How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

Windows 10 can run Ubuntu and other popular Linux distributions natively using the Bash shell for those of you who don’t know. If you want, however, you can use other shells like Zsh as well.

Think of it as Wine but for Windows. While Wine allows you to run Windows programs on Linux, Windows also allows you to run Linux subsystems. It’s not the whole package, but you can still do a lot.

In this article, we’re talking about how you can install and use the Zsh shell on Windows 10.

Before we get started with the Zsh shell, we need to install Bash and get a Linux subsystem up and running. The process for this is actually quite simple, but it’s divided into two main steps.

  • Enabling the Windows Subsystem for Linux.
  • Download the Linux distro of your choice from the Microsoft Store.

Enabling the Windows Subsystem for Linux

You can enable this feature just like you would any other optional Windows feature from the Control Panel. Here’s how.

Step 1: Press the Windows key and search for Control Panel.

Step 2: Click on Programs.

Step 3: Click on Turn Windows Features On Or Off.

Step 4: Find the Windows Subsystem for Linux in the list and click the checkbox.

Step 5: Wait for Windows to finish the installation. Once done, you’ll be prompted for a restart. Click on the Restart now button to proceed.

Downloading a Linux distro from the Microsoft Store

Once you’ve enabled the Linux subsystem, all you need to do is download the distro of your choice from Microsoft Store, and you’re good to go. Many major distributions, including Ubuntu, Debian, Kali, openSUSE Leap, and openSUSE Enterprise, are available on the store.

If you’re not sure which distro you should pick, we recommend starting with Ubuntu.

Step 1: Head over to the Microsoft Store and search for your distro of choice. Click on the distro you want to proceed with.

Step 2; Click on the Get button to download the distro.

Wait for the download to finish. You can now launch the distro just like any other app downloaded from the store. You’ll be prompted for login credentials on the first launch. Note that these don’t have to be the same as your Windows credentials.

From here on, the steps are pretty much the same as they’d be on Linux. You can download Zsh using the apt-get command. Launch your distro and type in the following command.

If you’re using another Linux distro, use the distro’s software installation command followed by the shell’s name. It doesn’t have to be Zsh.

Wait for the download to finish. You can now launch the Zsh shell using the zsh command. The first time you launch Zsh, you’ll be prompted to go through the first-time setup. Just press 2 to create a configuration profile with the recommended default settings.

You don’t always have to first open your distro and then Zsh. You can launch the shell directly from the Command Prompt as well. Just type in any of the following commands into the prompt, and you’re good to go.

You can also have Bash launch Zsh automatically every time you open your distro. The process involves making some simple changes to the bashrc file.

Step 1; Launch your distro and type in the following command to open the bashrc file with the Nano text editor.

Note that you can use any editor you want, we’re using Nano for simplicity.

Step 2: Add the following lines to the file.

You could get away with just writing exec zsh, but the other lines ensure that Zsh is only launched when you open a Bash window to avoid conflicts with any other software or Linux distros you might have.

If you want to execute a different shell, simply type in the shell’s name instead of zsh in the exec zsh line.

Step 3: When you’re done making changes, press Ctrl + X to exit the file followed by Y to save the modified buffer.

Should you want to reverse these changes, just remove the lines added in step 2.

Bash Shell is integrated into Windows 10 Anniversary Update version is just a compatible class to run Linux software on Windows operating system. You can use the Bash shell to run Zsh or any shell you want.

Bash Shell is integrated into Windows 10 Anniversary Update version is just a compatible class to run Linux software on Windows operating system. You can use the Bash shell to run Zsh or any shell you want.

Since Insider Build 14342, Zsh shell has been running on Windows 10. You can set Bash to automatically execute Zsh every time Bash starts.

Zsh is a shell program designed to interact, and Zsh is also a powerful scripting language. Zsh integrates many useful features of both bash, ksh and tcsh, and offers many other features.

How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

1. Install Bash

Before installing the Shell of your choice, the first thing you need to do is activate Windows subsystem for Linux and install Bash.

This process will install the Ubuntu user space environment on Windows, including the Bash shell.

How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

2. How to install Zsh (or other shell)?

After installing Bash, you just need to install the Shell you want to use in Bash. To do this, use apt-get, just like when you install any package on Ubuntu Linix.

To install Zsh, open the Bash shell and run the command:

Press “y” when asked and press Enter to continue. Apt-get will automatically download and install Zsh from repositories of Ubuntu.

How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

If you want to use another Shell, just specify the Shell name instead of writing Zsh. For example, if you want to install Fish shell, run the following command:

3. How to open Zsh (or other Shell)?

To open Zsh or other shells after installation is complete, simply enter the shell name in the Bash command prompt (Bash prompt) and press Enter. For example, to start using Zsh from Bash, you just need to enter:

You will be prompted to set up the first Zsh process and create a configuration profile the first time you open Zsh. Enter “2” to create a configuration profile containing default settings.

How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

To remove the zsh shell and return to Bash, run the following command:

4. How does Bash automatically run Zsh?

Because of the way Microsoft executes this feature, you cannot open Zsh directly and bypass Bash. To run any Linux software, you must open the Bash window and run the software there. However, you can set Bash to automatically convert to Zsh whenever you open.

To do this you have to edit the .bashrc file. Bash will run the command in this file every time it starts. To open the .bashrc file in nano, run the following command:

How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

Add the following lines to the file. You can only add “exec zsh”, but the following commands will ensure Bash only opens Zsh when you open the Bash window. This is to avoid causing problems with other software:

If you want to execute another shell, you only need to replace “zsh” with that shell command.

How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

Once done, press Ctrl + O and press Enter to save the changes. Press Ctrl + X to exit nano.

From now on whenever you open the Bash application on Windows, it will automatically open Zsh shell.

If you want to change to the original state, follow the same steps, edit the .bashrc file again and delete the parts you added.

How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

The era of .NET developers being constrained on using only Windows as a platform is gone. (At least for ASP.NET). That might be very cool to some, but also scary for others. Fear of change is true. Nevertheless, it’s definitely time (if not yet) to get out of the comfort zone and get your feet wet. Being able to work with .NET on Linux/Mac is one of the points that makes me agree 100% with Nick Craver that .NET Core is the future.

After reading Scott Hanselman’s blog post last week, I decided to setup WSL on my laptop. If you don’t know what Windows Subsystem for Linux is (WSL from now on in this post), I recommend reading this before.

The TL;DR of that link is:

WSL lets developers run Linux environments – including most command-line tools, utilities, and applications – directly on Windows, unmodified, without the overhead of a virtual machine.

While setting it up on my machine was very easy, I didn’t want to stay with the boring Windows bash shell. Guys at work use Mac’s with oh-my-zsh and boy that made me pretty jealous. It was not that straightforward to make it all work though. So hopefully, this post will help me and others in the future. Here’s what we are going to do:

  • Enable WSL on Windows 10
  • Install zsh + oh-my-zsh
  • Configure zsh and oh-my-zsh
  • Change Themes and colors
  • Adding Bash on Ubuntu task in ConEmu*

Enable WSL on Windows 10#

This is pretty straightforward to set up, Just follow the instructions here to get Ubuntu running. After you are in, update the packages, by running: sudo apt-get update . When all is working, you can continue to the next step.

Installing zsh#

Open the Ubuntu app installed from the App Store. We will now install zsh:

After installing it, type zsh . zsh will ask you to choose some configuration. We will do this later on while installing oh-my-zsh , so choose option 0 to create the config file and prevent this message to show again.

Installing oh-my-zsh#

Before all we need to have git installed:

Then, use curl to install oh-my-zsh:

This will clone the repo and replace the existing

/.zshrc with a template from oh-my-zsh .

How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10Installing oh-my-zsh

Configuring zsh/oh-my-zsh#

First, we need to make sure zsh is executed by default for Bash on Ubuntu. This is not mandatory, but if not done you need to type zsh every time. For this, edit the .bashrc file with nano: nano

/.bashrc and paste this right after the first comments:

Save it Ctrl + shift X and restart your Ubuntu shell. You should be on zsh by default now.

Changing the Theme of oh-my-zsh#

oh-my-zsh has several nice Themes. It’s worth checking them out. For this tutorial, I’m going to use the awesome agnoster.

/.zshrc again with nano: nano

Save it and restart your Ubuntu shell again.

How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10Broken theme

Now was the tricky part while I was doing this on my laptop. After installing the theme, I got a totally broken shell (as shown in the image), with weird fonts and missing icons. That was expected due to missing Powerline Fonts, but even after installing them on Ubuntu the Theme was still broken. I tried several things and couldn’t make it work. Since we will run it with ConEmu, I didn’t want to spend more time on it. The Ubuntu shell is very limited anyway so.. not a big deal.

Installing missing Powerline Fonts#

We need to install the Powerline fonts in our Windows to make the agnoster theme work. Follow these steps:

  1. Clone the powerline repository on Windows
  1. Open an admin PowerShell, navigate to the root of the repo and run this:

This will install all the fonts on your Windows. You might get an error from PowerShell blocking you from running the script. Check this out if it happens with you. Make sure to reverse the policy after.

Changing directory colors#

The directory colors for zsh is awful. If you followed along, by now you should have an ugly yellow or dark blue background on folders when ls/ll . Luckily, we can change that by installing a Solarized Color Theme from here. Follow these steps:

  1. Pick a theme from the GitHub repo (I’m using dircolors.ansi-dark since I use a dark shell).
  2. Download the file making sure to put it in the user’s home:
  1. Edit your

We have nice colors now 🙂 How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10Adding directory colors

Setting Bash on Ubuntu task in ConEmu#

Open ConEmu, and go to Settings . Navigate on the left-menu: Startup > Tasks . There, click at the + button at the bottom.

  1. Add a name for the task. Anything will suffice. I used bash::ubuntu to group Ubuntu into the bash tasks.
  2. On Task parameters choose an icon for the task. I picked the Ubuntu icon app that is buried under some very long path. but any .ico will work. You can leave it blank if you don’t care.
  3. For the command use this %windir%\system32\bash.exe

Open the new task on ConEmu and… Voalá! How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10View of the terminal configured

Nice command look, lots of git shortcuts and much more productivity. Couldn’t enjoy this more.

Additional links#

Here are a few other things you might want to look:

    : Lots of commands to improve your productivity : How to change ConEmu color scheme (If you liked mine, I’m using Solarized (Luke Maciak) with Meslo LG M DZ for Powerline console font)
  • Understand why you’re not supposed to touch Linux files using Windows apps: https://blogs.msdn.microsoft.com/commandline/2016/11/17/do-not-change-linux-files-using-windows-apps-and-tools/

Would be cool to see what other things you use on your setup. Just let me know in the comments!

This tutorial provides some resources and direction to help you customize your command prompt for PowerShell or Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) using Oh My Posh. Oh My Posh provides theme capabilities for a fully customized command prompt experience providing Git status color-coding and prompts.

In this tutorial, you learn how to:

How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

Install a Nerd Font

Customized command prompts often use glyphs (a graphic symbol) in order to style the prompt. If your font does not include the appropriate glyphs, you may see several Unicode replacement characters ‘▯’ throughout your prompt. In order to see all of the glyphs in your terminal, we recommend installing a Nerd Font.

If you’d like a font that looks like Cascadia Code, the Caskaydia Cove Nerd Font was built from the Cascadia Code repository by a community member.)

After downloading, you will need to unzip and install the font on your system. (How to add a new font to Windows).

To set a Nerd Font for use with Oh My Posh and Terminal Icons, open the Windows Terminal settings UI by selecting Settings (Ctrl+,) from your Windows Terminal dropdown menu. Select the profile where you wish to apply the font, PowerShell for example, and then the Appearance tab. In the Font face drop-down menu, select CaskaydiaCove Nerd Font or whichever Nerd font you would like to use with your customized prompt.

If you want to use a terminal font that does not support glyph icons, such as Cascadia Code PL, you may consider using an Oh My Posh theme that contains the minimal function, indicating that additional icons aren’t required.

Customize your PowerShell prompt with Oh My Posh

Oh My Posh enables you to use a full color set to define and render your terminal prompt, including the ability to use built-in themes or create your own custom theme.

If you want to use the same custom prompt themes across both PowerShell and WSL, we recommend installing Oh My Posh using winget, the official Windows Package Manager. It’s included with Windows 11, but you may need to install it if you’re running Windows 10. Then follow the winget install instructions in the Oh My Posh docs.

Install Oh My Posh for PowerShell

To customize your PowerShell prompt, you can install Oh My Posh using the PowerShell install-module. Enter the command:

This will install:

  • oh-my-posh.exe : The Windows executable
  • themes : The latest Oh My Posh themes

You may also want to enter this command to ensure you have the latest updates: Update-Module oh-my-posh .

If you are more familiar with the Scoop installer or Chocolatey package manager, these can also be used for installing on Windows, just follow the instructions in the Oh My Posh docs.

Choose and apply a PowerShell prompt theme

You may browse the full list of themes on the Oh My Posh themes page.

Choose a theme and update your PowerShell profile with this command. (You can replace notepad with the text editor of your choice.)

Add the following to the end of your PowerShell profile file to set the paradox theme. (Replace paradox with the theme of your choice.)

Now, each new PowerShell instance will start by importing Oh My Posh and setting your command line theme.

This is not your Windows Terminal profile. Your PowerShell profile is a script that runs every time PowerShell starts. Learn more about PowerShell profiles.

Customize your WSL prompt with Oh My Posh

Oh My Posh now allows you to customize WSL prompts, just like you would a PowerShell prompt using built-in themes.

Install Oh My Posh for WSL

We recommend installing Oh My Posh for WSL, whether using Bash, Zsh, or something else, by following the Linux install guide in the Oh My Posh docs.

Currently the recommended path for customizing WSL prompts with Oh My Posh uses the Homebrew package manager for installation. (Homebrew works with WSL now!) When installing Homebrew for Linux, be sure to follow Next steps instructions to add Homebrew to your PATH and to your bash shell profile script.

Homebrew will install:

  • oh-my-posh – Executable, added to /usr/local/bin
  • themes – The latest Oh My Posh themes

Choose and apply a WSL prompt theme

The Oh My Posh themes will be found in the oh-my-posh directory as JSON files. You can find it by entering cd $(brew –prefix oh-my-posh) , then just cd themes and ls for the list. For Ubuntu-20.04 running via WSL, the path is likely to be something like: \\wsl.localhost\Ubuntu-20.04\home\linuxbrew\.linuxbrew\Cellar\oh-my-posh\6.34.1\themes . You can also view what the themes look like in the Oh My Posh docs: Themes.

To use a theme, copy it from the themes folder to your $Home folder, then add this line to the bottom of the .profile file found in your $Home folder:

You can replace jandedobbeleer.omp.json with the name of whichever theme you prefer to use as long as it’s copied to your $Home folder.

Alternatively, if you are using oh-my-posh in both Windows with PowerShell and with WSL, you can share your PowerShell theme with WSL by pointing to a theme in your Windows user’s home folder. In your WSL distribution’s .profile path, replace

with the path: /mnt/c/Users/ . Replacing with your own Windows username. You may also need to add $env:POSH_PATH to your $PATH if you have only installed the Oh My Posh executable for PowerShell.

Use Terminal-Icons to add missing folder or file icons

Terminal-Icons is a PowerShell module that adds file and folder icons that may be missing when displaying files or folders in Windows Terminal, looking up their appropriate icon based on name or extension. It attempts to use icons for well-known files/folders, but falls back to a generic file or folder icon if one is not found.

To install Terminal-Icons with PowerShell, use the command:

For more information, including usage and commands, see the Terminal-Icons repo on GitHub.

GoLand includes an embedded terminal emulator for working with your command-line shell from inside the IDE. Use it to run Git commands, set file permissions, and perform other command-line tasks without switching to a dedicated terminal application.

Initially, the terminal emulator runs with your default system shell, but it supports many other shells, such as Windows PowerShell, Command Prompt cmd.exe , sh , bash , zsh , csh , and so on. For information about changing the shell, see Configure the terminal emulator.

If you use GoLand on Windows 10 version 1903 or later, ConPTY API will be used as an interface for the Terminal backend. For earlier Windows versions, winpty is used.

Open the Terminal tool window

From the main menu, select View | Tool Windows | Terminal or press Alt+F12 .

By default, the terminal emulator runs with the current directory set to the root directory of the current project. For information about changing the default start directory, see Configure the terminal emulator.

Alternatively, you can right-click any file (for example, in the Project tool window or any open tab) and select Open in Terminal from the context menu to open the Terminal tool window with a new session in the directory of that file.

Start a new session

Click on the toolbar to start a new session in a separate tab.

To run multiple sessions inside a tab, right-click the tab and select Split Right or Split Down in the context menu.

The Terminal saves tabs and sessions when you close the project or GoLand. It preserves tab names, the current working directory, and even the shell history.

To close a tab, click on the Terminal toolbar or right-click the tab and select Close Tab from the context menu.

Press Alt+Right and Alt+Left to switch between active tabs. Alternatively, you can press Alt+Down to see the list of all terminal tabs.

To rename a tab, right-click the tab and select Rename Session from the context menu.

To search for a certain string in a Terminal session, press Ctrl+F . This searches all text in the session: the prompt, commands, and output.

Configure the terminal emulator

Press Ctrl+Alt+S to open the IDE settings and select Tools | Terminal .

Project Settings

These settings affect the terminal only for the current project:

Specify the working directory where every new shell session should start. By default, it starts in the root directory of the current project.

Specify custom environment variables for every new shell session.

Application Settings

These settings affect the terminal in any project that you open with the current GoLand instance.

Specify the shell that will run by default. GoLand should automatically detect the default shell based on your environment. Here are some examples of different shells:

Bash for Windows: bash.exe

Command Prompt: cmd.exe

Cygwin: “C:\cygwin\bin\bash.exe” –login -i

Default Tab name

Specify the default name for new tabs.

Play the bell sound on various events.

Close session when it ends

Close the current session when the corresponding process ends (for example, by kill ).

Enable the mouse pointer support in the embedded local terminal.

Copy to clipboard on selection

Copy text selected in the terminal to the clipboard.

Paste on middle mouse button click

Paste clipboard contents by clicking the middle mouse button.

Override IDE shortcuts

Use shell-specific shortcuts instead of IDE shortcuts when the Terminal tool window is active.

Click Configure terminal keybindings to open the Keymap settings page and configure the shortcuts that are available int the Terminal tool window under Plugins | Terminal . For example, Switch Focus to Editor is mapped to Escape by default, which means that if you don’t override the IDE shortcuts, Escape will switch focus from the terminal to the editor.

Integrate the terminal with the system shell to properly keep track of your command history for sessions and load a custom config file with required environment variables.

Shell integration works for sh , bash , zsh , and fish shells.

Highlight HTTP links in the terminal and make them clickable.

Use Option as Meta key

On macOS, use the Option key as the Meta key.

Run Commands using IDE

Detect and highlight commands that can be used as IDE features instead of running them in the terminal and reading console output.

When enabled, instead of pressing Enter , which runs the command in the terminal, press Ctrl+Enter to open the corresponding GUI element.

Select the shape of the cursor: block, underline, or vertical.

The embedded terminal emulator also inherits the following IDE settings:

On the Keymap page, you can configure the copy Ctrl+C and paste Ctrl+V shortcuts.

On the Editor | General | Appearance page, you can configure blinking frequency for the caret. The Terminal does not inherit the Use block caret option because there is a separate option for that: Cursor shape.

On the Editor | Color Scheme | Console Font page, you can configure line spacing and fonts.

On the Editor | Color Scheme | Console Colors page, you can configure font colors.

On the Editor | Color Scheme | General page, you can configure the selection foreground and background colors.

IntelliJ IDEA includes an embedded terminal emulator for working with your command-line shell from inside the IDE. Use it to run Java tools, Git commands, set file permissions, and perform other command-line tasks without switching to a dedicated terminal application.

Initially, the terminal emulator runs with your default system shell, but it supports many other shells, such as Windows PowerShell, Command Prompt cmd.exe , sh , bash , zsh , csh , and so on. For information about changing the shell, see Configure the terminal emulator.

If you use IntelliJ IDEA on Windows 10 version 1903 or later, ConPTY API will be used as an interface for the Terminal backend. For earlier Windows versions, winpty is used.

Open the Terminal tool window

From the main menu, select View | Tool Windows | Terminal or press Alt+F12 .

By default, the terminal emulator runs with the current directory set to the root directory of the current project. For information about changing the default start directory, see Configure the terminal emulator.

Alternatively, you can right-click any file (for example, in the Project tool window or any open tab) and select Open in Terminal from the context menu to open the Terminal tool window with a new session in the directory of that file.

Start a new session

Click on the toolbar to start a new session in a separate tab.

To run multiple sessions inside a tab, right-click the tab and select Split Right or Split Down in the context menu.

The Terminal saves tabs and sessions when you close the project or IntelliJ IDEA. It preserves tab names, the current working directory, and even the shell history.

To close a tab, click on the Terminal toolbar or right-click the tab and select Close Tab from the context menu.

Press Alt+Right and Alt+Left to switch between active tabs. Alternatively, you can press Alt+Down to see the list of all terminal tabs.

To rename a tab, right-click the tab and select Rename Session from the context menu.

To search for a certain string in a Terminal session, press Ctrl+F . This searches all text in the session: the prompt, commands, and output.

Configure the terminal emulator

Press Ctrl+Alt+S to open the IDE settings and select Tools | Terminal .

Project Settings

These settings affect the terminal only for the current project:

Specify the working directory where every new shell session should start. By default, it starts in the root directory of the current project.

Specify custom environment variables for every new shell session.

Application Settings

These settings affect the terminal in any project that you open with the current IntelliJ IDEA instance.

Specify the shell that will run by default. IntelliJ IDEA should automatically detect the default shell based on your environment. Here are some examples of different shells:

Bash for Windows: bash.exe

Command Prompt: cmd.exe

Cygwin: “C:\cygwin\bin\bash.exe” –login -i

Default Tab name

Specify the default name for new tabs.

Play the bell sound on various events.

Close session when it ends

Close the current session when the corresponding process ends (for example, by kill ).

Enable the mouse pointer support in the embedded local terminal.

Copy to clipboard on selection

Copy text selected in the terminal to the clipboard.

Paste on middle mouse button click

Paste clipboard contents by clicking the middle mouse button.

Override IDE shortcuts

Use shell-specific shortcuts instead of IDE shortcuts when the Terminal tool window is active.

Click Configure terminal keybindings to open the Keymap settings page and configure the shortcuts that are available int the Terminal tool window under Plugins | Terminal . For example, Switch Focus to Editor is mapped to Escape by default, which means that if you don’t override the IDE shortcuts, Escape will switch focus from the terminal to the editor.

Integrate the terminal with the system shell to properly keep track of your command history for sessions and load a custom config file with required environment variables.

Shell integration works for sh , bash , zsh , and fish shells.

Highlight HTTP links in the terminal and make them clickable.

Use Option as Meta key

On macOS, use the Option key as the Meta key.

Run Commands using IDE

Detect and highlight commands that can be used as IDE features instead of running them in the terminal and reading console output.

When enabled, instead of pressing Enter , which runs the command in the terminal, press Ctrl+Enter to open the corresponding GUI element. For more information, see Run IDE features from the terminal.

Select the shape of the cursor: block, underline, or vertical.

For the Python interpreter being a virtual environment, with this checkbox selected, the virtual environment is automatically activated ( activate is performed automatically).

This option is available only if you have the Python plugin installed.

The embedded terminal emulator also inherits the following IDE settings:

On the Keymap page, you can configure the copy Ctrl+C and paste Ctrl+V shortcuts.

On the Editor | General | Appearance page, you can configure blinking frequency for the caret. The Terminal does not inherit the Use block caret option because there is a separate option for that: Cursor shape.

On the Editor | Color Scheme | Console Font page, you can configure line spacing and fonts.

On the Editor | Color Scheme | Console Colors page, you can configure font colors.

On the Editor | Color Scheme | General page, you can configure the selection foreground and background colors.

Run IDE features from the terminal

Instead of running a specific command in the integrated terminal and reading console output, you can use the relevant IDE feature, like a tool window or a dialog that implements this functionality. For example, the diff viewer actually runs the diff command in the system shell to produce results. Another example is the Log tab in the Git tool window, which is based on the output of the git log command.

Open the Log tab of the Git tool window from the terminal

Type a supported command in the terminal and notice how it is highlighted.

Instead of pressing Enter , which runs the command in the terminal, press Ctrl+Enter to open the corresponding GUI element. In this example, it will open the Log tab of the Git tool window and filter commits by authors with “dmitry” in their usernames.

This feature also works with most of the commands recognized by Run Anything (press Ctrl twice), such as mvn , gradle , rake , rails , and so on, depending on what plugins you have installed. To run a highlighted command in debug mode (use the Debug tool window instead of Run ) press Ctrl+Shift+Enter .

If you want to disable this feature, click on the title bar of the Terminal window and clear the Run Commands using IDE option.

The Windows Vs Mac war has been raging on for decades. I’m happy to admit I like both. Yes, I can hear you silently judging me. I just don’t care. If you ever hear a mac fan evangelize why the MAC is better suited for coding, you will quickly hear how bash and the Linux terminal kicks the Windows command line ass. It’s all true it does. The command line sucks when comparing it to bash. Thankfully, Microsoft has been working on something sneaky. You can now run a Linux kernel directly on windows

In this tutorial, you will learn how to run Linux natively on Windows using WSL2. The really cool thing about WSL2 is that it will allow you to run bash natively on Windows, meaning WSL2 gives us new super-powers. We can finally ditch the built-in Windows command line and instead use something a little more productive. We can now install ZSH and Oh My Zsh on Windows!

For those of you new to Z/Zsh you are in for a treat! Zsh is a new and improved shell that is based on bash. With the Zsh shell, you can install Oh My Zsh. Oh My Zsh can be used to customize your shell with themes and plug-ins. You no longer need to make do with having a dull and boring terminal! Oh My Zsh has some tricks up its sleeves that will make you more efficient. Sounds good right?

This whole process should take you around 30 minutes in total. The first step is to install WSL and Ubuntu. Next, we will install Zsh and Oh My Zsh. Finally, we will pimp up the terminal, installing some cool themes and plug-ins using Oh My Zsh. With Zsh and its plug-ins installed you become a Windows terminal productivity ninja. So buckle up. it’s going to be one hell of a ride

Installing WSL

The steps to install WSL2 are well documented on the Microsoft site and can be found here. An overview of the important things (some of which are not covered in the MS tutorial) is shown below:

  • Have docker desktop for Windows installed
  • Have SVN enabled in your BIOS settings. On my laptop is was disabled and stopped WSL2 from installing!
  • Within ‘turn windows feature on and off’ ensure:
    • Windows Hyper-vision Platform is enabled
    • Windows Subsystem for Linux is enabled

    After you have WSL2 installed, you can install a Linux distribution, like Ubuntu. This is how we can run bash on Windows. To install Ubuntu. open up the Windows Store and search for:

    • Ubuntu

    If you are at work and the MS stories blocked then you can manually download Ubuntu from this page.

    While you are in the Windows store you will also want to install:

    • Windows Terminal

    If the store is blocked on your PC, you can manually download it here. If everything goes to plan then you should be able to open the new Windows Terminal program and you should have an option to open a bash Ubuntu shell!

    Installing And Configuring Z and Oh My Zsh

    You can install both Z and Oh My Zsh from your new bash shell. Type in these two commands (remember to run the terminal as an admin 😊):

    After both of these great tools have been installed we can customize things! Oh My Zsh can be configured via its settings file, called .zshrc :

    First, we will change the theme from the default which will be set to ‘robbyrussle’. From within .zshrc , find the line that says Theme=robbyrussell . Update this to use a different theme. A full list of all the themes can be found here. Two themes that I like and recommend are agnoster and powerlevel9k. The configure to change .zshrc to use the powerlevel9k theme is shown below, simples!

    Next, let us install some plug-ins. Within .zshrc find this line:

    To install a new plug-in simply add a reference to it from within this list. For example, to install zsh-syntax-highlighting , clone this repository from the command line like this:

    Add a reference to zsh-syntax-highlighting within your plug-in options like this:

    Another plug-in that I recommend is called Z. Z ships with Oh My ZSH, however, it is not enabled by default. To enable it, simply add a reference to it within your plugin’s options:

    For reference, the plug-ins that I use are git , node , npm , bower , brew , extract , z , zsh-syntax-highlighting . Hopefully, by now you get the gist of how to install themes and plug-ins for Oh My Zsh. A full list of all the plug-ins can be found here. You are now a shell Ninja! You know how to install Ubuntu, install Z, OH MY ZSH, as well as trick it out. Happy Coding!

    The Z shell (zsh) is a Unix shell [. ]. Zsh can be thought of as an extended Bourne shell with a large number of improvements, including some features of bash, ksh, and tcsh.

    Choose one of the following options.

    Some Linux systems come preloaded with zsh. You can check if it exists as well as its version by writing zsh –version in a terminal window. In case this zsh version is ok for you, you’re done now!

    Determine on which Linux distribution your system is based on. See List of Linux distributions – Wikipedia for a list. Most Linux systems – including Ubuntu – are Debian-based.

    Debian-based linux systems

    Open a terminal window. Copy & paste the following into the terminal window and hit Return . You may be prompted to enter your password.

    You can use zsh now.

    Red Hat-based linux systems

    Open a terminal. Copy & paste the following into the terminal window and hit Return . You may be prompted to enter your password.

    Suse-based linux systems

    Open a terminal. Copy & paste the following into the terminal window and hit Return . You may be prompted to enter your password.

    You can use zsh now.

    OS X comes preloaded with zsh. You can check its version by writing zsh –version in a terminal window. In case this zsh version is ok for you, you’re done now!

    If you want the latest and greatest, use Homebrew: Proceed with the following steps to install a recent version.

    Homebrew [. ] simplifies the installation of software on the Mac OS X operating system.

    Copy & paste the following into the terminal window and hit Return .

    You will be requested to install the Command Line Developer Tools from Apple. Confirm by clicking Install. After the installation finished, continue installing Homebrew by hitting Return again.

    Step 2 – Install zsh

    Copy & paste the following into the terminal window and hit Return .

    You can use zsh now.

    Optional step 3 – default shell

    To set zsh as your default shell, execute the following.

    neo commented Nov 16, 2016

    Windows 10 now has bash which makes the it easier.

    elliott-beach commented Jan 26, 2017 •

    Tried the OSX install script and got an error:
    ruby -e “$(curl -fsSL https://raw.zshhubusercontent.com/Homebrew/install/master/install)”

    curl: (6) Could not resolve host: raw.zshhubusercontent.com

    yuseferi commented Jan 28, 2017

    And also for me

    Tried the OSX install script and got an error:
    ruby -e “$(curl -fsSL https://raw.zshhubusercontent.com/Homebrew/install/master/install)”

    curl: (6) Could not resolve host: raw.zshhubusercontent.com

    yuseferi commented Jan 28, 2017

    @e-beach

    brew install zsh
    then
    sudo -s ‘echo /usr/local/bin/zsh >> /etc/shells’ && chsh -s /usr/local/bin/zsh

    Worked for me
    Now I have zsh 🙂

    vjyanand commented Jan 29, 2017

    use /usr/bin/ruby -e “$(curl -fsSL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Homebrew/install/master/install)” instead.

    ilhamdoanggg commented Apr 29, 2017

    i was installed a git bash on windows and can i change git bash with zsh themes?

    rueTH commented May 15, 2017

    @e-beach @zhilevan
    I encountered that very same issue! For me, it was quickly resolved, though:
    Prior to pasting the above into the terminal, I had used:
    /usr/bin/ruby -e “$(curl -fsSL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Homebrew/install/master/install)”
    — meaning I had installed Homebrew according to the instructions on their actual site. It appears that version and the version instructed above are just two different roads leading to the same destination. As was the case for me, there’s a chance you may already have a version of Homebrew installed.
    I have only been diving into the dev game since the start of the year (and until today was only familiar setting things up on PC/Linux), so rather than potentially leading you astray, I suggest you check out https://brew.sh/ for guidance on all things Homebrew.

    Or, if you are the reckless or impatient sort, you can do what I did and press on by entering brew doctor into the terminal. If you have Homebrew already, it should be immediately evident. Boom.

    **ATTN: I am no seasoned vet, and I hope those more knowledgable will correct any misinformation I have supplied & elaborate on the rest!

    To set a custom shell, you first turn on the Shell Launcher feature, and then you can set your custom shell as the default using PowerShell or MDM. Go to Control Panel > Programs and features > Turn Windows features on or off.

    How do I change my default shell manually?

    How to Change my default shell

    1. First, find out the available shells on your Linux box, run cat /etc/shells.
    2. Type chsh and press Enter key.
    3. You need to enter the new shell full path. For example, /bin/ksh.
    4. Log in and log out to verify that your shell changed corretly on Linux operating systems.

    How do I change the default terminal in Windows 10?

    How to change default terminal application in Windows 10

    1. Open the Windows Terminal app version 1.9 or higher.
    2. Click the down arrow icon, present next to the “New Tab” button.
    3. Click the Settings menu item.
    4. On the right-side panel, click the dropdown that says ” Default terminal application “.

    How do I change Windows Terminal settings?

    Open Windows Terminal and click on the down arrow in the title bar (just to the right of the plus symbol), and then choose “Settings.” A JSON file will launch in the editor you choose earlier. You can make all changes here.

    How do I change the default terminal in VS code?

    9 Answers. You can also select your default terminal by pressing F1 in VS Code and typing/selecting Terminal: Select Default Profile (or Terminal: Select Default Shell in older VSCode versions).

    How do I find my default Windows shell?

    Just make sure that it’s a plain-text editor. In settings, scroll to the section for the shell that you want to make the default. There’s a heading at the top of each section saying what each shell is for.

    Does Windows Terminal replace CMD?

    The new Windows Terminal does not replace PowerShell or Command Prompt. They are both there, and you can use it as separate consoles. But it combines them in a new neat interface. You can also run other terminals as well as we will see, so, let us take a look at the key features.

    What is default shell?

    Bash, or the Bourne-Again Shell, is by far the most widely used choice and it comes installed as the default shell in the most popular Linux distributions.

    How do I start zsh by default?

    Once installed, you can set zsh as the default shell using: chsh -s $(which zsh) . After issuing this command, you’ll need to log out, then log back in again for the changes to take effect. If at any point you decide you don’t like zsh, you can revert to Bash using: chsh -s $(which bash) .

    Why would you want to change your default shell quizlet?

    Why would you want to change your default shell? To get the different functionality of another shell.

    How do I change my default shell to zsh?

    changing the default shell to zsh

    1. Make sure that zsh is installed and is an accepted shell $ cat /etc/shells.
    2. Change the shell $ chsh -s $(which zsh)
    3. Restart your shell.

    How do I make Windows Terminal default?

    Set Windows Terminal default app for Command Prompt and PowerShell

    1. Open Windows Terminal.
    2. Click the menu (down-arrow) button and select the Settings option.
    3. Click on Startup.
    4. Use the “Default terminal application” setting and select the Windows Terminal option. Windows Terminal default app.
    5. Click the Save button.

    How do I change my default terminal in command prompt?

    On Windows 7, you Right click My Computer → Properties → Advanced system settings (on the left pane). Go down to the bottom and select Environment Variables… . Change the ComSpec to whatever shell application you want. The default value is %SystemRoot%system32cmd.exe .

    Where does Windows Terminal install?

    Terminal (stable / general release): %LOCALAPPDATA%PackagesMicrosoft. WindowsTerminal_8wekyb3d8bbweLocalStatesettings. json. Terminal (preview release): %LOCALAPPDATA%PackagesMicrosoft.

    Many developers rave about Oh My Zsh, an open-source, community-driven framework built on top of the zsh shell and playing around with Oh My Zsh has been on my bucket list for some time.

    Starting with the Catalina update, zsh is the default shell on Macs and WSL 2 became available on Windows 10 in 2020 (and a native Linux GUI is apparently coming to Windows soon), so it seemed like a good time to dig deeper into the zsh shell.

    Install Zsh Shell and Oh My Zsh – MacOS

    Install Zsh Shell – MacOS

    Oh My Zsh requires that the zsh shell be installed. Zsh is already installed on MacOS. If you are using bash as your default shell, you can experiment with zsh and Oh My Zsh without changing your default settings. Open the terminal, click Terminal -> Preferences and for the setting “Shells open with”, select the option “Command (complete path)” and enter “/bin/zsh”.

    Close and launch a new Terminal window. The shell should be zsh.

    You will be prompted to update your default shell to zsh.

    Once you are happy with your settings in the zsh shell, run the following command to set your default

    Alternatively, you can use a different terminal such as iTerm2 and configure it to use zsh by default. I found this to be a good way to get familiar with zsh while still having bash as the default in the Mac terminal.

    Install Oh My Zsh

    Next download and install Oh My Zsh using the command below:

    Close the terminal and reopen it. The terminal should start up with the default Oh My Zsh theme.

    Install Zsh Shell and Oh My Zsh – Windows 10

    Before you begin, make sure you have enabled the Windows Subsystem for Linux. I’m using Ubuntu running on WSL 2 in this example.

    Install Zsh – Ubuntu on WSL 2

    Open a terminal window and install zsh and make it your default shell.

    Launch Zsh and go through through the first-time setup process.

    Install Oh My Zsh

    The installation command are the same for Ubuntu and MacOS.

    Install Fonts and Ligatures

    Add Fonts

    Oh My Zsh comes with a number of custom themes to choose from, but many of them rely on fonts that are usually not already installed on your local machine. One font that is used in a number of themes is Powerline fonts.

    Install the Powerline Fonts – MacOS

    After installing the fonts, you’ll need to update your terminal application for use the fonts. See instructions for updating fonts in Mac Terminal and iTerm2.

    Install the Powerline Fonts – Windows

    To use Powerline font in WSL, you install the fonts in the Windows OS. Clone the Powerline fonts repo to a folder in the Windows OS and open PowerShell as an administrator to execute the “install.ps1” script

    After installing the fonts, update the Windows Terminal to use the fonts. Open the settings JSON file for the terminal and add the following line to the profile for Ubuntu on WSL 2.

    Ligatures

    Some terminals, such as iTerm2 and Windows Terminal also support ligatures. In order to enable ligatures, you will need to install a font that can support these types of characters, such as FiraCode and Cascadia Code. Install FiraCode or Cascadia Code and then update your terminal settings to use the font.

    Customize Oh My Zsh

    Update Your Theme

    Oh My Zsh comes with a number of great themes preinstalled. To activate one, simply update your zsh profile file.

    Agnoster is a great theme. The one complaint I have is that the prompt is quite long since it shows the computer/user name and the full path to the current directory. You can add the following to your .zshrc file to shorten the prompt. Make sure you add the following after the line: source $ZSH/oh-my-zsh.sh

    There are also a number of external themes that you can install if you want more options than the themes included by default. A list of external themes along with with installation instructions can be found here – https://github.com/ohmyzsh/ohmyzsh/wiki/External-themes. Some of my favorites are:

    • Spaceship https://github.com/denysdovhan/spaceship-prompt
    • Power Level 10k https://github.com/romkatv/powerlevel10k

    Install Plugins

    Plugins add more functionality to Oh My Zsh, such as suggestions and auto-completion. A list of all official plugins https://github.com/ohmyzsh/ohmyzsh/tree/master/plugins. Try to just install the plugins you need, otherwise it will take a long time to load the zsh shell.

    The git plugin is included by default. Some plugins can be added simply by updating the .zshrc file and adding the plugin name to the plugins=(…) list.

    Some plugins require more setup steps. For example the VS Code plugin will only work after you update PATH variable and add the plugin name to the plugins=(…) list.

    There are many more plugins aside from the official list. One of my favorites is the salesforce-cli-zsh-completion plugin, which is more current than the sfdx plugin included in the official list.

    I recently re-imaged my laptop to a clean Windows 10. I haven’t yet taken the time to re-setup my Linux setup on top of Windows 10. In this post, I’ll walk you through how to setup WSL2, in combination with the (new) Windows Terminal and oh-my-zsh.

    WSL stands for the Windows Subsystem for Linux. WSL has brought a Linux kernel to Windows 10. WSL2 is the new version of WSL, available to only Windows insiders for now . It drastically improves performance, as it no longer translates kernel calls, but rather runs in a micro-VM on top of Hyper-V.

    The new Windows terminal is an improved terminal announced by Microsoft at Build 2019. Is allow multi-tabbed terminals, can connect to multiple run-times (PowerDhell, WSL, cloud shell) and is heavily customizable.

    Oh-my-zsh is a terminal tool that allows you to pretty up your Linux terminal. It can do pretty color printing, show git status and much more.

    Let’s get started and set this up.

    In order to run WSL2 you need to be a Windows Insider and be on at least on version 18917 or higher. To check your Windows version, hit Windows Key + x and click on system . There you’ll see your Windows version:

    How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10My OS build is high enough to run WSL2

    To run WSL2, you’ll need to enable to additional Windows features: Hyper-V and WSL. To get both up and running, look for “Turn Windows features on or off” in the start menu:

    You’ll need to turn on Hyper-V and WSL.

    In that window, make sure to select both HyperV and Windows Subsystem for Linux.

    How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10Enable Hyper-V and WSL

    If you have those selected, click OK and go through with the reboot of your system.

    After the reboot, we’ll go ahead and install our favorite Linux distro. Open the Microsoft store, and look for your distro (Ubuntu in my case).

    How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10I’ll be installing Ubuntu 18.04

    Hit the install button, and give it a couple of minutes to download and install. Once installed, hit the ‘Launch’ button, to start your Ubuntu. This will trigger an installation, which will take another couple of minutes.

    How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10Once the app is installed, hit the Launch button to trigger the actual Linux installation.

    Once the installation is complete, you’ll get prompted for a username and password. Fill that in, and your Linux installation will be complete.

    Now, we’ll go ahead and switch this installation from WSL1 to WSL2. To do this, open a (regular) command line, and execute the following commands:

    This will convert our WSL1 to a WSL2. We can verify the conversion was successful, with the following command:

    With that done, we have our WSL2 setup. Next up, setting up the Windows Terminal.

    Windows Terminal

    Installing the Windows Terminal isn’t too difficult. Simply head over to the Microsoft store, look for Windows Terminal, and hit the install button.

    How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

    Give this a couple minutes to install, and then you can launch the terminal. The default shell in the terminal is PowerShell.

    How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

    I want to change this to WSL2. To edit this, go to the Terminal settings file.

    How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

    This opens up the settings file. Copy the GUID from the Ubuntu config and paste that in the defaultProfile:

    How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

    Save this file, and then reload the terminal. This should now open a WSL terminal.

    Oh my zsh setup

    Finally, we’ll go ahead and setup oh my zsh. Let’s start with setting up the prerequisites:

    With the prerequisites installed, we can go ahead and install Oh my zsh:

    This will ask you if you want the switch your shell to zsh. Hit yes.

    Next up, we’ll want to pick a fancier theme (if you feel like it). The agnoster theme is a popular one. To change the theme, edit the

    /.zshrc file and input the agnoster theme there.

    How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

    Reload your Terminal now. You will see that the visual isn’t perfect just yet. First thing we’ll do is edit the color setup of your Terminal. To edit this, open up the settings file for the Terminal again. We’ll make two changes:

    1. Add a custom scheme.
    2. Link that scheme to our WSL terminal.

    To add the scheme, paste the following code into schemes:

    Then, look for the configuration of you WSL, and add a line that says: “colorScheme” : “wsl” :

    Save this file and look back at your Terminal. The color scheme should have changed now. Final step remaining is installing a Powerline font that allows special characters. To do this, open up a PowerShell window as adminstrator. Navigate to a folder where you can execute git clone .

    That final step, will install the fonts onto your Windows installation. To have the Terminal use the newly installed fonts, we’ll need to add another line to our Terminal configuration:

    This is starting to look a bit better. There is one final change that I like to make personally, that changes my username background color and no longer shows the machine name. To do this, open up the agnoster theme file

    and change line 92:

    Which should make it look like:

    Save the file, and open up a new terminal. This should look like this:

    One final thing I want to change here is to open the shell on the Linux home directory, not the Windows home directory. To do this, add this line to the

    This should make your terminal look like:

    Which is what I was looking for.

    Summary

    In this post I explained how I setup my development environment using WSL2, Windows Terminal and oh my zsh. There are many ways to configure oh my zsh, and I only covered my personal flavor.

    Leave a Reply Cancel reply

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    About the author

    I’m Nills, a cloud architect focused on cloud automation. I share my technical stories on this blog, mainly on Azure, Kubernetes and cloud networking.

    The command line is a powerful tool used by developers to find, create, and manipulate files and folders. This short tutorial will walk you through the steps for setting up the command line application on your computer.

    Command Line Interfaces (CLIs) come in many forms. The CLI we’ll use is called Bash.

    What is Bash?

    Bash, or the Bourne-Again SHell, is a CLI that was created in 1989 by Brian Fox as a free software replacement for the Bourne Shell. A shell is a specific kind of CLI. Bash is “open source,” which means that anyone can read the code and suggest changes. Since its beginning, it has been supported by a large community of engineers who have worked to make it an incredible tool. Bash is the default shell for Linux and Mac up through macOS 10.14 (Mojave). For these reasons, Bash is the most used and widely distributed shell. If you want to learn more about Bash, this Wikipedia article is a good place to start.

    Bash Setup for Mac and Windows

    Mac users:

    As mentioned before, Bash is the default shell on Linux and MacOS up through version 10.14 (Mojave), so good news, you don’t have to install anything! MacOS version 10.15 (Catalina) and higher uses a similar, but slightly different default shell called Z shell or Zsh. In most ways Zsh is an exact replacement for Bash, so there is no need to switch over or install Bash instead.

    To access Bash in MacOS, you can use an application called Terminal.

    1. First open the Applications folder, then open the Utilities folder.

    2. Once you’re in the Utilities folder you will see the application Terminal. Open the Terminal application and you’re ready to go!

    3. For ease of access later, you can keep Terminal in your Dock. Simply right click (alt-click) the Terminal icon in your dock, then select “Options”, then “Keep In Dock.”

    Continue to the “Try it Out!” section below for some simple first steps with your new tool.

    Windows users:

    Windows has a different CLI, called Command Prompt. While this has many of the same features as Bash, Bash is much more popular. Because of the strength of the open source community and the tools they provide, mastering Bash is a better investment than mastering Command Prompt.

    To use Bash on a Windows computer, we will download and install a program called Git Bash. Git Bash allows us to easily access Bash as well as another tool we’ll be using later called Git, inside the Windows environment.

    You can either watch the following video, or read the rest of this article.

    How to install Git Bash:

    1. Navigate to the Git Bash installation page and click the Download button. How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 102. Once Git Bash is downloaded, run the downloaded .exe file and allow the application to make changes to your PC. You will get a prompt that says “Do you want to allow this app to make changes to your device?” Click Yes.

    3. To keep things simple, we will use the default settings for everything in this installation, so all you need to do now is keep clicking Next, and finally Finish. How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 104. Open the Start menu by clicking on the Windows icon and typing “Git Bash” into the search bar. The icon for Git Bash and the words “Git Bash Desktop App” will appear. Click on the icon or the words “Git Bash Desktop App” to open Git Bash. How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 105. A new window will open. This is the Git Bash CLI where we will run Bash commands. Whenever a new window of the Git Bash app is opened, you will always be placed in the same directory, your home directory.

    The home directory is represented by the tilde sign,

    , in the CLI after MINGW64 . The tilde is another way to say /c/Users/username in Git Bash or C:\home\Users\username in Windows’ Command Prompt.

    The absolute path of your current working directory, how you got from the root directory to the directory you are currently in, will always be noted at the top of the window:

    How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

    Git Bash works by giving you a CLI that acts like a Bash CLI. That means you can now work with your files and folders using Bash commands instead of Windows commands.

    Congratulations, you now have Bash installed on your computer, ready to use! In case you wanted to try out the built-in Windows command line for basic system tasks, we talk about it in this article.

    Try it out!

    Now that you have your Command Line Interface open on your desktop, you are ready to use it. Go ahead and try some of the commands on your personal computer. Here are some good commands for practice:

    1. ls to list the contents of the current directory. It may look something like this:
    2. mkdir test to make a new directory named test. Now, when you type ls you should see a folder called test :
    3. cd test to navigate into the new directory. You won’t see an output when you do this.
    4. echo “Hello Command Line” >> hello_cli.txt to create a new file named hello_cli.txt and add Hello Command Line to that file. When you type ls , you should see the following:
    5. cat hello_cli.txt to print the contents of the hello_cli.txt file to the terminal. You should see something like:

    Good job! You’re ready to explore the world of the Command Line Interface on your own computer.

    Compose comes with command completion for the bash and zsh shell.

    Install command completion

    Make sure bash completion is installed.

    Linux

    On a current Linux OS (in a non-minimal installation), bash completion should be available.

    Place the completion script in /etc/bash_completion.d/ .

    Reload your terminal. You can close and then open a new terminal, or reload your setting with source

    /.bashrc command in your current terminal.

    Install via Homebrew
      Install with brew install bash-completion .

    After the installation, Brew displays the installation path. Make sure to place the completion script in the path.

    For example, place the completion script in /usr/local/etc/bash_completion.d/ .

    Add the following to your

    Install via MacPorts

    Run sudo port install bash-completion to install bash completion.

    Add the following lines to

    You can source your

    /.bash_profile or launch a new terminal to utilize completion.

    Make sure you have installed oh-my-zsh on your computer.

    With oh-my-zsh shell

    Add docker and docker-compose to the plugins list in

    /.zshrc to run autocompletion within the oh-my-zsh shell. In the following example, . represent other Zsh plugins you may have installed. After that, type source

    /.zshrc to bring the changes. To test whether it is successful, type docker ps and then press the Tab key.

    • How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10
    • How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10
    • How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10
    • How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10
    • How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10
    • How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

    Oh My Zsh is an open source, community-driven framework for managing your Zsh configuration.

    Sounds boring. Let’s try again.

    Oh My Zsh will not make you a 10x developer. but you may feel like one!

    Once installed, your terminal shell will become the talk of the town or your money back! With each keystroke in your command prompt, you’ll take advantage of the hundreds of powerful plugins and beautiful themes. Strangers will come up to you in cafés and ask you, “that is amazing! are you some sort of genius?”

    Finally, you’ll begin to get the sort of attention that you have always felt you deserved. . or maybe you’ll use the time that you’re saving to start flossing more often. 😬

    Plugins

    Oh My Zsh comes bundled with plugins that’ll make your life as a software developer easier and leave you feeling like a superhero.

    Community

    Oh My Zsh has a vibrant community of happy users and delightful contributors. Without all the time and help from our contributors, it wouldn’t be so awesome.

    Themes

    We’ll admit it. Early in the Oh My Zsh world, we may have gotten a bit too theme happy. We currently ship with 150 themes bundled.

    “Dropping bash for ZSH and the Oh-My-ZSH (@ohmyzsh) framework has made me much more comfortable in the terminal. It’s been about a year of using it now and I keep learning new things about it. 10/10 would recommend”

    “As others have said and I’ll say as well, install @ohmyzsh . It takes the magic of zsh , bottles it up, and then anytime you use the CLI out comes a genie and asks you your wish.

    Without it, discovering the greatness of zsh requires a PhD.”

    ” @ohmyzsh is simply amazing – I wish I would have installed it earlier”

    “The last OS X upgrade made ZSH the default shell. I figured it was about time to finally leave bash. After I was on ZSH, I decided to try the much famed oh-my-zsh. OMG, why hand’t I tried this thing before. If you’re a programmer and you’re not using this, try it, now! @ohmyzsh “

    Install oh-my-zsh now

    Oh My Zsh is installed by running one of the following commands in your terminal. You can install this via the command-line with either curl or wget.

    • Install oh-my-zsh via curl
    • Install oh-my-zsh via wget

    $ sh -c “$(curl -fsSL https://raw.github.com/ohmyzsh/ohmyzsh/master/tools/install.sh)”

    $ sh -c “$(wget https://raw.github.com/ohmyzsh/ohmyzsh/master/tools/install.sh -O -)”

    Not ready to jump right in? We’re not offended; it’s never a bad idea to read the documentation first.

    Psst… Oh My Zsh works best on macOS or Linux.

    Got Plugins?

    If you don’t, we do! Oh My Zsh includes over 275 plugins, and we like to share. Here are some featured plugins:

    The ZSH or Z Shell is a Unix based shell or can be called as a command-line interpreter. It is an extended version of the good old Bourne shell (sh). It does have some features form Bash with lots of added features like automatic cd (Change Directory), spell check, path expansion, and many more. It also supports plugins and themes.

    Installing ZSH on Ubuntu

    Step 1: First, we will have to update the repository by running the following command:

    How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

    Step 2: Now we will install the zsh by running the following command:

    How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

    Step 3: Now we have to make the zsh as our default shell using the following command:

    Note: You will need to enter your password for the user after running the command.

    Step 4: Now that we have set the zsh as our default shell, we have to configure it. So, we will run zsh in the terminal to execute it. This will show the Z shell configuration.

    How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

    Step 5: Here you can do what is specified by typing the character given at the start of every line. You can quit, go in the main menu and configure the shell your self or you can go for the recommended configuration for the shell by pressing 2, which is what we have done.

    How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

    Step 6: After this, the Z shell is ready to use. But the shell is not changed from bash to zsh.

    Step 7: You will have to logout of your system and log back in to see the change. Open terminal and you should see the Z shell started. To check run the following command:

    As you can see, it showed /usr/bin/zsh, which means it is successfully set as the default shell.

    Sublime Text includes a command line tool, subl , to work with files on the command line. This can be used to open files and projects in Sublime Text, as well working as an EDITOR for unix tools, such as git and subversion.

    Setup

    Some operating systems and installation methods will require a configuration change to make subl available on the PATH .

    Windows

    On Windows, the command line helper is subl.exe . To use this from the Command Prompt or Powershell, the Sublime Text installation folder needs to be added to the Path environment variable:

    Windows 10

    • Open the Start Menu and type environ
    • Select the item Edit the system environment variables
    • Click the button Environment Variables at the bottom of the System Properties dialog
    • Select, or create, the Path environment variable in the appropriate section:
      • For the current user, select Path in the User variables for section
      • For all users, select Path in the System variables section
      • 64bit installs are typically in C:\Program Files\Sublime Text\
      • 32bit installs on a 64bit version of Windows will be in C:\Program Files (x86)\Sublime Text\
      • 32bit installs on a 32bit version of Windows will be in C:\Program Files\Sublime Text\

      Windows 8

      • Press the Windows Key and type environ
      • Select the item Edit the system environment variables
      • Click the button Environment Variables at the bottom of the System Properties dialog
      • Select, or create, the Path environment variable in the appropriate section:
        • For the current user, select Path in the User variables for section
        • For all users, select Path in the System variables section
        • 64bit installs are typically in C:\Program Files\Sublime Text\
        • 32bit installs on a 64bit version of Windows will be in C:\Program Files (x86)\Sublime Text\
        • 32bit installs on a 32bit version of Windows will be in C:\Program Files\Sublime Text\

        Windows 7

        • Open the Start Menu
        • Right-click on Computer and select Properties
        • Click on Advanced System Settings in the left-hand sidebar
        • Click the button Environment Variables at the bottom of the System Properties dialog
        • Select, or create, the Path environment variable in the appropriate section:
          • For the current user, select Path in the User variables for section
          • For all users, select Path in the System variables section
          • 64bit installs are typically in C:\Program Files\Sublime Text\
          • 32bit installs on a 64bit version of Windows will be in C:\Program Files (x86)\Sublime Text\
          • 32bit installs on a 32bit version of Windows will be in C:\Program Files\Sublime Text\

          To use subl , the Sublime Text bin folder needs to be added to the path. For a typical installation of Sublime Text, this will be located at /Applications/Sublime Text.app/Contents/SharedSupport/bin .

          If using Bash, the default before macOS 10.15, the following command will add the bin folder to the PATH environment variable:

          If using Zsh, the default starting with macOS 10.15, the following command will add the bin folder to the PATH environment variable:

          Linux

          If Sublime Text is installed via one of the Linux Package Manager Repositories or a package, a subl symlink will automatically be installed into the /usr/bin/ directory.

          If installing from a tarball, the sublime_text executable should be symlinked to subl , with a command such as:

          The exact details of the symlink command will depend on the installation location. Most default PATH environment variable values should contain /usr/local/bin , so no further commands should be necessary.

          Usage

          To see the available flags, run subl –help . The available flags will vary per operating system – the following example is from a Mac.

          Configuring as EDITOR

          To use Sublime Text as the editor for many commands that prompt for input, set your EDITOR environment variable:

          Specifying -w will cause the subl command to not exit until the file is closed.

          Below diagram explains what we are going to do.

          So to list the steps, we’ll

          • Install WSL (Windows subsystem for linux)
          • Install Ubuntu from Microsoft store
          • Install zsh shell
          • Install oh my zsh
          • Install PowerLevel10k
          • Plugins
          • Choose a terminal
          • Colors
          • Points worth noting

          Installations

          I just enabled ‘Windows Subsystem for Linux’ in Windows Feature and restarted the system.

          How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

          You can follow the instructions on Microsoft website.

          Ubuntu

          For this, visit this Microsoft Store webpage and install it.

          After it is installed. Open it from start menu to continue installation.
          Setup will ask for a username for linux subsystem.

          How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

          After entering username, the setup will finish.

          How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

          Update the packages with following command

          Install ZSH with following command

          Make zsh the default shell with following command:

          Restart the Ubuntu app and you should be greeted with following screen:

          Complete the configuration as per your liking.

          OH MY ZSH

          Next, lets install ‘OH MY ZSH’ with following command:

          Below is the screenshot of completed installation.

          PowerLevel10k

          Time to spice up the terminal with a nice theme.

          But before that, Install the recommended font ‘Meslo Nerd Font’:

          Why?
          Icons will render properly with this font

          You can download the fonts from this GitHub page.

          To install a font, open it and click install button on top

          Install PowerLevel10k

          Now, for PowerLevel10k, you can follow the guide at https://github.com/romkatv/powerlevel10k

          Below are the steps I’ve taken:

          Installation of PowerLevel10k for Oh My Zsh

          After doing the configuration, my terminal looked like below:

          Plugins

          zsh-autosuggestions

          This plugin will suggest command as you write from the terminal history.
          Just use → right arrow key to complete the command.

          Steps I followed:

          You will also need to force reload of your .zshrc:

          Try typing any command if its available in the history, you will see suggestion as below and then you press -> right arrow key to complete it.

          Choose a terminal

          So far we have just configured a shell, zsh in this case.

          Time to pick a terminal of choice.

          Terminals are dumb. They are just UI layer. They take input and pass it on (to a shell for example). You can choose any terminal like Hyper, cmder, Windows Terminal etc etc.

          Up till now, we have been using the Ubuntu app as our terminal. You can continue using that and it works fine.

          In case you want to switch, below i have notes on few of them.

          Install

          Open its settings from the dropdown and add fontFace to the profile named Ubuntu as shown below

          How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

          Default Profile

          By default it opens up PowerShell. You can change it by assigning the GUID of Ubuntu profile to the defaultProfile in the settings.

          Install

          • Download the installer from https://hyper.is/
          • Install it

          Make hyper use the custom font we installed earlier.
          Open Hyper Terminal config file with ctrl+, and add ‘MesloLGS NF,’ in front of the existing value for fontFamily key.

          Shell

          Lets tie hyper with Window’s bash now.

          • Open Hyper’s configuration file with ctrl+, .
          • Scroll down and edit shell ‘s value to C:\\Windows\\System32\\bash.exe .

          Configuration we did in last step, will always open bash shell in Hyper.
          To switch to ZSH on startup, Open your bash profile with

          Add following in the very beginning of the file

          How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

          Colors

          The colors were a little bit bright for me. So I installed a theme for hyper terminal named ‘hyper-material-theme’ from Hyper Website using below command:

          ⚠ Make sure you are running the hyper command from windows terminal. Meaning you are out zsh or linux terminal per se.
          Use exit command to get out of zsh.

          Now colors are nice!

          How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

          Issue

          One issue I noticed with hyper terminal is that it doesn’t refresh/clear the screen after nano editor is closed.

          As shown below, Hyper(on left) and Windows Terminal(on right) after closing nano editor.

          Install

          • Download the installer from https://cmder.net/
          • Install it

          Make Cmder use the custom font we installed earlier.
          Open settings and select ‘MesloLGS NF’ as shown below

          How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

          In this posting, I will show how to install ZSH and Oh-My-Zsh on Windows PC (WSL). This will be helpful if you want to setup a Linux development environment on Windows PC.

          I have already installed Ubuntu 20.04 on Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL). Bash is the default shell program. With using a different shell program, ZSH, we can access many features that Bash does not provide. It offers aesthetically pleasant themes and powerful plugins that can boost your productivity. Oh-My-Zsh makes it easier for us to handle ZSH configurations.

          You can follow the steps in this video.

          Install ZSH

          After installation, you will find .zshrc file inside your home directory. We will come back to that file for configuration later on.

          2. Install Oh-My-Zsh

          Oh-My-Zsh includes many themes and plugins. You will find .oh-my-zsh directory inside your home directory. For curiosity, you can navigate pre-shipped themes and plugins. If you add a custom or external theme or plugin, they should store inside the custom directory. The next step is one good example. We will install an external theme, Powerlevel10K, which is very popular now among developers.

          Before doing this, let’s restart your terminal.

          3. Install a few required fonts for Powerlevel10K theme.

          Go to https://github.com/romkatv/powerlevel10k#meslo-nerd-font-patched-for-powerlevel10k. Download and install four MesloLGS NF fonts to your PC (double-clicking the downloaded ttf file for installation).

          4. Install Powerlevel10K

          You can find the theme installed in

          5. Update the theme name inside .zshrc file.

          Open the file .zshrc at your home directory. Find the line of ZSH_THEME and replace with the new theme.

          Restart your terminal.

          6. Configure ZSH theme (powerlevel10k) with Oh-My-Zsh

          When you restart your terminal, you will find interactive windows that lead you through many powerlevel10k theme options. Select as you like. We are all done. You can now enjoy the beautiful theme.

          7. Bonus! Install two plugins

          Install zsh-syntax-highlighting

          Install zsh-autosuggestions

          After installation, open the file .zshrc and find the line plugins=(git). Update it with plugins=(git zsh-autosuggestions zsh-syntax-highlighting)

          8. Change the font in Visual Studio Code terminal

          Open Settings and search “terminal.integrated.fontFamily.” And add the font name, MesloLGS NF. This will make you use powerlevel10k theme inside VSC terminal.

          How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

          Using Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) in Windows Terminal

          In this video, I will show how to customize the bash prompt of Windows Subsystem for Linux and how to add the bash program to Windows Terminal. I assume that

          This article is about installing and configuring ZSH on Ubuntu 20.04. This step applies to all Ubuntu-based distributions. ZSH stands for Z Shell which is a shell program for Unix-like operating systems. ZSH is an extended version of Bourne Shell which incorporates some features of BASH, KSH, TSH.

          Zsh Features

          • Command-line completion.
          • History can be shared among all shells.
          • Extended file globbing.
          • Better variable and array handling.
          • Compatibility with shells like bourne shell.
          • Spelling correction and autofill of command names.
          • Named directories.

          Installing Zsh in Ubuntu Linux

          There are two ways to install ZSH in Ubuntu using an apt package manager and installing it from the source.

          We will use the apt package manager to install ZSH on Ubuntu.

          How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

          The package manager will install the latest release of ZSH which is 5.8.

          Installing ZSH will not modify and set it as the default shell. We have to modify the settings to make ZSH our default shell. Use the “chsh” command with ‘-s’ flag to switch the default shell for the user.

          How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

          Now to use the new zsh shell, log out of the terminal and log in again.

          Setting Up Zsh in Ubuntu Linux

          Compared to other shells like BASH, ZSH requires some first-time configuration to be taken care of. When you start ZSH for the first time it will throw you some options to configure. Let’s see what those options are and how to configure those options.

          Select option “1” on the first page which will take us to the main menu.

          How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

          The main menu will display some recommended options to configure.

          How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

          Press 1, it will take you to configure History related parameters like how many history lines to be retained and history file location. Once you are on the “History Configuration page” you can simply type “1” or “2” or “3” to change the associated configuration. Once you make the changing status will be changed from “not yet saved” to “set but not saved”.

          Press “0” to remember the changes. Once you come out to the main menu status will change from “recommended” to “Unsaved changes“.

          Similarly, you have to modify the configuration for the completion system, keys, and common shell options. Once done press “0” to save all the changes.

          How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

          Setup is completed now and it will take you to the shell. From next time your shell will not run through these initial setup, but you can run the new-user install command again as shown in the below image whenever needed.

          How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

          There is an alternate and easy way instead of manually setting up each configuration. This is the way I prefer normally. Instead of choosing the option “1” and going to the main menu to set each setting, we can choose option “2” which will populate the .zshrc file with default parameters. We can change the parameters directly in the .zshrc file.

          How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

          Revert to Old Bash Shell

          In case you want to revert to the old shell you have to follow the below steps.

          Now open a new session to see the changes to be effective

          That’s all for this article. Take a look at our article on installing and configuring oh-my-zsh on ubuntu 20.04. Install ZSH and explore its features and share your experience with us.

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          Related Posts

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          How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

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          How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

          How to use zsh (or another shell) in windows 10

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          При открытии новых окон и вкладок Терминала может использоваться профиль по умолчанию, профиль активного окна или вкладки, а также выбранный Вами профиль.

          В панели настроек «Основные» можно выбрать профили, которые будут использоваться при открытии новых окон и вкладок. Если Вы не выбрали профиль по умолчанию, используется профиль Basic (см. Выбор профиля по умолчанию и загрузочного профиля окна Терминала).

          Открытие новых окон Терминала с профилем по умолчанию или с тем же профилем, который используется в активном окне

          Открываемый профиль (профиль по умолчанию или тот же профиль, который используется в активном окне) зависит от значения параметра «В новых окнах открывать» в панели настроек «Основные».

          В приложении «Терминал» на Mac можно сделать следующее.

          Нажмите сочетание клавиш Command-N.

          Выберите пункт меню «Shell» > «Новое окно» > «Новое окно с профилем».

          Имя открываемого профиля добавляется к пункту «Новое окно» в меню «Профиль».

          Открытие новых окон Терминала с выбранным профилем

          В приложении «Терминал» на Mac можно сделать следующее.

          Выберите «Shell» > «Новое окно», затем выберите профиль из списка профилей в конце меню.

          Выберите «Терминал» > «Настройки», затем нажмите «Профили». В списке профилей дважды нажмите значок профиля, который хотите использовать.

          Открытие новых вкладок с профилем по умолчанию или с тем же профилем, который используется в активной вкладке

          Открываемый профиль (профиль по умолчанию или тот же профиль, который используется в активной вкладке) зависит от значения параметра «В новых вкладках открывать» в панели настроек «Основные».

          В приложении «Терминал» на Mac можно сделать следующее.

          Нажмите сочетание клавиш Command-T.

          Выберите пункт меню «Shell» > «Новая вкладка» > «Новая вкладка с профилем».

          Имя открываемого профиля добавляется к пункту «Новая вкладка» в меню «Профиль».

          Открытие новых вкладок с выбранным профилем

          В приложении «Терминал» на Mac выберите «Shell» > «Новая вкладка», затем выберите профиль из списка профилей в конце меню.

          This article explains how to change the default shell in Linux. Using this you can set Bash, sh, Zsh, Csh, Fish, etc. as your shell.

          The article includes instructions for changing the login shell from the command line using chsh, or changing the shell only for a particular terminal application. While the article is targeted at Linux users, this should also work on other Unix-like systems.

          How to change the default login shell using chsh (from the command line)

          To change the default login shell we’ll use chsh , a command line tool to change the login shell.

          This program changes the login shell by modifying the /etc/passwd file and setting the $SHELL environment variable. You can override the default shell in a terminal application, by setting the shell from the terminal settings – see the second part of this article for details.

          A note for Fedora users. Fedora doesn’t have chsh installed by default and to use it, you must install a package called util-linux-user . If you want to skip installing this package, you can use lchsh instead to change the login shell, which is available by default:

          It’s important to note that using chsh, a normal user may only change the login shell for the current account, while the superuser may change the login shell for any account, including the root account. Also, the default behavior for non-root users is to accept only shells listed in the /etc/shells file, and issue a warning for root user.

          So before changing your shell, list all the shells listed in the /etc/shells file from your Linux system by using the following command:

          Example with output:

          If the shell you want to use is not listed here, it may not be installed on your system. So install it (for example, install Zsh on Debian / Ubuntu / Linux Mint / Pop!_OS using: sudo apt install zsh ) and check again.

          To change the shell for your user, run:

          This runs chsh in an interactive mode, asking you for the password, then listing your current shell (most Linux distributions use Bash as the default shell) and asking you to enter a value for your new shell. Here’s the command with its output:

          To change your shell, type the path to the new shell (which exists in /etc/shells ) and press the Enter key.

          For example, to change the shell for the current user from Bash to Zsh:

          In case you’re using a chsh version that doesn’t launch with an interactive prompt after executing chsh , change the login shell for your user directly:

          E.g. to change the shell to Zsh:

          After changing your account’s shell, logout and re-login to use the new shell.

          To change the login shell for another user or for the root user, login to the shell prompt as root using su – , sudo -i , sudo su , etc., and run:

          • To change the shell for the root account (and when prompted, enter the login shell you want to use, with its full path):
          • To change the shell of another user (this also works for the root user, using root as the username):

          This time we’ve used chsh with the -s option, which changes the login shell directly (doesn’t run in an interactive mode). Here, SHELL is the new shell (e.g. /bin/zsh ) and USERNAME is the user for which you’re changing the shell; for example, to change the shell to /bin/zsh for the user Logix , you’d use: chsh -s /bin/zsh Logix ).

          Change the shell for your user in a terminal application

          You can use a shell that’s different from the login shell ( $SHELL ) for a particular terminal application, if that application allows setting a custom shell or running a custom command instead of the default shell.

          As a side note, you may also change the current shell (non-permanent change) by typing the shell command you want to use in a terminal (e.g. if you type “zsh”, you’ll switch to using Zsh for that session; exit by typing “exit”.).

          Take GNOME Terminal for example (used in GNOME and Cinnamon desktops as the default terminal). Open its Preferences , click on the current active profile (usually called Default or Unnamed if you haven’t changed it or added new profiles) in the left-hand sidebar, then click on the Command tab:

          This is where you can set a custom shell to be used with this application only. Enable the Run a custom command instead of my shell option, then in the Custom command field enter the full path to the shell you want to use, e.g. /bin/zsh , /bin/bash , etc.

          In Xfce4 Terminal, open the Preferences and on the General tab you’ll need to enable an option called Run a custom command instead of my shell , then enter the custom command below that (this being the shell you want to use with this terminal, e.g. /bin/zsh , /usr/bin/fish , etc.).

          Using KDE Plasma’s Konsole, go to Settings -> Edit Current Profile , and on the General tab, change the Command field to the full path of the shell you want to use (once again, something like: /bin/zsh , /bin/bash , /usr/bin/fish , etc.).

          Using Guake, you can change the user shell from its Preferences , on the Shell tab, where you’ll find an option called Default interpreter that allows choosing any shell listed in /etc/shells .

          For terminals that allow running a custom shell you should also find an option that allows running the command as a login shell (usually called just that: “Run command as a login shell”). To read on the differences between a login shell and an interactive shell, see this page.

          Setting this is the same in most cases, so I won’t give any more examples. However, it’s worth noting that not all terminal applications have options to allow using a custom shell — in such cases, use the chsh command to change the login shell, as explained above.

          Installing SDKMAN! on UNIX-like platforms is as easy as ever. SDKMAN! installs smoothly on macOS, Linux, WSL, Cygwin, Solaris and FreeBSD. We also support Bash and ZSH shells.
          Simply open a new terminal and enter:

          Follow the instructions on-screen to complete installation.
          Next, open a new terminal or enter:

          Lastly, run the following code snippet to ensure that installation succeeded:

          If all went well, the version should be displayed. Something like:

          Windows Installation

          Several options exist for installing SDKMAN! on Windows today.

          The first solution involves installing Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL) prior to attempting SDKMAN installation. You need a basic toolchain including bash, zip, unzip, and curl (tar and gzip required for special cases). Most likely it will work out of the box.

          Another solution involves installing Cygwin prior to attempting SDKMAN installation. For our software to function, we require that Cygwin is installed with the same toolchain as described for WSL.

          The third solution is for Git users using the Git Bash for Windows environment. In order for this to work, the environment needs to be supplemented with MinGW to add the necessary toolchain to function.

          Please be aware that as SDKMAN is written in bash, it requires a bash environment to be present. SDKMAN can not be installed natively on Windows and requires WSL, Cygwin or MSYS+MinGW.

          Beta Channel

          For the more adventurous among us, we have a beta channel. All new CLI features will first be rolled out to this group of users for trial purposes. Beta versions can be considered stable for the most part, but might occasionally break. To join the beta channel, you can install it directly as follows: If you already have the stable version installed, simply update the

          /.sdkman/etc/config file as follows: Next, open a new terminal and perform a forced update with: To leave the beta channel, simply set the above config back to false and follow the same procedure.