users. (The PCWorld staff included.) But we like using one specific application of it: echo off | clip .

Entering this string into the Command Prompt clears the last item on your Clipboard—helpful when you’ve copied sensitive information and are done with it. (This command won’t clear your full Clipboard history though, so you’ll have to use Windows 10’s Clipboard settings to do that. You can also turn off history while you’re in that menu.)

An alternative way to use this command is to open Windows 10’s Run command window (Win + R) and enter cmd /c “echo off | clip”. If you never use Run for anything else, it’ll remember this command whenever you next call it up, making it slightly faster than opening a fresh Command Prompt window each time.

powercfg

The powercfg command can be of use to both desktop PC and laptop owners, especially if you need to toggle the hibernation feature ( powercfg /hibernate ) or begin an investigation into what’s disturbing your computer from sleep ( powercfg /lastwake ).

But laptops benefit the most from the gem among powercfg’s operations: the battery report ( powercfg /batteryreport ). If you’ve felt like your battery life has taken a sudden dip, this information will share the battery level at certain points in time, along with the time it recently took to drain since last plugged in. By default, the report will save to your Windows 10 user folder under the name “battery-report.html”

ipconfig

On its own, ipconfig gives a brief readout of the active networking hardware’s local IP address—useful for identifying your PC when looking separately at your router’s list of connected devices.

But the real beauty of ipconfig is when Windows 10’s network troubleshooting isn’t fixing your connection woes and you need to manually release ( ipconfig /release ) and renew ( ipconfig /renew ) your IP address. You can also see full detailed information of all of your networking hardware, including the MAC address for when you need to add it to a whitelist, whether or not it’s connected ( ipconfig /all ).

tracert

Can’t connect to a website and want to tell whether it’s you or the site? (As much as we wish it knew everything, downdetector.com doesn’t always catch every outage.) Use tracert to both test the connection and see where in the journey the trouble is, if any exists ( tracert [website address or ip address] ).

The tracert command functions similarly to ping in that it sends out data packets to the site and waits for a response, but it also reports the details of the journey that the data takes. If a communication attempt times out, you’ll see where in the trip it happens, helping you to troubleshoot. For example, if you can’t even reach the first hop—your router—then you’ll want to start by looking at your connection to your home network.

Ping is better for answering the question “Is there a connection and how fast is it?”, while tracert answers both that and “Where does the connection fail?”. It’s more rare that we want only the information that ping reveals, hence tracert’s place on this list.

When parts of the Windows interface start acting up—say, disappearing taskbar icons—it may be time to lean on the System File Checker. Running sfc /scannow will check for corrupted files on your system and attempt to repair any files with problems.

To open a Command prompt as an administrator, hit the Windows key or click on Start button, then type cmd. Right-click on the result for the Command Prompt, then choose Run as administrator. As a a slightly faster alternative, you can also open a PowerShell window as an administrator (Win+X or right-clicking on the Start button). It’ll work the same as the Command Prompt.

chkdsk

You may already be familiar with chkdsk . After an unexpected shutdown, Windows will sometimes halt a reboot to run chkdsk, in order to check for bad sectors and repair errors on the disk. If you suspect that one of your drives may have issues, you can initiate this same scan manually as well.

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

Linux users who used to using the command line on a daily basis must get clumsy when switching to Windows. On Linux, you can effortlessly use the previous commands you typed by just pressing the up and down arrow keys on the keyboard thanks to the history feature. On Linux, the history feature applies not only for the current session but also for previous sessions. The different story goes on Windows.

The Command Prompt on Windows also offers the history feature. However, it doesn’t remember commands from the previous sessions. This means you won’t be able to reuse the commands you used on previous sessions as you can do on Linux.

Speaking of the command line, Windows users seem rarely enough to use the command line because on Windows everything is GUI-based. But, some tasks — like checking internet connection using PING — keep way easier using the command line.

In case you new to the command line, this post will cover the use of history feature on Command Prompt, a standard tool to execute the command line on Windows.

How to use the command history

You can use keyboard shortcuts to show the command history on Command Prompt. Following are the shortcuts you can use.

  • Up arrow – to view the previous commands you have typed within a session. Press the up arrow key repeatedly to walk through your command history.
  • Down arrow – the opposite to up arrow. To view the next command you have typed. Press the key repeatedly to walk through your command history.
  • Page up – to view the first command you used in a session.
  • Page down – the opposite to page up. To view the last command you used in a session.
  • Esc – to clean the command line.
  • F7 – display your command history in a pop-up. Use the up and down arrow keys on the keyboard to select a command and hit Enter to use it. Press Esc to close this pop-up.
  • F8 – You can use F8 to search for previous commands that match the text on the current command line. For instance, if you want to search for a command that begins with the “t” letter, you can type “t” on the command line and press F8 repeatedly to view recent commands begin with “t”.
  • F9 – You can use this shortcut to reuse the command based on its history number, which you can figure out using F7. For instance, on the F7 execution above, the 8th order belongs to PING. Simply press F9, followed by 8 and hit Enter to reuse the PING command.

If you want to print all of the commands you have used within a session, you can type following command.

The command above will display the list of the commands you used within a session. Much like F7, but not in a pop-up.

How to clear and save your command history

As we have mentioned earlier, the Command Prompt of Windows doesn’t record the commands you have typed on the current session for the next sessions. Everything will be lost once you close the session. So, you can simply close your current session to clear the command history.

If you want Command Prompt to forget everything you typed on the current session, you can set the history size to 0 with the doskey .

By setting the history size to 0, you won’t be able to use shortcuts like F7, arrow keys, F8, and other shortcuts mentioned above.

You can use cls to clean up Command Prompt.

If for a certain reason, you want to save your command history into a text file, you can use doskey . Following is the example.

At Linux BASH shell, we can type in history command to print a list of the commands that have been entered in the current shell. Combining with other commands (e.g. awk) with pipelines, we can do some statistics to show the most frequently typed commands, like the following two:

At windows command prompt, you can show a Graphical History window by pressing the F7 key.

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

As you can see, the commands that have been typed in in the current shell are listed, and you can navigate by using arrow keys (up, down) or the page up and page down. You can also press enter to repeat the command if you wish.

Alternatively, you can press F9 function key to enter the specific command you want to execute in the command history.

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

This is one of the nice awesome (but kinda forgotten) feature for Windows Command Line Prompt!

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Press F2, or use the control provided at the right end of the command line, to see the extended command history.

How do I find Command History?

  1. Open Start.
  2. Search for Command Prompt, and click the top result to open the console.
  3. Type the following command to view the command history and press Enter: doskey /history.

How do I change Command History in AutoCAD?

To Work With Command Window Appearance and History

  1. Click Application menu Options.
  2. In the Options dialog box, User Preferences tab, click the Right-click Customization button.
  3. In the Right-Click Customization dialog box, specify the right-click behavior you want to use.

Where is all commands in AutoCAD?

To find all locations from which a command can be accessed

  1. Right-click on any ribbon tab.
  2. On the shortcut menu, choose Show Tabs or Show Panels, and click the hidden tab or panel that you want to display.

Does CMD have a history?

The Windows Command Prompt has a built-in history feature, allowing you to quickly view commands you’ve run in the current session.

How do I find previous commands in Terminal?

Ctrl+R to search and other terminal history tricks.

Can you see the history in AutoCAD?

When clicking “Open” button in Quick Menu of AutoCAD ® the dialog box Select File will be opened. To see the history list click “History” on the left frame of this dialog box.

What is a log file in AutoCAD?

Writes the contents of the command history to a file. … log) that may need periodic deletion as the number of log files continues to grow. You can also control the log file with the OPTIONS command. Use the Maintain a Log File option on the Open and Save tab in the Options dialog box to turn the log file off and on.

How do I hide command history in AutoCAD?

Click the Customize button to the left of the prompt area, and select Transparency. In the Transparency dialog box, move the sliders to change transparency of the command window.

How do you check Windows history?

Press the Windows key on your keyboard – the Windows symbol is found in the bottom-left corner of most keyboards, between the CTRL and ALT keys. This will bring up a window that shows all of the files that have been recently edited on your computer.

How do I clear my command prompt history?

There is a simple keyboard shortcut for doing so while the command prompt is still open, Alt+F7. Alternatively, the command history is cleared every time you exit and restart the command prompt.

How to use your command history in the windows command prompt

If you’ve ever done any sort of coding, you’re familiar with the Command Prompt. The Command Prompt is an app installed on all Windows computers that lets you manage the computer using text commands.

But unlike other apps, the Command Prompt isn’t always easy to find. Here’s how to open Command Prompt on your PC, no matter which version of Windows 10 you have.

How to open Command Prompt in Windows 10

There are three main ways to access Command Prompt. Using the Power User Menu shortcut is the fastest method for most people.

Power User Menu

The quickest way to open a Command Prompt window is through the Power User Menu, which you can access by right-clicking the Windows icon in the bottom-left corner of your screen, or with the keyboard shortcut Windows Key + X.

It’ll appear in the menu twice: Command Prompt and Command Prompt (Admin). The second option will open an “elevated” Command Prompt, which gives you administrator privileges, which are required for some commands. In nearly all cases, it’s better to use the elevated Command Prompt — it can do everything that the normal Command Prompt can and more.

Note: In newer versions of Windows, Command Prompt has been replaced with Windows PowerShell. If you still want access to Command Prompt, check out our step-by-step instructions below.

Windows Search

If you right-click Command Prompt and select Run as administrator or click it in the results, you’ll open an elevated Command Prompt.

Quick tip: The Command Prompt is sometimes referred to as “cmd prompt,” or simply “cmd.” When searching for Command Prompt, you can also just search for “cmd.”

Start Menu

You can also open Command Prompt by navigating through the Start menu.

To open Command Prompt through the Start menu, click the Windows icon and then scroll down to find the Windows System folder. Open the folder and click or right-click Command Prompt to open it.

How to switch from PowerShell to Command Prompt

Windows PowerShell is a newer program that’s similar to Command Prompt. And in some versions of Windows 10, it replaces Command Prompt in the menus you’d usually use to open it.

There’s nothing wrong with PowerShell — it can do pretty much anything that the Command Prompt can do — but if you’re used to using Command Prompt, it’s easy to switch back.

1. Press the Windows Key + I to open the Settings app, and then select Personalization.

2. Click the Taskbar option in the left sidebar.

3. On the page that appears, head down to the Replace Command Prompt with Windows PowerShell option and click its slider so it turns Off.