How to work around a 404 error in homebrew for macos

Justin Pot
How to work around a 404 error in homebrew for macosJustin Pot
Writer

Justin Pot has been writing about technology for over a decade, with work appearing in Digital Trends, The Next Web, Lifehacker, MakeUseOf, and the Zapier Blog. He also runs the Hillsboro Signal, a volunteer-driven local news outlet he founded. Read more.

How to work around a 404 error in homebrew for macos

You’re installing some packages with Homebrew on your Mac, when you see a 404 error. Installation simply stops. Seriously?

The Homebrew team is generally good about finding and fixing 404 errors, so running brew update will generally solve such problems. But if that doesn’t work, and you need a particular application right now, you can work around the issue yourself. Here’s how.

Step One: Find The File Homebrew Cannot

The first thing you need to do is find the missing file. Generally the first step is to look at the the download URL Homebrew tried to use to find where the project is hosted.

In my example, the file that couldn’t be found was mp4v2-2.0.0.tar.bz2, which is hosted at Google Code. That’s a service Google shut down and archived recently, which might be the problem. To investigate, I head to mp4v2.googlecode.com, the site Homewbrew tried to download from, then head to the “Downloads” page to find the file I need.

How to work around a 404 error in homebrew for macos

It seems like Google Code has changed the URLs for their downloads, which is why Homebrew failed. No matter: we can download the file manually right here by clicking the link.

Your process for tracking down the file you need might look a little different, depending on where the files you need are stored, but the idea is the same. You need to head to the page where the project is hosted and download the exact file Homebrew was looking for.

Step Two: Put The File in Homebrew’s Cache

Now that we’ve got the file, we need to access the hidden Library folder in the Finder, then head to the Homebrew cache. From the Library folder go to Caches > Homebrew.

How to work around a 404 error in homebrew for macos

To get to this folder quickly you can press Command Shift and G in the Finder, then paste

How to work around a 404 error in homebrew for macos

You’ll see a bunch of files that Homebrew has recently downloaded. Drag the file you just downloaded to the folder so it’s alongside them, like this:

How to work around a 404 error in homebrew for macos

Homebrew now has access to the exact file it couldn’t find before.

Step Three: Run Brew Install Again

The hard part is done! Attempt to install the software just like you did before, and Homebrew will find the missing file in the cache. Here’s what that looks like:

How to work around a 404 error in homebrew for macos

As you can see, Homebrew thinks it downloaded the file earlier, and uses it to complete the installation. You can now get back to whatever very important work it is that needs doing. My thanks to Jason Verly over at MyGeekDaddy.net for pointing out this handy workaround.

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How to work around a 404 error in homebrew for macos Justin Pot
Justin Pot has been writing about technology for over a decade, with work appearing in Digital Trends, The Next Web, Lifehacker, MakeUseOf, and the Zapier Blog. He also runs the Hillsboro Signal, a volunteer-driven local news outlet he founded.
Read Full Bio »

This page describes how to install Bazel on macOS and set up your environment.

You can install Bazel on macOS using one of the following methods:

Bazel comes with two completion scripts. After installing Bazel, you can:

  • Access the bash completion script
  • Install the zsh completion script

Installing using the binary installer

The binary installers are on Bazel’s GitHub releases page.

The installer contains the Bazel binary. 1 Some additional libraries must also be installed for Bazel to work.

Step 1: Install Xcode command line tools

If you don’t intend to use ios_* rules, it is sufficient to install the Xcode command line tools package by using xcode-select :

Otherwise, for ios_* rule support, you must have Xcode 6.1 or later with iOS SDK 8.1 installed on your system.

Download Xcode from the App Store or the Apple Developer site.

Once Xcode is installed, accept the license agreement for all users with the following command:

Step 2: Download the Bazel installer

Next, download the Bazel binary installer named bazel--installer-darwin-x86_64.sh from the Bazel releases page on GitHub.

Note: on macOS Catalina or newer (macOS >= 11), due to Apple’s new app signing requirements, you need to download the installer from the terminal using curl :

This is a temporary workaround until the macOS release flow supports signing (#9304).

Step 3: Run the installer

Run the Bazel installer as follows:

The –user flag installs Bazel to the $HOME/bin directory on your system and sets the .bazelrc path to $HOME/.bazelrc . Use the –help command to see additional installation options.

If you are on macOS Catalina or newer (macOS >= 11) and get an error that “bazel-real” cannot be opened because the developer cannot be verified, you need to re-download the installer from the terminal using curl as a workaround; see Step 2 above.

Step 4: Set up your environment

If you ran the Bazel installer with the –user flag as above, the Bazel executable is installed in your $HOME/bin directory. It’s a good idea to add this directory to your default paths, as follows:

You can also add this command to your

All set! You can confirm Bazel is installed successfully by running the following command:

To update to a newer release of Bazel, download and install the desired version.

Installing using Homebrew

Step 1: Install Homebrew on macOS

Install Homebrew (a one-time step):

Step 2: Install Bazel via Homebrew

Install the Bazel package via Homebrew as follows:

All set! You can confirm Bazel is installed successfully by running the following command:

Once installed, you can upgrade to a newer version of Bazel using the following command:

You must use a kubectl version that is within one minor version difference of your cluster. For example, a v1.23 client can communicate with v1.22, v1.23, and v1.24 control planes. Using the latest compatible version of kubectl helps avoid unforeseen issues.

Install kubectl on macOS

The following methods exist for installing kubectl on macOS:

Install kubectl binary with curl on macOS

Download the latest release:

To download a specific version, replace the $(curl -L -s https://dl.k8s.io/release/stable.txt) portion of the command with the specific version.

For example, to download version v1.23.0 on Intel macOS, type:

And for macOS on Apple Silicon, type:

Validate the binary (optional)

Download the kubectl checksum file:

Validate the kubectl binary against the checksum file:

If valid, the output is:

If the check fails, shasum exits with nonzero status and prints output similar to:

Make the kubectl binary executable.

Move the kubectl binary to a file location on your system PATH .

Test to ensure the version you installed is up-to-date:

Or use this for detailed view of version:

Install with Homebrew on macOS

If you are on macOS and using Homebrew package manager, you can install kubectl with Homebrew.

Run the installation command:

Test to ensure the version you installed is up-to-date:

Install with Macports on macOS

If you are on macOS and using Macports package manager, you can install kubectl with Macports.

Run the installation command:

Test to ensure the version you installed is up-to-date:

Verify kubectl configuration

In order for kubectl to find and access a Kubernetes cluster, it needs a kubeconfig file, which is created automatically when you create a cluster using kube-up.sh or successfully deploy a Minikube cluster. By default, kubectl configuration is located at

Check that kubectl is properly configured by getting the cluster state:

If you see a URL response, kubectl is correctly configured to access your cluster.

If you see a message similar to the following, kubectl is not configured correctly or is not able to connect to a Kubernetes cluster.

For example, if you are intending to run a Kubernetes cluster on your laptop (locally), you will need a tool like Minikube to be installed first and then re-run the commands stated above.

If kubectl cluster-info returns the url response but you can’t access your cluster, to check whether it is configured properly, use:

Optional kubectl configurations and plugins

Enable shell autocompletion

kubectl provides autocompletion support for Bash, Zsh, Fish, and PowerShell which can save you a lot of typing.

Below are the procedures to set up autocompletion for Bash, Fish, and Zsh.

Introduction

The kubectl completion script for Bash can be generated with kubectl completion bash . Sourcing this script in your shell enables kubectl completion.

However, the kubectl completion script depends on bash-completion which you thus have to previously install.

Upgrade Bash

The instructions here assume you use Bash 4.1+. You can check your Bash’s version by running:

If it is too old, you can install/upgrade it using Homebrew:

Reload your shell and verify that the desired version is being used:

Homebrew usually installs it at /usr/local/bin/bash .

Install bash-completion

You can test if you have bash-completion v2 already installed with type _init_completion . If not, you can install it with Homebrew:

As stated in the output of this command, add the following to your

Reload your shell and verify that bash-completion v2 is correctly installed with type _init_completion .

Enable kubectl autocompletion

You now have to ensure that the kubectl completion script gets sourced in all your shell sessions. There are multiple ways to achieve this:

Source the completion script in your

Add the completion script to the /usr/local/etc/bash_completion.d directory:

If you have an alias for kubectl, you can extend shell completion to work with that alias:

If you installed kubectl with Homebrew (as explained here), then the kubectl completion script should already be in /usr/local/etc/bash_completion.d/kubectl . In that case, you don’t need to do anything.

In any case, after reloading your shell, kubectl completion should be working.

The kubectl completion script for Fish can be generated with the command kubectl completion fish . Sourcing the completion script in your shell enables kubectl autocompletion.

To do so in all your shell sessions, add the following line to your

After reloading your shell, kubectl autocompletion should be working.

The kubectl completion script for Zsh can be generated with the command kubectl completion zsh . Sourcing the completion script in your shell enables kubectl autocompletion.

To do so in all your shell sessions, add the following to your

If you have an alias for kubectl, kubectl autocompletion will automatically work with it.

After reloading your shell, kubectl autocompletion should be working.

If you get an error like 2: command not found: compdef , then add the following to the beginning of your

Install kubectl convert plugin

A plugin for Kubernetes command-line tool kubectl , which allows you to convert manifests between different API versions. This can be particularly helpful to migrate manifests to a non-deprecated api version with newer Kubernetes release. For more info, visit migrate to non deprecated apis

How to work around a 404 error in homebrew for macos

Are you getting below error while executing Homebrew command? Today while installing PHP on my new Macbook 16″ I got below error.

I tried below few tips but it didn’t work for me.

  • Execute same commands few times
  • Execute few more homebrew commands
  • Deleted all caches under /Library/Caches/Homebrew folder and retried

Check out at the bottom of this post for command which fixed my issue.

Are you getting below error?

  • Homebrew: Permissions Denied Issue Fix (OS X / macOS)
  • How to fix homebrew permissions?
  • Error Permission denied when running brew.
  • Cannot update HomeBrew: Permission denied.
  • [Solved] brew Brew update fails with Permission denied.

Here is a log which I got while installing PHP.

Here is some more log details. I’m not pasting complete error log but this is a tail end of the failure log.

How to work around a 404 error in homebrew for macos

How to fix above Permission Denied error while running Homebrew command on MacOS?

Step-1

  • Open Terminal.
  • Enter Command + Spacebar to open Spotlight .
  • Type Terminal to open Terminal application.

Step-2

Here is a output:

You need to enter your password as you are executing this command as a root user.

And you are all set. Try executing Homebrew command again and you shouldn’t see any permission issue any more.

Hope this helps. Let me know if you have any other suggestions.

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OpenResty ® Scalable Web Platform by Extending NGINX with Lua

How to work around a 404 error in homebrew for macos

How to work around a 404 error in homebrew for macos

How to work around a 404 error in homebrew for macos

Download

OpenResty ® provides official pre-built packages for common Linux distributions.

We currently support Ubuntu, Debian, RHEL, CentOS, Fedora, OpenSUSE, Alpine, and Amazon Linux.

We also provide official package repositories for our users so that receiving and installing package updates can be trivial.

All the releases are signed by the public PGP key A0E98066 of Yichun Zhang.

  • For 32-bit Windows: openresty-1.19.9.1-win32.zip 16MB PGP – 6 August 2021
  • For 64-bit Windows: openresty-1.19.9.1-win64.zip 16MB PGP – 6 August 2021

See Windows-specific documentation for basic usage on Windows.

We provide docker images for users with containerization. You can get the official maintained images from Docker Hub.

It is highly recommended to install OpenResty on our Mac OS X or macOS systems via homebrew package manager, like this:

If you already installed OpenResty from homebrew/nginx , please run the following command first:

Hard-core developers may also want to try out the openresty-debug package:

Please note that you can find the configuration files for openresty under $HOMEBREW_PREFIX/etc/openresty/ (The default value of $HOMEBREW_PREFIX is /usr/local and you can check the value of $HOMEBREW_PREFIX with brew –config command).

Source Code Releases

All the releases are signed by the public PGP key A0E98066 of Yichun Zhang.

You can download the source release tarballs below. After that, you can follow the instructions on the Installation page to build and install it.

In this guide, we’ll walk you through how to install Linkerd into your Kubernetes cluster. Then we’ll deploy a sample application to show off what Linkerd can do.

Installing Linkerd is easy. First, you will install the CLI (command-line interface) onto your local machine. Using this CLI, you’ll then install the control plane onto your Kubernetes cluster. Finally, you’ll “mesh” one or more of your own services by adding Linkerd’s data plane to them.

Step 0: Setup

Before we can do anything, we need to ensure you have access to modern Kubernetes cluster and a functioning kubectl command on your local machine. (If you don’t already have a Kubernetes cluster, one easy option is to run one on your local machine. There are many ways to do this, including kind, k3d, Docker for Desktop, and more.)

You can validate your setup by running:

You should see output with both a Client Version and Server Version component.

Now that we have our cluster, we’ll install the Linkerd CLI and use it validate that your cluster is capable of hosting the Linkerd control plane.

(Note: if you’re using a GKE “private cluster”, there are some extra steps required before you can proceed to the next step.)

Step 1: Install the CLI

If this is your first time running Linkerd, you will need to download the linkerd command-line interface (CLI) onto your local machine. The CLI will allow you to interact with your Linkerd deployment.

To install the CLI manually, run:

Be sure to follow the instructions to add it to your path.

Alternatively, if you use Homebrew, you can install the CLI with brew install linkerd . You can also download the CLI directly via the Linkerd releases page.

Once installed, verify the CLI is running correctly with:

You should see the CLI version, and also Server version: unavailable . This is because you haven’t installed the control plane on your cluster. Don’t worry—we’ll fix that soon enough.

Step 2: Validate your Kubernetes cluster

Kubernetes clusters can be configured in many different ways. Before we can install the Linkerd control plane, we need to check and validate that everything is configured correctly. To check that your cluster is ready to install Linkerd, run:

If there are any checks that do not pass, make sure to follow the provided links and fix those issues before proceeding.

Step 3: Install the control plane onto your cluster

Now that you have the CLI running locally and a cluster that is ready to go, it’s time to install the control plane.

The first step is to install the control plane core. To do this, run:

The linkerd install command generates a Kubernetes manifest with all the core control plane resources. (Feel free to inspect the output.) Piping this manifest into kubectl apply then instructs Kubernetes to add those resources to your cluster.

Note

Some control plane resources require cluster-wide permissions. If you are installing on a cluster where these permissions are restricted, you may prefer the alternative multi-stage install process, which will split these “sensitive” components into a separate, self-contained step which can be handed off to another party.

Now let’s wait for the control plane to finish installing. Depending on the speed of your cluster’s Internet connection, this may take a minute or two. Wait for the control plane to be ready (and verify your installation) by running:

Next, we’ll install some extensions. Extensions add non-critical but often useful functionality to Linkerd. For this guide, we will need:

  1. The viz extension, which will install an on-cluster metric stack; or
  2. The buoyant-cloud extension, which will connect to a hosted metrics stack.

For this guide, you can install either or both. To install the viz extension, run:

To install the buoyant-cloud extension, run:

Once you’ve installed your extensions, let’s validate everything one last time:

Assuming everything is green, we’re ready for the next step!

Step 4: Explore Linkerd!

With the control plane and extensions installed and running, we’re now ready to explore Linkerd! If you installed the viz extension, run:

You should see a screen like this:

How to work around a 404 error in homebrew for macos The Linkerd dashboard in action

If you installed the buoyant-cloud extension, run:

You should see a screen lke this: How to work around a 404 error in homebrew for macos The Linkerd dashboard in action

Click around, explore, and have fun! One thing you’ll see is that, even if you don’t have any applications running on this cluster, you still have traffic! This is because Linkerd’s control plane components all have the proxy injected (i.e. the control plane runs on the data plane), so traffic between control plane compnments is also part of the mesh.

Step 5: Install the demo app

To get a feel for how Linkerd would work for one of your services, you can install a demo application. The emojivoto application is a standalone Kubernetes application that uses a mix of gRPC and HTTP calls to allow the users to vote on their favorite emojis.

Install emojivoto into the emojivoto namespace by running:

Before we mesh it, let’s take a look at the app. If you’re using Docker Desktop at this point you can visit http://localhost directly. If you’re not using Docker Desktop, we’ll need to forward the web-svc service. To forward web-svc locally to port 8080, you can run:

Now visit http://localhost:8080. Voila! The emojivoto app in all its glory.

Clicking around, you might notice that some parts of emojivoto are broken! For example, if you click on a doughnut emoji, you’ll get a 404 page. Don’t worry, these errors are intentional. (And we can use Linkerd to identify the problem. Check out the debugging guide if you’re interested in how to figure out exactly what is wrong.)

Next, let’s add Linkerd to emojivoto by running:

This command retrieves all of the deployments running in the emojivoto namespace, runs the manifest through linkerd inject , and then reapplies it to the cluster. The linkerd inject command adds annotations to the pod spec instructing Linkerd to “inject” the proxy as a container to the pod spec.

As with install , inject is a pure text operation, meaning that you can inspect the input and output before you use it. Once piped into kubectl apply , Kubernetes will execute a rolling deploy and update each pod with the data plane’s proxies, all without any downtime.

Congratulations! You’ve now added Linkerd to existing services! Just as with the control plane, it is possible to verify that everything worked the way it should with the data plane. To do this check, run:

That’s it! 👏

Congratulations, you’re now a Linkerd user! Here are some suggested next steps:

This reference guide contains information about upgrading, migrating from a legacy version, and uninstalling Shopify CLI.

Upgrade Shopify CLI

You can manage upgrades to Shopify CLI with the package manager for your platform. You must use the same package manager to upgrade that you originally used to install Shopify CLI.

For extension development, you might also need to update specific node modules manually to use all of the latest features.

Homebrew (macOS)

apt (Debian, Ubuntu)

    Download the latest .deb file for Shopify CLI from the releases page.

Install the downloaded file and make sure to replace /path/to/download/shopify-cli-x.y.z.deb with the path to your file’s location:

yum (CentOS 8+, Fedora, Red Hat, SUSE)

    Download the latest .rpm file for Shopify CLI from the releases page.

Install the downloaded file and make sure to replace /path/to/downloaded/shopify-cli-x.y.x.rpm with the path to your file’s location.

RubyGems (macOS, Linux, Windows 10)

Update node modules for extension development

For extension development, you might also need to update specific node modules manually to use all of the latest features.

Post-purchase checkout extension

Uninstall the client library and command line tool:

Yarn (without React):

Yarn (if using React):

NPM (without React):

NPM (if using React):

Install the new client library:

Yarn (without React):

Yarn (if using React):

NPM (without React):

NPM (if using React):

Install the new command line tool:

In your extension code, replace all references to the old client library with the new library:

  • If you’re using React, then replace @shopify/argo-post-purchase-react with @shopify/post-purchase-ui-extensions-react .
  • If you’re not using React, then replace @shopify/argo-post-purchase with @shopify/post-purchase-ui-extensions .

Update your scripts in package.json to use the new checkout-ui-extensions-run :

Product subscription app extension

Uninstall the client library and command line tool:

Yarn (without React):

Yarn (if using React):

NPM (without React):

NPM (if using React):

Install the new client library:

Yarn (without React):

Yarn (if using React):

NPM (without React):

NPM (if using React):

Install the new command line tool:

In your extension code, replace all references to the old client library with the new library:

  • If you’re using React, then replace @shopify/argo-admin-react with @shopify/admin-ui-extensions-react .
  • If you’re not using React, then replace @shopify/argo-admin with @shopify/admin-ui-extensions .

Update your scripts in package.json to use the new checkout-ui-extensions-run :

Migrate from a legacy version

As of version 0.9.0, Shopify CLI is installed and managed as a software package, instead of as a Git repository. If you’re using a version prior to 0.9.0, then you need to perform a one-time migration to keep using the CLI.

Complete the following steps to remove the legacy version and reinstall Shopify CLI as a package:

Check if you are using the legacy version

You can determine if you’re using a legacy version by running the following command. If you get a command not found error, then you’re using a legacy version.

How to work around a 404 error in homebrew for macos

Advanced Mac users that utilize the command line may occasionally encounter a “command not found” error message when attempting to run something in the command line. The “command not found” error in the Terminal can surface for several reasons in the command line of MacOS and Mac OS X, as we’ll discuss here, and of course we’ll offer solutions to these issues.

Why you see “command not found” error messages at the command line

The four most common reasons why you may see the “command not found” message in the Mac command line are as follows:

  • the command syntax was entered incorrectly
  • the command you are attempting to run is not installed
  • the command was deleted, or, worse, the system directory was deleted or modified
  • the users $PATH is incomplete, or $PATH has been erroneously set, reset, or cleared – this is the most common reason to see a ‘command not found’ message

Fortunately you can solve all of these issues and get the common working again as expected. If you simply entered the syntax wrong, entering it correctly resolves that, easy! Beyond that, we’ll start off with the most common reason, which is that the users $PATH is not set properly, or was reset somehow.

Fixing “Command Not Found” Terminal Messages in Mac OS with $PATH Setting

The most likely reason why Mac users may unexpectedly see the command not found message in the command line is something went awry with the users $PATH, or the path where the command is located is not set. You can check the $PATH with “echo $PATH” if you feel like it, otherwise you can just run the following commands to set the standard default path that Mac OS uses in the command line:

Hit return and run your command again, it should work fine.

By the way, even though we’re focusing on Mac OS here, this same idea applies to other unix and linux varieties as well.

Note if the intended command you’re attempting to use is located in a nonstandard directory or in another location (/usr/local/sbin/ etc), you can always add that new $PATH at the command line to specify where to look if needed.

Before, where the “command not found” message shows up running simple commands line ls and cd:

How to work around a 404 error in homebrew for macos

After, with those commands working successfully as expected:

How to work around a 404 error in homebrew for macos

How does this happen? Sometimes it can be running an incomplete or incorrect export $PATH command, a failure of adjusting environment variables, amongst other reasons.

You may need to refresh the command line shell for the change to take effect. If you relaunch the Terminal and get the “command not found” error again, then add the export $PATH commands to the users .bash_profile, .profile, or relevant shell profile if using an alternative shell in the Terminal app.

“Command not found” because command isn’t installed? Use HomeBrew

If the command just isn’t installed on the Mac, for common examples like wget, htop, or the many other useful unix commands available as Homebrew packages that are not otherwise preinstalled in Mac OS, then the simplest solution is to install and use Homebrew on the Mac to gain access to those command line utilities. Homebrew is a great tool anyway, so if you’re going to be spending time in the Terminal you’ll probably want it.

“Command not found” because a system directory is missing? Restore the missing system files

Every once in a while, Mac users may find themselves in a situation where they accidentally or inadvertently deleted system files from Mac OS. Usually this happens when someone is experimenting with the rm/srm commands and a wildcard, or maybe they became overly zealous with the Trash can when logged in as root. In any event, you can read here how to restore deleted or missing system files to Mac OS and Mac OS X – it usually involves restoring from a backup or reinstalling the system software itself.

Do you know of another reason why you may see the “command not found” error message in Mac OS Terminal? Maybe you have a better solution than what is offered above? Share with us in the comments below!

Fn is a lightweight Docker-based serverless functions platform you can run on your laptop, server, or cloud. In this installation tutorial we’ll walk through installing Fn.

Setting up a working Fn installation involves these three simple steps:

  • Ensure you have the necessary prerequisites
  • Download the Fn command line interface (CLI) utility
  • Run fn start command which will download the Fn server docker image and start the Fn server

Before you Begin

Before we can install Fn you’ll need:

  1. A computer running Linux or MacOS. If you have a Windows machine the easiest thing to do is install VirtualBox and run a free Linux virtual machine. 17.10 (or higher) needs to be installed and running.
    • Note: Version 0.6.12+ of the Fn CLI added Podman support. To use Podman to build Fn images, see: Using Fn with Podman instead of Docker

As you make your way through this tutorial, look out for this icon. Whenever you see it, it’s time for you to perform an action.

Download and Install the Fn CLI

For a MacOS installation you can use Homebrew:

Or, alternatively for Linux/Unix/MacOS from a terminal type the following:

Once installed you’ll see the Fn CLI version printed out. You should see something similar to the following displayed (although likely with a later version number):

Note: The above Fn CLI install script requires write access to restricted folders like /usr/local/bin. If the user doesn’t have write access to /usr/local/bin, or if you prefer to install Fn CLI in a different location, please see the Fn Manual Install section.

Start the Fn Server

The next install step is to start the Fn server. Since Fn runs on Docker it will need to be up and running too.

To start the Fn server you use the Fn CLI. Run the fn start command. This will download the Fn server docker image and start the Fn Server on port 8080 by default. Note that this process runs in the foreground so that it is easy to stop with Ctrl-C:

If the Fn Server starts up successfully, you should see output similar to:

Note: The Fn server stores its metadata in the

/.fn/data directory. If you run in to errors after updating the Fn server, you may want to delete the contents of this data directory and restart Fn server.

If you have some other process running on port 8080, fn start will fail with the following error:

In this case you can stop the other process and run fn start again. Alternatively, you can start Fn server on a different port.

Start Fn Server with DEBUG Mode Enabled

If you are troubleshooting an issue with a function, enabling the DEBUG log level can be very helpful. To enable DEBUG log level, start the Fn server with this command.

Now detailed information about errors will be displayed in the terminal window where you started the Fn server.

Start the Fn Server on a Different Port

Fn Server starts on port 8080 by default. To use a different port use the –port or the -p option. For example

When using a non-default port, you must point the Fn CLI to the new port using the FN_API_URL environment variable:

Alternatively, you can also set the api_url using Fn contexts.

Test the Install

Let’s verify everything is up and running correctly.

Open a new terminal and run the following:

You should see the version of the Fn CLI (client) and server displayed (your version will likely differ):

Note: If the server version is ‘?’ then the Fn CLI cannot reach the Fn server. If this happens it’s likely you have something else running on port 8080 or you started the server on a different port but forgot to set the FN_API_URL .

Configure your Context

Before we start using Fn, we need to configure Fn to point to an appropriate Docker registry so it knows where to push your function images to. Normally Fn points to your Docker Hub account by specifying your Docker Hub username. However, for pure local development we can simply configure Fn with an arbitrary value such as “fndemouser”.

We store the registry value in an Fn context. An Fn context represents our current deployment environment and we can have more than one if we are deploying to multiple servers.

Get a List of Contexts

First, get a list of available contexts.

The result should be similar to this:

Notice we have a default context which deploys to a local Fn server. The default context is created the first time you run the Fn CLI. However, we need to select default as our current context and set a registry value for remote or local Docker use.

In the previous articles of the series, we have seen the local Kubernetes solutions for Windows and Linux. In this article, we talk about MacOS and take a look at Docker Desktop and Minikube.

Similar to the Windows version, Docker for Mac provides an out of the box solution using a native virtualization system. Docker for Mac is very easy to install, but it also comes with limited configuration options.

On the other hand, Minikube has more complete Kubernetes support with multiple add-ons and driver support (e.g. VirtualBox) at the cost of a more complicated configuration.

Docker on Mac with Kubernetes support

Kubernetes is available in Docker for Mac for 18.06 Stable or higher and includes a Kubernetes server and client, as well as integration with the Docker executable. The Kubernetes server runs locally within your Docker instance and it is similar to the Docker on Windows solution. Notice that Docker on Mac uses a native MacOS virtualization system called Hyperkit.

When Kubernetes support is enabled, you can deploy new workloads not only on Kubernetes but also on Swarm and as standalone containers, without affecting any of your existing workloads.

Installation

As mentioned already, Kubernetes is included in the Docker on Mac binary so it installed automatically with it. You can download and install Docker for Mac from the Docker Store.

How to work around a 404 error in homebrew for macos

Note: If you already use a previous version of Docker (e.g. docker toolbox ), or an older version of Docker on Mac, we strongly recommend upgrading to the newer version, instead of having multiple docker installations versions active. If for some reason you cannot upgrade, you should be able to use Minikube instead.

After a successful installation, you need to explicitly enable Kubernetes support. Click the Docker icon in the status bar, go to “Preferences”, and on the “Kubernetes” tab check “Enable Kubernetes” as shown in the figure below.

How to work around a 404 error in homebrew for macos

This will start a single node Kubernetes cluster for you and install the kubectl command line utility as well. This might take a while, but the dialog will let you know once the Kubernetes cluster is ready.

How to work around a 404 error in homebrew for macos

Management

Now you are ready to deploy your workloads similar to Windows. If you are working with multiple Kubernetes clusters and different environments you should already be familiar with switching contexts. You can view contexts using the kubectl config command:

Set the context to use as docker-for-desktop :

Unfortunately, (as was the case with the Windows version), the bundled Kubernetes distribution does not come with its dashboard enabled. You need to enable it with the following command:

To view the dashboard in your web browser run:

And navigate to your Kubernetes Dashboard at: http://localhost:8001/api/v1/namespaces/kube-system/services/kubernetes-dashboard/proxy

Deployment

Deploying an application it is very straightforward. In the following example, we install a cluster of nginx servers using the commands:

Once Kubernetes completed downloading the containers, you can see the containers running by using the command:

You can view the dashboard, as mentioned before, to verify that nginx was indeed installed and your cluster is in working mode.

Kubernetes on Mac using Minikube

As another alternative to Docker-for-Mac, we can also use Minikube to set up and operate a single node Kubernetes cluster as a local development environment. Minikube for Mac supports multiple hypervisors such as VirtualBox, VMWare, and Hyperkit. In this tutorial, we are talking about the installation mode that uses VirtualBox. (If Hyperkit is available then Docker-for-Mac is easier to install.)

Installation

Instead of manually installing all the needed packages for Minikube, it is easier to install all prerequisites using the Homebrew package manager. If you don’t have the Homebrew package manager already installed, you can easily install it using the following command in the terminal application:

This will also include prerequisites such as Xcode command line tools.
To install Minikube itself including the prerequisites, we execute the following command:

After completion, the following packages will be installed in your machine:

Management

After successful installation, you can start Minikube by executing the following command in your terminal:

Now Minikube is started and you have created a Kubernetes context called “minikube”, which is set by default during startup. You can switch between contexts using the command:

Furthermore, to access the Kubernetes dashboard, you need to execute/run the following command:

Additional information, on how to configure and manage the Kubernetes cluster can be found in the official documentation.

Deployment

Deploying an application is the same for all drivers supported in Minikube. For example, you can deploy, expose, and scale a service using the usual kubectl commands, as provided in the Minikube Tutorial.

You can view the workloads of your Minikube cluster either through the Kubernetes dashboard or using the command line interface – kubectl. For example, to see the deployed pods you can use the command:

Conclusion

After looking at both solutions, here are our results…

Minikube is a mature solution available for all major operating systems. Its main advantage is that it provides a unified way of working with a local Kubernetes cluster regardless of the operating system. It is perfect for people that are using multiple OS machines and have some basic familiarity with Kubernetes and Docker.

  • Mature solution
  • Works on Windows (any version and edition), Mac, and Linux
  • Multiple drivers that can match any environment
  • Installs several plugins (such as dashboard) by default
  • Very flexible on installation requirements and upgrades
  • Installation and removal not as streamlined as other solutions
  • Does not integrate into the MacOS UI

Docker Desktop for Mac is a very user-friendly solution with good integration for the MacOS UI.

  • Very easy installation for beginners
  • All-in-one Docker and Kubernetes solution
  • Configurable via UI
  • Relatively new, possibly unstable
  • Limited configuration options (i.e. driver support)

Let us know in the comments which local Kubernetes solution you are using and why.

http-server is a simple, zero-configuration command-line static HTTP server. It is powerful enough for production usage, but it’s simple and hackable enough to be used for testing, local development and learning.

Installation:

Running on-demand:

Using npx you can run the script without installing it first:

Globally via npm

This will install http-server globally so that it may be run from the command line anywhere.

Globally via Homebrew

As a dependency in your npm package:

Usage:

[path] defaults to ./public if the folder exists, and ./ otherwise.

Now you can visit http://localhost:8080 to view your server

Note: Caching is on by default. Add -c-1 as an option to disable caching.

Available Options:

Command Description Defaults
-p or –port Port to use. Use -p 0 to look for an open port, starting at 8080. It will also read from process.env.PORT . 8080
-a Address to use 0.0.0.0
-d Show directory listings true
-i Display autoIndex true
-g or –gzip When enabled it will serve ./public/some-file.js.gz in place of ./public/some-file.js when a gzipped version of the file exists and the request accepts gzip encoding. If brotli is also enabled, it will try to serve brotli first. false
-b or –brotli When enabled it will serve ./public/some-file.js.br in place of ./public/some-file.js when a brotli compressed version of the file exists and the request accepts br encoding. If gzip is also enabled, it will try to serve brotli first. false
-e or –ext Default file extension if none supplied html
-s or –silent Suppress log messages from output
–cors Enable CORS via the Access-Control-Allow-Origin header
-o [path] Open browser window after starting the server. Optionally provide a URL path to open. e.g.: -o /other/dir/
-c Set cache time (in seconds) for cache-control max-age header, e.g. -c10 for 10 seconds. To disable caching, use -c-1 . 3600
-U or –utc Use UTC time format in log messages.
–log-ip Enable logging of the client’s IP address false
-P or –proxy Proxies all requests which can’t be resolved locally to the given url. e.g.: -P http://someurl.com
–proxy-options Pass proxy options using nested dotted objects. e.g.: –proxy-options.secure false
–username Username for basic authentication
–password Password for basic authentication
-S , –tls or –ssl Enable secure request serving with TLS/SSL (HTTPS) false
-C or –cert Path to ssl cert file cert.pem
-K or –key Path to ssl key file key.pem
-r or –robots Automatically provide a /robots.txt (The content of which defaults to User-agent: *\nDisallow: / ) false
–no-dotfiles Do not show dotfiles
–mimetypes Path to a .types file for custom mimetype definition
-h or –help Print this list and exit.
-v or –version Print the version and exit.

Magic Files

  • index.html will be served as the default file to any directory requests.
  • 404.html will be served if a file is not found. This can be used for Single-Page App (SPA) hosting to serve the entry page.

Catch-all redirect

To implement a catch-all redirect, use the index page itself as the proxy with:

Note the ? at the end of the proxy URL. Thanks to @houston3 for this clever hack!

TLS/SSL

First, you need to make sure that openssl is installed correctly, and you have key.pem and cert.pem files. You can generate them using this command:

You will be prompted with a few questions after entering the command. Use 127.0.0.1 as value for Common name if you want to be able to install the certificate in your OS’s root certificate store or browser so that it is trusted.

This generates a cert-key pair and it will be valid for 3650 days (about 10 years).

Then you need to run the server with -S for enabling SSL and -C for your certificate file.

If you wish to use a passphrase with your private key you can include one in the openssl command via the -passout parameter (using password of foobar)

e.g. openssl req -newkey rsa:2048 -passout pass:foobar -keyout key.pem -x509 -days 365 -out cert.pem

For security reasons, the passphrase will only be read from the NODE_HTTP_SERVER_SSL_PASSPHRASE environment variable.

This is what should be output if successful:

Checkout this repository locally, then:

Now you can visit http://localhost:8080 to view your server

You should see the turtle image in the screenshot above hosted at that URL. See the ./public folder for demo content.

In my research into font creation software, there was one free & open source piece that came to the top: FontForge. Some say it’s even more capable than FontLab Studio, which costs around $650 and seems to be what is most often recommended. FontForge makes me think of Gimp, which is a free, open source graphics manipulation program that is equivalent to Photoshop. Clunkier, and possibly more powerful in some areas.

There are no current “normal” installer for Mac. Nor for Windows or Linux, for that matter. So to install it, it must be compiled from source. It’s (almost) an easy process, so don’t be scared. I only had one glitch in the installation process, and once I got over that, the installation completed.

Get Homebrew

Here’s the first trick. Don’t compile it from source. I mean, don’t do it yourself. Let Homebrew do it for you. Installation instructions here. I already had homebrew installed, but if I remember correctly, I had to run the ruby command using sudo. I mean sudo /usr/bin/ruby -e “$(curl -fsSL https://raw.github.com/gist/323731)” . You should try it without sudo first. Homebrew does require xcode, which is a free download from the apple store. But it’s a big download that will probably take an hour or longer.

Install fontforge, first attempt

OK, so you have homebrew installed. Great! Now let’s put it to work. At your commandline, type: sudo brew install fontforge . Homebrew should already know about fontforge, and will determine that it has some dependencies. gettext, pango, etc. etc. And these dependencies have their own dependencies. Homebrew figures all that out, downloads what it needs to, compiles stuff, and you can just watch the code in the terminal and feel all super powerful. But when I did this, it failed when installing a glib library. Tried again, same fail, except quicker. We can’t get fontforge installed until this glib library is installed.

Install fontforge, second attempt, and success!

I could see that the problem was caused by a 404 on a patch file. By enabling verbose mode in homebrew and doing a little sleuthing at github, I found a fix. So if this happens to you, do this:

How to work around a 404 error in homebrew for macos

Have you ever wondered if it would be possible to make a functional website from scratch, but without paying the heavy time investment of learning how to program? Never fear! Sinatra has your back. Sinatra is described as a domain-specific language (DSL) “for quickly creating web applications in Ruby with minimal effort.”

So why should you try Sinatra, and what exactly is it? Sinatra is a simple web framework that gives a developer the “bricks” to build dynamic websites. It is driven by the Ruby language and represents a solid step before moving up to its better-known big brother Ruby on Rails.

What’s exciting about Sinatra is how quickly you can write websites that respond to users (i.e. HTTP requests) by outputting useful information (HTML pages on the browser) — all without needing decades of programming experience. There are other technologies out there that can help you quickly put those websites live on the net, like Heroku or Engine Yard.

Ruby is a language loved by developers for its ease of use. It is overseen by a vibrant community, as are the projects that spring from it. Sometimes reading the odd names for things makes you wonder if you have walked into the wrong nightclub by mistake, but don’t worry unduly. Treat this article as an open-top bus tour visiting all the sights at once. So if you are new to any of this, take your time. I only assume that you have basic computing literacy and enjoy bus tours.

The only tools you need to get going are a laptop or a virtual machine that you have admin access to, and a terminal or command prompt. For the purposes of this article, I’ll assume you have a Mac in front of you, with Homebrew installed. But most of the steps work exactly the same way on Windows, once you have downloaded a Ruby installation. Make sure you have a text editor available too.

So let’s start by installing Ruby. After that, we can install the modules (called “gems“) that Ruby needs to build Sinatra. (Yes, there is a kind of “dependency vortex” or bootstrapping going on already — “you first need to have X before running Y”. This happens a lot.)

The Azure Command-Line Interface (CLI) allows the execution of commands through a terminal using interactive command-line prompts or a script. You can install the Azure CLI locally on macOS computers. The Azure CLI on macOS allows the execution of various commands through a terminal using interactive command-line prompts or a script.

For the macOS platform, you can install the Azure CLI with homebrew package manager. Homebrew makes it easy to keep your installation of the CLI update to date. The CLI package has been tested on macOS versions 10.9 and later.

The current version of the Azure CLI is 2.34.1. For information about the latest release, see the release notes. To find your installed version and see if you need to update, run az version.

Install with Homebrew

Homebrew is the easiest way to manage your CLI install. It provides convenient ways to install, update, and uninstall. If you don’t have homebrew available on your system, install homebrew before continuing.

You can install the Azure CLI on macOS by updating your brew repository information, and then running the install command:

The Azure CLI has a dependency on the Homebrew [email protected] package, and will install it.

Troubleshooting

If you encounter a problem when installing the CLI through Homebrew, here are some common errors. If you experience a problem not covered here, file an issue on github.

Completion is not working

The Homebrew formula of Azure CLI installs a completion file named az in the Homebrew-managed completions directory (default location is /usr/local/etc/bash_completion.d/ ). To enable completion, please follow Homebrew’s instructions here.

Unable to find Python or installed packages

There may be a minor version mismatch or other issue during homebrew installation. The CLI doesn’t use a Python virtual environment, so it relies on finding the installed Python version. A possible fix is to install and relink the [email protected] dependency from Homebrew.

CLI version 1.x is installed

If an out-of-date version was installed, it could be because of a stale homebrew cache. Follow the update instructions.

Proxy blocks connection

You may be unable to get resources from Homebrew unless you have correctly configured it to use your proxy. Follow the Homebrew proxy configuration instructions.

If you are behind a proxy, HTTP_PROXY and HTTPS_PROXY must be set to connect to Azure services with the CLI. If you are not using basic auth, it’s recommended to export these variables in your .bashrc file. Always follow your business’ security policies and the requirements of your system administrator.

In order to get the bottle resources from Homebrew, your proxy needs to allow HTTPS connections to the following addresses:

  • https://formulae.brew.sh
  • https://homebrew.bintray.com

Update

The CLI is regularly updated with bug fixes, improvements, new features, and preview functionality. A new release is available roughly every three weeks.

The CLI provides an in-tool command to update to the latest version:

The az upgrade command was added in version 2.11.0 and will not work with versions prior to 2.11.0. Older versions can be updated by reinstalling as described in Install the Azure CLI.

This command will also update all installed extensions by default. For more az upgrade options, please refer to the command reference page.

You can also update your local Homebrew repository information and then upgrade the azure-cli package.

Uninstall

If you decide to uninstall the Azure CLI, we’re sorry to see you go. Before you uninstall, use the az feedback command to let us know what could be improved or fixed. Our goal is to make the Azure CLI bug-free and user-friendly. If you found a bug, we’d appreciate it if you file a GitHub issue.

Use homebrew to uninstall the azure-cli package.

Remove data

If you don’t plan to reinstall Azure CLI, remove its data.

Other installation methods

If you can’t use homebrew to install the Azure CLI in your environment, it’s possible to use the manual instructions for Linux. Note that this process is not officially maintained to be compatible with macOS. Using a package manager such as Homebrew is always recommended. Only use the manual installation method if you have no other option available.

For the manual installation instructions, see Install Azure CLI on Linux manually.

Next Steps

Now that you’ve installed the Azure CLI on macOS, take a short tour of its features and common commands.

После обновления до Sierra MariaDB больше не будет запускаться в моей системе. Поскольку он не содержал критических данных, я удалил его и попытался переустановить через homebrew, однако постустановка не удалась, и я также не могу запустить mysql_install_db вручную. Все в актуальном состоянии, и я пробовал несколько раз.

Я смог запустить службу и даже создать новую базу данных и пользователя, но при попытке установить пароль пользователя база данных зависала, говоря, что mysql.user поврежден. Бег optimize / analyze / repair казалось, он ничего не делал. Также не уверен, что было сделано по-другому, чтобы позволить MariaDB начать этот единственный раз.

Распространенной ошибкой, по-видимому, является mysqld got signal 4 , что заставляет меня думать, что существует несовместимость между MariaDB и gcc ?

Любая помощь очень ценится.

Установить MariaDB

Не удается выполнить шаг после установки.

Запустить после установки через Homebrew

Вручную запустить mysql_install_db

Начало DB

Информационная Система

Homebrew

MariaDB удаление

1 ответ

Как лучше установить python3.3 на Mac OS X? через homebrew или через официальный установщик в http://python.org/download /

Только что установлен MariaDB (с homebrew). Все выглядит так, как будто это работает, но я не могу понять, как заставить его автоматически запускаться на boot на моем Mac. Я не могу найти никаких специфичных для Mac документов для этого. Вывод установки говорит: To start mysqld at boot time you.

В давней традиции работать над проблемой в течение нескольких дней, а затем исправлять ее сразу после публикации вопроса. Я смог установить MariaDB, используя Homebrew на OSX Sierra.

Я собирался удалить и переустановить XCode и инструменты командной строки, но по какой-то причине решил убедиться, что он указывает правильный путь, и запустил:

В то же время я обнулил ssleay_rand_bytes и my_random_bytes части stacktrace и подумал, что, возможно, openssl не был установлен (он был), но затем переустановил его с помощью homebrew. Затем я решил попробовать еще раз, прежде чем убить XCode, и это сработало.

openssl уже установлено

переустановить openssl

установить mariadb

подключение к mariadb

Я хочу настроить mariadb на своем mac и попытаться заставить cakephp работать с ним. Я намеревался использовать homebrew, но когда я войду: brew install mariadb Я получаю: ==> Downloading http://ftp.osuosl.org/pub/mariadb/mariadb-5.3.7/kvm-tarbake-jaun curl: (22) The requested URL returned.

У меня есть проблема с установкой homebrew в mac sierra. Я следовал инструкциям по этой ссылке: https://coolestguidesontheplanet.com/installing-homebrew-on-macos-sierra-package-manager-for-unix-apps / Это команда: ruby -e $(curl -fsSL.

Похожие вопросы:

На Mac OS X 10.6.8 я только что установил Homebrew. Он сломался ClamXav. Поэтому я удалил его и установил clamav Homebrew. В конце процесса установки я получил это: / Warning: /usr/local/sbin is not.

Я использую Mac OS X Sierra, и я обнаружил, что clang (LLVM версия 8.1.0 (clang-802.0.38)) не поддерживает OpenMP: когда я запускаю clang -fopenmp program_name.c , я получаю следующую ошибку: clang.

Я не уверен, что это отличается от более ранних версий OS X, но я хотел бы поделиться тем, как я получил панель предпочтений MySQL для работы с MariaDB 10.10, установленной с homebrew. Во первых.

Как лучше установить python3.3 на Mac OS X? через homebrew или через официальный установщик в http://python.org/download /

Только что установлен MariaDB (с homebrew). Все выглядит так, как будто это работает, но я не могу понять, как заставить его автоматически запускаться на boot на моем Mac. Я не могу найти никаких.

Я хочу настроить mariadb на своем mac и попытаться заставить cakephp работать с ним. Я намеревался использовать homebrew, но когда я войду: brew install mariadb Я получаю: ==> Downloading.

У меня есть проблема с установкой homebrew в mac sierra. Я следовал инструкциям по этой ссылке: https://coolestguidesontheplanet.com/installing-homebrew-on-macos-sierra-package-manager-for-unix-apps.

После обновления до mac os x sierra мой репозиторий cvs (да, я все еще использую cvs) больше не доступен с удаленного компьютера. Я все еще могу получить доступ к командам cvs на локальной машине с.

Я пытался установить расширение pcntl с помощью homebrew в MacOS High sierra с помощью команды brew install homebrew/php/php71-pcntl brew install homebrew-php/php71-pcntl Также пробовал с php54, 55.

Depending on your platform, there are different methods available to install sentry-cli .

You can find the list of releases on the GitHub release page

. We provide executables for Linux, OS X and Windows. It’s a single file download and upon receiving the file you can rename it to just sentry-cli or sentry-cli.exe to use it.

If you are on OS X or Linux, you can use the automated downloader which will fetch the latest release version for you and install it:

This will automatically download the correct version of sentry-cli for your operating system and install it. If necessary, it will prompt for your admin password for sudo . For a different installation location or for systems without sudo (like Windows), you can export INSTALL_DIR=/custom/installation/path before running this command.

To verify it’s installed correctly you can bring up the help:

Installation via NPM

There is also the option to install sentry-cli via npm for specialized use cases. This, for instance, is useful for build servers. The package is called @sentry/cli and in the post installation it will download the appropriate release binary:

You can then find it in the .bin folder:

In case you want to install this with npm system wide with sudo you will need to pass -–unsafe-perm to it:

This installation is not recommended however.

Downloading From a Custom Source

By default, this package will download sentry-cli from the CDN managed by Fastly

. To use a custom CDN, set the npm config property sentrycli_cdnurl . The downloader will append “//sentry-cli-” .

Another option is to use the environment variable SENTRYCLI_CDNURL .

Available Installation Options

Options listed below control how sentry-cli install script behaves, when installed through npm .

SENTRYCLI_CDNURL : If set, the script will use given URL for fetching the binary. Defaults to https://downloads.sentry-cdn.com/sentry-cli .

SENTRYCLI_USE_LOCAL : If set to 1 , sentry-cli binary will be discovered from your $PATH and copied locally instead of being downloaded from external servers. It will still verify the version number, which has to match.

SENTRYCLI_SKIP_DOWNLOAD : If set to 1 , the script will skip downloading the binary completely.

SENTRYCLI_SKIP_CHECKSUM_VALIDATION : If set to 1 , the script will skip the checksum validation phase. You can manually verify the checksums by visiting Build Checksums page.

SENTRYCLI_NO_PROGRESS_BAR : If set to 1 , the script will not display download progress bars. This is a default behavior for CI environments.

SENTRYCLI_LOG_STREAM : If set, the script will change where it writes its output. Possible values are stdout and stderr . Defaults to stdout .

Installation via Homebrew

If you are on OS X, you can install sentry-cli via homebrew:

Installation via Scoop

If you are on Windows, you can install sentry-cli via Scoop

For unsupported distributions and CI systems, we offer a Docker image that comes with sentry-cli preinstalled. It is recommended to use the latest tag, but you can also pin to a specific version. By default, the command runs inside the /work directory. Mount relevant project folders and build outputs there to allow sentry-cli to scan for resources:

Updating and Uninstalling

You can use sentry-cli update and sentry-cli uninstall to update or uninstall the sentry-cli binary. These commands may be unavailable in certain situations, generally when sentry-cli has been installed by a tool like homebrew or yarn, either directly or as a dependency of another package. In those cases, the same tool will need to be used for updating and removal. If you find that sentry-cli update and sentry-cli uninstall aren’t working and you don’t know how the package was installed, running which sentry-cli will often provide a clue as to which tool to use.

When downloading an executable from a remote server, it’s often a good practice to verify, that what has been downloaded, is in fact what we expect it to be. To make sure that this is the case, we can use checksum validation. A checksum is the value calculated from the contents of a file, in a form of hash, in our case SHA256, and it acts as the data integrity check, as it’s always producing the same output, for a given input.

Below is the table of SHA256 checksums for all available build targets that our CLI supports. To calculate the hash of a downloaded file, you can use sha256sum utility, which is preinstalled in OSX and most Linux distributions.

The Envoy project provides a number of pre-built Docker images for both amd64 and arm64 architectures.

If you are installing on Mac OSX , you can install natively with brew .

Once you have installed Envoy, check out the quick start guide for more information on getting your Envoy proxy up and running.

Install Envoy on Debian GNU/Linux¶

Install Envoy on Ubuntu Linux¶

Install Envoy on RPM-based distros¶

You can install Envoy on Centos/Redhat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) using packages created by Tetrate until official packages exist.

Install Envoy on Mac OSX¶

You can install Envoy on Mac OSX using the official brew repositories.

Install Envoy on Windows¶

You can run Envoy using the official Windows Docker image.

Install Envoy using Docker¶

You can run Envoy using the official Docker images.

The following commands will pull and show the Envoy version of current images.

Contrib images¶

As described in this document, the Envoy project allows extensions to enter the repository as “contrib” extensions. The requirements for such extensions are lower, and as such they are only available by default in special images. The envoyproxy/envoy-contrib image contains all contrib extensions on top of an Ubuntu base. The envoyproxy/envoy-contrib-debug image contains all contrib extensions on top of an Ubuntu base as well as debug symbols. Throughout the documentation, extensions are clearly marked as being a contrib extension or a core extension.

Tools images¶

The Envoy project ships images for tools that are separate from the proxy binary but are useful in supporting systems such as CI, configuration generation pipelines, etc. Currently installed tools in /usr/local/bin include:

Pre-built Envoy Docker images¶

The following table shows the available Docker images

Release binary with symbols stripped on top of an Ubuntu Bionic base.

Release contrib binary with symbols stripped on top of an Ubuntu Bionic base.

Release binary with symbols stripped on top of a distroless base.

Release binary with symbols stripped on top of a Windows Server 1809 base.

Release binary with debug symbols on top of an Ubuntu Bionic base.

Release contrib binary with debug symbols on top of an Ubuntu Bionic base.

Release tools on top of an Ubuntu Bionic base.

Release binary with symbols stripped on top of an Ubuntu Bionic base.

Release contrib binary with symbols stripped on top of an Ubuntu Bionic base.

Release binary with symbols stripped on top of a distroless base.

Release binary with debug symbols on top of an Ubuntu Bionic base.

Release contrib binary with debug symbols on top of an Ubuntu Bionic base.

Release binary with symbols stripped on top of a Windows Server 1809 base. Includes build tools.

Release tools on top of an Ubuntu Bionic base.

Build image which includes tools for building multi-arch Envoy and containers.

In the above repositories, we tag a vX.Y-latest image for each security/stable release line.

In the above dev repositories, the latest tag points to a container including the last Envoy build on main that passed tests.

The Envoy project considers main to be release candidate quality at all times, and many organizations track and deploy main in production. We encourage you to do the same so that issues can be reported as early as possible in the development process.

The envoy-build-ubuntu image does not contain a working Envoy server, but can be used for building Envoy and related containers. This image requires 4-5GB of available disk space to use.

All the docker images are available in Docker Hub, but its rate limit policy doesn’t apply to users since the “envoyproxy” namespace is allowlisted.