How to work with external drives on a chromebook

Chris Hoffman
How to work with external drives on a chromebookChris Hoffman
Editor-in-Chief

Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He’s written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami’s NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times—and that’s just here at How-To Geek. Read more.

How to work with external drives on a chromebook

Chromebooks include only a small amount of internal storage. However, they support external storage devices like USB flash drives, external hard drives, and microSD cards. Use an external storage device to expand your Chromebook’s storage or transfer files between Chromebooks and other computers, including Windows PCs and Macs.

Google includes support for a variety of file systems, and whatever you connect should just work–mostly. You can even connect an external disc drive via USB to access files stored on DVDs and CDs. Check your Chromebook to see what external storage ports it offers.

Supported File Systems

Chrome OS supports a variety of file systems on removable devices. It supports the cross-platform FAT16, FAT32, and exFAT file systems. It also supports the Windows NTFS file system with full read and write support.

It can also read the Mac HFS+ file system, but it can’t write to it. Chromebooks support the MTP protocol for digital cameras and music players, and for external disc drives that connect via USB, Chromebooks can read the ISO9660 and UDF file systems on discs.

You’re probably best off formatting your external drive as exFAT. In fact, if you format a USB drive or SD card from within Chrome OS, it will automatically format the drive as exFAT without even asking which file system you want to use.

How to Access a Drive and Work With Files

To use an external storage device on Chrome OS, just connect it to your Chromebook and open the Files app. The drive will appear in the left pane of the files app, below Google Drive and the Downloads folder, which contains all the files stored locally on your Chromebook.

To move files to the drive, you can either drag and drop them from the Downloads folder or Google Drive, or right-click them, select “Copy” and then right click in the drive and select “Paste”. When you use the “Save As” dialog to download a file in Chrome OS, you can choose to download it directly to an external drive.

Common keyboard shortcuts like Ctrl+A to select all files, Ctrl+C to copy files, Ctrl+X to cut files, and Ctrl+V to paste files also work here. Right-click inside the drive and select “New Folder”–or press Ctrl+E–to create a new folder on the drive.

How to work with external drives on a chromebook

The options at the top right corner of the window allow you to change the view, so you can view a grid of thumbnail previews instead of a list of files and sort the files by file name, size, type, or date modified. There’s also a search button for quickly finding files.

Many files, including videos, music files, images, PDFs, and other documents can be opened directly from the external drive. Just store them on the drive and double-click them.

How to work with external drives on a chromebook

How to See How Much Storage Space is Available

To see how much storage space is available on your external drive, select it in the left pane and then click the menu button at the top right corner of the Files window. You’ll see an indication of how much space is left. Delete files from the drive to make more room. You can also use this trick to see how much space is available on your Chromebook. Just select the “Downloads” folder first and then click the menu button. (Though this experimental feature will give you more information.)

There’s also an option to view normally hidden files here.

How to work with external drives on a chromebook

How to Format a Drive

To erase and format the drive, right-click the name of the drive and select “Format Device”. Chrome OS will format the drive with the exFAT file system. There’s no way to choose a different file system, change the drive’s partition layout, or name the drive.

Warning: Formatting a drive will erase the current file system and any files on the drive at the moment.

How to work with external drives on a chromebook

How to Eject a Drive

When you’re done with the drive, be sure to eject it before removing it from your Chromebook. This protects against data loss by ensuring your Chromebook is done writing to the drive before you remove it. It’s the same reason you should “safely remove” drives on Windows

To do so, either click the “Eject” icon to the right of the drive’s name in the Files app or right-click the drive and select “Eject Device”.

How to work with external drives on a chromebook

External storage devices work alright on Chrome OS, but you won’t find a lot of extra features. For example, there’s no way to partition your device or rename it without heading to a Windows, Mac, or Linux computer. And, while you can connect a DVD drive to your Chromebook via a USB cable, you can only access the files on it. There’s no way to play copy-protected DVD movies without ripping them first. But if all you need is some extra space, an external drive will do the trick.

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How to work with external drives on a chromebook Chris Hoffman
Chris Hoffman is Editor-in-Chief of How-To Geek. He’s written about technology for over a decade and was a PCWorld columnist for two years. Chris has written for The New York Times, been interviewed as a technology expert on TV stations like Miami’s NBC 6, and had his work covered by news outlets like the BBC. Since 2011, Chris has written over 2,000 articles that have been read nearly one billion times—and that’s just here at How-To Geek.
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Google designed Chrome OS as a lightweight, secure platform for laptops, meaning Chromebooks initially didn’t need lots of storage. Now they support Android and the limited storage can be problematic. To help overcome this problem, here’s how to use Chromebook with external storage, whether it’s an external hard drive or a memory card.

Android the Space Hog

The whole idea behind Chrome OS was to create a platform that supports web-based apps. You didn’t need to download and install these apps, which required relatively no space on the Chromebook’s local drive. The internal storage, instead, hosted the operating system and your files.

Now that Google Play appears on most modern Chromebooks, Android apps go directly to the internal storage, meaning you need additional space to house your downloaded media, photos, and files. That’s where external storage comes in.

Here are the supported file systems, according to Google:

    (FAT16, FAT32, exFAT)
  • HFS+ (read-only on journaled HFS+)
  • ISO9660 (read-only)
  • MTP
  • NTFS
  • UDF (read-only)

As shown above, your Chromebook can read and write to any external drive formatted on a Windows-based PC. It can also read a drive formatted on a Mac, but it can’t write. It also supports the Media Transfer Protocol used by media devices, like DSLRs and mobile devices.

Here are the types of external drives supported by Chrome OS:

  • USB hard drives (HDD or SSD)
  • USB thumb drives
  • USB CD-ROM (read-only)
  • USB DVD-ROM (read-only)
  • SD Card
  • MicroSD Card

How to Connect Chromebook to External Storage

There are four ways to connect an external drive, depending on your Chromebook’s configuration:

  • USB-A: The older, rectangular USB port with square corners. You can only insert the male connector one way.
  • USB-C: The newer, smaller USB port with rounded corners. You can insert the male connector up or down.
  • SD card slot: This thin slot typically measures 24mm across. You can use a MicroSD card, but it requires an adapter.
  • MicroSD card slot: This thin slot typically measures 11mm across.

How to Access an External Drive on Chromebook

As long as you have an external storage device that has the connections mentioned above, you can connect your drive to your Chromebook. Here's how:

Connect your external drive or insert your card into the appropriate port.

Chrome OS detects the drive and presents a notification. Click Open Files App.

Alternatively, if you missed the notification, click the Files app located on the shelf.

How to Use Your Chromebook External Hard Drive

With the Files app open, locate your external drive listed on the left. In this example, both a MicroSD card and a thumb drive are available. Select the listed external drive to view its contents.

You can move files to and from the new drive just like you can in Windows using the mouse or keyboard commands. For example, here's how to move screenshots from the Chromebook’s external storage to a USB thumb drive.

In the Files app, select your external drive.

Right-click within the drive’s contents listed on the right, then select New Folder. Alternatively, you can press the CTRL+E to create a new folder.

Type the folder’s name and press Enter.

Click Images listed on the left. This is where screenshots you capture with your Chromebook will be stored.

Select a batch of screenshots by holding down the mouse button to create a rectangle around the files you want to copy or move. Alternatively, you can select the first item, then press Shift and select the other items to add to your selection.

Release the mouse button to complete the selection.

With your files highlighted, click and hold in the highlighted area to drag them all to the new folder on your drive. If you’d rather just copy and paste, right-click the selected files, then click Copy. You can also press the CRTL+C.

If you’re using the copy and paste method, go back into the external drive’s new folder and press the CTRL+V to paste. Otherwise, you can click and drag the files from one location to another.

How to Format the External Storage Drive With Chromebook

If you want to wipe the new drive before transferring your Chromebook’s files, formatting is easy. Here's what you need to do

Open the Files app and select the drive.

Right-click the drive, then select Format Device. Alternatively, click the three-dot More icon in the top right corner.

In the pop-up window, name your drive using the keyboard (if needed) and select a file type. You only have three options: FAT32, exFAT, and NTFS. If you plan to use the drive on Windows too, select NTFS. Click Erase and Format to proceed.

How to Check the Drive’s Capacity

Unlike Windows, Chrome OS doesn’t provide a visual measurement of the drive’s storage capacity within the Files app. That said, you can still find out how much space you have left.

With the drive already connected, open the Files app and select it.

Click the three-dot More icon in the top right corner.

You’ll see the amount of available space at the bottom of the drop-down menu.

Properly Eject a Drive

While you can certainly remove the device at any time, data loss may occur. Instead, you should be sure to properly eject the device to ensure Chrome OS isn’t writing to the drive.

How to work with external drives on a chromebook

A Chromebook supports different external storage devices including hard drives, USB flash memory, and micro SD cards. These external storage devices can be used to expand the small storage space on a Chromebook and transfer files between a Chromebook and other devices including Mac and Windows computers. The Chrome operating system supports file systems like FAT32, FAT16, exFAT, and NTFS. It can also read the Mac HFS+ file system but cannot write on it. Chromebook can read ISO9660 and UDF files on disc and also support MTP protocol for external disc drives that connect to USB, digital cameras, and music players. When you connect an external device to a Chromebook for the first time, it will automatically format that drive to exFAT. You can format your storage device to exFAT or let Chromebook do it automatically for you.

Almost any external hard drive device will work with a Chrome operating system. The only condition is that it should connect through USB because these are the ports available on a Chromebook. No matter how fancy the drive is or if it has special added software features, it will be blank on a Chromebook and only used as a storage device for moving files. There are different types of Chromebook compatible external hard drives in the market, and you can make your choice in regards to the amount of storage space you need.

If you want to see how much storage space your external drive has on Chromebook, you can do this in the files section by the menu bottom in the top corner of the files page. You will see the available space at the bottom of the drop-down menu.

Part 2: Why Do I Need a Chromebook Compatible External Hard Drive

A Chromebook has some storage space on the device itself and 100GB of free storage space on the cloud. This storage space might be enough for one user and they do not need extra space. But some heavy users require more storage space and other people prefer to have all their files off the Internet for security reasons. An external hard drive is a more personal, more secure, and long term location to store all your files. You can also use it to move data from your Chromebook to your other devices and vice versa easily.

Part 3: How to Use External Drive with My Chromebook

You do not need to install any drivers on your Chromebook. The external drive is also powered through the USB port on your Chromebook so there is no need for any extra attachments or cords before the connection is made. There are no hidden steps. Just plug in the Chromebook compatible external hard drive and the Chromebook will format your drive properly the first time it is inserted. After plugging in, simply open the files section in the launcher. The hard drive will operate just like a hard drive on any other computer with folders that can be broken into subfolders and even more subfolders within that. There is an eject button next to the device in files. You should use this button to eject the hard drive every time you want to disconnect. Unplugging the hard drive without ejecting can have detrimental effects on the hard drive and the Chromebook as well.

Part 4: How to Eject a Drive

Whenever your Chromebook compatible external hard drive is connected to the Chromebook, you should not disconnect the drive without protocol. Disturbing the connection when Chromebook is still writing on the drive can cause data loss and can also be damaging to the Chromebook and the hard drive in different ways. To eject a hard drive properly from Chromebook, you can click on the eject button by the side where the drive name is in the files section. You can also right-click on the hard drive in files and select “eject device” from the options that pop up. Another option is to use the shortcut for this; press Ctrl+Shift+E for this.

Part 5: Recover data from Chromebook

In the process of using hard drives on Chromebook and other ways, data can be lost from your Chromebook compatible hard drive. You will need hard drive data recovery software to recover the lost data. Recoverit can be used to recover lost data from Chromebook in the same way where you recover data from a Windows hard drive. It is simple, easy, and fast to use.

Your Safe & Reliable Hard Drive Data Recovery Software

  • Recover lost or deleted files, photos, audio, music, emails from any storage device effectively, safely and completely.
  • Supports data recovery from recycle bin, hard drive, memory card, flash drive, digital camera, and camcorders.
  • Supports to recover data for sudden deletion, formatting, hard drive corruption, virus attack, system crash under different situations.

A Chromebook has limited storage space on the device. An option to expand this space can be the use of external hard drives. They can also help you to transfer files between devices. Different external drives work on Chromebook so there are options to choose from. If you lose files on your external drive or Chromebook during the use of external drives, then you can recover them with Recoverit hard drive data recovery software.

How to work with external drives on a chromebook

Chromebooks are cloud-based machines and low on storage space. However, you can use external drives with them and it’s as straight-forward as Windows or macOS.

Chromebooks are cloud-based computers that are low on local storage. This keeps the price down, but you might have a lot of data and need more storage space. Google Drive is an effective method of storing your files in the cloud so they are always available – and you can always buy more space.

But sometimes you might need to transfer files by moving a flash drive or have a bunch of movies on an external drive for times when you don’t have an internet connection. Or, perhaps you have sensitive files that you don’t want to store online. Whatever the case, whether it’s a flash drive or large external hard drive, here is how to use it with your Chromebook.

Using an External Drive with a Chromebook

When you plug in your external drive (here I’m using a flash drive) you should see a notification in the lower-right corner of the screen. Click on it to open the Files app to view the content on the drive.

How to work with external drives on a chromebook

If you miss the notification or want to look at the files on your external drive, you can click the Launcher button and open the Files app.

How to work with external drives on a chromebook

Choose your drive and like you can with other file management systems such as File Explorer on Windows or Finder on macOS. You have all the options you’re familiar with such as changing the file view, renaming or deleting files, sorting by type, name, or date modified.

How to work with external drives on a chromebook

If you need to search for a file, click the magnifying glass icon at the top and type in your query.

How to work with external drives on a chromebook

The process of moving files in and out of the drive or into other folders is also the same as other computer systems. You can drag and drop items or copy and paste. Keyboard shortcuts are essentially the same as on Windows, too. Hit Ctrl + A to select all, Ctrl + C to copy, and Ctrl + V to paste them. Of course, there is also the ability to “Cut” instead of “Copy” if you are moving a file and not copying it.

How to work with external drives on a chromebook

Another important thing when using an external drive on your Chromebook is you need to eject it. On Windows, you just remove the drive, but Chrome OS is pickier. If you just remove a drive, you will see a notification like the one below.

How to work with external drives on a chromebook

To eject a drive properly, click (or tap on a touchscreen) the small “Eject” button to the right of the drive.

How to work with external drives on a chromebook

Your Chromebook will work with the most common file types including Office files, video files like AVI and MP3, and image files such as JPG, GIF, and PNG. To see all supported files check out this Chromebook support page.

However, if you have a file that your Chromebook can’t open, there’s probably an app for that. When that happens, Chrome OS will ask which app you want to use and even make suggestions. For example, in the shot below I need to open a VOB video file and it’s suggesting VLC. And because VLC isn’t installed yet, it gives me a link to install it from the Web Store. If you don’t like the app suggestion, hit the “See more” link at the bottom of the window.

How to work with external drives on a chromebook

Using an external drive on a Chromebook is straight-forward. If you’ve used one with a PC or Mac, you’ll have no problem using it and getting things done.

Chromebooks can use the following file types, external devices, and cloud storage systems.

Important: If you use your Chromebook at work or school, some devices or files might not work with your Chromebook. For more help, contact your administrator.

File types

  • Microsoft Office files: .doc, .docx, .xls, .xlsx, .ppt (read-only), .pptx (read-only). Learn more about how to view and edit Office documents.
  • Media: .3gp, .avi, .mov, .mp4, .m4v, .m4a, .mp3, .mkv, .ogv, .ogm, .ogg, .oga, .webm, .wav
  • Images: .bmp, .gif, .jpg, .jpeg, .png, .webp
  • Compressed files: .zip, .rar
  • Other: .txt, .pdf (read-only)

External devices

Important: Make sure you have the latest version of Chrome OS. Learn how to update your Chromebook.

Chromebooks can connect to the following accessories:

  • Adapters
  • Docking stations
  • Drawing tablets
  • Ethernet dongles
  • External storage (SD and USB hard drives, thumb drives, USB CD-ROM, and read-only DVD-ROM)
    • To remove a storage device safely, select Eject .

    For best results, look for accessories that are certified Works With Chromebook. These accessories have been tested and proven to meet Chromebook compatibility standards, to ensure they work seamlessly with your Chromebook.

    Important: AMR and GSM are no longer supported on Chromebooks.

    You can access files on external devices connected to your Chromebook if they use the following types of filesystems:

    • FAT (FAT16, FAT32, exFAT)
    • HFS+ (read-only on journaled HFS+)
    • ISO9660 (read-only)
    • MTP
    • NTFS
    • UDF (read-only)

    Chromebooks work with cloud file systems, like Google Drive, Box, or SMB. To connect to an SMB file share:

    1. In the corner of your screen, select the Launcher Up arrow .
    2. Open Files .
    3. In the top right, select More .
    4. Select Add new serviceSMB Shares.
    5. A window will open. Select Add File Share. Fill out your info.
    6. Select Add.

    To connect to other cloud file systems:

    1. In the corner of your screen, select the Launcher Up arrow .
    2. Open Files .
    3. In the top right, select More .
    4. Select Install new service.
    5. To install a new cloud file system, choose a system and follow the onscreen steps.

    Chromebooks can connect to certain phones. You can unlock your Chromebook with an Android phone.

    Troubleshoot problems with file types and external devices

    This error means that this file type isn’t working on your Chromebook at this time.

    Instead, try saving the file to Google Drive or another web application, then opening it in your browser.

    Your Chromebook might not support the external storage device you’re trying to use. Make sure your external storage device’s format is supported.

    If your storage device is supported, make sure your Chromebook is using the latest version of Chrome OS.

    If your Chromebook is using the latest version, and no updates are available, try using Google Drive to view the files:

    1. Plug your storage device into another computer.
    2. Upload the files from the device to a cloud file system, such as Google Drive.
    3. Open your Chromebook, then open Google Drive to view the files.

    You’ll need to reformat your external storage device before you can use it with your Chromebook. Follow the steps below.

    Important: These steps will erase all your files stored on the storage device. Make sure to back them up somewhere else before erasing.

    Linux on Chrome OS (Crostini) doesn’t automatically detect external drives you plug into your Chromebook. But you can easily set one up.

    You may access external drives from the Files app on your Chromebook, but if you want to access them in the Linux environment, also known as Crostini, you may look in a directory like /media, and they aren't there. What gives?

    It's easy to set up any external optical, USB, or SD media for command-line access on your Chromebook. Here's how to do it.

    Why Your Drive Isn’t Mounted in Crostini by Default

    Why isn't your drive available in Crostini by default? The main reason is security. From a security standpoint, you just don't know where that drive has been, even if in practice you know it belongs to you. But you wouldn't plug in some random USB stick you found on the ground somewhere, right?

    The Linux environment is designed to minimize security risks by limiting access from outside sources by default.

    Sharing External Drives With Linux

    To share your drive, go to the Files app and right-click an external drive (if you're using an external mouse) or touch the trackpad with two fingers and select Share with Linux in the contextual menu.

    You'll then see a dialog box asking you to confirm that you want to share your drive with Linux. Click OK to share your drive with Linux.

    Where Is Your Drive Mounted?

    To find your files, open the Settings menu, click Advanced > Linux Development Environment. Then select Manage shared folders. You should see the drives you've shared with Linux.

    In the command line, they'll be mounted under /mnt/chromeos. You can use all the Linux commands that would work on other files in the Linux hierarchy.

    In addition to whole drives, you can mount individual folders in Crostini as well. Just share that directory on your drive in the Files app as shown earlier.

    When you're done using your drive, click the X next to them in the menu, and Chrome OS will unmount them from the Linux environment.

    Now You Can Use External Drives With Linux on Your Chromebook

    With a few clicks, you can use external drives in the Linux Crostini environment on your Chromebook securely and easily. Read on for more tips and tricks for new Chromebook users.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebookChromeBooks are known for their affordability and ease of use. However, one thing that ChromeBooks are often lacking are options available for external storage. ChromeBooks ship from the factory with very small hard drives and these are often very hard to upgrade. Many users will use Google Cloud storage but some users would like a Chromebook external hard drive to backup their data and have more storage space (maybe up to 8TB!). If you do not need all the storage of an external hard drive, it may be worth looking at some of the best Chromebook compatible USB flash drives or a Chromebook compatible SD card.

    The only option for most Chromebook users is to buy an external hard drive that is compatible with their ChromeBook set up. Having more storage space will allow you to really use your Chromebook as your main computer. You may also want to check out several Chromebook cases to go along with your new storage. A basic external hard drive that works with a Chromebook will run between $50 to $100 for a 500GB to a 1TB Chromebook hard drive.

    Most external hard drives will work with ChromeOS as long as they are formatted the correct way. Once properly formatted, a user can store many more photos and videos than is normally allowed in a ChromeBook. This is all very easy to do, but first the correct external hard drive for a ChromeBook must be purchased. Below are some external hard drives recommended for ChromeBook that will surely give users all the storage that they need to backup their files.

    The hard disk drive (HDD) has been the standard technology for storage drives since the 1950s, but solid state drives (SSD) are rising in popularity and installed by default in most Chromebooks. The main reason for this is the lack of mechanical moving parts in a solid state drive. This drastically lowers the chances of drive failure and ultimately, the loss of your data when traveling with your Chromebook.

    Solid state drives (SSD) are also faster at accessing data and faster at starting up, and they’re not affected by magnetic fields or drastic temperature changes like a HDD. Although the variety of types of hard drives this guide covers seems broad, consider buying the ones with fewer moving parts (such as an SSD), and look at the price per GB, which is dropping every day. Your best value will typically be found in a storage size somewhere in the middle range of what’s available. The list below has some of the best external storage options for Chromebook users.

    Toshiba Canvio Advance 1TB Portable External Hard Drive USB 3.0

    The Toshiba’s Canvio Basics portable hard drive works great on Chromebooks. You can store up to 2TB on different models of this external hard drive. Plug and play operation. Easy to use with no software to install . This is a great external hard drive for a Chromebook.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebookAs is widely known, Chromebooks tend to have small internal hard drives. Most users will probably find themselves getting external storage one day. The most common way to increase the storage capacity of a Chromebook is getting a USB flash drive. There are many different USB flash drives that are compatible with Chromebooks. Files saved locally are stored in the Downloads folder. You can also save to external storage media, such as an SD card or a USB flash drive. Remember that files can be deleted from a download folder in ChromeOS when the disk space is limited. Thus, it is recommended to find other storage options if you intend on downloading many things to your Chromebook.

    Chromebooks include only a small amount of internal storage. However, they support external storage devices like USB flash drives, external hard drives, and microSD cards. Use an external storage device to expand your Chromebook’s storage or transfer files between Chromebooks and other computers, including Windows PCs and Mac

    Once a USB flash drive or a SD memory card is purchased, it is very easy to use with a Chromebook. Just plug it in and it will start working. Most Chromebook users will want to do a few more things with the USB flash drives that they purchase. This short tutorial will show how to move files from a Chromebook to a USB flash drive, how to format a USB flash drive on a Chromebook, and how to delete files from a USB flash drive on a Chromebook. If you need more storage space on your Chromebook, it might be best to purchase a Chromebook compatible external harddrive. If you do not need that much, it might make sense to get an SD card that works with Chromebooks.

    How do I transfer files to/from My Flash Drive/Memory card on My Chromebook?

    You can transfer your files manually to your Flash Drive or Memory card using your Chromebook. The flash drive (whether an SDCard or a USB Stick) should auto-open the files app.

    1. Open the Files app by clicking on the icon.
    2. When connected to your Chromebook, the device appears as a folder in the left navigation panel of the Files app.
    3. Click to place check marks next to any files and folders you want to copy.
    4. Drag and drop the selected items to copy them between the external drive and Chromebook.

    Alternatively, press Ctrl + C to copy the selected items to the clipboard, navigate to the desired destination, and then press Ctrl + V to paste to the new location. It is this easy to move files around the ChromeOS “file explorer”

    Formatting a Memory Card or Flash Drive using Chromebook

    How Do I format My Memory card/Flash drive on my Chrome book? Below are the steps to Format a Memory card/Flash drive on a Chromebook. A formatting option is available directly from the File Manager; no extra apps, add-ons or actions needed.

    1. Click the apps icon button and then click Files or use the keyboard shortcut Alt+Shift+M.
    2. Right-click on the drive you wish to format and select the ‘Format Device‘ option from the menu.
    3. Chrome OS will prompt you to confirm that you wish to format. To proceed click ‘OK’.
    4. When formatting has completed you will see a small toast appear in the lower right hand corner.

    Devices are formatted to a FAT32 file system. This is perhaps the most versatile and widely supported, with read and write support through most operating systems and devices (such as smartphones and digital cameras). FAT32 is inferior to NTFS or /ext3 or 4. The file allocation table gets hosed easily, too, and I’m certain Chrome OS has no utilities to deal with that problem, either. More information on Chromebook file systems.

    File Formats compatible with Chromebook

    There is a come question, “My files saved on the Flash Drive/Memory Card are not opening in Chromebook” How can I open certain file types of a Chromebook? Do all file types work on a Chromebook? In order to view files on from your memory card/USB flash drive using your Chromebook, the files must be in a compatible format.

    The following file formats are supported on Chromebooks:

    • Microsoft Office files: .doc, .docx, .xls, .xlsx, .ppt (read-only), .pptx (read-only)
    • Media: .3gp, .avi, .mov, .mp4, .m4v, .m4a, .mp3, .mkv, .ogv, .ogm, .ogg, .oga, .webm, .wav
    • Images: .bmp, .gif, .jpg, .jpeg, .png, .webp
    • Compressed files: .zip, .rar
    • Other: .txt, .pdf

    Deleting Files on a Chromebook USB Flash Drive

    1. Click the apps list button.
    2. Select the Files app icon.
    3. Open your Flash Drive/Memory card from the Files app.
    4. Check the Files or Folders which you want to delete by clicking on them.
    5. Click the trash icon or use the shortcut Alt+Backspace.

    Troubleshoot Issues with USB Flashdrive on Chromebook

    If you have multiple SDCards and/or USB Sticks, you could try them to see if some are detected and others not. You could try the USB Stick on a different computer. That is about all we can suggest from afar like this since it really requires hands-on testing to try to determine if it is a bad USB port, a bad flash drive,or what exactly is going on. If the analysis still is inconclusive, then a ChromeOS restore might be the way to go to make certain everything is working fine: Recover your Chromebook (also known as Powerwashing a Chromebook).

    W hen it comes to Chromebooks, ample storage isn’t really their thing. You’ll find variants of 32 GB or 64 GB at best in the market, and that’s about it as far as ROM is concerned. These handy devices depend heavily on cloud storage to tackle the compromise of inadequate space for great speed and lightweight build.

    Therefore, you have applications like Google Drive, Dropbox, OneDrive, Spotify, and other cloud services readily available at your disposal to take the load off of the Chromebook’s main storage. Quite fortunately, there’s something for each file type – may those be documents, audio files, or even photos and videos.

    However’s, that’s not the end of the story, for each Chromebook comes slapped on with USB ports and SD card slots alike. Using this hardware feature, you can connect your Chrome OS to external hard drives very easily, transfer files, and manage everything smoothly so the system won’t slow down for you when it matters the most.

    This article will guide you to connect and use any external drive with your Chromebook, so continue reading to leave here knowledgeably well-equipped.

    Connecting an External Drive to Your Chromebook

    If you focus on your device’s left and right sides, you’ll notice at least one USB port and one SD card slot. With the help of a proper adapter, you can effortlessly access your microSD card from your Chromebook as well, if you need to, that is. Anyhow, it’s the courtesy of these ports and slots that you can effortlessly use your hard drives, especially when they’re the only source of the files you’re looking for. The following steps emphasize the connecting process.

    1) Begin by inserting your external drive inside the Chromebook’s USB port. As soon as you do that, the following prompt will make its way onto your screen.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebook

    External Drive Detected

    This means that your drive was successfully detected by Chrome OS and is now usable.

    2) Continue by heading over to Files on your Chromebook. Do this by opening up the Launcher and clicking on this program’s icon. You can also open it by clicking on the “Open Files App,” as shown in the prompt above.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebook

    3) Next, you’re going to notice how your inserted external drive appears on the left column and below everything else. Whatever name your drive may be, click on it to proceed. Note: The drive is the one that has an “Eject” button beside it.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebook

    Accessing the External Drive

    4) That’s it for the connecting. If you’ve made it this far, know for sure that you’ve successfully set up your external drive with your Chromebook. Nicely done!

    Using Your External Drive on Chromebook

    An external drive mainly plays the role of a storage backup option for any system. Hence, you can transfer files back and forth from your system to the drive and vice versa, or copy and cut files from your system to the drive for good. Here’s how to do that.

    1) To copy a folder or an individual file from your external drive, hover over to its location and double-tap to reveal more options. Then, click on copy. As a shortcut, you can also tap on the folder once and press CTRL + C. This would automatically copy all the contents within the folder.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebook

    Copying Files From the Drive

    2) The next step is straightforward. Paste the copied content onto anywhere in your Chromebook. To do this, you can click on My files and paste everything there. You can also paste what you’ve copied inside an existing folder on your system in the same way; You’ll have to double-click on this folder and click on paste. Moreover, you can always press CTRL + V as an easier alternative.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebook

    Pasting Files to Chromebook

    3) After you click on “Paste into folder,” the process will begin shortly and finish in a couple of minutes. The screenshot below illustrates the prompt after it’s done.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebook

    All of this can happen reversely as well. None of the steps would change, except for their direction. You’ll first have to begin by copying the desired content in your system and simply pasting them onto your connected external drive. Oh, and don’t forget ejecting your drive after you’re done! This prevents any damage to your external connection and also safely removes the drive without any loss of data.

    Like conventional laptops, Chromebooks also support external drives like USB sticks, optical discs, hard disks, and more.

    While Chromebooks are mainly designed for working with the internet, sooner or later, you'll need to use data stored on external drives, whether optical, USB, or hard drives. You can easily use such storage drives with your Chromebook. Here's how.

    Optical Discs Are Read Only

    You might want to read data from optical discs, like CD-ROM, DVDs, and Blu-ray discs. You can use an external USB optical drive to read these, but they will have some limitations.

    You will only be able to use data discs, and you can only read them, not burn any new data. You wouldn't be able to watch a DVD movie on your Chromebook, as Chrome OS doesn't come with the necessary codecs to compress and decompress the data.

    Because more people are moving to the cloud for data storage as well as using streaming media services for video and music, this is less of a limitation than it would have been a decade ago.

    Working With Flash Media or External Hard Drives

    If you need to write files to an external local drive, your best bet is an external hard drive or a USB stick.

    To use one of these drives, you can just plug them into your Chromebook's USB ports as you would on any other computer. Chromebooks have the drivers to read and write to these drives built-in. With the Files app, you can drag and drop files onto the drive.

    Chromebooks can read FAT32 filesystems, which is standard on most USB drives. They can also read NTFS, and macOS's HFS+, though the latter will be read-only on a journaled filesystem, as it is with optical drives. So if you need to exchange files with other people, FAT32 might be the best option because it works across many different systems.

    You Can Connect External Drives to Your Chromebook

    While you may store more files in the cloud, you can connect external drives to your Chromebook when you need to. There are even more ways to upgrade the local storage if you feel the need.

    I have an HP 245 G5 laptop with windows 10 installed on it. I want to buy a Chromebook.

    I am a newbie and don't really have hardware knowledge. But here's my plan:

    Take out the hard drive from the laptop. Sell the rest of the components of the laptop.

    Use that hard drive as an external device.

    Plug it in the Chromebook.

    While the Chromebook is booting, hopefully, I get the option of choosing which operating system I want to run.

    If all goes well, I will be able to use Windows 10 or Chrome OS depending upon my need.

    Will the above plan work? Or am I Icarus who's flying too close to the sun? Please also state the reason(s) behind your answer so I can have a better understanding. Thank you.

    As to reasons, it's already been asked and answered many times over the years.

    I second u/trigmarr: the short answer is no; but what do you want to do on a Chromebook that you can't already do in Windows 10 on your HP laptop? And do you have previous experience of setting up multiboot, perhaps with a Linux distro, on your laptop?

    I received the laptop I have due to a government effort in my country to facilitate learning. I received it in January 2017. Now, almost 4 and a half years later, it has gotten quite slow and I am looking for a new device.

    For financial reasons, a chromebook seems like a better choice. But I don't want to lose my windows softwares (like PowerDirector). So I was wondering if the steps mentioned in the post would work.

    I once installed and used windows xp and windows 7 in an old desktop for years. The harddrive in that desktop came with partitions so installing and using different versions wasn't an issue. The government provided laptop also had windows 10 and a Linux OS but I never got around to using it. I then had to format the laptop and reinstall windows (through a cd they had provided with the laptop). And since I didn't use Linux, I didn't bother with installing it.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebook

    Finding peripherals and accessories that are compatible with Chrome OS is a lot easier than it used to be thanks to Google’s “Works with Chromebook” initiative. The partnership between Google and companies like Cable Matters, Logitech, WD, Plugable, and many more means that you can purchase add-ons for your Chromebook and confidently rest assured that they will “just work” when you plug them in.

    If you checked out our 2020 “Gear of the Year” video, you may have seen the My Passport SSD from WD. Not only does it “work with Chromebook,” we use the external drive along with its SanDisk counterpart all the time. The My Passport ditches the rugged outer shell but still offers up 1TB of lightning-fast storage with read-write speeds of 1,050Mbps/1,000Mbps. It comes with a Gen 2 USB-C cable (USB 3.2) and a USB-A adapter. The tiny terabyte drive is ultra-portable thanks to a design that is half the size of the average smartphone.

    Normally priced between $200 and $230, the 1TB My Passport is on sale right now over at Best Buy for the deliciously low price of only $139. As an added bonus, you’ll get a free $25 credit for Shutter Fly or an 8×8 photo book. Chromebooks are getting more and more suitable storage options with each new generation but some users, like us, need some serious portable storage for video projects and high-res photos. The My Passport is a great way to spare your precious space on your Chromebook while keeping your files safe and portable. You can find the deal at the link below and don’t forget to check out our full Gear of the Year list for more awesome Chromebook accessories.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebook

    The days of Chromebooks not needing a lot of storage is gone. Well, that’s not strictly true if all you’ll be doing is internet surfing. However, if you’ve bought a Chromebook to take advantage of Android Apps, then you’ll need as much storage as you can get.

    Also, not everyone likes to store their files to the cloud on a service such as Google One, which was previously known as Google Drive. Personally, I would always recommend storing your files on Google One because it gives you that added protection from any hardware failures. Regularly saving your files stored on your HDD to another location reduces the risk of you losing data.

    Chromebooks have changed significantly over the last couple of years and you can do a lot more than ever before. This is one of the reasons why extra storage is needed. Saving files in the cloud is fine for text files. The same cannot be said for media such as videos or High-Resolution images.

    If you’re taking advantage of Android Apps to create videos or image editing, then having an external Hard Disk to save your work makes perfect sense.

    CHOOSING YOUR EXTERNAL STORAGE

    If you use a Chromebook then you’ll most likely want to choose either USB storage or a Micro SD card. This is because you can keep this storage attached to your Chromebook when you’re out and about. If you’re looking for mobile storage for your Chromebook have a read of How to add external storage to your Chromebook.

    There are a lot of people who buy a Chromebook but never take it outside the home. If this is the case, then you may want to consider choosing an external Hard Disk (HDD) rather than mobile storage. This is also the case for anyone who uses a Chromebox. In fact, if you have a Chromebox then you should definitely opt for an external hard disk over USB or Micro SD storage.

    Mobile storage such as USB and Micro SD is great for just that. Storage that you need to access when you’re out and about. The problem with mobile storage is that it isn’t as reliable as using an external HDD.

    EXTERNAL HDD WITH MOVING PARTS

    When you think of an external Hard Disk (HDD), you automatically think of an HDD that has moving parts. These types of HDD are still very popular. This is because you can get this type of external drive with huge amounts of storage at very reasonable prices.

    If you’re looking for huge amounts of storage then an HDD with moving parts is definitely the right choice.

    EXTERNAL HDD SSD

    Go back five years and buying a Solid State Drive would cost you a fortune. You also got very little storage for the price you would have to pay. It’s still the case that SSD is more expensive than a Hard Disk with moving parts. However, they are a lot cheaper than they once were.

    The advantage of an SSD drive is that you get no moving parts. This means you get much faster transfer times, so reading and writing become much faster. There is also no noise from an SSD like you get with a traditional Hard Disk.

    BEST EXTERNAL HDD

    SEAGATE 6TB HDD AVAILABLE AT AMAZON UK

    If you want lots of storage then this HDD from Seagate is amazing value. Seagate has been making hard disk drives for many years. In fact, I remember having a Seagate Hard Disk with my first ever computer the Atari ST.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebook6TB Seagate HDD Available from Amazon UK

    TOSHIBA 4TB HDD AVAILABLE AT AMAZON USA

    This Toshiba external Hard Disk is also great value. It provides 4TB of storage from a manufacturer that is well known for offering great quality and reliable products.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebookToshiba 4TB HDD available at Amazon USA

    BEST EXTERNAL SSD

    SAMSUNG EXTERNAL SSD 1 TB FROM AMAZON UK

    There are a few manufacturers now making SSD drives. This SSD from Samsung is an amazing buy.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebookSamsung 1TB SSD from Amazon UK

    SAMSUNG 500GB EXTERNAL SSD FROM AMAZON USA

    A 500GB SSD drive from Samsung offers great value for money. They have many other different sizes available to suit your needs.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebookSamsung 500GB SSD from Amazon USA

    How to work with external drives on a chromebook

    Check How to Set Up External Drives in Chromebook Linux Environment

    Assuming this change progresses, some Crostini-enabled Chromebooks with limited storage could run the Linux virtual machine on a USB drive or even an SD memory card. You’ll definitely want quick media if you get a chance to try it out; It would not be optimal to run a virtual machine with a Linux container on slower media. The software giants integrate Linux into their main operating system in one way or another. Microsoft recently released WSLg on Windows 10 with support for GUI apps, while Google introduced Linux on Chromebooks in 2018 and dubbed it Project Crostini. In the last three years of development, Chrome OS has gained GPU acceleration and microphone support in Linux on Chromebooks, USB devices, and sound.

    From general users, IT administrators to software developers and students looking to learn to code, the addition of Linux to Chromebooks has proven to be a boon. And in the next version of Chrome OS, Linux will also come out of beta. And yes, it also includes school-issued Chromebooks. However, school administrators can still disable Linux support from their end. If this is the case with your Chromebook, please contact your school administrator to remove the restriction. Other than that, you don’t need to put your Chromebook in developer mode or any other channels.

    • Assuming this change goes ahead, it could allow some Crostini-compatible Chromebooks with limited storage space to run the virtual machine for Linux on a USB drive or even an SD memory card.
    • You’ll want quick media in any case if you get a chance to try this out; running a virtual machine with a Linux container on slower media would not be optimal.
    • Although I see a potential need for this on Chromebooks with smaller internal drives, it could benefit all Chromebook users.
    • For example, you might have 64GB or more of storage capacity on your device, but you might be using most of it just for Chrome OS, Android apps, and file storage.
    • It would be helpful to just pull out a USB drive with your Linux instance on it, boot up, and do whatever you need to in the virtual machine.
    • Or maybe you have different Linux containers configured for different purposes: one for work and one for general use. Either way, having this flexibility could be beneficial.
    • Of course, since Google is so focused on keeping Chrome OS secure, implementing Linux and VM support on external drives presents some challenges.
    • There has been developer talk here about how to better keep the environment secure while also bringing this external drive feature.
    • The last relevant comment on the security aspect was “allow additional disks only on untrusted VMs”, but that may not be a bad thing.
    • Recently, we’ve seen progress in allowing such virtual machines and that has led to the ability to install Windows 10 in a virtual machine on a Chromebook.
    • In theory, one could run any operating system inside such a reliable VM with the only caveat being that you might not have full access to all the hardware and software on your Chromebook.

    Final words: How to Set Up External Drives in Chromebook Linux Environment

    I hope you understand this article How to Set Up External Drives in Chromebook Linux Environment, if your answer is no then you can ask anything via contact forum section related to this article. And if your answer is yes then please share this article with your family and friends.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebook

    Almost every Chromebook comes with at least one rectangular-shaped USB Type A (USB-A) port. This port is used to connect various kinds of peripheral devices, such as a flash disk, portable hard drive, mouse, camera, or keyboard. Most Chromebook support USB 3.0 which is at least 10 times faster(4.8 Gbit/s or 600MBps) than the previous USB 2.0 standard (480 Mbit/s or 60MBps).

    The USB 3.0 is normally colored coded with the blue color. But sometimes it’s marked with the SS label which is the standard for Super Speed. My Galaxy Chromebook Go with one USB 3.2 USB Type A port. But you can also use the newer oval-shaped USB-C ports to connect to compatible USB portable hard drives.

    Every Chromebook comes with at least one USB-C port. My Chromebook has two of these. This port is used to charge your Chromebook, connect to an external display or external portable hard drive or flash disk. Most USB-C ports support USB 3.2 Gen 1 (formerly USB 3.0) standard which supports upto 5Gbits/s transfer speeds. However, some support USB 3.2 Gen 2 with transfer speeds of upto 10 Gbits/s.

    Keep in mind that USB-C and USB-A are physical connectors. USB 2.0, 3.0, 3.2 Gen 1 are USB standards that define data transfer among devices. To get the most speeds out of your Chromebook, it’s important that you know which USB standard and physical connector your Chromebook and external hard drive are.

    Connecting USB-A Flash disk or portable hard drive

    How to work with external drives on a chromebook

    When connecting an external portable device to your Chromebook, the first thing you should check are the power requirements of that device. Flash drives and most portable USB hard drives and SSD drives are USB powered. However, bigger devices that require more power have to be connected to an external power source such as your wall socket.

    If your Chromebook has a USB-A port, then you simply plug in. However, if it doesn’t, then you might need an adapter with USB-A ports and a USB-C connector. Popular adapters are USB-C hubs. They come with several ports such as HDMI, Ethernet and USB-A 2.0 and 3.0 ports.

    When you plug in your Flash disk or portable hard drive, it’ll immediately appear on the side panel of the File App as USB Drive. Click on it and your files and folders will show. You can now move files between the external storage and your Chromebook storage.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebook

    Connect USB-C flash disk or portable drive

    How to work with external drives on a chromebook

    Every Chromebook has a USB-C port which is used to both charge the device, connect it to an external monitor and to portable storage. That’s because the USB-C interface along with USB 3.2/4.0 standard support power, video and data transfer.

    Before you connect your portable storage device to the USB-C port, you have to ensure that it also has a USB-C connector.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebook

    To safely eject the portable storage device, click on the eject icon next to the USB Drive label.

    Warning/Disclaimer: Switching a Chromebook to developer mode will wipe the storage disk on the device, which defeats the entire purpose of imaging your Chromebook. Please proceed with caution and understand the risks before attempting to perform this action.

    To acquire an image of a Chromebook hard disk, you will need to perform the following steps

    1. Switch to Developer Mode (WARNING: MAY WIPE HARD DISK)
    2. Create a bootable Linux USB flash drive
    3. Image the hard disk (using the bootable USB drive)

    Because of the complexity of the Chromebook boot process, one or more of these steps may be tricky depending on which particular Chromebook you are running on. Once you are able to get a Linux distribution running on your Chromebook, you can simply run the ‘dd’ command to perform the imaging of the hard disk.

    Entering Developer Mode

    Before we can boot from a USB drive, Developer Mode must be enabled on the Chromebook. Keep in mind that if you switch the device to Developer Mode at this time, the system’s data stored on the disk will be wiped and not recoverable. If you wish to proceed, please follow the recommended procedure for entering Developer Mode for your device.

    For an updated list of Chromebook devices, see here

    Creating a bootable USB drive

    Next, we need to create a bootable USB drive. The procedure will depend on which Chromebook you are using. Please note that not all procedures have been tested on the corresponding Chromebook devices.

    If you have an Acer C720 Chromebook, HP Chromebook 14, Chromebook Pixel, or any other Chromebook with SeaBIOS legacy boot, you should be able to install OSFClone or your favourite Linux distribution on a USB drive as you would for a PC. When you start up your Chromebook, you need to press Ctrl-L at the white boot splash screen to start SeaBIOS. Press Esc to get a boot menu and select the number corresponding to your USB drive.

    For Samsung Series 3 Chromebox, Samsung Series 5 550 Chromebook and Acer C7 Chromebook, please follow the instructions here to create a bootable USB disk

    Once you have created the bootable USB image, ensure that you are able to boot it on your Chromebook.

    Imaging the hard disk

    Before you boot from the USB drive, plug in an external hard disk that has enough space to store the Chromebook hard disk image. Proceed to boot from the USB flash drive (by pressing Ctrl-U at the white boot splash screen).

    If you are booting OSFClone, follow the prompts to acquire your image.

    If you are booting from another Linux distribution, you need to run the following commands

    1. Mount the external drive Replace ‘/dev/sdb1’ with the device name of your external drive’s partition
    2. Use ‘dd’ to create a bit-by-bit image of the Chromebook hard disk If your external disk is low in disk space, you can try to create a compressed image using the following command: Replace ‘/dev/sda’ with the device name of the Chromebook hard disk, ‘/mnt/sdb1/chromebookhd.img’ with the output filepath of the resulting image file

    Option 2: Extracting a decrypted logical backup of the encrypted data

    Daniel Dickerman has detailed a process to extract a decrypted backup of all encrypted data.
    Full instructions at https://dfir.pubpub.org/pub/inkjsqrh/release/1

    This method does NOT require the device to be in Developer Mode

    This will not produce a full disk image but will allow you to extract most user and system data of evidentiary value.
    This will allow you to extract more data than simply logging in to the device and copying user files, particularly;
    – /mnt/stateful_partition/encrypted
    – /home/chronos
    – /var

    This tutorial is about the How to Set Up External Drives in Chromebook Linux Environment. We will try our best so that you understand this guide. I hope you like this blog How to Set Up External Drives in Chromebook Linux Environment. If your answer is yes then please do share after reading this.

    Check How to Set Up External Drives in Chromebook Linux Environment

    Assuming this change progresses, some Crostini-enabled Chromebooks with limited storage could run the Linux virtual machine on a USB drive or even an SD memory card. You’ll definitely want quick media if you get a chance to try it out; It would not be optimal to run a virtual machine with a Linux container on slower media. The software giants integrate Linux into their main operating system in one way or another. Microsoft recently released WSLg on Windows 10 with support for GUI apps, while Google introduced Linux on Chromebooks in 2018 and dubbed it Project Crostini. In the last three years of development, Chrome OS has gained GPU acceleration and microphone support in Linux on Chromebooks, USB devices, and sound.

    From general users, IT administrators to software developers and students looking to learn to code, the addition of Linux to Chromebooks has proven to be a boon. And in the next version of Chrome OS, Linux will also come out of beta. And yes, it also includes school-issued Chromebooks. However, school administrators can still disable Linux support from their end. If this is the case with your Chromebook, please contact your school administrator to remove the restriction. Other than that, you don’t need to put your Chromebook in developer mode or any other channels.

    • Assuming this change goes ahead, it could allow some Crostini-compatible Chromebooks with limited storage space to run the virtual machine for Linux on a USB drive or even an SD memory card.
    • You’ll want quick media in any case if you get a chance to try this out; running a virtual machine with a Linux container on slower media would not be optimal.
    • Although I see a potential need for this on Chromebooks with smaller internal drives, it could benefit all Chromebook users.
    • For example, you might have 64GB or more of storage capacity on your device, but you might be using most of it just for Chrome OS, Android apps, and file storage.
    • It would be helpful to just pull out a USB drive with your Linux instance on it, boot up, and do whatever you need to in the virtual machine.
    • Or maybe you have different Linux containers configured for different purposes: one for work and one for general use. Either way, having this flexibility could be beneficial.
    • Of course, since Google is so focused on keeping Chrome OS secure, implementing Linux and VM support on external drives presents some challenges.
    • There has been developer talk here about how to better keep the environment secure while also bringing this external drive feature.
    • The last relevant comment on the security aspect was “allow additional disks only on untrusted VMs”, but that may not be a bad thing.
    • Recently, we’ve seen progress in allowing such virtual machines and that has led to the ability to install Windows 10 in a virtual machine on a Chromebook.
    • In theory, one could run any operating system inside such a reliable VM with the only caveat being that you might not have full access to all the hardware and software on your Chromebook.

    Final words: How to Set Up External Drives in Chromebook Linux Environment

    I hope you understand this article How to Set Up External Drives in Chromebook Linux Environment, if your answer is no then you can ask anything via contact forum section related to this article. And if your answer is yes then please share this article with your family and friends.

    If you experiencing problems listed in the troubleshooting guide, you can replace the hard drive. The hard drive stores the operating system (Chrome OS), along with saved files and pictures. Installing a new hard drive will require reinstalling Chrome OS and backing up your local files.

    Инструменты

    Phillips #0 Screwdriver

    Запчасти

    Acer Chromebook C710 Hard Drive Connector Board

    Для продажи с другого сайта

    Acer Chromebook C710 SSD Caddy + Connector

    Для продажи с другого сайта

    Шаг 1 Battery

    Place the laptop on a flat surface with the bottom side facing up.

    Place the tip of a spudger or finger into the hole on the battery release slider.

    Шаг 2

    Use the spudger to move the slider to the right and hold it there.

    With the slider held, use your other hand to pull the battery back away from the laptop.

    Шаг 3 Acer Chromebook C710-2847 Back Cover Replacement

    This step will void your device warranty.

    Use the screwdriver to pierce the warranty sticker.

    Unscrew and remove the #0 6mm Phillips screw and set it aside.

    Шаг 4

    Slide the back panel towards you. The best spots to place your fingers are on the bumpers.

    Lift on the front edge to remove the panel.

    Шаг 5 Hard Drive

    The hard drive assembly is attached to the laptop by a ribbon cable. Only lift the side of the drive facing you about an inch above the laptop. If you tear the ribbon cable the laptop will need to be serviced by a professional.

    Use one finger to lift up the hard drive assembly from the bottom left corner.

    Шаг 6

    Hold the hard drive assembly keeping the end closest to you near the laptop. It’s ok to tilt the far end of the drive up towards you.

    Unscrew the two silver #0 3mm Phillips screws on the left and right sides of the hard drive.

    Шаг 7

    Hold the base of the hard drive in your right hand.

    Use your left hand to pull the hard drive away from its housing. Don’t let the housing tug on the ribbon cable.

    To reassemble your device, follow these instructions in reverse order.

    To reassemble your device, follow these instructions in reverse order.

    21 участников успешно повторили данное руководство.

    Автор

    Bradley Pavy

    Участник с: 30.09.2013

    1 254 Репутация

    Автор 6 руководств

    Команда

    Cal Poly, Team 13-3, Forte Fall 2013 Участник Cal Poly, Team 13-3, Forte Fall 2013

    Автор 14 руководств

    Комментариев: 8

    Attempted to upgrade my C710 with the:

    PNY XLR8 SATA 120GB 6Gbps 2.5-Inch Solid State Drive SSD9SC120GMDF-RB

    Unfortunately, one corner of the SSD –near the SATA-connector– interferes with a screw on the motherboard/chassis. And then the laptop cover cannot be re-attached.

    Hope this comment saves someone some grief.

    Not sure I understand.

    Seems its still not clear what brand/size of SSD that you can upgrade to? 60GB? 120? 480?

    Bootable flash drive did not get the C710 working until I reseated the HDD. Never would have known about the hidden screw unless I read this,

    Unit requesting recovery even after carrying out the listed procedure,tried to upgrade to a 128 ssd but won,t, reinstalled hhd after viewing folders on another computer and the unit finally booted again into chrome screen. Would still like to install ssd drive

    The idea behind a Chromebook is an always-connected, always-online super lightweight computer that doesn’t need a bunch of storage or local apps to accomplish what you need to get done on the go. The reality is that you still very likely do need expandable storage from time to time for things like downloading TV shows, books, or other media you need to access without Wi-Fi or on a slow (or metered) network. Fortunately, downloading Netflix and Plex content directly to your Chromebook’s SD card storage is a snap, and we’ll show you how to do it.

    How to get Chromebook Android apps to see your SD card

    To get started, you first need to open your Chromebook’s settings, click “Device”, select “Storage Management,” then “External Storage Preferences,” and finally identify and enable your SD card, as shown below. To speed things up, you can also just search for “External Storage Preferences” in settings or in the Chrome OS launcher and enter the menu right away. Once you’ve enabled your external storage, you need to restart your device before proceeding.

    How to set up Android apps to use your SD card for downloads

    After restarting, open the Chrome OS settings again and navigate to the Google Play Store option and select “Manage Android preferences.” If you don’t want to scroll through all the settings options, simply type “Android preferences” into the search bar or the Chrome OS launcher to jump straight to the needed entry. A new window with the Android preferences should open.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebook

    Though the chrome OS is designed by Google for PC, it is not only available on desktop; actually, you can run the Google chrome OS in other ways, such as from a USB drive. The following content will tell you how to run the OS from external drive and how to distinguish if this OS is right for you.

    As an operating system designed by Google, the Chrome OS is produced on the basis of Linux kernel. The Google Chrome web browser is used as the main user interface in Chrome OS. Announced in July 2009, the Google Chrome OS is mainly used to support and run web applications.

    All in all, Google Chromebook is not the only way to work on Google OS. In the next part of this article, I’ll walk you through the way to run Google’s desktop OS with the help of a USB drive. And after that, I’ll show you how to determine whether the Chrome OS is suitable for you.

    Run Google Chrome OS from A USB Drive

    Things you need to prepare:

    • A fully-functional computer system
    • A USB drive with a capacity of more than 4GB
    • A zipped-file extractor (7-Zip for Windows, Keka for Mac OS, p7zip for Linux)
    • An imaging burning program (Etcher or other options)

    7 Steps to Run Google’s Desktop Operating System from a USB

    1. Download the latest Chromium OS image.
    2. Extract the zipped image file you’ve downloaded.
    3. Connect a USB drive to computer and format it to FAT32.
    4. Get an image burning program for Chrome OS installation.
    5. Use the software to install OS image on the USB drive.
    6. Restart computer to enter BIOS and select the boot device.
    7. Boot into Chrome OS through USB drive.

    Step 1: Download Chrome OS to USB

    To run Chrome OS from USB, you need to download the system to your USB drive first. Please download the latest OS image from an alternate source (Arnold The Bat is a good choice) since Google doesn’t offer any official Chrome OS (actually Chromium OS, the development version – opensource – of the operating system).

    Step 2: Extract Chrome OS

    The downloaded OS image file will be kept in zipped format, so you need to extract the file with a zipped-file extractor you have prepared. After that, you can use it.

    Step 3: Format USB to FAT32

    Please plug in your USB drive to the computer and then format it as FAT32 in Windows: open File Explorer -> right click on your USB drive -> select Format -> choose FAT32 as the file system -> click Start.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebook

    Various solutions are provided for you to fix USB flash drive not recognized error and recover data from the not showing up/not working USB device.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebook

    For Mac users, the built-in Disk Utility is able to help them format the USB drive as FAT32. However, if you find it is labeled as “MS-DOS FAT” in Mac, it’s the same thing; please don’t worry.

    Step 4: Prepare an Image Burning Program

    You need to get an image burning program for Chrome OS installation. There are plenty of such tools, Etcher is a good choice for its good compatibility; it works the same way on Windows, Mac and Linux.

    Step 5: Install the Chrome OS Image

    Please start to install the OS image you’ve got in step 1 to the formatted external USB drive with the help of the image burning software you prepare.

    Step 6: Change Boot Order

    Please restart your computer and press corresponding key to enter BIOS. Then, you’ll need to select the USB drive with OS image as the first boot device. After that, exit and save changes.

    Step 7: Boot Chrome OS from USB

    Please let the computer start automatically. Now, you’re able to enter the Chrome OS and experience all the glory of it promptly.

    This method is suitable for Windows, Mac OS, and Linux users. And it doesn’t require you to overwrite your current OS.

    Another way to create a bootable USB disk with Chrome OS: download the CloudReady Home Edition from the official website of Neverware -> extract the downloaded file (.bin file) -> install the Chromebook Recovery Utility (which is provide by Google officially to help users create a bootable USB drive) -> launch Chromebook Recovery Utility and follow the instructions to make a bootable USB drive. After that, you can boot your USB drive and use the Chrome OS.

    How to Decide If Chrome OS Is Right for You

    Before getting moving to install Chrome OS, you should ask yourself 4 questions to figure out if it is a good choice for you.

    1. Are you used to spending much of your time using the web and web-centric services?
    2. Can web-centric (and/or Android app) equivalents do most of the things you need to do on a computer?
    3. Is there any specific local program that you must need?
    4. Can you live only in the Chrome browser on your computer for a week or a longer time?

    If the answers to above questions are respectively: yes, yes, no, and yes, the Chrome OS may be right for you.

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    ABOUT THE AUTHOR

    Position: Columnist

    Sarah has been working as an editor at MiniTool since she graduated from university. Sarah aims at helping users with their computer problems such as disk errors and data loss. She feels a sense of accomplishment to see that users get their issues fixed relying on her articles. Besides, she likes to make friends and listen to music after work.

    These steps outline how to delete files on Chromebook and more

    Has some “spring cleaning” at work involved an upgrade to the computer systems? If your organization is replacing its Chromebooks with newer models, make sure the process outlines a step to clean up the computers. Or, if you’re in charge of data disposal in your company and you are wondering, “How do I powerwash my Chromebook”, then this is the guide for you.

    With the amount of personal and essential data that each computer stores, failing to remove all data before selling or disposing of old Chromebooks could leave your organization vulnerable to severe data breaches.

    For your own security, it is important to properly remove all data from your Chromebook by resetting your device back to its factory settings. If you’re unsure of how to do this, follow these steps.

    How to Delete Files on Chromebook: First, Backup Your Files

    Step 1: Make sure your Chromebook is powered on and connect it to an external hard drive.

    Step 2: Launch Files App to manage your files, documents and photos. Once you have the Files app open on your desktop, the backup process can begin.
    Step 3: Find your connected external hard drive in the menu on the left-hand side.

    Step 4: Choose all of the files you’d like to back up, and start transferring your files to your external hard drive by dragging and dropping. Your files will start to transfer over instantly.

    Step 5: Once all your files have been transferred, safely eject your hard drive. Your device’s data and documents have now been backed up properly.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebook

    Check To See If You’re the Chromebook’s Owner

    Chances are that if you’re using your Chromebook at work or at school, your device administrator will be the owner. Before you start the rest process of your Chromebook, check to see if your Google account is the owner or not by following these steps:

    Step 1: Sign in to your Chromebook and navigate to Settings.
    Step 2:
    In the “People” section, select Manage other people.

    Step 3: If your account is the owner, you can turn these settings on or off, but if another account is the owner, these messages will appear: “These settings may only be modified by the owner” or “These settings are controlled by enterprise policy”

    Step 4: Since it is not possible to transfer owner permissions to another account on your Chromebook, resetting your Chromebook to its factory settings will not only erase all data and files, but the accounts linked to your Chromebook as well.

    Follow the next set of instructions to perform a factory reset below:

    Reset Chromebook to Factory Settings

    Step 1: Make sure your power cord is plugged into your Chromebook.

    Step 2: Shut off your Chromebook.

    Step 3: Restart by pressing and holding Ctrl + Alt + Shift + R. A recovery screen will appear that says, “Reset This Chrome Device.”

    Step 4: In the bottom right corner of your screen, you’ll select Powerwash > Continue. After pressing Continue, your Chromebook will start to reset your device and will restart itself multiple times. This could take a few minutes.

    Step 5: Once the welcome screen appears, prompting you to sign in to your Google account/ choose your WiFi network, you’ll know your device has been reset successfully to factory settings.

    Congratulations, you now have a factory reset Chromebook and will be ready to dispose of or sell!

    Bulk Wiping Chromebooks

    It can be a time consuming process to wipe Chromebooks or other Google-Android based devices in large quantities during a system refresh, but it’s still essential to keep your data safe with a secure removal.

    If you need to wipe these devices in bulk, or want extra security measures to make your data not only inaccessible but destroyed, consider going to Greentec! Following the Communications Security Establishment (CSE) IT Media Sanitization standards, our certified methods to go one step further in wiping devices to ensure that they end up as fresh as a brand new computer.

    Contact us for more information about how we can help your organization collect and store, recycle or dispose of electronic devices at end-of-life, including Chromebooks.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebook

    This should be a simple problem to solve. The fact that it isn’t is really pissing me off.

    A Dropbox user shared a 2.7gb file with me before I had a Dropbox account. I was only able to free up 1.9gb of internal storage making a direct download impossible at the time. So I signed up for the free account to accept the share while I ran to a store and bought an external hard drive. I was grateful at the time they let this one file slide past the 2gb free cap.

    The external drive works fine and I can move local files onto it, but the bulk of internal storage is apps and data that I cannot move to removable storage so I am still unabe to free the 2.7gb plus the size of Dropbox app required to sync the file on internal storage. There is a red X next to the file in the Dropbox app. I do not know what that means.

    I need the file to go straight from my online Dropbox to the external storage, using internal storage only to host the Dropbox app and a little partial file cache during the transfer. But I’ve tried copy, move, and save to devce and they all say my device has insufficient storage. Export cannot even see external storage at all. A few times it attempted the transfer and failed partway through when it completely filled the remaining internal storage. I was lucky to be able to delete the partial files it left behind as the lack of space was slowing down the Chromebook terribly. I have 4tb free externally and now 1.8gb free internally. The original Dropbox user has since deleted the file from their account to save space so a direct download is no longer an option. I just want this file off Dropbox and saved locally. I don’t even want Dropbox anymore but it seems like they are holding my file hostage constantly asking me to upgrade because I have exceeded the storage limit.

    I would imagine this is one of the basic scenarios Dropbox was created to solve. Is there some setting I have to change to make this work? If so, why on earth isn’t that the default?

    Like many other laptops, Chromebook abandons the optical drive. It makes sense as it has to keep thin. However, you may still have DVDs to play from time to time. How to make that work? As you think, you will need an external DVD drive connected to Chromebook. However, don’t expect a plug-and-play process to get an external DVD player work on Chromebook. In fact, there are many limitations. In this post, we will get you through how to connect Chromebook to an external DVD drive and play DVDs (video & music) on Chromebook without worries.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebookChromebook external disc drive

    Table of Contents:

    What can You Play with an External DVD Drive on Chromebook?

    It’s easy and possible to connect an external DVD drive to Chromebook. Once connected, you can play CD, CD-RW, DVD, DVD-RW, Blu-ray, Blu-ray RW on Chromebook via an external DVD drive. However, don’t be surprised if your DVD won’t open or work. In fact, you need to pay attention to the type of media on the disc. Chromebook can read files on the disks if they are written in a data format. However, you currently can’t watch DVD movies by default in Chrome OS. This is because Chromebook lacks the proper codec needed to play DVD video.

    What can’t You Do with an External DVD Drive on Chromebook?

    Even with a Chromebook external disc drive, there are things you can’t do like other laptops.

    • You can play a video CD or movie DVD. As mentioned above, Google has not licensed and is unlikely to license DVD Video software in Chrome OS. VLC used to be able to help play DVD movie on Chromebook. But now it no longer works. To play video DVD movies on Chromebook, it’s quite complicated. You need to switch into developer mode and install Linux.
    • You can’t burn DVDs on Chromebook. According to Google’s support site, USB CDROM and DVDROM (read-only) devices are compatible with Chromebooks. Even with an external disc drive, it’s able to read data on the supported discs only. There is no way to write data to a disc.
    • You can’t rip a DVD on Chromebook. When it is possible to directly play a video DVD on Chromebook, you may want to rip it to a digital format for it. You can’t do it on Chromebook as there is no DVD ripper that will work on Chrome OS.

    In a nutshell, decide if you still need an external DVD drive for Chromebook, you should know that it:

    • • Can read disks, but with only accepted file types
    • • Can’t burn or rip a DVD or CD
    • • Can play music and movies in digital formats, like MP4 or MP3

    How to Connect External DVD Drive to Chromebook

    Chromebook supports USB-powered CD or DVD drives. You can connect the external drive to Chromebook via a USB able. Once connected, insert the disc you want to open in the external DVD player. To access the disc, click Launcher on its main interface, and then the Files app. Like Windows Explorer and Finder, you will then see the external drive listed on the left panel below the Downloads folder. Click on it and you will see the data on the disc.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebookHow to open a DVD on Chromebook

    How to Play DVD Movies on Chromebook?

    Apparently, you can’t play a video DVD on Chromebook directly via an external disc drive. Why not rip the DVD to digital and watch on Chromebook without external DVD drive? Try something like WinX DVD Ripper Platinum. It will easily convert any DVDs to Chromebook supported formats.

    Step 1: Download WinX DVD Ripper Platinum on your Windows or Mac computer, install and launch it on desktop.

    How to work with external drives on a chromebookRip DVD for Chromebook

    Step 2: Insert the DVD you want to play on Chromebook, and click the "DVD Disc" button to load the DVD.

    Step 3: Select an output format when a window pops up automatically. For example, choose MP4 from the General Profiles.

    Note:
    Video formats supported by Chromebook:
    .3gp, .avi, .mov, .mp4, .m4v, .m4a, .mp3, .mkv, .ogv, .ogm, .ogg, .oga, .webm, .wav

    Step 4: Click Run to start the rip. Several minutes later, you will get an MP4 video with high quality. Then transfer it to the Chromebook with a USB drive and watch without the use of an external DVD player.

    2022 Best External DVD Drive for Chromebook

    1. MthsTec External DVD CD Drive

    This external DVD drive is compatible with a wide range of platforms, including Chromebooks, laptops, Macbook, PC, Chrome OS, Linux, macOS, Windows, and many more. It’s easy to carry, light weight and small size. You don’t need driver and external power to play a DVD on Chromebook. More importantly, it’s able to provide a data transfer speed as fast as 5Gbps on USB 3.0 ports.

    2. LG Electronics 8X USB 2.0

    This is the best external disc drive or newer Chromebooks. It’s light weight, compact, easy to handle, and works as both a DVD drive and a USB drive. This drive is able to decode in numerous disc formats, such as DVD+R/R DL/RW, DVD-R/R DL/RW, and many more. It also includes a smart USB cable which makes things easier.

    3. ZSMJ External DVD Drive

    This is an external DVD drive made for a Mac which also works on a Chromebook. It has a unremovable cable on it so it’s very convenient. You can use it to open DVDs on Chromebook via USB2.0 or 3.0. The entire unit is very lightweight and easy to carry around. You don’t need an external power supply at all.

    Other Useful How-to Guides

    [Review] Top 5 Region Free DVD Players

    Here are the top 5 region-free DVD players capable of playing back DVD discs from any country, needless to change region code any more!

    How to Play and Watch DVD on Chromebook Offline?

    How to play DVD on Chromebook? Learn the step-by-step guide from this article and watch any movie DVDs on Acer, Samsung, HP etc. Chromebook laptops offline freely.

    How to Play DVD on TV (Samsung, LG, Sony, etc.)

    Don’t know how to watch a DVD on a smart TV? Here are the detailed steps to connect and play DVDs on Samsung TV, Sony, Panasonic, LG, etc. with DVD player and from your computer.

    Which Formats Does Your DVD Player Support/Read/Play

    What kind of formats does a DVD player read or play? Check the DVD player supported formats and solve the problem if you cannot play DVDs or videos on your DVD player.

    ABOUT THE AUTHOR

    Donna Peng

    Donna Peng’s fascination with multimedia began at an early age – shortly after she licked the physical disc and then she’s been obsessed ever since. Her decade-long career at Digiarty after the graduation has seen her unmatched expertise in the field of DVD, digital video, software and anything related to home theatre. She is currently fascinated with photography.

    Digiarty Software is a leading multimedia software provider, delivering easy-to-use and innovative multimedia solutions to users all over the world.